Date   

(Belarus and France) Nazi Stolen Books Not Being Returned to Families of Owners #belarus

Jan Meisels Allen
 

I recently posted on the IAJGS Leadership Digest and JewishGen Discussion
Group as to how Germany was making an effort to return Nazi looted books
returned to their original Jewish owners through the "Initial Check" whose
mission is finding stolen books and rightful heirs, which is coordinated by
the Magdeburg-based Lost Art Foundation.

Unfortunately, the same is not true of the Nazi looted books in Belarus.
The focus is on 1.2 million volumes the Nazis plundered which went from
France to Germany to Silesia where the Red Army took them as "spoils of
war". This includes about 500,000 books taken >from French Jewish families
and institutions.

The Soviets sent 54 railcars to Minsk where they have remained. Many of the
books were found by the Soviets in Berlin so called "trophy-Brigades of the
Red Army which picked up cultural property in occupied countries. Many of
the French books were stored alongside the books the Nazis plundered from
Belarus. The books remained in Minsk an not mentioned until the falloff
Communism. Many of the French books were taken >from prominent families'
private libraries and are first editions, many of them signed.

There have been discussions between the French and Belarus and other
countries, including the Claims Conference who seeks restitution for those
who lost property or art. Belarus will not discuss restitution, as Belarus
lost nearly all they had in the war. Belarus is willing to discuss
"transfers and exchanges of publications."

The Claims Conference created a website on the looted books and the Minsk
collection which can be accessed at:
https://www.errproject.org/looted_libraries_fr.php the article contains a
link to the list which is at:
http://www.culture.gouv.fr/documentation/mnr/RBS/T_7.pdf

To read more about this see: http://tinyurl.com/ybphcr7s
Original url:
https://www.wsj.com/articles/on-the-trail-of-books-stolen-by-the-nazis-15016
87602?mg=prod/accounts-wsj

The Wall Street Journal is a subscription newspaper. However, if you place
the title of the article On the Trail of Books Stolen by the Nazis," into
Google you will be able to read the article.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Belarus SIG #Belarus (Belarus and France) Nazi Stolen Books Not Being Returned to Families of Owners #belarus

Jan Meisels Allen
 

I recently posted on the IAJGS Leadership Digest and JewishGen Discussion
Group as to how Germany was making an effort to return Nazi looted books
returned to their original Jewish owners through the "Initial Check" whose
mission is finding stolen books and rightful heirs, which is coordinated by
the Magdeburg-based Lost Art Foundation.

Unfortunately, the same is not true of the Nazi looted books in Belarus.
The focus is on 1.2 million volumes the Nazis plundered which went from
France to Germany to Silesia where the Red Army took them as "spoils of
war". This includes about 500,000 books taken >from French Jewish families
and institutions.

The Soviets sent 54 railcars to Minsk where they have remained. Many of the
books were found by the Soviets in Berlin so called "trophy-Brigades of the
Red Army which picked up cultural property in occupied countries. Many of
the French books were stored alongside the books the Nazis plundered from
Belarus. The books remained in Minsk an not mentioned until the falloff
Communism. Many of the French books were taken >from prominent families'
private libraries and are first editions, many of them signed.

There have been discussions between the French and Belarus and other
countries, including the Claims Conference who seeks restitution for those
who lost property or art. Belarus will not discuss restitution, as Belarus
lost nearly all they had in the war. Belarus is willing to discuss
"transfers and exchanges of publications."

