Date   

Devora Klein of the Rubin Chassidic Dynasty of Vizhniz-Bochnia #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with Devora Klien or her family. She posted a
Page of Testimony in 2012 for her great-grandfather, Rav Haim Baruch
Rubin of Vizhniz-Bochnia who perished.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Devora Klein of the Rubin Chassidic Dynasty of Vizhniz-Bochnia #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with Devora Klien or her family. She posted a
Page of Testimony in 2012 for her great-grandfather, Rav Haim Baruch
Rubin of Vizhniz-Bochnia who perished.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy Translation Request - Hebrew #rabbinic

Aaron Slotnik
 

Hello,

As a follow up to my previous message, I am hoping that someone here
will be willing and able to translate a paragraph >from Sefer Oshpitsin
that apparently discusses the yichus of Rabbi Eliyahu ROSEN, ABD
Oswiecim prior to the Holocaust. Unfortunately, it was not included
in the translation on JewishGen and, as luck would have it, that's the
part that I need
(https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oswiecim1/osw253.html#Page255).
He was the gg-grandson of Rabbi Menachem Mendel ROSEN who I mentioned
in my previous message. He was also the older brother of Rabbi Moses
ROSEN, former chief rabbi of Romania.

If you are willing to take this up, please let me know and I can
provide you with a high quality scan of the relevant page.

Regards,
Aaron Slotnik
Chicago, IL

BLUMENTHAL, KANTOR, TREISTER, ELLENBOGEN - Borshchiv, Husiatyn and
Horodenka, Ukraine
WOROSHILSKY - Bialystok area, Poland
GOLDBERG, KATZ - Dabrowa Bialostocka, Poland
BLUM, KATZ, MARTON, LIEBERMANN, ELKOVITS, VAISZ, SAMUEL - Salaj,
Satu Mare, and Maramures Counties, Romania


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbinic Genealogy Translation Request - Hebrew #rabbinic

Aaron Slotnik
 

Hello,

As a follow up to my previous message, I am hoping that someone here
will be willing and able to translate a paragraph >from Sefer Oshpitsin
that apparently discusses the yichus of Rabbi Eliyahu ROSEN, ABD
Oswiecim prior to the Holocaust. Unfortunately, it was not included
in the translation on JewishGen and, as luck would have it, that's the
part that I need
(https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oswiecim1/osw253.html#Page255).
He was the gg-grandson of Rabbi Menachem Mendel ROSEN who I mentioned
in my previous message. He was also the older brother of Rabbi Moses
ROSEN, former chief rabbi of Romania.

If you are willing to take this up, please let me know and I can
provide you with a high quality scan of the relevant page.

Regards,
Aaron Slotnik
Chicago, IL

BLUMENTHAL, KANTOR, TREISTER, ELLENBOGEN - Borshchiv, Husiatyn and
Horodenka, Ukraine
WOROSHILSKY - Bialystok area, Poland
GOLDBERG, KATZ - Dabrowa Bialostocka, Poland
BLUM, KATZ, MARTON, LIEBERMANN, ELKOVITS, VAISZ, SAMUEL - Salaj,
Satu Mare, and Maramures Counties, Romania


Rebbetzin Rivka bat R' Nachman Tzvi EPSTEIN ABD of Kolomyya #rabbinic

Aaron Slotnik
 

Hello,

I'm trying to find out more information about Rivka who was a daughter
of Rabbi Nachman Tzvi EPSTEIN (1740 - 1829), ABD Kolomyya. According to
Meorei Galicia, her first marriage was to R' Menachem Mendel ROSEN.
After he died in Iasi on their way to Eretz Yisrael, she continued on
and married a prominent Sephardic Rabbi.

Who was the Sephardic Rabbi? When did she die and how old was she? For
some reason, I think she is buried is Safed but I can't find the source
so I could be mistaken.

