Date   

Thanking those who help -- know how to use your spam filter! #general

nitram <martin@...>
 

Based on the thread that is going about not being thankful, I want to
say I am sorry to anyone that I did not reply to. Let me explain what
happened to me and I assume that it may have happened to others.

When I first found this site about a month ago, I saw all the questions
posted and very few replies online. I assumed it was a waste of time.
I did not realize that people responded personally and that it would
not show up online.

I made my first post and I could not believe all the people that
responded. I was so excited to check my mail and see your replies
waiting for me. I always thanked everyone - whether the information
was useful or not.

So, who did I not reply to? All of you that were filtered by my email
spam filter! I never saw your replies. My spam filter was set up (1)
to delete all messages not >from the United States. An obvious mistake
if you are on this board, (2) to delete any messages that were >from a
web account unless you were specifically on my "friends" list, such as
@yahoo.com and @msn.com. (3) Some end up in my delete box and I have
no idea why - even if you sent me something before.

The second problem I had was that my delete box was set up to empty
when I closed my email. So, once I realized that some responses were
going there, it was too late. Your replies were gone.

Overall, this site is wonderful and I am hoping that people will not
take it personally if I didn't respond. As someone else said, it is
probably the newbies (even newer than me) that don't reply. I am
wondering how many don't even no how to use their spam filters?

Thanks to everyone;

Martin Kleiner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thanking those who help -- know how to use your spam filter! #general

nitram <martin@...>
 

Based on the thread that is going about not being thankful, I want to
say I am sorry to anyone that I did not reply to. Let me explain what
happened to me and I assume that it may have happened to others.

When I first found this site about a month ago, I saw all the questions
posted and very few replies online. I assumed it was a waste of time.
I did not realize that people responded personally and that it would
not show up online.

I made my first post and I could not believe all the people that
responded. I was so excited to check my mail and see your replies
waiting for me. I always thanked everyone - whether the information
was useful or not.

So, who did I not reply to? All of you that were filtered by my email
spam filter! I never saw your replies. My spam filter was set up (1)
to delete all messages not >from the United States. An obvious mistake
if you are on this board, (2) to delete any messages that were >from a
web account unless you were specifically on my "friends" list, such as
@yahoo.com and @msn.com. (3) Some end up in my delete box and I have
no idea why - even if you sent me something before.

The second problem I had was that my delete box was set up to empty
when I closed my email. So, once I realized that some responses were
going there, it was too late. Your replies were gone.

Overall, this site is wonderful and I am hoping that people will not
take it personally if I didn't respond. As someone else said, it is
probably the newbies (even newer than me) that don't reply. I am
wondering how many don't even no how to use their spam filters?

Thanks to everyone;

Martin Kleiner


Where would records from Szirak, Nograd be found? #hungary

Beth Galleto
 

Does anyone know in what archive a person could find birth records for
Szirak, in the county of Nograd, for the period of about 1885 to 1900?
I am aware that there is one film set of records in the LDS library that
is supposed to be Jewish records >from 1850 to 1895 for Szirak, but I
have looked at those films and I did not find the records I was looking
for.
A cousin is going to Hungary and if we can find out where the correct
archive is he will search for birth records for our grandmother and her
siblings.
Thanks in advance for any help you can provide. This is my first posting
to this list.
Beth Galleto
Greenbrae, CA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Where would records from Szirak, Nograd be found? #hungary

Beth Galleto
 

Does anyone know in what archive a person could find birth records for
Szirak, in the county of Nograd, for the period of about 1885 to 1900?
I am aware that there is one film set of records in the LDS library that
is supposed to be Jewish records >from 1850 to 1895 for Szirak, but I
have looked at those films and I did not find the records I was looking
for.
A cousin is going to Hungary and if we can find out where the correct
archive is he will search for birth records for our grandmother and her
siblings.
Thanks in advance for any help you can provide. This is my first posting
to this list.
Beth Galleto
Greenbrae, CA


Re: Stropkov #hungary

Hallie Feldman
 

Hello Sandor, Melody, Touvia -

I'm wondering if part of the mystery about the Abraham Chaim Schonfelds
is that maybe there was one Abraham Chaim Schonfeld in Stropkov, and
another in Orlik?

