Date   

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Radio inteview with Howard Margol #lithuania

Ronnie Mink
 

Members of the LitvakSIG might be interested in tuning in to the following
radio-show that will be aired on Sunday,January 10,2010. Although it
emanates >from Johannesburg, South Africa, it can easily be heard via
audio-streaming. The show is called ".....The Rest is History "and is
hosted by Ronnie Mink. It airs every Sunday >from 6 - 8 pm local time,
(GMT +2 hours), and the guest this coming Sunday (January 10, 2010) is the
celebrated genealogist HOWARD MARGOL Past President of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies and of LitvakSIG.

The main theme of the interview will centre around Lithuanian Jewry, and
the issues to be covered, among others, will include aspects of research
such as: "How to research our Lithuanian origins", "What can LitvakSIG
and JewishGen offer the researcher setting out on his task?", "Utilising
archival material, either local or >from Lithuania, and how to access the
latter", "Holocaust and post-Holocaust records", the "Lithuanian internal
passport' and finally, tours to Lithuania today.

To tune in to this discussion >from anywhere in the global village via
audio-streaming, simply go to CHAI FM's website at: www.chaifm.com
and follow the simple instructions on their home page (It simply requires
one click of the mouse!) Should you wish to call-in at any time during the
programme, you are welcome to do so. Details of the phone numbers to dial
will be given during the course of the show.

Date : Sunday, January 10 2010. Time : 6-8 pm South African and Israel
time 11am-1pm EST 4-6pm if you're in London.

Sincerely Ronnie Mink


Radio inteview with Howard Margol #lithuania

Ronnie Mink
 

Members of the LitvakSIG might be interested in tuning in to the following
radio-show that will be aired on Sunday,January 10,2010. Although it
emanates >from Johannesburg, South Africa, it can easily be heard via
audio-streaming. The show is called ".....The Rest is History "and is
hosted by Ronnie Mink. It airs every Sunday >from 6 - 8 pm local time,
(GMT +2 hours), and the guest this coming Sunday (January 10, 2010) is the
celebrated genealogist HOWARD MARGOL Past President of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies and of LitvakSIG.

The main theme of the interview will centre around Lithuanian Jewry, and
the issues to be covered, among others, will include aspects of research
such as: "How to research our Lithuanian origins", "What can LitvakSIG
and JewishGen offer the researcher setting out on his task?", "Utilising
archival material, either local or >from Lithuania, and how to access the
latter", "Holocaust and post-Holocaust records", the "Lithuanian internal
passport' and finally, tours to Lithuania today.

To tune in to this discussion >from anywhere in the global village via
audio-streaming, simply go to CHAI FM's website at: www.chaifm.com
and follow the simple instructions on their home page (It simply requires
one click of the mouse!) Should you wish to call-in at any time during the
programme, you are welcome to do so. Details of the phone numbers to dial
will be given during the course of the show.

Date : Sunday, January 10 2010. Time : 6-8 pm South African and Israel
time 11am-1pm EST 4-6pm if you're in London.

Sincerely Ronnie Mink


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Collective name pages on Facebook #general

Carol Graham <stukawife@...>
 

I jsut wanted to say that yes there are name pages on Facebook and
I too have made one...yet there are so few witht he name that most
people that I can find on (or Off) Facebook have been identified.
I keep hoping that someone will stumble accross the page and have
new information about the family.

I think Facebook is so cool for finding family..

Carol Graham
Chelsea Maine

Searching: Bonchek, Yellin, Fisherman (and others) in Lomza, Riga
on Facebook: the page is "Bonchek >from Lomza"


Re: Collective name pages on Facebook #general

Carol Graham <stukawife@...>
 

I jsut wanted to say that yes there are name pages on Facebook and
I too have made one...yet there are so few witht he name that most
people that I can find on (or Off) Facebook have been identified.
I keep hoping that someone will stumble accross the page and have
new information about the family.

I think Facebook is so cool for finding family..

Carol Graham
Chelsea Maine

Searching: Bonchek, Yellin, Fisherman (and others) in Lomza, Riga
on Facebook: the page is "Bonchek >from Lomza"


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Museum of Family History February 2010 Update #general

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

A Happy New Year to all. This year promises many new and interesting
exhibitions at the Museum of Family History, so stay tuned. The best way, of
course, to learn first about new exhibitions is by visiting or subscribing
to the Museum blog at http://museumoffamilyhistory.blogspot.com .