I would also be interested if anyone has more information about her
first husband, R' ROSEN. Particularly what year he died and how old he
was. I have his entry >from Meorei Galicia and am trying to determine
how he was related to the luminaries mentioned there--Maharam Lublin,
the Levush, Tosafot Yom Tov, the Bach, Noda b'Yehuda, the Shlah, the
Maharal, and the Rema.

Thanks in advance for any assistance you can provide.

Regards,
Aaron Slotnik
Chicago, IL

ZLOTNIK, RZEZNIK - Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Zakroczym, and Nasielsk, Poland
SCHAPIRA - Jagielnica and Horodenka, Ukraine
BLUMENTHAL, KANTOR, TREISTER, ELLENBOGEN - Borshchiv, Husiatyn and
Horodenka, Ukraine
WOROSHILSKY - Bialystok area, Poland
GOLDBERG, KATZ - Dabrowa Bialostocka, Poland


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rebbetzin Rivka bat R' Nachman Tzvi EPSTEIN ABD of Kolomyya #rabbinic

Aaron Slotnik
 

Hello,

I'm trying to find out more information about Rivka who was a daughter
of Rabbi Nachman Tzvi EPSTEIN (1740 - 1829), ABD Kolomyya. According to
Meorei Galicia, her first marriage was to R' Menachem Mendel ROSEN.
After he died in Iasi on their way to Eretz Yisrael, she continued on
and married a prominent Sephardic Rabbi.

Who was the Sephardic Rabbi? When did she die and how old was she? For
some reason, I think she is buried is Safed but I can't find the source
so I could be mistaken.

I would also be interested if anyone has more information about her
first husband, R' ROSEN. Particularly what year he died and how old he
was. I have his entry >from Meorei Galicia and am trying to determine
how he was related to the luminaries mentioned there--Maharam Lublin,
the Levush, Tosafot Yom Tov, the Bach, Noda b'Yehuda, the Shlah, the
Maharal, and the Rema.

Thanks in advance for any assistance you can provide.

Regards,
Aaron Slotnik
Chicago, IL

ZLOTNIK, RZEZNIK - Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Zakroczym, and Nasielsk, Poland
SCHAPIRA - Jagielnica and Horodenka, Ukraine
BLUMENTHAL, KANTOR, TREISTER, ELLENBOGEN - Borshchiv, Husiatyn and
Horodenka, Ukraine
WOROSHILSKY - Bialystok area, Poland
GOLDBERG, KATZ - Dabrowa Bialostocka, Poland


Re: Avraham on Headstones #ukraine

osachy@...
 

Hi Everyone,

This is Rabbi David Osachy writing >from Florida. I am a trained
historian in addition to being a rabbi, so perhaps I can help with
this issue.

If one really needs an authoritative source for this long-established
tradition of calling a person whose father is unknown "ben Avraham" or
"ben Avraham Avinu" -- then please see the Shulchan Aruch, Even
ha-Ezer 129:20, as well as Rosh, Clal 15:4. The first source dates
from the 1500s and is the central code of Jewish law in use today.
The second is a rabbinic ruling by a leading rabbi of his generation
in both Germany and Spain, dating >from around 1300.

But please let me add I think you are all overcomplicating this matter
and viewing it through our present-day cultural practices, which did
not much apply generations ago. Of course I can't say for certain,
but a little understanding of how given names typically worked in
Jewish tradition and for the immigrant generation may help you to see
that the more likely possibility in this case is NOT that this man's
father's name was unknown. Rather, like countless other Jews of his
generation, he was probably known by several different names at
different times of his life, and in different contexts.