>from Teddy Goldstein's tree I have that an Abraham Chaim Schonfeld
married Leah Kreindl Goldstein. Their daughter was Hannah Mindl
Schonfeld, my greatgrandmother. Teddy you sent me this tree in 1991.
While you don't have Abraham Chaim Schonfeld's place of birth on this
tree, Hannah Schonfeld and her mother Leah were born in Orlik.

I don't have a date of birth either for the Abraham Chaim Schonfeld or
for Leah, although Leah would have been born betw 1844 and 1849. Hannah
Schonfeld was born 1864 in Orlik.

Hannah also had a brother Moishe Schonfeld, again I don't see any
birthdate for him but judging by the rest of this tree he would be born
betw 1866 and 1873. This is the Moishe Schonfeld who married Dvora
Weil. Is he the Rabbi Moishe of Likev or another Moishe Schonfeld?

Thanks,
Hallie Berliner Feldman




Bacskai Sándor wrote:

Dear Melody Amsel,

I hope it will help you that the Stropkov-born Salamon Amsel was the
sochet in Senyo and later in Nyirbogdany (both are in Szabolcs County,
Hungary). His wife Hani Schonfeld was born in Mezolaborc.
Their children: Ignatz Amsel (1867 in Senyo), Gizella (1886 in
Nyirbogdany), and Samu (1892 in Nyirbogdany).

I don't know whether Salamon Amsel was related or not to Rabbi
Yitzchak Zvi Amsel of Zborov/Stropkov.

Regards,
Sandor Bacskai
Budapest, Hungary


Subject: Schonfelds of Stropkov
From: Melody Amsel-Arieli <nomietai@yahoo.com>

My great-grandfather, Avraham Chaim Schonfeld, was the leader of the
Stropkov Jewish community
in the late 1800s. Other than this, I know nothing about him, nor
have I seen the name Schonfeld before or after in all my Stropkov
research. However,I do have two slim clues that, hopefully, ring a
bell....

Can anyone help?
Thanks, Melody


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Stropkov #hungary

Hallie Feldman
 

Hello Sandor, Melody, Touvia -

I'm wondering if part of the mystery about the Abraham Chaim Schonfelds
is that maybe there was one Abraham Chaim Schonfeld in Stropkov, and
another in Orlik?

>from Teddy Goldstein's tree I have that an Abraham Chaim Schonfeld
married Leah Kreindl Goldstein. Their daughter was Hannah Mindl
Schonfeld, my greatgrandmother. Teddy you sent me this tree in 1991.
While you don't have Abraham Chaim Schonfeld's place of birth on this
tree, Hannah Schonfeld and her mother Leah were born in Orlik.

I don't have a date of birth either for the Abraham Chaim Schonfeld or
for Leah, although Leah would have been born betw 1844 and 1849. Hannah
Schonfeld was born 1864 in Orlik.

Hannah also had a brother Moishe Schonfeld, again I don't see any
birthdate for him but judging by the rest of this tree he would be born
betw 1866 and 1873. This is the Moishe Schonfeld who married Dvora
Weil. Is he the Rabbi Moishe of Likev or another Moishe Schonfeld?

Thanks,
Hallie Berliner Feldman




Bacskai Sándor wrote:

Dear Melody Amsel,

I hope it will help you that the Stropkov-born Salamon Amsel was the
sochet in Senyo and later in Nyirbogdany (both are in Szabolcs County,
Hungary). His wife Hani Schonfeld was born in Mezolaborc.
Their children: Ignatz Amsel (1867 in Senyo), Gizella (1886 in
Nyirbogdany), and Samu (1892 in Nyirbogdany).

I don't know whether Salamon Amsel was related or not to Rabbi
Yitzchak Zvi Amsel of Zborov/Stropkov.