Here is what's new at the Museum:

1. "The Jews of Asia." The Museum's first offering to you is an exhibition
entitled "Synagogues and Memorials." Currently you can see photographs of
synagoggues taken in the 1990s and 2000s in the following locations: Hong
Kong and Shanghai, China; Bombay (Mumbai) and Cochin (Kochi) in India;
Rangoon (Yangon) in Burma (Myanmar), Singapore, Tajikistan, Lebanon and
Istanbul, Turkey (i.e. the Asian side of the Bosphorus).
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/ce/jasia/jasia.htm

2. All sections of the 1905/1907 book "The Immigrant Jew in America" is now
available to you at the Museum. You can now read about the Russian Jew of
Chicago, as well as the Russian Jews of New York and Philadelphia. The
exhibition's table of contents can be found at
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/ija-contents.htm.

3. Anti-Semitism in Europe - Letters >from Leipzig: Within the six years
preceding the start of World War II, a non-Jewish German woman named Ilse
Gerngrofs wrote four letters to a Jewish friend in New Zealand (not knowing
she was Jewish). The Museum presents these to you now so that they may serve
as an example of the anti-Semitic sentiments that existed in Germany before
and after Hitler came into power. These letters are very offensive, but
worth reading. The link is
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/as-letters-leipzig.htm

4. Synagogues of Europe: Greece: Athens, Corfu, Rhodes and Thesssalonika;
Spain: Madrin and Toledo; Ukraine: Husiatyn and Zastavna.
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/mfh-syn-europe.htm

5. Newspaper Archives: There are now over one-hundred articles available for
your perusal. Please visit the archives at
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/archive-newspaper.htm to see what might be of
interest to you. There are now over two dozen articles published between the
1880s and 1906 about the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Reading these
articles is a great way to get a feel for Jewish life there more than one
hundred years ago. There are even two short film clips for you to see, made
in 1903, showing scenes of the Lower East Side.

6. For those of you who don't already know, The Museum has placed online an
important report and a table of pogroms that occurred between 1903 and 1906.
First, you will be able to read over the introduction and commentary to all
of this as published by the American Jewish Committee in their American
Jewish Year Book, Volume 8 (1906-1907). Secondly, you will be able to peruse
a table of more than two hundred and fifty towns and cities in Europe where
pogroms occurred. Within this table is a listing of the damage caused in
these locations (when available), as well as some general remarks made about
each pogrom. You will also find for each pogrom event listed, the date of
occurrence, the name of the town or city, the gubernia, the overall
population of the location and the Jewish population, though numbers are not
given for every town or city. There is also a supplemental table of pogroms
in other locations in November 1905 not included in this larger table. There
are also articles about the pogroms in Gomel, Belarus and Bialystok, Poland.
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/ajc-yb-v08-pogroms.htm

Best,
Steven Lasky
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com
blog: http://museumoffamilyhistory.blogspot.com
steve@...


Museum of Family History February 2010 Update #general

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

A Happy New Year to all. This year promises many new and interesting
exhibitions at the Museum of Family History, so stay tuned. The best way, of
course, to learn first about new exhibitions is by visiting or subscribing
to the Museum blog at http://museumoffamilyhistory.blogspot.com .

Here is what's new at the Museum:

1. "The Jews of Asia." The Museum's first offering to you is an exhibition
entitled "Synagogues and Memorials." Currently you can see photographs of
synagoggues taken in the 1990s and 2000s in the following locations: Hong
Kong and Shanghai, China; Bombay (Mumbai) and Cochin (Kochi) in India;
Rangoon (Yangon) in Burma (Myanmar), Singapore, Tajikistan, Lebanon and
Istanbul, Turkey (i.e. the Asian side of the Bosphorus).
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/ce/jasia/jasia.htm

2. All sections of the 1905/1907 book "The Immigrant Jew in America" is now
available to you at the Museum. You can now read about the Russian Jew of
Chicago, as well as the Russian Jews of New York and Philadelphia. The
exhibition's table of contents can be found at
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/ija-contents.htm.

3. Anti-Semitism in Europe - Letters >from Leipzig: Within the six years
preceding the start of World War II, a non-Jewish German woman named Ilse
Gerngrofs wrote four letters to a Jewish friend in New Zealand (not knowing
she was Jewish). The Museum presents these to you now so that they may serve
as an example of the anti-Semitic sentiments that existed in Germany before
and after Hitler came into power. These letters are very offensive, but
worth reading. The link is
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/as-letters-leipzig.htm

4. Synagogues of Europe: Greece: Athens, Corfu, Rhodes and Thesssalonika;
Spain: Madrin and Toledo; Ukraine: Husiatyn and Zastavna.
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/mfh-syn-europe.htm

5. Newspaper Archives: There are now over one-hundred articles available for
your perusal. Please visit the archives at
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/archive-newspaper.htm to see what might be of
interest to you. There are now over two dozen articles published between the
1880s and 1906 about the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Reading these
articles is a great way to get a feel for Jewish life there more than one
hundred years ago. There are even two short film clips for you to see, made
in 1903, showing scenes of the Lower East Side.