Let me illustrate this by talking about one of my own direct
ancestors, who was born in Romania in the 1890s. In legal documents
from the Romanian government (birth certificate, emigration papers)
his first name is listed as Lupu, which is the Romanian-language
equivalent of the Yiddish name, Volf (Wolf). At home as a child he
was normally called Volf or Velvl (a dimunitve of Volf), but in more
formal contexts (such as at school) he was known as Wilhelm, since his
parents spoke some German and this was a prestige language in the
region where he lived. When he came to America he was legally known
as Wilhelm until he became a soldier in the US Army in World War One.
Obviously Wilhelm won't fly when you are fighting the German kaiser of
the same name, so this man was renamed William. He was then commonly
called Bill for the rest of his life, until he had a bout of serious
illness, when his Hebrew name was changed in a formal ceremony to
David to fool the angel of death (another old Jewish tradition). When
he was buried, his children asked the rabbi which name to put on his
monument, and the answer was Ze'ev. Ze'ev? Well sure, that name is
the Hebrew equivalent and counterpart of Wolf, and is perfectly
appropriate for formal religious usage.

I think you all get my point. Please feel free to write with any
questions, and best wishes to everyone for the coming new year.

David Osachy



On 8/28/18, David Cherson dcherson@gmail.com
<ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote in part:

It may seem anecdotal but it has long been the custom to use the names
of our Father and Mother (as in the Jewish people), i.e. Avraham and
Sarah in place of a "missing" name or those who were converts to
Judaism. > David Cherson


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Avraham on Headstones #ukraine

osachy@...
 

Hi Everyone,

This is Rabbi David Osachy writing >from Florida. I am a trained
historian in addition to being a rabbi, so perhaps I can help with
this issue.

If one really needs an authoritative source for this long-established
tradition of calling a person whose father is unknown "ben Avraham" or
"ben Avraham Avinu" -- then please see the Shulchan Aruch, Even
ha-Ezer 129:20, as well as Rosh, Clal 15:4. The first source dates
from the 1500s and is the central code of Jewish law in use today.
The second is a rabbinic ruling by a leading rabbi of his generation
in both Germany and Spain, dating >from around 1300.

But please let me add I think you are all overcomplicating this matter
and viewing it through our present-day cultural practices, which did
not much apply generations ago. Of course I can't say for certain,
but a little understanding of how given names typically worked in
Jewish tradition and for the immigrant generation may help you to see
that the more likely possibility in this case is NOT that this man's
father's name was unknown. Rather, like countless other Jews of his
generation, he was probably known by several different names at
different times of his life, and in different contexts.

Let me illustrate this by talking about one of my own direct
ancestors, who was born in Romania in the 1890s. In legal documents
from the Romanian government (birth certificate, emigration papers)
his first name is listed as Lupu, which is the Romanian-language
equivalent of the Yiddish name, Volf (Wolf). At home as a child he
was normally called Volf or Velvl (a dimunitve of Volf), but in more
formal contexts (such as at school) he was known as Wilhelm, since his
parents spoke some German and this was a prestige language in the
region where he lived. When he came to America he was legally known
as Wilhelm until he became a soldier in the US Army in World War One.
Obviously Wilhelm won't fly when you are fighting the German kaiser of
the same name, so this man was renamed William. He was then commonly
called Bill for the rest of his life, until he had a bout of serious
illness, when his Hebrew name was changed in a formal ceremony to
David to fool the angel of death (another old Jewish tradition). When
he was buried, his children asked the rabbi which name to put on his
monument, and the answer was Ze'ev. Ze'ev? Well sure, that name is
the Hebrew equivalent and counterpart of Wolf, and is perfectly
appropriate for formal religious usage.

I think you all get my point. Please feel free to write with any
questions, and best wishes to everyone for the coming new year.

David Osachy



On 8/28/18, David Cherson dcherson@gmail.com
<ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote in part:

It may seem anecdotal but it has long been the custom to use the names
of our Father and Mother (as in the Jewish people), i.e. Avraham and
Sarah in place of a "missing" name or those who were converts to
Judaism. > David Cherson


Post Warsaw conference #2 message #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

If you read the notes/slides >from the Warsaw conference, for the Bessarabia
SIG meeting, where we discussed briefly what we did last year, and what is
coming new.  I really encourage you to read it in full and send your
comments, ideas, etc.