Regards,
Sandor Bacskai
Budapest, Hungary


Subject: Schonfelds of Stropkov
From: Melody Amsel-Arieli <nomietai@yahoo.com>

My great-grandfather, Avraham Chaim Schonfeld, was the leader of the
Stropkov Jewish community
in the late 1800s. Other than this, I know nothing about him, nor
have I seen the name Schonfeld before or after in all my Stropkov
research. However,I do have two slim clues that, hopefully, ring a
bell....

Can anyone help?
Thanks, Melody


How to work the Hamburg Lists #general

Susan Meehan <smeehan@...>
 

I'm glad to learn I wasn't the only one who found the Hamburg lists
directions daunting! I've had a great many messages >from JewishGen
members who also had trouble.

The trick is to be as simple as possible; just use the last name, or a
combination of the last name and first name. Nothing else!! That
works! (Do keep in mind that the spelling of your family member may
have changed, so make allowances for that.)

BTW, I'm not counting on the passenger number system used by Hamburg to
be any help to me. I checked the microfilms of many vessels at
[name of commercial site deleted --Mod.] (for which you have to pay),
and found that Hamburg had superimposed its own numbering system. Too
bad -- it seemed like a good possibility.

Best of luck to all -

Susan Bergman Meehan
Washington, DC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How to work the Hamburg Lists #general

Susan Meehan <smeehan@...>
 

I'm glad to learn I wasn't the only one who found the Hamburg lists
directions daunting! I've had a great many messages >from JewishGen
members who also had trouble.

The trick is to be as simple as possible; just use the last name, or a
combination of the last name and first name. Nothing else!! That
works! (Do keep in mind that the spelling of your family member may
have changed, so make allowances for that.)

BTW, I'm not counting on the passenger number system used by Hamburg to
be any help to me. I checked the microfilms of many vessels at
[name of commercial site deleted --Mod.] (for which you have to pay),
and found that Hamburg had superimposed its own numbering system. Too
bad -- it seemed like a good possibility.

Best of luck to all -

Susan Bergman Meehan
Washington, DC


Re: The lack of common courtesy #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

Answering Dave Schwartz, about his complaint dated 19 May 2005, I
want to say that I have answered around 300 questions here since
exactly ten years (also some others on the French SIG and also on the
French Cercle de Genealogie Juive website). I always received thanks
and in two or three opportunities it led me to a real friendship with
the people I helped. Yes, indeed, it's not friendly (and not polite)
not to take the time to say "thank you", but it doesn't matter and
it's not useful to bother about such rude people. As far as I'm
concerned, I don't help with the aim of receiving thanks, but just
because I love to help. If I receive thanks, it's ok. If not, I don't
mind. Let's just avoid to help them next time !
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The lack of common courtesy #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

Answering Dave Schwartz, about his complaint dated 19 May 2005, I
want to say that I have answered around 300 questions here since
exactly ten years (also some others on the French SIG and also on the
French Cercle de Genealogie Juive website). I always received thanks
and in two or three opportunities it led me to a real friendship with
the people I helped. Yes, indeed, it's not friendly (and not polite)
not to take the time to say "thank you", but it doesn't matter and
it's not useful to bother about such rude people. As far as I'm
concerned, I don't help with the aim of receiving thanks, but just
because I love to help. If I receive thanks, it's ok. If not, I don't
mind. Let's just avoid to help them next time !
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


Re: The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness #general

Barry Finkel <b19141@...>
 

I send answers to questions with a "request read receipt". then I know for
sure that they received it. (This is found under Tools when using Outlook
and Outlook Express).
While many mailers honor this "return-receipt-requested" flag, it is not
part of any mail standard. Its use varies, depending on the mail system
and mail user agent. Some mailers will send the return receipt when
the mail has been placed in the recipient's mailbox. Some will send
the receipt when the recipient has opened the mail. Some will not send
if the recipient opens the mail but then deletes it. Some do not
honor the request. Don't rely on this feature with 100% accuracy.
--Barry S. Finkel
Chicago, IL, USA


common courtesy #romania

jschwart@...
 

My experience has been uniformly positive. Anytime that I replied to
a request for information I have received an appropriate reply.