6. For those of you who don't already know, The Museum has placed online an
important report and a table of pogroms that occurred between 1903 and 1906.
First, you will be able to read over the introduction and commentary to all
of this as published by the American Jewish Committee in their American
Jewish Year Book, Volume 8 (1906-1907). Secondly, you will be able to peruse
a table of more than two hundred and fifty towns and cities in Europe where
pogroms occurred. Within this table is a listing of the damage caused in
these locations (when available), as well as some general remarks made about
each pogrom. You will also find for each pogrom event listed, the date of
occurrence, the name of the town or city, the gubernia, the overall
population of the location and the Jewish population, though numbers are not
given for every town or city. There is also a supplemental table of pogroms
in other locations in November 1905 not included in this larger table. There
are also articles about the pogroms in Gomel, Belarus and Bialystok, Poland.
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/ajc-yb-v08-pogroms.htm

Best,
Steven Lasky
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com
blog: http://museumoffamilyhistory.blogspot.com
steve@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JOWBR Update Announcement #general

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 year-end update to the
JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR
database can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/

This update includes approximately 104,500 new records and 20,700
new photos. The database is adding 118 new cemeteries along with updates or
additions to an additional 99 cemeteries >from 15 countries. This brings
JOWBR's holdings in excess of 1.3 million records >from more than 2,500
cemeteries / cemetery sections >from 45 countries!

JewishGen is also pleased to announce two new partnerships, both
starting in the fourth quarter of 2009:
1. The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives (AJA)
in Cincinnati, Ohio. JewishGen volunteers will help to create searchable
databases >from paper holdings at the archives for inclusion in JOWBR. We
thank the administration at the Archives and Jennie Cole for help
facilitating the arrangement. Thanks also to JewishGen volunteer Marian
Brown for help on premises.
2. The Jewish Cemetery Restoration Project, led by Harley Felstein,
assists in restoring abandoned Jewish cemeteries around the United States.
The Project will be adding burial records >from these abandoned cemeteries to
the JOWBR database. If you are aware of such sites, please contact Harley at
harleyfelstein@...

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:
. Bayside, NY. Thanks to Maurice Kessler and his team for an
additional 23,000 records >from the Bayside / Ozone Queens cemetery complex
whose original records were documented by Florence Marmor and David
Gevertzman.
. Weil Funeral Home Records - Cincinnati, OH. Thanks to the
management of the Weil Funeral Home (http://www.weilfuneralhome.com/) and
the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives
(http://www.americanjewisharchives.org) for the first installment of 10,800
funeral records.
. Washington State. Thanks to the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Washington State, led by coordinator Nancy Adelson, for over 9,100 records
from 11 cemetery locations within the state. Photographs and additional
records are still to come.
. Mount of Olives, Israel. Thanks to the Israel Genealogical Society
through a project coordinated by Mathilde A. Tagger and facilitated by Rose
Feldman, to add portions of approximately 7,600 records >from their detailed
Mount of Olives records to JOWBR. Full records can be found on their site
at (http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/153/4977.asp)
. Maryland Records. Thanks to the Jewish Museum of Maryland
(www.jewishmuseummd.org) and Deb Weiner for an additional 6,600 records from
four Baltimore area cemeteries.
. Radauti, Romania. Thanks to Yossi Yagur for adding over 5,300
records to the existing Radauti records.
. Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park and Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Ontario.
Thanks to Kevin Hanit and Allen Halberstadt representing the JGS of Canada
(Toronto) for more than 4,900 records >from 70 sections of these two Canadian
cemeteries.
. Colorado, Nebraska, Oklahoma, the Dakotas and Kansas. Thanks to
Terry Lasky who has submitted records and photographs that he has personally
created or coordinated with other volunteers in these states. This update
includes more than 4,300 new records and approximately 3,600 photographs.
. Petach Tikvah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman for her ongoing
work at the Segulah Cemetery in Petach Tikvah, with approximately 4,300
additional records and 2,300 additional photos
. Home of Peace Cemetery & Emanu-El Mausoleum, Colma, CA. Thanks to
Pierre Hahn and Rosanne Leeson >from the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Sacramento, for adding close to 4,200 records >from the first book of burial
records for this San Francisco area cemetery.
. New York City Metropolitan Cemeteries. JOWBR has added
approximately 3,200 records along with their corresponding photos through
the Jewish Genealogy Society of New York's Cemetery Project >from various
landsmanschaft plots in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and New Jersey
cemeteries.
. Shara Tfilo, West Roxbury, MA. Thanks to Marjorie Duby for adding
to JOWBR's existing records with an additional 2,400 burial records and
3,800 photos.
. Khotyn, Ukraine. Thanks to Hymie Reichstein for coordinating the
submission of approximately 2,700 burial records and photos >from the
cemetery in Khotyn.
. Weibstadt, Germany. Thanks to Allan T. Hirsh for adding
approximately 2,700 records >from the old and new cemeteries in Weibstadt.
. South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Hellman, president of the
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina (http://www.jhssc.org/) for
their submission of close to 2,100 burial records and 900 photos >from seven
South Carolina cemeteries.
. Lodz Ghetto Victims. Thanks to Avigdor Ben-Dov for coordinating
submissions of close to 1,400 records >from burials marked by the IDF working
with the Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute (YZI) Witnesses in
Uniform project at three sections of the cemetery in Lodz.
. Slovakian Cemeteries and Foreign Language Volunteers. Thanks to
Bobby Furst for submitting photos >from around Slovakia and a special thanks
to our team of Hebrew and foreign language translators for their patience
working with often very hard-to-read headstones; David Rosen, Ernest
Kallman, Gilberto Jugend, Nathen Gabriel, Osnat Hazan, Reuben Gross, Shay
Meyer and Zygmont Boxer.
. Anchorage, Alaska. Last but not least, thanks to Brock Shamberg for
submitting records and photos >from Anchorage Alaska cemeteries. probably our
northernmost burial records.
. Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to
make additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery
section individually or consider a group project for your local Society,
temple or other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR
database and make it possible for researchers and family members to find
answers they otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations
you may be affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that
would consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
January 2010