There is a section of the slides where I referenced Alan Levitt, who is part
of our Leadership group and a moderator for the Bessarabia Discussion
group.  Alan had two very good ideas and sent them to me a YEAR ago.  I
presented them at Orlando meeting last year, but I did not hear any
response?  Alan, did you?  This year I decided to use them too.

I want to focus on one of them:
Asking for success stories >from our members - how has our SIG helped? We
know that there are success stories, but you need to tell us about them.
Please submit your success stories to us.

I know that it is not easy to write something and post it for 800+ people, 
but please do so.  It is like sharing with a family, your Bessarabia
family?.

Actually, after the conference, I received many congratulations and in a
number of messages people were saying that they found something very valuable
for them because of our SIG - few records about their grandfather or great
grandmother or that with help of our website they found a name and a place
of a small town where their ancestors lived and many more?  and these are
all success stories!!  I am glad to get them, but I would more happy to read
them at our Bessarabia SIG discussion group, where we share, we learn, we
are helping each other.

I hope I convince all of you. I am looking forward to hear many "old" and
"new" stories >from you, your findings, your research, and genealogy, and how
we can help you to be more successful.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Post Warsaw conference #2 message #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

If you read the notes/slides >from the Warsaw conference, for the Bessarabia
SIG meeting, where we discussed briefly what we did last year, and what is
coming new.  I really encourage you to read it in full and send your
comments, ideas, etc.

There is a section of the slides where I referenced Alan Levitt, who is part
of our Leadership group and a moderator for the Bessarabia Discussion
group.  Alan had two very good ideas and sent them to me a YEAR ago.  I
presented them at Orlando meeting last year, but I did not hear any
response?  Alan, did you?  This year I decided to use them too.

I want to focus on one of them:
Asking for success stories >from our members - how has our SIG helped? We
know that there are success stories, but you need to tell us about them.
Please submit your success stories to us.

I know that it is not easy to write something and post it for 800+ people, 
but please do so.  It is like sharing with a family, your Bessarabia
family?.

Actually, after the conference, I received many congratulations and in a
number of messages people were saying that they found something very valuable
for them because of our SIG - few records about their grandfather or great
grandmother or that with help of our website they found a name and a place
of a small town where their ancestors lived and many more?  and these are
all success stories!!  I am glad to get them, but I would more happy to read
them at our Bessarabia SIG discussion group, where we share, we learn, we
are helping each other.

I hope I convince all of you. I am looking forward to hear many "old" and
"new" stories >from you, your findings, your research, and genealogy, and how
we can help you to be more successful.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

"The Last Will and Testament of Fania Barbakow" >from the Yizkor book of
Druya, Belarus are the final short letters she wrote while she and her
family hid in a bunker in the ghetto before they were discovered by the
Germans. The notes are sad ("How I wish I could survive and attain a
little bit of the goodness of life") and a cry for revenge for what
happened to her people ("Brothers >from all nations, avenge our deaths!)."
She his the her notebook in the bunker and somehow managed to let a
Christian family friend know the location of the letters before she was
murdered.

URL: https://business.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1916829861672493

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

"The Last Will and Testament of Fania Barbakow" >from the Yizkor book of
Druya, Belarus are the final short letters she wrote while she and her
family hid in a bunker in the ghetto before they were discovered by the
Germans. The notes are sad ("How I wish I could survive and attain a
little bit of the goodness of life") and a cry for revenge for what
happened to her people ("Brothers >from all nations, avenge our deaths!)."
She his the her notebook in the bunker and somehow managed to let a
Christian family friend know the location of the letters before she was
murdered.

URL: https://business.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1916829861672493

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Shana Tova #poland

ehfurman@...
 

Le'Shana Tova Tikatevu ve'Tichatemu

Shalom,
Chana Furman
Kiryat Gat, Israel


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Shana Tova #poland

ehfurman@...
 

