Date   
Named for more than one person #general

Barbara Zimmer <bravo.zulu@...>
 

My cousin was named for both of her grandmothers, both of whom were
Anna. But instead of namiing her Anna (since one of her grandmothers
was still living), her parents named her Diane (Di indicating two).

Barbara Zimmer
Norfolk VA

Fran Segall wrote:

Could someone please tell me if Jewish children are ever given a given-name for
more than one person? My Hebrew name is Feige. My mother's grandmother and my
father's grandmother were both named Feige. Both died many years before my birth,
although I don't know the years. I have no way to know which one I was named for,
but is it possible or likely that the intention was to honor both?

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Named for more than one person #general

Barbara Zimmer <bravo.zulu@...>
 

My cousin was named for both of her grandmothers, both of whom were
Anna. But instead of namiing her Anna (since one of her grandmothers
was still living), her parents named her Diane (Di indicating two).

Barbara Zimmer
Norfolk VA

Fran Segall wrote:

Could someone please tell me if Jewish children are ever given a given-name for
more than one person? My Hebrew name is Feige. My mother's grandmother and my
father's grandmother were both named Feige. Both died many years before my birth,
although I don't know the years. I have no way to know which one I was named for,
but is it possible or likely that the intention was to honor both?

Dave Fox #belarus

Andrea Simon
 

I'd like to join all the others in thanking Dave Fox for his extraordinary
work. Having begun my own research in the days of letter-writing and tedious
fact-checking, I can appreciate how quickly and comprehensibly genealogical
information is now available via electronic sources. So much of the credit
for this access can be attributed to Dave Fox's relentless and dedicated
work, important both personally and historically. On a daily basis, it
amazes me how many people are still trying to reach out and locate their
relatives, share facts, and offer support. It has truly been a family tree,
spreading its roots wide and far. So thanks again Dave for all your efforts
and the best of luck in your personal endeavors.
Andrea Simon
New York

Belarus SIG #Belarus Dave Fox #belarus

Andrea Simon
 

I'd like to join all the others in thanking Dave Fox for his extraordinary
work. Having begun my own research in the days of letter-writing and tedious
fact-checking, I can appreciate how quickly and comprehensibly genealogical
information is now available via electronic sources. So much of the credit
for this access can be attributed to Dave Fox's relentless and dedicated
work, important both personally and historically. On a daily basis, it
amazes me how many people are still trying to reach out and locate their
relatives, share facts, and offer support. It has truly been a family tree,
spreading its roots wide and far. So thanks again Dave for all your efforts
and the best of luck in your personal endeavors.
Andrea Simon
New York

Driving route from Vienna to southern Moravia #austria-czech

Michael Gordy
 

I'm looking for advice on the best driving route >from Vienna to Straznice,
near Hodonin in southern Moravia. Last time I did it, I took B7 north >from
Vienna to the border crossing near Mikulov. That route is a bit slow, and
I'm wondering whether it makes more sense to drive east >from Vienna into
Slovakia and take the D2 highway north to the border crossing near Breclav.

To be more precise with my question:
(a) If I go through Slovakia, where should I cross the Austria-Slovakia border?
(b) When I cross into Slovakia, will I need to buy currency? Will I need a
highway sticker?
(c) Not all border crossings are open to third-country citizens. I found this
out the hard way at a crossing near Hodonin, where I was sent back. Any
warnings in this respect?
I'm a US citizen.

By the way, I'll be spending two full days in Straznice, probably with a
half-day in Hodonin. Can I be of service?

-- Michael Gordy
Takoma Park, MD USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Driving route from Vienna to southern Moravia #austria-czech

Michael Gordy
 

I'm looking for advice on the best driving route >from Vienna to Straznice,
near Hodonin in southern Moravia. Last time I did it, I took B7 north >from
Vienna to the border crossing near Mikulov. That route is a bit slow, and
I'm wondering whether it makes more sense to drive east >from Vienna into
Slovakia and take the D2 highway north to the border crossing near Breclav.

To be more precise with my question:
(a) If I go through Slovakia, where should I cross the Austria-Slovakia border?
(b) When I cross into Slovakia, will I need to buy currency? Will I need a
highway sticker?
(c) Not all border crossings are open to third-country citizens. I found this
out the hard way at a crossing near Hodonin, where I was sent back. Any
warnings in this respect?
I'm a US citizen.

By the way, I'll be spending two full days in Straznice, probably with a
half-day in Hodonin. Can I be of service?

-- Michael Gordy
Takoma Park, MD USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.

Old professions in Vienna #austria-czech

Florence & Henry Wellisch <kelwel@...>
 

As I mentioned in another message, while Bob Hanscom and I are collecting
the Viennese birth and marriage records 1784 - 1848 we found various archaic
expressions. Here are a few with a French origin;
Admodiateur = Tenant, leaseholder
Traiteur = Caterer, Restaurateur (a French word in itself)

I grew up in Vienna and remember many French words in everyday use, such as:
Plafond = Ceiling
Trottoir = Sidewalk
Parapluie = Umbrella
Friseur = Barber, hairdresser
Rentier = Pensioner
Bankier = Banker
Magazineur = Stock keeper
Kabinett = Small room
Boudoir = Ladies private room
Rendezvous = Meeting
Renommee = Reputation ........... and many others
Some of these words can not be found in German dictionaries, since these
were produced in Germany, also once known in Vienna as the "Altreich" or
Deutschland and whose inhabitants were sometimes referred to as "Die
Saupreussen".