JOWBR Update Announcement #general

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 year-end update to the
JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR
database can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/

This update includes approximately 104,500 new records and 20,700
new photos. The database is adding 118 new cemeteries along with updates or
additions to an additional 99 cemeteries >from 15 countries. This brings
JOWBR's holdings in excess of 1.3 million records >from more than 2,500
cemeteries / cemetery sections >from 45 countries!

JewishGen is also pleased to announce two new partnerships, both
starting in the fourth quarter of 2009:
1. The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives (AJA)
in Cincinnati, Ohio. JewishGen volunteers will help to create searchable
databases >from paper holdings at the archives for inclusion in JOWBR. We
thank the administration at the Archives and Jennie Cole for help
facilitating the arrangement. Thanks also to JewishGen volunteer Marian
Brown for help on premises.
2. The Jewish Cemetery Restoration Project, led by Harley Felstein,
assists in restoring abandoned Jewish cemeteries around the United States.
The Project will be adding burial records >from these abandoned cemeteries to
the JOWBR database. If you are aware of such sites, please contact Harley at
harleyfelstein@...

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:
. Bayside, NY. Thanks to Maurice Kessler and his team for an
additional 23,000 records >from the Bayside / Ozone Queens cemetery complex
whose original records were documented by Florence Marmor and David
Gevertzman.
. Weil Funeral Home Records - Cincinnati, OH. Thanks to the
management of the Weil Funeral Home (http://www.weilfuneralhome.com/) and
the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives
(http://www.americanjewisharchives.org) for the first installment of 10,800
funeral records.
. Washington State. Thanks to the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Washington State, led by coordinator Nancy Adelson, for over 9,100 records
from 11 cemetery locations within the state. Photographs and additional
records are still to come.
. Mount of Olives, Israel. Thanks to the Israel Genealogical Society
through a project coordinated by Mathilde A. Tagger and facilitated by Rose
Feldman, to add portions of approximately 7,600 records >from their detailed
Mount of Olives records to JOWBR. Full records can be found on their site
at (http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/153/4977.asp)
. Maryland Records. Thanks to the Jewish Museum of Maryland
(www.jewishmuseummd.org) and Deb Weiner for an additional 6,600 records from
four Baltimore area cemeteries.
. Radauti, Romania. Thanks to Yossi Yagur for adding over 5,300
records to the existing Radauti records.
. Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park and Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Ontario.
Thanks to Kevin Hanit and Allen Halberstadt representing the JGS of Canada
(Toronto) for more than 4,900 records >from 70 sections of these two Canadian
cemeteries.
. Colorado, Nebraska, Oklahoma, the Dakotas and Kansas. Thanks to
Terry Lasky who has submitted records and photographs that he has personally
created or coordinated with other volunteers in these states. This update
includes more than 4,300 new records and approximately 3,600 photographs.
. Petach Tikvah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman for her ongoing
work at the Segulah Cemetery in Petach Tikvah, with approximately 4,300
additional records and 2,300 additional photos
. Home of Peace Cemetery & Emanu-El Mausoleum, Colma, CA. Thanks to
Pierre Hahn and Rosanne Leeson >from the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Sacramento, for adding close to 4,200 records >from the first book of burial
records for this San Francisco area cemetery.
. New York City Metropolitan Cemeteries. JOWBR has added
approximately 3,200 records along with their corresponding photos through
the Jewish Genealogy Society of New York's Cemetery Project >from various
landsmanschaft plots in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and New Jersey
cemeteries.
. Shara Tfilo, West Roxbury, MA. Thanks to Marjorie Duby for adding
to JOWBR's existing records with an additional 2,400 burial records and
3,800 photos.
. Khotyn, Ukraine. Thanks to Hymie Reichstein for coordinating the
submission of approximately 2,700 burial records and photos >from the
cemetery in Khotyn.
. Weibstadt, Germany. Thanks to Allan T. Hirsh for adding