The Claims Conference created a website on the looted books and the Minsk
collection which can be accessed at:
https://www.errproject.org/looted_libraries_fr.php the article contains a
link to the list which is at:
http://www.culture.gouv.fr/documentation/mnr/RBS/T_7.pdf

To read more about this see: http://tinyurl.com/ybphcr7s
Original url:
https://www.wsj.com/articles/on-the-trail-of-books-stolen-by-the-nazis-15016
87602?mg=prod/accounts-wsj

The Wall Street Journal is a subscription newspaper. However, if you place
the title of the article On the Trail of Books Stolen by the Nazis," into
Google you will be able to read the article.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Bostomsky and Froom #southafrica

Bubbles Segall
 

I am helping a family with their research. This is what they have given me:

Boris [Borukh] Bostomsky

Born in Vilnius, Lithuania 30 November 1895

Died in Johannesburg, South Africa 31 March 1979

Married Millie Froom

She was born in Papile in Lithuania 4 March 1903

She died in Johannesburg, South Africa 11 August 1977

My query:

What were the names of Millie Froom's parents?

Bubbles Segall


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Bostomsky and Froom #southafrica

Bubbles Segall
 

I am helping a family with their research. This is what they have given me:

Boris [Borukh] Bostomsky

Born in Vilnius, Lithuania 30 November 1895

Died in Johannesburg, South Africa 31 March 1979

Married Millie Froom

She was born in Papile in Lithuania 4 March 1903

She died in Johannesburg, South Africa 11 August 1977

My query:

What were the names of Millie Froom's parents?

Bubbles Segall


Thanks re: DOLGENAS and JAROZLIMSKY #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

Thanks to all the member of this group and my own extended family who
have sent me information on Rabbi Jacob DOLGENAS and my wife's
extended family JAROZALIMSKI. everything was very useful.

Shabbat Shalom
Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Thanks re: DOLGENAS and JAROZLIMSKY #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

Thanks to all the member of this group and my own extended family who
have sent me information on Rabbi Jacob DOLGENAS and my wife's
extended family JAROZALIMSKI. everything was very useful.

Shabbat Shalom
Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


Correction: Yitzchak SZULZYNGIER #rabbinic

Heshel Teitelbaum
 

Dear fellow RavSIGers:

Just a quick correction of a typo. I meant to say that Rabbi Icyk
SZULZYNGIER of Opatow must have been born around 1735, not
1755.

Heshel Teitelbaum
Ottawa.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Correction: Yitzchak SZULZYNGIER #rabbinic

Heshel Teitelbaum
 

Dear fellow RavSIGers:

Just a quick correction of a typo. I meant to say that Rabbi Icyk
SZULZYNGIER of Opatow must have been born around 1735, not
1755.

Heshel Teitelbaum
Ottawa.


Looking for a Dr. PISTNER of Poland #general

Moshe Schaeffer
 

In a letter written after 1971 but talking about some time before this
I would guess 1965 to 1970. My great aunt writes that she spent three
summers in Poland with her great friend Dr. PISTNER. I have tried to
find info about this Doctor and have been unable to. I was hoping the
doctor might have family who know my aunt and would able to tell me
somethings about her. Dose any one know of Dr. Pistner >from Poland or
how I might find more information on the Doctor.

Thank you for your help in this matter
Moshe Schaeffer
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for a Dr. PISTNER of Poland #general

Moshe Schaeffer
 

In a letter written after 1971 but talking about some time before this
I would guess 1965 to 1970. My great aunt writes that she spent three
summers in Poland with her great friend Dr. PISTNER. I have tried to
find info about this Doctor and have been unable to. I was hoping the
doctor might have family who know my aunt and would able to tell me
somethings about her. Dose any one know of Dr. Pistner >from Poland or
how I might find more information on the Doctor.

Thank you for your help in this matter
Moshe Schaeffer
Jerusalem


Help in locating Y-DNA educational resources; researching Zweighaft surname, Katzenellenbogen rabbinical lineage #dna

Susan Zweighaft
 

Two years ago I had 3 male relatives take the Y-DNA test at
FamilyTreeDNA to add proof to my paper trail which indicated that the
three identified branches had a recent common ancestor. 2 of the
Zweighaft males matched perfectly on 37 markers and the 3rd on 36 of
37. While this was great news, little did I suspect that there might
be an additional surprise awaiting. Two years later, at the recent
IAJGS 2017 conference in Orlando, the Zweighaft surname popped up on
Dr. Jeffrey Mark Paull's slide in his talk on famous rabbinical
lineages. 'Zweighaft' was one of 18 surnames in the FamilyTreeDNA
database whose DNA matched that of the three pedigreed
Katzenellenbogen descendants.