Adieu
Henry Wellisch
Toronto

Address books in Vienna - two sources? #austria-czech

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Hi fellow Jgenners,

I am planning a family history research trip to Vienna and
would like to consult address and telephone books. Address books
(Lehmann's Wiener Wohnungsanzeiger) are apparently available >from
1859 to 1965. Telephone books are available since 1900. In
examining sites over the Internet, it appears that there are at least
two where these books can be accessed. One is at the Austrian
National Library located in the Heldenplatz. The other is at the
Wiener Stadt- und Landesbibliothek., Magistratabteilung 9, in the
Rathaus.

Do these two sites have identical information? What are the relative
advantages and disadvantages of using each of these two sites?

I would appreciate your help. Please respond to me privately at
tfweiss@...

Tom Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@...

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Old professions in Vienna #austria-czech

Florence & Henry Wellisch <kelwel@...>
 

As I mentioned in another message, while Bob Hanscom and I are collecting
the Viennese birth and marriage records 1784 - 1848 we found various archaic
expressions. Here are a few with a French origin;
Admodiateur = Tenant, leaseholder
Traiteur = Caterer, Restaurateur (a French word in itself)

I grew up in Vienna and remember many French words in everyday use, such as:
Plafond = Ceiling
Trottoir = Sidewalk
Parapluie = Umbrella
Friseur = Barber, hairdresser
Rentier = Pensioner
Bankier = Banker
Magazineur = Stock keeper
Kabinett = Small room
Boudoir = Ladies private room
Rendezvous = Meeting
Renommee = Reputation ........... and many others
Some of these words can not be found in German dictionaries, since these
were produced in Germany, also once known in Vienna as the "Altreich" or
Deutschland and whose inhabitants were sometimes referred to as "Die
Saupreussen".

Adieu
Henry Wellisch
Toronto

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Address books in Vienna - two sources? #austria-czech

Thomas F. Weiss
 

Hi fellow Jgenners,

I am planning a family history research trip to Vienna and
would like to consult address and telephone books. Address books
(Lehmann's Wiener Wohnungsanzeiger) are apparently available >from
1859 to 1965. Telephone books are available since 1900. In
examining sites over the Internet, it appears that there are at least
two where these books can be accessed. One is at the Austrian
National Library located in the Heldenplatz. The other is at the
Wiener Stadt- und Landesbibliothek., Magistratabteilung 9, in the
Rathaus.

Do these two sites have identical information? What are the relative
advantages and disadvantages of using each of these two sites?

I would appreciate your help. Please respond to me privately at
tfweiss@...

Tom Weiss
Newton, MA
USA
tfweiss@...

Re: Eastern LI Mental Institution - Thank you #general

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

I want to thank all of you who replied to my inquiry about finding a
relative who had been a patient in an Eastern LI mental institution. This is
an amazing group, both extremely knowledgeable, and willing to go look up
things for a complete stranger.

Thank you all!

Sam Schleman

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Eastern LI Mental Institution - Thank you #general

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

I want to thank all of you who replied to my inquiry about finding a
relative who had been a patient in an Eastern LI mental institution. This is
an amazing group, both extremely knowledgeable, and willing to go look up
things for a complete stranger.

Thank you all!

Sam Schleman

Surname - YUDLEVITZ in California #general

Barbara Zimmer <bravo.zulu@...>
 

One of the problems of searching by surnames is that they could be
spelled in so many ways and then transcribed (or misread) in many
other ways,.
For example, a search for YUD** in the 1920 census for California
yields the followiing:
Herman YUDBNITZ b 1855 in Poland
Geroge YUDLEWITZ b 1871 in Russia
Belle YUDLOWITZ b 1896 in Russia.

Try writing YUDLEVITZ in script form and you will see that it may
well be transcribed as YUD -B (for the L and E) -N (for the V or W) -
ITZ.

Searching the California Death index also yields many possible
matches and often provides the mother's maiden name (if it was given.)

Barbara Zimmer
Norfolk VA

Jeff Miller wrote:
My challenge now is to find Yane YUDLEVITZ' descendants. I know in the US the
family first lived in New Jersey, but relocated early on in the 1900s to the Los
Angeles area.

Other names of related family members include Etta GORE (the name FORER is also
listed as her mother's maiden name). She was born in 1898 and died in Los Angeles
in 1985. Also Edith YUDLEVITZ, born 1900 or 1901, died in San Bernardino in 1970.
Irving (Isidore) YUDLEVITZ born 1905, died in Los Angeles in 1987. Also Sophia
born 1902.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Surname - YUDLEVITZ in California #general

Barbara Zimmer <bravo.zulu@...>
 

One of the problems of searching by surnames is that they could be
spelled in so many ways and then transcribed (or misread) in many
other ways,.
For example, a search for YUD** in the 1920 census for California
yields the followiing:
Herman YUDBNITZ b 1855 in Poland
Geroge YUDLEWITZ b 1871 in Russia
Belle YUDLOWITZ b 1896 in Russia.