approximately 2,700 records >from the old and new cemeteries in Weibstadt.
. South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Hellman, president of the
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina (http://www.jhssc.org/) for
their submission of close to 2,100 burial records and 900 photos >from seven
South Carolina cemeteries.
. Lodz Ghetto Victims. Thanks to Avigdor Ben-Dov for coordinating
submissions of close to 1,400 records >from burials marked by the IDF working
with the Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute (YZI) Witnesses in
Uniform project at three sections of the cemetery in Lodz.
. Slovakian Cemeteries and Foreign Language Volunteers. Thanks to
Bobby Furst for submitting photos >from around Slovakia and a special thanks
to our team of Hebrew and foreign language translators for their patience
working with often very hard-to-read headstones; David Rosen, Ernest
Kallman, Gilberto Jugend, Nathen Gabriel, Osnat Hazan, Reuben Gross, Shay
Meyer and Zygmont Boxer.
. Anchorage, Alaska. Last but not least, thanks to Brock Shamberg for
submitting records and photos >from Anchorage Alaska cemeteries. probably our
northernmost burial records.
. Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to
make additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery
section individually or consider a group project for your local Society,
temple or other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR
database and make it possible for researchers and family members to find
answers they otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations
you may be affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that
would consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
January 2010


Re: SKUI or SKUJA #courland #latvia

Harry Sky <rabbi@...>
 

Dear Max: I have searched and researched. I know >from stories told to me by my
father, alav hashlom, that Kreuzberg was an intense "Yiddish shtat" with its
rav, perhaps shtat rabbiner (official government rav). They were close to the
rabbanim of Dvinsk. >from his description of life people knew each other in a
very deep way. It leads me to the belief that skui had to do with a group who
was drawn to the mystical stories of forest life. the stories of yehudah
hachasid, one of shneur zalman of Ladi's mentors.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Michelson, Max" <maxmich@...>
To: "Courland Area Research Group" <courland@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 07, 2010 4:08 PM
Subject: RE: [courland] SKUI or SKUJA


Dear Harry,

I am originally >from Latvia and my paternal family is >from Courland.
Unfortunately
I have no information about your family. Here, however are some corections.

The German name of the town is Kreuzburg, and the Latvian name of the same
is
Krustpils. Skuja means a pine needle or a conifer needle. It is a very
Latvian
name, not general used by Jews.

Sorry I have nothing more to contribute. Good luck in your search.

Max
________________________________________
From: Harry Sky [rabbi@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 07, 2010 5:11 AM
To: Courland Area Research Group
Subject: [courland] SKUI or SKUJA

Does anyone have any information on family named skui or skuja. they lived
in
krupspil or kreizburg.

Harry (zvi)sky


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Re: SKUI or SKUJA #courland #latvia

Harry Sky <rabbi@...>
 

Dear Max: I have searched and researched. I know >from stories told to me by my
father, alav hashlom, that Kreuzberg was an intense "Yiddish shtat" with its
rav, perhaps shtat rabbiner (official government rav). They were close to the
rabbanim of Dvinsk. >from his description of life people knew each other in a
very deep way. It leads me to the belief that skui had to do with a group who
was drawn to the mystical stories of forest life. the stories of yehudah
hachasid, one of shneur zalman of Ladi's mentors.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Michelson, Max" <maxmich@...>
To: "Courland Area Research Group" <courland@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 07, 2010 4:08 PM
Subject: RE: [courland] SKUI or SKUJA


Dear Harry,

I am originally >from Latvia and my paternal family is >from Courland.
Unfortunately
I have no information about your family. Here, however are some corections.

The German name of the town is Kreuzburg, and the Latvian name of the same
is
Krustpils. Skuja means a pine needle or a conifer needle. It is a very
Latvian
name, not general used by Jews.

Sorry I have nothing more to contribute. Good luck in your search.