Jonathan Schwartz, Nashville.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Lack of Common Courtesy and how it affects the Usefulness #general

Barry Finkel <b19141@...>
 

I send answers to questions with a "request read receipt". then I know for
sure that they received it. (This is found under Tools when using Outlook
and Outlook Express).
While many mailers honor this "return-receipt-requested" flag, it is not
part of any mail standard. Its use varies, depending on the mail system
and mail user agent. Some mailers will send the return receipt when
the mail has been placed in the recipient's mailbox. Some will send
the receipt when the recipient has opened the mail. Some will not send
if the recipient opens the mail but then deletes it. Some do not
honor the request. Don't rely on this feature with 100% accuracy.
--Barry S. Finkel
Chicago, IL, USA


Romania SIG #Romania common courtesy #romania

jschwart@...
 

My experience has been uniformly positive. Anytime that I replied to
a request for information I have received an appropriate reply.

Jonathan Schwartz, Nashville.


Research in Romanian archives #romania

Andras Koltai <kolamcg@...>
 

Dear Genners,

This is my first trip >from the HGIS to foreign
territories :)

I am looking for trustworthy locals in Romania, who
would help me with researching in Western-Romanian
archives.

If you know such person, please respond privately.

Thank you.

Best regards,

Andras Koltai
Budapest


Re: introducing a new member #romania

Bruce Reisch <bir1@...>
 

Dear Dan:

First of all, welcome to the group! If you haven't already found
some of the following web sites, you'll soon see that there some
valuable resources regarding Bukovina.

History of the Jews in the Bukowina:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/Bukowina.html
in particular, see chapters on Radauti, Dornesti, and Czernowitz.

Bukovina and Suceava web site:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/suceava.htm

ShtetLinks web site for Radauti:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/radauti/radautz.html

Czernowitz History and Genealogy:
http://members.shaw.ca/Czernowitz/


In 1792, Jews in the Austrian Empire were required to adopt surnames;
Bukovina had become a crown land of the Austrian Empire in 1774. At
that time the official language was German, though there were many
languages spoken by the various groups that lived there. So
naturally, German surnames were adopted. It is my understanding that
until that time, most Jews did not have surnames - each person was
simply known in Jewish tradition as the [given name] son or daughter
of [father's given name]. For instance: "Moshe son of David" or
"Ruchel daughter of Eliezer".

Bruce Reisch
Geneva, New York


Subject: introducing a new member
From: "Dan Kraft" <dan@kraft.adv.br>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2005 09:13:48 -0300
snip


I am not sure
about the family's name before the Romanian treaty with the Austrian empire,
that obliged jewish families to adopt German surnames. I am curious about
that

snip

Dan Markus Kraft, Esq.
Belo Horizonte, Brazil


Romania SIG #Romania Research in Romanian archives #romania

Andras Koltai <kolamcg@...>
 

Dear Genners,

This is my first trip >from the HGIS to foreign
territories :)

I am looking for trustworthy locals in Romania, who
would help me with researching in Western-Romanian
archives.

If you know such person, please respond privately.

Thank you.

Best regards,

Andras Koltai
Budapest


Romania SIG #Romania Re: introducing a new member #romania

Bruce Reisch <bir1@...>
 

Dear Dan:

First of all, welcome to the group! If you haven't already found
some of the following web sites, you'll soon see that there some
valuable resources regarding Bukovina.

History of the Jews in the Bukowina:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/Bukowina.html
in particular, see chapters on Radauti, Dornesti, and Czernowitz.

Bukovina and Suceava web site:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/suceava.htm

ShtetLinks web site for Radauti:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/radauti/radautz.html

Czernowitz History and Genealogy:
http://members.shaw.ca/Czernowitz/


In 1792, Jews in the Austrian Empire were required to adopt surnames;
Bukovina had become a crown land of the Austrian Empire in 1774. At
that time the official language was German, though there were many
languages spoken by the various groups that lived there. So
naturally, German surnames were adopted. It is my understanding that
until that time, most Jews did not have surnames - each person was
simply known in Jewish tradition as the [given name] son or daughter
of [father's given name]. For instance: "Moshe son of David" or
"Ruchel daughter of Eliezer".