(for background on Dr. Paull's earlier study see
http://www.avotaynuonline.com/2016/03/y-dna-genetic-signature-ethnic-origin-katzenellenbogen-rabbinical-lineage/).

I am at a loss as to how to proceed >from here. My knowledge of Y-DNA
analysis is rudimentary at best and I never seem to advance my
understanding much by perusing the learning resources on
FamilyTreeDNA. I'd very much appreciate any suggestions of other
resources I could use to get up to speed on analyzing DNA, Y-DNA
projects, haplogroup studies, terminology, etc. - books, online
classes, blogs, social media groups, etc. I have so many questions -
for instance, my brother closely matches 2 of the testers used in Dr.
Paull's 2016 study, but they are identified as haplogroup J-L823 and
my brother as J-M267. They all are identified as descendants of the
Katzenellenbogen rabbinical dynasty. Thanks very much.
Susan Zweighaft
Falls Church, VA


DNA Research #DNA Help in locating Y-DNA educational resources; researching Zweighaft surname, Katzenellenbogen rabbinical lineage #dna

Susan Zweighaft
 

Two years ago I had 3 male relatives take the Y-DNA test at
FamilyTreeDNA to add proof to my paper trail which indicated that the
three identified branches had a recent common ancestor. 2 of the
Zweighaft males matched perfectly on 37 markers and the 3rd on 36 of
37. While this was great news, little did I suspect that there might
be an additional surprise awaiting. Two years later, at the recent
IAJGS 2017 conference in Orlando, the Zweighaft surname popped up on
Dr. Jeffrey Mark Paull's slide in his talk on famous rabbinical
lineages. 'Zweighaft' was one of 18 surnames in the FamilyTreeDNA
database whose DNA matched that of the three pedigreed
Katzenellenbogen descendants.

(for background on Dr. Paull's earlier study see
http://www.avotaynuonline.com/2016/03/y-dna-genetic-signature-ethnic-origin-katzenellenbogen-rabbinical-lineage/).

I am at a loss as to how to proceed >from here. My knowledge of Y-DNA
analysis is rudimentary at best and I never seem to advance my
understanding much by perusing the learning resources on
FamilyTreeDNA. I'd very much appreciate any suggestions of other
resources I could use to get up to speed on analyzing DNA, Y-DNA
projects, haplogroup studies, terminology, etc. - books, online
classes, blogs, social media groups, etc. I have so many questions -
for instance, my brother closely matches 2 of the testers used in Dr.
Paull's 2016 study, but they are identified as haplogroup J-L823 and
my brother as J-M267. They all are identified as descendants of the
Katzenellenbogen rabbinical dynasty. Thanks very much.
Susan Zweighaft
Falls Church, VA


Re: Y-DNA Big Y test #dna

R Jaffer
 

I will give you a non-scientific example as to why you should NOT do
further Y-DNA testing for your stated purpose of finding matches.

My husband knew his ancestral location, and through the records of
LitvakSig, we were able to create a tree containing most of the
inter-related Jaffe families. His line goes back to Shakhna b. Borukh
born in 1782. Through Family Finder on JewishGen, we met a man who
should be related. In 2012, the two of them took a 67 marker test and
the results showed a genetic distance of 0. Our paper-trail indicates
that the man born in 1782 is the common ancestor.

Since then, the closest 67 or 111 marker matches have been three men
with different surnames at a distance of 1. These men could have
originally had the Jaffe surname which for some reason was changed, or
they could be related >from an earlier time before surnames. Since we
have a paper trail, this match gives those three men some clue about
their roots, but nothing more. They need to do more records research.

This month, after five years, my husband finally had a 37 marker 0
distance match to a man with the surname Jaffe. Initial inquiries show
his ancestors came >from the same town. We have not yet exchanged
detailed information.