Max
________________________________________
From: Harry Sky [rabbi@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 07, 2010 5:11 AM
To: Courland Area Research Group
Subject: [courland] SKUI or SKUJA

Does anyone have any information on family named skui or skuja. they lived
in
krupspil or kreizburg.

Harry (zvi)sky


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Theo Richmond, "KONIN - a Quest #yizkorbooks

lance.ackerfeld@...
 

Shalom,

If anyone can assist me with contact information for Theo Richmond, the
author of "KONIN - a Quest", please contact me privately.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Mitau revisions are available online #courland #latvia

Pavel Bernshtam
 

Mitau revisions are available online at Raduraksti:
http://lvva-raduraksti.lv/

--
Pavel Bernshtam
javaap@...


Theo Richmond, "KONIN - a Quest #yizkorbooks

lance.ackerfeld@...
 

Shalom,

If anyone can assist me with contact information for Theo Richmond, the
author of "KONIN - a Quest", please contact me privately.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Mitau revisions are available online #courland #latvia

Pavel Bernshtam
 

Mitau revisions are available online at Raduraksti:
http://lvva-raduraksti.lv/

--
Pavel Bernshtam
javaap@...


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Lewis ABRAHAMS #southafrica

alfred goldschmidt <alfredlouise@...>
 

I am trying to find out more of the sad case of Lazarus Lewis alias Lewis
Abrahams, who went to Somerset East in the late 19th century >from London. He
may have been the cousin of my father Marcus Cohen son of Lewis Cohen who
emigrated to the Cape of Good Hope in about 1870. He was know to me as a
very tiny child as Uncle Lewis or Uncle Lazarus. While there, Lazarus or
Lewis, married and had children, but his wife and children were drowned. I
dont know if it was on the boat or in S. Africa. About 1935 he lost all his
money in the ostrich feather business and returned to England where he died
a few years later at the Home for Aged Jews. His sister in London was Fanny
Barnett. I would be delighted to hear more about him.

Louise in London, researching PRINCE, COHEN and NATHAN family of Pierston and
Somerset East


Lewis ABRAHAMS #southafrica

alfred goldschmidt <alfredlouise@...>
 

I am trying to find out more of the sad case of Lazarus Lewis alias Lewis
Abrahams, who went to Somerset East in the late 19th century >from London. He
may have been the cousin of my father Marcus Cohen son of Lewis Cohen who
emigrated to the Cape of Good Hope in about 1870. He was know to me as a
very tiny child as Uncle Lewis or Uncle Lazarus. While there, Lazarus or
Lewis, married and had children, but his wife and children were drowned. I
dont know if it was on the boat or in S. Africa. About 1935 he lost all his
money in the ostrich feather business and returned to England where he died
a few years later at the Home for Aged Jews. His sister in London was Fanny
Barnett. I would be delighted to hear more about him.

Louise in London, researching PRINCE, COHEN and NATHAN family of Pierston and
Somerset East


JOWBR Update Announcement #belarus

bounce-1957772-772948@...
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 year-end update to the
JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR
database can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/

This update includes approximately 104,500 new records and 20,700
new photos. The database is adding 118 new cemeteries along with updates or
additions to an additional 99 cemeteries >from 15 countries. This brings
JOWBR's holdings in excess of 1.3 million records >from more than 2,500
cemeteries / cemetery sections >from 45 countries!

JewishGen is also pleased to announce two new partnerships, both
starting in the fourth quarter of 2009:
1. The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives (AJA)
in Cincinnati, Ohio. JewishGen volunteers will help to create searchable
databases >from paper holdings at the archives for inclusion in JOWBR. We
thank the administration at the Archives and Jennie Cole for help
facilitating the arrangement. Thanks also to JewishGen volunteer Marian
Brown for help on premises.
2. The Jewish Cemetery Restoration Project, led by Harley Felstein,
assists in restoring abandoned Jewish cemeteries around the United States.
The Project will be adding burial records >from these abandoned cemeteries to
the JOWBR database. If you are aware of such sites, please contact Harley at
harleyfelstein@...