Bruce Reisch
Geneva, New York


Subject: introducing a new member
From: "Dan Kraft" <dan@kraft.adv.br>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2005 09:13:48 -0300
snip


I am not sure
about the family's name before the Romanian treaty with the Austrian empire,
that obliged jewish families to adopt German surnames. I am curious about
that

snip

Dan Markus Kraft, Esq.
Belo Horizonte, Brazil


"Jewish Families in Galicia" - Conversions #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

I recently received a fascinating file, entitled: “Judische Familien In
Galizien” (Jewish Families in Galicia), >from Manfred Daum who works with
“Galizien German Descendants” -- a special interest group devoted to family
history research of the German descendants >from the Austrian province of
Galicia. (http://www.galiziengermandescendants.org/)

This document is a compilation of Jewish men, women and entire families,
either born in or residing at some point in Galicia, who converted to
Christianity: Greek or Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Evangelical/Evangelical
Reformed. In some cases these conversions were a results of “mixed
marriages,” but in others, entire Jewish families converted. There are many
interrelated families.

Mr. Daum’s sources were primarily church records >from which he extracted
this information, using parish registers, christening documents, church
marriage and death records, and some personal family notes. The dates of
these events run >from the late 1700s unti 1941, and include a few people who
were murdered in the concentration camps. Detailed occupations are listed,
house numbers, name variations, the maiden names of the women, movement >from
village to village over time, and other personal details. The towns
represented cover all of Galicia, including Kolomea, Lvov, Krakow,
Stanislau, Tarnopol, Tarnow, Drohobycz, Brody, Rzeszow, Stryj, Kamionka
Strumilowa, Tarnow, Brzezany, and then expand to Ukraine, Germany and other
countries where these people eventually settled or had moved from.

Although there are only 72 entries, most listings contain information on
several family members, and the intriguing possibility exists that some
researchers might discover that missing link in a family tree, due to a
conversion long ago.

Although written in German, Mr. Daum has provided a legend—standard in
European genealogical research--that makes deciphering the contents somewhat
easy to follow once you get the hang of it. Below are some very loose
translations to give you a sampling of the details:

Nusen SCHEIB, Jew, leasing a pub/restaurant in Josefsberg (Korosnica),
married to Liebe KESTENBLATT SCHEIB, Jew, and their son, Chaim SCHEIB, born
1869 in Josefsberg, Jew, converted to Evangelical Reformed Church in 1869.

Emanuel FINKLER, Jew, >from Czernovitz, married to Diorri GOLDENTHAL, born in
Brzezany, in 1849. In 1867 ran a pub in the Lemberg-Czernowitzer Train
Station in Lemberg. Daughter: Hedwig (Betti) FINKLER b. 1849 in
Czernowitz, baptized in 1867 in Lemberg.

Rosalia SCHWARZ, Jew, born in Jaroslau, 1824, died in House number 98 in
Stryj, converted to Roman Catholicism and baptized in 1847

Rachmil FLACHS, Jew, died in 1914 in Ugartsberg (Wypucki) House Number 14,
was a cattle salesman in Ugartsberg. Married in 1890 to Chaje KAMMERMAN,
Jew, born in Ugartsberg in 1875, died in 1914 in House number 14. Children:
Abraham, b. 1890, Laja, b. 1894- married. GRAF, Schaindl, b,1897,
Wilhelmine B. 1898

Wilhelm RASCH, Jew, lawyer in Kolomea, married to Adelheid (Pineles)
RASCH, Jew, and Children: Ernestina, b. 1860, Roberta, b. 1862, Leonia, B.
1866, converted to Roman Catholicism in 1880.

Samuel ROSENTHAL, Jew, Salesman in Brody, married in 1820 to Deborah REIS,
Jew, and their daughter, Ernestine Adele ROSENTHAL (married to STEINSBERG)
born in 1820, baptized in Lemberg in 1842.