Try writing YUDLEVITZ in script form and you will see that it may
well be transcribed as YUD -B (for the L and E) -N (for the V or W) -
ITZ.

Searching the California Death index also yields many possible
matches and often provides the mother's maiden name (if it was given.)

Barbara Zimmer
Norfolk VA

Jeff Miller wrote:
My challenge now is to find Yane YUDLEVITZ' descendants. I know in the US the
family first lived in New Jersey, but relocated early on in the 1900s to the Los
Angeles area.

Other names of related family members include Etta GORE (the name FORER is also
listed as her mother's maiden name). She was born in 1898 and died in Los Angeles
in 1985. Also Edith YUDLEVITZ, born 1900 or 1901, died in San Bernardino in 1970.
Irving (Isidore) YUDLEVITZ born 1905, died in Los Angeles in 1987. Also Sophia
born 1902.

Re: Named for More than One Person? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 06:30:59 UTC, FranSegall@... (Fran Segall)
opined:

Could someone please tell me if Jewish children are ever given a given-name for
more than one person? My Hebrew name is Feige. My mother's grandmother and my
father's grandmother were both named Feige. Both died many years before my birth,
although I don't know the years. I have no way to know which one I was named for,
but is it possible or likely that the intention was to honor both?

Fran Segall
Manassas, VA
FranSegall@...
The custom of naming children after a departed (in Ashkenazi tradition) or
live (Sfaradi) forebear is only that, a custom or social habit. It has no
foundation in either written or oral law. Whether the parents of a child had
in mind a maternal grandparent, a paternal great-grandparent, a prestigious
personage, a Biblical character, or all of the above simultaneously, is a
question that can be answered only by interrogating the parents, and
perhaps not even thus.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Named for More than One Person? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 06:30:59 UTC, FranSegall@... (Fran Segall)
opined:

Could someone please tell me if Jewish children are ever given a given-name for
more than one person? My Hebrew name is Feige. My mother's grandmother and my
father's grandmother were both named Feige. Both died many years before my birth,
although I don't know the years. I have no way to know which one I was named for,
but is it possible or likely that the intention was to honor both?

Fran Segall
Manassas, VA
FranSegall@...
The custom of naming children after a departed (in Ashkenazi tradition) or
live (Sfaradi) forebear is only that, a custom or social habit. It has no
foundation in either written or oral law. Whether the parents of a child had
in mind a maternal grandparent, a paternal great-grandparent, a prestigious
personage, a Biblical character, or all of the above simultaneously, is a
question that can be answered only by interrogating the parents, and
perhaps not even thus.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.

Thank You Dave #belarus

Shana Egan <segan@...>
 

May I add my voice to those who thank Dave Fox for all his work in our
behalf. Without you, Dave, I don't think this SIG would have achieved what
it has. You got things started and kept looking for ways to improve and
enhance our research. Thank you, Thank you, Thank you.

Wishing you and Cindy the best.

Shana

Belarus SIG #Belarus Thank You Dave #belarus

Shana Egan <segan@...>
 

May I add my voice to those who thank Dave Fox for all his work in our
behalf. Without you, Dave, I don't think this SIG would have achieved what
it has. You got things started and kept looking for ways to improve and
enhance our research. Thank you, Thank you, Thank you.

Wishing you and Cindy the best.

Shana

Re: Named for More than One Person? #general

ben-ari <yrcdi@...>
 

My eldest son, Chaim Zvi, is name after two greatgrandfathers, one was Chaim
the other Zvi.

Yoni Ben-Ari

----- Original Message -----
From: "Fran Segall" < FranSegall@... >
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" < jewishgen@... >
Sent: Thursday, March 10, 2005 2:55 AM
Subject: Named for More than One Person?

Could someone please tell me if Jewish children are ever given a given-name for
more than one person? My Hebrew name is Feige. My mother's grandmother and my
father's grandmother were both named Feige. Both died many years before my birth,
although I don't know the years. I have no way to know which one I was named for,
but is it possible or likely that the intention was to honor both?

Fran Segall
Manassas, VA
FranSegall@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Named for More than One Person? #general

ben-ari <yrcdi@...>
 

My eldest son, Chaim Zvi, is name after two greatgrandfathers, one was Chaim
the other Zvi.

Yoni Ben-Ari

----- Original Message -----
From: "Fran Segall" < FranSegall@... >
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" < jewishgen@... >
Sent: Thursday, March 10, 2005 2:55 AM
Subject: Named for More than One Person?

Could someone please tell me if Jewish children are ever given a given-name for
more than one person? My Hebrew name is Feige. My mother's grandmother and my
father's grandmother were both named Feige. Both died many years before my birth,
although I don't know the years. I have no way to know which one I was named for,
but is it possible or likely that the intention was to honor both?

Fran Segall
Manassas, VA
FranSegall@...