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:
. Bayside, NY. Thanks to Maurice Kessler and his team for an
additional 23,000 records >from the Bayside / Ozone Queens cemetery complex
whose original records were documented by Florence Marmor and David
Gevertzman.
. Weil Funeral Home Records - Cincinnati, OH. Thanks to the
management of the Weil Funeral Home (http://www.weilfuneralhome.com/) and
the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives
(http://www.americanjewisharchives.org) for the first installment of 10,800
funeral records.
. Washington State. Thanks to the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Washington State, led by coordinator Nancy Adelson, for over 9,100 records
from 11 cemetery locations within the state. Photographs and additional
records are still to come.
. Mount of Olives, Israel. Thanks to the Israel Genealogical Society
through a project coordinated by Mathilde A. Tagger and facilitated by Rose
Feldman, to add portions of approximately 7,600 records >from their detailed
Mount of Olives records to JOWBR. Full records can be found on their site
at (http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/153/4977.asp)
. Maryland Records. Thanks to the Jewish Museum of Maryland
(www.jewishmuseummd.org) and Deb Weiner for an additional 6,600 records from
four Baltimore area cemeteries.
. Radauti, Romania. Thanks to Yossi Yagur for adding over 5,300
records to the existing Radauti records.
. Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park and Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Ontario.
Thanks to Kevin Hanit and Allen Halberstadt representing the JGS of Canada
(Toronto) for more than 4,900 records >from 70 sections of these two Canadian
cemeteries.
. Colorado, Nebraska, Oklahoma, the Dakotas and Kansas. Thanks to
Terry Lasky who has submitted records and photographs that he has personally
created or coordinated with other volunteers in these states. This update
includes more than 4,300 new records and approximately 3,600 photographs.
. Petach Tikvah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman for her ongoing
work at the Segulah Cemetery in Petach Tikvah, with approximately 4,300
additional records and 2,300 additional photos
. Home of Peace Cemetery & Emanu-El Mausoleum, Colma, CA. Thanks to
Pierre Hahn and Rosanne Leeson >from the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Sacramento, for adding close to 4,200 records >from the first book of burial
records for this San Francisco area cemetery.
. New York City Metropolitan Cemeteries. JOWBR has added
approximately 3,200 records along with their corresponding photos through
the Jewish Genealogy Society of New York's Cemetery Project >from various
landsmanschaft plots in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and New Jersey
cemeteries.
. Shara Tfilo, West Roxbury, MA. Thanks to Marjorie Duby for adding
to JOWBR's existing records with an additional 2,400 burial records and
3,800 photos.
. Khotyn, Ukraine. Thanks to Hymie Reichstein for coordinating the
submission of approximately 2,700 burial records and photos >from the
cemetery in Khotyn.
. Weibstadt, Germany. Thanks to Allan T. Hirsh for adding
approximately 2,700 records >from the old and new cemeteries in Weibstadt.
. South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Hellman, president of the
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina (http://www.jhssc.org/) for
their submission of close to 2,100 burial records and 900 photos >from seven
South Carolina cemeteries.
. Lodz Ghetto Victims. Thanks to Avigdor Ben-Dov for coordinating
submissions of close to 1,400 records >from burials marked by the IDF working
with the Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute (YZI) Witnesses in
Uniform project at three sections of the cemetery in Lodz.
. Slovakian Cemeteries and Foreign Language Volunteers. Thanks to
Bobby Furst for submitting photos >from around Slovakia and a special thanks
to our team of Hebrew and foreign language translators for their patience
working with often very hard-to-read headstones; David Rosen, Ernest
Kallman, Gilberto Jugend, Nathen Gabriel, Osnat Hazan, Reuben Gross, Shay
Meyer and Zygmont Boxer.
. Anchorage, Alaska. Last but not least, thanks to Brock Shamberg for
submitting records and photos >from Anchorage Alaska cemeteries. probably our
northernmost burial records.
. Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to
make additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery
section individually or consider a group project for your local Society,
temple or other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR
database and make it possible for researchers and family members to find
answers they otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations
you may be affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that
would consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
January 2010


Belarus SIG #Belarus JOWBR Update Announcement #belarus

bounce-1957772-772948@...
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 year-end update to the
JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR
database can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/

This update includes approximately 104,500 new records and 20,700
new photos. The database is adding 118 new cemeteries along with updates or
additions to an additional 99 cemeteries >from 15 countries. This brings
JOWBR's holdings in excess of 1.3 million records >from more than 2,500
cemeteries / cemetery sections >from 45 countries!

JewishGen is also pleased to announce two new partnerships, both
starting in the fourth quarter of 2009:
1. The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives (AJA)
in Cincinnati, Ohio. JewishGen volunteers will help to create searchable
databases >from paper holdings at the archives for inclusion in JOWBR. We
thank the administration at the Archives and Jennie Cole for help
facilitating the arrangement. Thanks also to JewishGen volunteer Marian
Brown for help on premises.
2. The Jewish Cemetery Restoration Project, led by Harley Felstein,
assists in restoring abandoned Jewish cemeteries around the United States.
The Project will be adding burial records >from these abandoned cemeteries to
the JOWBR database. If you are aware of such sites, please contact Harley at
harleyfelstein@...