Phillip KOHLI, Lutheran, murdered 1941 in a concentration camp in
Sapiezanka, married to Helen EHRLICHER KOHLI, Jew, children: Edmund, Sophie,
& Christine KOHLI. The Notes read: “Because he didn’t want to get a divorce
from his Jewish wife.”
Here is the list of the surnames contained in this file:

BAUER/BERCK/ BERNACKI//BERNSTEIN/BORONSTEIN/CUZEK/DIETRICH/ EHRLICHER/
EICHHOLZ /FINKLER//FISCHER/
FORYBER/FÜRST/FLACHS/FRANK//GEIL/GLASER/GOLDENTHAL/GOLDSTEIN/GRAF/
GRÜNBERG /GUTTMANN/ GOLDENTHAL / HAFER/ HAPERIN/HAUER/HEIM HOLPERING/
HUVEN/ KAMMERMANN KAMMERMANN /KATZ/ KESTENBLATT/ KLIPPEL, KOHMANN, KOPACZ/
/KOSTICZ/ KÖHLI/LICHTENSTADT/ LIFSCHÜTZ/LIPINER, LÖWENBERG/ /MAYER
MIKULAS/MOLDAUER/OCHSENHAUER/PASSOWER/PATIN/POLLAK/PINELES/RASCH/RECHEN/REIS
/ROSENBERG/ROSENTHAL/ RUPP/ SACHS/ SANTRUCEK/SAX /SCHEIB/
SCHWARZ/SCHULMAN/SELVER /SENZER/SOBEL/ SPIEGEL/
SPINDLER/STEINER/STEIN/STEINSBERG/STERN/STORCH/
UNTERSCHÜTZ/WACHSMANN/WITTLIN/ZADORA/ZAUSNER/ZIELINSKI/ZINNER.

Although Gesher Galicia hopes to make this information available on their
website at some point in the future, if you are interested in receiving the
30 page PDF file >from me now, please contact me privately. Certainly, this
document shows that details about the Jews of Galicia are present in church
records, and even though these deal solely with conversions they may prove
helpful to a few researchers. If you can provide insights into the nature
or reason for these conversions, or know of personal stories handed down by
families involving conversions, please feel free to share that with the
group.

Thanks to Manfred Daum for so generously agreeing to share the fruits of his
labor with us.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@hotmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Mr Daum has given permission for these examples to be
posted here.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Jewish Families in Galicia" - Conversions #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

I recently received a fascinating file, entitled: “Judische Familien In
Galizien” (Jewish Families in Galicia), >from Manfred Daum who works with
“Galizien German Descendants” -- a special interest group devoted to family
history research of the German descendants >from the Austrian province of
Galicia. (http://www.galiziengermandescendants.org/)

This document is a compilation of Jewish men, women and entire families,
either born in or residing at some point in Galicia, who converted to
Christianity: Greek or Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Evangelical/Evangelical
Reformed. In some cases these conversions were a results of “mixed
marriages,” but in others, entire Jewish families converted. There are many
interrelated families.

Mr. Daum’s sources were primarily church records >from which he extracted
this information, using parish registers, christening documents, church
marriage and death records, and some personal family notes. The dates of
these events run >from the late 1700s unti 1941, and include a few people who
were murdered in the concentration camps. Detailed occupations are listed,
house numbers, name variations, the maiden names of the women, movement >from
village to village over time, and other personal details. The towns
represented cover all of Galicia, including Kolomea, Lvov, Krakow,
Stanislau, Tarnopol, Tarnow, Drohobycz, Brody, Rzeszow, Stryj, Kamionka
Strumilowa, Tarnow, Brzezany, and then expand to Ukraine, Germany and other
countries where these people eventually settled or had moved from.

Although there are only 72 entries, most listings contain information on
several family members, and the intriguing possibility exists that some
researchers might discover that missing link in a family tree, due to a
conversion long ago.

Although written in German, Mr. Daum has provided a legend—standard in
European genealogical research--that makes deciphering the contents somewhat
easy to follow once you get the hang of it. Below are some very loose
translations to give you a sampling of the details:

Nusen SCHEIB, Jew, leasing a pub/restaurant in Josefsberg (Korosnica),
married to Liebe KESTENBLATT SCHEIB, Jew, and their son, Chaim SCHEIB, born
1869 in Josefsberg, Jew, converted to Evangelical Reformed Church in 1869.