Testing at 111 markers could only eliminate men who matched at a lower
level, not find more men. However, you might want to upload his
information to gedmatch.com which is free. Big-Y will tell you
genetic make-up before the time of records. You may find matches to
men who only did a Big-Y test, but I think that fewer men have taken
that test because of expense. Thus, you could play the lottery or
invest the cash and wait for more men to test. If money is burning a
hole in your pocket, do an autosomal test for him. FTDNA can run their
Family Finder test with the sample your husband already submitted.

Roberta Jaffer
Massachusetts


DNA Research #DNA Re: Y-DNA Big Y test #dna

R Jaffer
 

I will give you a non-scientific example as to why you should NOT do
further Y-DNA testing for your stated purpose of finding matches.

My husband knew his ancestral location, and through the records of
LitvakSig, we were able to create a tree containing most of the
inter-related Jaffe families. His line goes back to Shakhna b. Borukh
born in 1782. Through Family Finder on JewishGen, we met a man who
should be related. In 2012, the two of them took a 67 marker test and
the results showed a genetic distance of 0. Our paper-trail indicates
that the man born in 1782 is the common ancestor.

Since then, the closest 67 or 111 marker matches have been three men
with different surnames at a distance of 1. These men could have
originally had the Jaffe surname which for some reason was changed, or
they could be related >from an earlier time before surnames. Since we
have a paper trail, this match gives those three men some clue about
their roots, but nothing more. They need to do more records research.

This month, after five years, my husband finally had a 37 marker 0
distance match to a man with the surname Jaffe. Initial inquiries show
his ancestors came >from the same town. We have not yet exchanged
detailed information.

Testing at 111 markers could only eliminate men who matched at a lower
level, not find more men. However, you might want to upload his
information to gedmatch.com which is free. Big-Y will tell you
genetic make-up before the time of records. You may find matches to
men who only did a Big-Y test, but I think that fewer men have taken
that test because of expense. Thus, you could play the lottery or
invest the cash and wait for more men to test. If money is burning a
hole in your pocket, do an autosomal test for him. FTDNA can run their
Family Finder test with the sample your husband already submitted.

Roberta Jaffer
Massachusetts


Conference Highlights #2 - New Exhibitor Booth & Booth Talks #bessarabia

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During these weeks following the conference,
we are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some
of the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.
The previous issue can be accessed here:
http://tinyurl.com/IAJGS2017-A

Today's focus is on JewishGen's new Exhibitor Booth. We designed this
booth with the intention of offering a more professional experience,
and plan to use it as we expand our marketing efforts and promote
JewishGen to a much wider audience. As part of this strategy, we also
debuted our "Booth Talks" program, whereby JewishGen experts offered
booth visitors a short, five minute presentation on a particular topic.
This enabled conference participants an opportunity to connect with
experts, while giving JewishGen staff the opportunity to engage, and
forge new connections. Throughout the conference, hundreds of people
stopped by the booth, >from JewishGen volunteers, donors, users, members
of other organizations, and even some of the hotel staff. Here are some
highlights:

(1) Yizkor Books: A member of the JewishGen family walked up to the
booth, pulled an old book out of her bag, and asked Rebecca Schaeffer (a
member of the booth team, and Assistant to the Director) if she could
identify it. Rebecca explained that it was a Yizkor (memorial) book,
written by Holocaust survivors to perpetuate the history and heritage of
towns which once had thriving Jewish communities. Visibly moved, the
individual asked if there was a translated version in English, and when
she was given the link to the translated book on JewishGen, and started
reading it, she broke down in tears.

(2) Great-Great Grandfathers Matzeiva (Tombstone): Another individual
stopped by and expressed her longing to find any information about her
great-great-grandfather. Nolan Altman (VP for Data Acquisition) was
there, did a quick search on JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial
Registry) and helped her find the record for the gravestone of her great-
great-grandfather, which also included the name of her great-great-great-
grandfather!