Le'Shana Tova Tikatevu ve'Tichatemu

Shalom,
Chana Furman
Kiryat Gat, Israel


Viewmate translation request - Polish #poland

Mike Paneth <mike.paneth@...>
 

Can somebody please translate the following for me.

They are on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69189

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Mike Paneth
Melbourne Australia

Researching: Paneth (Tarcal-Desz), Szydlo (Warsaw), Rozenryter (Bedzin),
Margules (Bedzin), Rothstein (Jaraslow) families


JRI Poland #Poland Viewmate translation request - Polish #poland

Mike Paneth <mike.paneth@...>
 

Can somebody please translate the following for me.

They are on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69189

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Mike Paneth
Melbourne Australia

Researching: Paneth (Tarcal-Desz), Szydlo (Warsaw), Rozenryter (Bedzin),
Margules (Bedzin), Rothstein (Jaraslow) families


Translation of Russian Request #poland

Lorne Hanick
 

I have posted a Russian language marriage registry to ViewMate on
JewishGen: ViewMate 69329: Bodzentyn, 1870, LDS 1192416 Marriages Akta
7: The marriage of Mosiek Zylbersztajn and Fajga Malka Kolenberg. I am
most interested in finding out who the bride and groom's parents were.
The exact date of the marriage would be a plus. Thank you in advance.

Lorne Hanick, Toronto, Canada

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The direct link to the image on Viewmate is:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69329
Please respond privately or on the Viewmate form.


JRI Poland #Poland Translation of Russian Request #poland

Lorne Hanick
 

I have posted a Russian language marriage registry to ViewMate on
JewishGen: ViewMate 69329: Bodzentyn, 1870, LDS 1192416 Marriages Akta
7: The marriage of Mosiek Zylbersztajn and Fajga Malka Kolenberg. I am
most interested in finding out who the bride and groom's parents were.
The exact date of the marriage would be a plus. Thank you in advance.

Lorne Hanick, Toronto, Canada

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The direct link to the image on Viewmate is:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM69329
Please respond privately or on the Viewmate form.


Mikhail Favelyukis #ukraine

Alyssa Freeman
 

Hi, all -
I have found information on three or four different people with
the name Mikhail Favelyukis. i'm trying to figure out if anyone knows
anything more about any of them as I'm trying to figure out if they
fit into my family tree. Here's what I've found:

(1) Mikhail Favelyukis, b. 8/20/1923. Married Gitlya (4/21/1924 -
12/16/2001. Died in Brooklyn) (Found in public records) Nothing else
is known.

(2) Mikhail Favelukis, 4/20/1924 - 8/1980, in "USSR". Married Dina
Gorokhova (4/20/1924 - 2/2006). Has descendants named Abramovich,
Abramson, Verchenko, and Chetvertakova. his parents were Joseph(?) and
"Klava" (literally, Iosiv and Klava in Russian in the family tree I've
seen them in). There were five (that I know of) Favelyukis brothers
in the mid 1800's - Joseph, Solomon, Jacob, Pinchas, and an unknown.
This Joseph died 20 years before this Mikhail was born, and I know for
sure he's not related to Solomon or Jacob. But I know nothing about
Pinchas and the other brother, so he could be the child or grandchild
of one of them. It's possible one of their children named their child
after their Uncle Joseph, or one of them was younger enough than the
others that, by the time he had children, his brother Joseph had died.
(found in a couple of family trees)

(3) Mikhail Favelyukis, 1910 (in Odessa) - 1941, died in Ukraine as
POW of the Nazis, according to his niece, Zinada Favelyukis Storozhuk.
His parents were Issai and Yekaterina (nee Feldman). (Found at Yad
Vashem)