Emanuel FINKLER, Jew, >from Czernovitz, married to Diorri GOLDENTHAL, born in
Brzezany, in 1849. In 1867 ran a pub in the Lemberg-Czernowitzer Train
Station in Lemberg. Daughter: Hedwig (Betti) FINKLER b. 1849 in
Czernowitz, baptized in 1867 in Lemberg.

Rosalia SCHWARZ, Jew, born in Jaroslau, 1824, died in House number 98 in
Stryj, converted to Roman Catholicism and baptized in 1847

Rachmil FLACHS, Jew, died in 1914 in Ugartsberg (Wypucki) House Number 14,
was a cattle salesman in Ugartsberg. Married in 1890 to Chaje KAMMERMAN,
Jew, born in Ugartsberg in 1875, died in 1914 in House number 14. Children:
Abraham, b. 1890, Laja, b. 1894- married. GRAF, Schaindl, b,1897,
Wilhelmine B. 1898

Wilhelm RASCH, Jew, lawyer in Kolomea, married to Adelheid (Pineles)
RASCH, Jew, and Children: Ernestina, b. 1860, Roberta, b. 1862, Leonia, B.
1866, converted to Roman Catholicism in 1880.

Samuel ROSENTHAL, Jew, Salesman in Brody, married in 1820 to Deborah REIS,
Jew, and their daughter, Ernestine Adele ROSENTHAL (married to STEINSBERG)
born in 1820, baptized in Lemberg in 1842.

Phillip KOHLI, Lutheran, murdered 1941 in a concentration camp in
Sapiezanka, married to Helen EHRLICHER KOHLI, Jew, children: Edmund, Sophie,
& Christine KOHLI. The Notes read: “Because he didn’t want to get a divorce
from his Jewish wife.”
Here is the list of the surnames contained in this file:

BAUER/BERCK/ BERNACKI//BERNSTEIN/BORONSTEIN/CUZEK/DIETRICH/ EHRLICHER/
EICHHOLZ /FINKLER//FISCHER/
FORYBER/FÜRST/FLACHS/FRANK//GEIL/GLASER/GOLDENTHAL/GOLDSTEIN/GRAF/
GRÜNBERG /GUTTMANN/ GOLDENTHAL / HAFER/ HAPERIN/HAUER/HEIM HOLPERING/
HUVEN/ KAMMERMANN KAMMERMANN /KATZ/ KESTENBLATT/ KLIPPEL, KOHMANN, KOPACZ/
/KOSTICZ/ KÖHLI/LICHTENSTADT/ LIFSCHÜTZ/LIPINER, LÖWENBERG/ /MAYER
MIKULAS/MOLDAUER/OCHSENHAUER/PASSOWER/PATIN/POLLAK/PINELES/RASCH/RECHEN/REIS
/ROSENBERG/ROSENTHAL/ RUPP/ SACHS/ SANTRUCEK/SAX /SCHEIB/
SCHWARZ/SCHULMAN/SELVER /SENZER/SOBEL/ SPIEGEL/
SPINDLER/STEINER/STEIN/STEINSBERG/STERN/STORCH/
UNTERSCHÜTZ/WACHSMANN/WITTLIN/ZADORA/ZAUSNER/ZIELINSKI/ZINNER.

Although Gesher Galicia hopes to make this information available on their
website at some point in the future, if you are interested in receiving the
30 page PDF file >from me now, please contact me privately. Certainly, this
document shows that details about the Jews of Galicia are present in church
records, and even though these deal solely with conversions they may prove
helpful to a few researchers. If you can provide insights into the nature
or reason for these conversions, or know of personal stories handed down by
families involving conversions, please feel free to share that with the
group.

Thanks to Manfred Daum for so generously agreeing to share the fruits of his
labor with us.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@hotmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Mr Daum has given permission for these examples to be
posted here.