(3)Bar/Bat Mitzvah Projects: A member of the JewishGen family stopped by
the booth, saw the literature about JewishGen's Memorial Plaques Project,
and was so inspired that he committed to having his synagogue's youth
department participate.

(4) Possible Connections: An individual was thrilled to discover the
JewishGen Family Finder, and that there were 90 people researching the
same town she was.

To view a listing of the Booth Talks which took place at the conference,
along with a few pictures, please visit:
http://tinyurl.com/BoothTalks2017

Please stay tuned for more updates.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Conference Highlights #2 - New Exhibitor Booth & Booth Talks #bessarabia

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During these weeks following the conference,
we are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some
of the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.
The previous issue can be accessed here:
http://tinyurl.com/IAJGS2017-A

Today's focus is on JewishGen's new Exhibitor Booth. We designed this
booth with the intention of offering a more professional experience,
and plan to use it as we expand our marketing efforts and promote
JewishGen to a much wider audience. As part of this strategy, we also
debuted our "Booth Talks" program, whereby JewishGen experts offered
booth visitors a short, five minute presentation on a particular topic.
This enabled conference participants an opportunity to connect with
experts, while giving JewishGen staff the opportunity to engage, and
forge new connections. Throughout the conference, hundreds of people
stopped by the booth, >from JewishGen volunteers, donors, users, members
of other organizations, and even some of the hotel staff. Here are some
highlights:

(1) Yizkor Books: A member of the JewishGen family walked up to the
booth, pulled an old book out of her bag, and asked Rebecca Schaeffer (a
member of the booth team, and Assistant to the Director) if she could
identify it. Rebecca explained that it was a Yizkor (memorial) book,
written by Holocaust survivors to perpetuate the history and heritage of
towns which once had thriving Jewish communities. Visibly moved, the
individual asked if there was a translated version in English, and when
she was given the link to the translated book on JewishGen, and started
reading it, she broke down in tears.

(2) Great-Great Grandfathers Matzeiva (Tombstone): Another individual
stopped by and expressed her longing to find any information about her
great-great-grandfather. Nolan Altman (VP for Data Acquisition) was
there, did a quick search on JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial
Registry) and helped her find the record for the gravestone of her great-
great-grandfather, which also included the name of her great-great-great-
grandfather!

(3)Bar/Bat Mitzvah Projects: A member of the JewishGen family stopped by
the booth, saw the literature about JewishGen's Memorial Plaques Project,
and was so inspired that he committed to having his synagogue's youth
department participate.

(4) Possible Connections: An individual was thrilled to discover the
JewishGen Family Finder, and that there were 90 people researching the
same town she was.

To view a listing of the Booth Talks which took place at the conference,
along with a few pictures, please visit:
http://tinyurl.com/BoothTalks2017

Please stay tuned for more updates.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Conference Highlights #2 - New Exhibitor Booth & Booth Talks #poland

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During these weeks following the conference,
we are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some
of the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.
The previous issue can be accessed here:
http://tinyurl.com/IAJGS2017-A

Today's focus is on JewishGen's new Exhibitor Booth. We designed this
booth with the intention of offering a more professional experience,
and plan to use it as we expand our marketing efforts and promote
JewishGen to a much wider audience. As part of this strategy, we also
debuted our "Booth Talks" program, whereby JewishGen experts offered
booth visitors a short, five minute presentation on a particular topic.
This enabled conference participants an opportunity to connect with
experts, while giving JewishGen staff the opportunity to engage, and
forge new connections. Throughout the conference, hundreds of people
stopped by the booth, >from JewishGen volunteers, donors, users, members
of other organizations, and even some of the hotel staff. Here are some
highlights:

(1) Yizkor Books: A member of the JewishGen family walked up to the
booth, pulled an old book out of her bag, and asked Rebecca Schaeffer (a
member of the booth team, and Assistant to the Director) if she could
identify it. Rebecca explained that it was a Yizkor (memorial) book,
written by Holocaust survivors to perpetuate the history and heritage of
towns which once had thriving Jewish communities. Visibly moved, the
individual asked if there was a translated version in English, and when
she was given the link to the translated book on JewishGen, and started
reading it, she broke down in tears.