(4) Mikhail Favelyukis, father of Anna (b. 1938) and Dima (b. 1940)
Favelyukis. Refugees >from the Holocaust in Tashkent, with (likely)
their aunt and uncle, Esther and Motya Favelyukis. The only reason I
know of Mikhail here is because the patronymic of Anna and Dima was
Mikhailovna. (Found at the USHMM)

I've been wondering if #'s 3 and 4 are the same person, but (a) Zinada
doesn't mention him being married in her record, and (b) how likely is
it that someone who was a soldier in the Red Army during WWII and was
killed in 1941 had children in 1938 and 1940? I don't know exact
birthdates so it's possible Dima was born very early in 1940 and would
have been conceived in early '39 (with Anna, or course, possibly
conceived in '37). I don't know the parents of #1 or #4 (if they're
different people).

I have Favelyukis relatives with the last name spelled about 5
different ways (Favelyukis, Favilyukis, Favelukes, Faveluke, and
Faivelyukus), all >from within about 100 miles of Odessa and who spread
out around the world.If anyone knows anything more about these
Mikhail's, Zinada, Issai, Pinchas, or the other brother, please let me
know. Thank you!

Alyssa Freeman
Henrico, VA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Mikhail Favelyukis #ukraine

Alyssa Freeman
 

Hi, all -
I have found information on three or four different people with
the name Mikhail Favelyukis. i'm trying to figure out if anyone knows
anything more about any of them as I'm trying to figure out if they
fit into my family tree. Here's what I've found:

(1) Mikhail Favelyukis, b. 8/20/1923. Married Gitlya (4/21/1924 -
12/16/2001. Died in Brooklyn) (Found in public records) Nothing else
is known.

(2) Mikhail Favelukis, 4/20/1924 - 8/1980, in "USSR". Married Dina
Gorokhova (4/20/1924 - 2/2006). Has descendants named Abramovich,
Abramson, Verchenko, and Chetvertakova. his parents were Joseph(?) and
"Klava" (literally, Iosiv and Klava in Russian in the family tree I've
seen them in). There were five (that I know of) Favelyukis brothers
in the mid 1800's - Joseph, Solomon, Jacob, Pinchas, and an unknown.
This Joseph died 20 years before this Mikhail was born, and I know for
sure he's not related to Solomon or Jacob. But I know nothing about
Pinchas and the other brother, so he could be the child or grandchild
of one of them. It's possible one of their children named their child
after their Uncle Joseph, or one of them was younger enough than the
others that, by the time he had children, his brother Joseph had died.
(found in a couple of family trees)

(3) Mikhail Favelyukis, 1910 (in Odessa) - 1941, died in Ukraine as
POW of the Nazis, according to his niece, Zinada Favelyukis Storozhuk.
His parents were Issai and Yekaterina (nee Feldman). (Found at Yad
Vashem)

(4) Mikhail Favelyukis, father of Anna (b. 1938) and Dima (b. 1940)
Favelyukis. Refugees >from the Holocaust in Tashkent, with (likely)
their aunt and uncle, Esther and Motya Favelyukis. The only reason I
know of Mikhail here is because the patronymic of Anna and Dima was
Mikhailovna. (Found at the USHMM)

I've been wondering if #'s 3 and 4 are the same person, but (a) Zinada
doesn't mention him being married in her record, and (b) how likely is
it that someone who was a soldier in the Red Army during WWII and was
killed in 1941 had children in 1938 and 1940? I don't know exact
birthdates so it's possible Dima was born very early in 1940 and would
have been conceived in early '39 (with Anna, or course, possibly
conceived in '37). I don't know the parents of #1 or #4 (if they're
different people).

I have Favelyukis relatives with the last name spelled about 5
different ways (Favelyukis, Favilyukis, Favelukes, Faveluke, and
Faivelyukus), all >from within about 100 miles of Odessa and who spread
out around the world.If anyone knows anything more about these
Mikhail's, Zinada, Issai, Pinchas, or the other brother, please let me
know. Thank you!

Alyssa Freeman
Henrico, VA

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