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:
. Bayside, NY. Thanks to Maurice Kessler and his team for an
additional 23,000 records >from the Bayside / Ozone Queens cemetery complex
whose original records were documented by Florence Marmor and David
Gevertzman.
. Weil Funeral Home Records - Cincinnati, OH. Thanks to the
management of the Weil Funeral Home (http://www.weilfuneralhome.com/) and
the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives
(http://www.americanjewisharchives.org) for the first installment of 10,800
funeral records.
. Washington State. Thanks to the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Washington State, led by coordinator Nancy Adelson, for over 9,100 records
from 11 cemetery locations within the state. Photographs and additional
records are still to come.
. Mount of Olives, Israel. Thanks to the Israel Genealogical Society
through a project coordinated by Mathilde A. Tagger and facilitated by Rose
Feldman, to add portions of approximately 7,600 records >from their detailed
Mount of Olives records to JOWBR. Full records can be found on their site
at (http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/153/4977.asp)
. Maryland Records. Thanks to the Jewish Museum of Maryland
(www.jewishmuseummd.org) and Deb Weiner for an additional 6,600 records from
four Baltimore area cemeteries.
. Radauti, Romania. Thanks to Yossi Yagur for adding over 5,300
records to the existing Radauti records.
. Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park and Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Ontario.
Thanks to Kevin Hanit and Allen Halberstadt representing the JGS of Canada
(Toronto) for more than 4,900 records >from 70 sections of these two Canadian
cemeteries.
. Colorado, Nebraska, Oklahoma, the Dakotas and Kansas. Thanks to
Terry Lasky who has submitted records and photographs that he has personally
created or coordinated with other volunteers in these states. This update
includes more than 4,300 new records and approximately 3,600 photographs.
. Petach Tikvah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman for her ongoing
work at the Segulah Cemetery in Petach Tikvah, with approximately 4,300
additional records and 2,300 additional photos
. Home of Peace Cemetery & Emanu-El Mausoleum, Colma, CA. Thanks to
Pierre Hahn and Rosanne Leeson >from the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Sacramento, for adding close to 4,200 records >from the first book of burial
records for this San Francisco area cemetery.
. New York City Metropolitan Cemeteries. JOWBR has added
approximately 3,200 records along with their corresponding photos through
the Jewish Genealogy Society of New York's Cemetery Project >from various
landsmanschaft plots in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and New Jersey
cemeteries.
. Shara Tfilo, West Roxbury, MA. Thanks to Marjorie Duby for adding
to JOWBR's existing records with an additional 2,400 burial records and
3,800 photos.
. Khotyn, Ukraine. Thanks to Hymie Reichstein for coordinating the
submission of approximately 2,700 burial records and photos >from the
cemetery in Khotyn.
. Weibstadt, Germany. Thanks to Allan T. Hirsh for adding
approximately 2,700 records >from the old and new cemeteries in Weibstadt.
. South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Hellman, president of the
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina (http://www.jhssc.org/) for
their submission of close to 2,100 burial records and 900 photos >from seven
South Carolina cemeteries.
. Lodz Ghetto Victims. Thanks to Avigdor Ben-Dov for coordinating
submissions of close to 1,400 records >from burials marked by the IDF working
with the Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute (YZI) Witnesses in
Uniform project at three sections of the cemetery in Lodz.
. Slovakian Cemeteries and Foreign Language Volunteers. Thanks to
Bobby Furst for submitting photos >from around Slovakia and a special thanks
to our team of Hebrew and foreign language translators for their patience
working with often very hard-to-read headstones; David Rosen, Ernest
Kallman, Gilberto Jugend, Nathen Gabriel, Osnat Hazan, Reuben Gross, Shay
Meyer and Zygmont Boxer.
. Anchorage, Alaska. Last but not least, thanks to Brock Shamberg for
submitting records and photos >from Anchorage Alaska cemeteries. probably our
northernmost burial records.
. Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to
make additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery
section individually or consider a group project for your local Society,
temple or other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR
database and make it possible for researchers and family members to find
answers they otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations
you may be affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that
would consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
January 2010


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for people from Minkovets #general

L. K. <lkorekh@...>
 

Shalom ve'kulam!

I am looking for people who have roots >from Ninkovets (Minkovtsy)
Kamenets-Podolsk area (gubernia), Ukraine. Any information about this
shtetl will be highly appreciated.

You can send message to lkorekh@...

Thank for advance.

Leonid (Levy)


Looking for people from Minkovets #general

L. K. <lkorekh@...>
 

Shalom ve'kulam!

I am looking for people who have roots >from Ninkovets (Minkovtsy)
Kamenets-Podolsk area (gubernia), Ukraine. Any information about this
shtetl will be highly appreciated.

You can send message to lkorekh@...

Thank for advance.

Leonid (Levy)