(2) Great-Great Grandfathers Matzeiva (Tombstone): Another individual
stopped by and expressed her longing to find any information about her
great-great-grandfather. Nolan Altman (VP for Data Acquisition) was
there, did a quick search on JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial
Registry) and helped her find the record for the gravestone of her great-
great-grandfather, which also included the name of her great-great-great-
grandfather!

(3)Bar/Bat Mitzvah Projects: A member of the JewishGen family stopped by
the booth, saw the literature about JewishGen's Memorial Plaques Project,
and was so inspired that he committed to having his synagogue's youth
department participate.

(4) Possible Connections: An individual was thrilled to discover the
JewishGen Family Finder, and that there were 90 people researching the
same town she was.

To view a listing of the Booth Talks which took place at the conference,
along with a few pictures, please visit:
http://tinyurl.com/BoothTalks2017

Please stay tuned for more updates.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Conference Highlights #2 - New Exhibitor Booth & Booth Talks #poland

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During these weeks following the conference,
we are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some
of the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.
The previous issue can be accessed here:
http://tinyurl.com/IAJGS2017-A

Today's focus is on JewishGen's new Exhibitor Booth. We designed this
booth with the intention of offering a more professional experience,
and plan to use it as we expand our marketing efforts and promote
JewishGen to a much wider audience. As part of this strategy, we also
debuted our "Booth Talks" program, whereby JewishGen experts offered
booth visitors a short, five minute presentation on a particular topic.
This enabled conference participants an opportunity to connect with
experts, while giving JewishGen staff the opportunity to engage, and
forge new connections. Throughout the conference, hundreds of people
stopped by the booth, >from JewishGen volunteers, donors, users, members
of other organizations, and even some of the hotel staff. Here are some
highlights:

(1) Yizkor Books: A member of the JewishGen family walked up to the
booth, pulled an old book out of her bag, and asked Rebecca Schaeffer (a
member of the booth team, and Assistant to the Director) if she could
identify it. Rebecca explained that it was a Yizkor (memorial) book,
written by Holocaust survivors to perpetuate the history and heritage of
towns which once had thriving Jewish communities. Visibly moved, the
individual asked if there was a translated version in English, and when
she was given the link to the translated book on JewishGen, and started
reading it, she broke down in tears.

(2) Great-Great Grandfathers Matzeiva (Tombstone): Another individual
stopped by and expressed her longing to find any information about her
great-great-grandfather. Nolan Altman (VP for Data Acquisition) was
there, did a quick search on JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial
Registry) and helped her find the record for the gravestone of her great-
great-grandfather, which also included the name of her great-great-great-
grandfather!

(3)Bar/Bat Mitzvah Projects: A member of the JewishGen family stopped by
the booth, saw the literature about JewishGen's Memorial Plaques Project,
and was so inspired that he committed to having his synagogue's youth
department participate.

(4) Possible Connections: An individual was thrilled to discover the
JewishGen Family Finder, and that there were 90 people researching the
same town she was.

To view a listing of the Booth Talks which took place at the conference,
along with a few pictures, please visit:
http://tinyurl.com/BoothTalks2017

Please stay tuned for more updates.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Conference Highlights #2 - New Exhibitor Booth & Booth Talks #lodz #poland

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During these weeks following the conference,
we are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some
of the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.
The previous issue can be accessed here:
http://tinyurl.com/IAJGS2017-A

Today's focus is on JewishGen's new Exhibitor Booth. We designed this
booth with the intention of offering a more professional experience,
and plan to use it as we expand our marketing efforts and promote
JewishGen to a much wider audience. As part of this strategy, we also
debuted our "Booth Talks" program, whereby JewishGen experts offered
booth visitors a short, five minute presentation on a particular topic.
This enabled conference participants an opportunity to connect with
experts, while giving JewishGen staff the opportunity to engage, and
forge new connections. Throughout the conference, hundreds of people
stopped by the booth, >from JewishGen volunteers, donors, users, members
of other organizations, and even some of the hotel staff. Here are some
highlights:

(1) Yizkor Books: A member of the JewishGen family walked up to the
booth, pulled an old book out of her bag, and asked Rebecca Schaeffer (a
member of the booth team, and Assistant to the Director) if she could
identify it. Rebecca explained that it was a Yizkor (memorial) book,
written by Holocaust survivors to perpetuate the history and heritage of
towns which once had thriving Jewish communities. Visibly moved, the
individual asked if there was a translated version in English, and when
she was given the link to the translated book on JewishGen, and started
reading it, she broke down in tears.

(2) Great-Great Grandfathers Matzeiva (Tombstone): Another individual
stopped by and expressed her longing to find any information about her
great-great-grandfather. Nolan Altman (VP for Data Acquisition) was
there, did a quick search on JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial
Registry) and helped her find the record for the gravestone of her great-
great-grandfather, which also included the name of her great-great-great-
grandfather!

(3)Bar/Bat Mitzvah Projects: A member of the JewishGen family stopped by
the booth, saw the literature about JewishGen's Memorial Plaques Project,
and was so inspired that he committed to having his synagogue's youth
department participate.

(4) Possible Connections: An individual was thrilled to discover the
JewishGen Family Finder, and that there were 90 people researching the
same town she was.

To view a listing of the Booth Talks which took place at the conference,
along with a few pictures, please visit:
http://tinyurl.com/BoothTalks2017

Please stay tuned for more updates.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Conference Highlights #2 - New Exhibitor Booth & Booth Talks #poland #lodz

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During these weeks following the conference,
we are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some
of the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.
The previous issue can be accessed here:
http://tinyurl.com/IAJGS2017-A

Today's focus is on JewishGen's new Exhibitor Booth. We designed this
booth with the intention of offering a more professional experience,
and plan to use it as we expand our marketing efforts and promote
JewishGen to a much wider audience. As part of this strategy, we also
debuted our "Booth Talks" program, whereby JewishGen experts offered
booth visitors a short, five minute presentation on a particular topic.
This enabled conference participants an opportunity to connect with
experts, while giving JewishGen staff the opportunity to engage, and
forge new connections. Throughout the conference, hundreds of people
stopped by the booth, >from JewishGen volunteers, donors, users, members
of other organizations, and even some of the hotel staff. Here are some
highlights:

(1) Yizkor Books: A member of the JewishGen family walked up to the
booth, pulled an old book out of her bag, and asked Rebecca Schaeffer (a
member of the booth team, and Assistant to the Director) if she could
identify it. Rebecca explained that it was a Yizkor (memorial) book,
written by Holocaust survivors to perpetuate the history and heritage of
towns which once had thriving Jewish communities. Visibly moved, the
individual asked if there was a translated version in English, and when
she was given the link to the translated book on JewishGen, and started
reading it, she broke down in tears.

(2) Great-Great Grandfathers Matzeiva (Tombstone): Another individual
stopped by and expressed her longing to find any information about her
great-great-grandfather. Nolan Altman (VP for Data Acquisition) was
there, did a quick search on JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial
Registry) and helped her find the record for the gravestone of her great-
great-grandfather, which also included the name of her great-great-great-
grandfather!

(3)Bar/Bat Mitzvah Projects: A member of the JewishGen family stopped by
the booth, saw the literature about JewishGen's Memorial Plaques Project,
and was so inspired that he committed to having his synagogue's youth
department participate.

(4) Possible Connections: An individual was thrilled to discover the
JewishGen Family Finder, and that there were 90 people researching the
same town she was.

To view a listing of the Booth Talks which took place at the conference,
along with a few pictures, please visit:
http://tinyurl.com/BoothTalks2017

Please stay tuned for more updates.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org

50541 - 50560 of 657932