Date   

Avenue M New York USA area Synagogue. #general

Rosalind
 

Dear Genners,
Could someone please help me with the following.
A relative had his barmitvah about 1928 at Avenue M Synagogue/Temple.
I have not been able to discover where Ave M is (which burrough) of New
York?.
Does it still exist or where could I look for records of members in 1928?

Another went to the 114th Street Synagogue. Again does this exist or where
would I search for records?

My most urgent interest is where might a member of either who died ,be
buried in 1920-1945 period?
They came >from Galicia to NY.

Many thanks in anticipation,

Ros Romem
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Avenue M New York USA area Synagogue. #general

Rosalind
 

Dear Genners,
Could someone please help me with the following.
A relative had his barmitvah about 1928 at Avenue M Synagogue/Temple.
I have not been able to discover where Ave M is (which burrough) of New
York?.
Does it still exist or where could I look for records of members in 1928?

Another went to the 114th Street Synagogue. Again does this exist or where
would I search for records?

My most urgent interest is where might a member of either who died ,be
buried in 1920-1945 period?
They came >from Galicia to NY.

Many thanks in anticipation,

Ros Romem
Jerusalem


Re: Viewmate 8339: Hebrew Cemetery Headstone #general

robert fraser <robertandginafraser@...>
 

Dear Group -

I'd like to thank all those who responded, both on-list and off-list. I
still don't know if Simon and Eva Wolf were family, but it's too large a
coincidence for them to be anything else. Simon Wolf was the father of
Amalie Wolf who married Moritz Nowak in Lostice and thus became my
great-grandmother.

Shalom

Robert Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@iinet.net.au
Searching:
NOWAK - Moravia, Austria/Vienna - >
EISINGER - Moravia - >
FINKELSTEIN - Galicia, Poland
NAGEL - Austria
KRAUTERBLUTH - ? Galicia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Viewmate 8339: Hebrew Cemetery Headstone #general

robert fraser <robertandginafraser@...>
 

Dear Group -

I'd like to thank all those who responded, both on-list and off-list. I
still don't know if Simon and Eva Wolf were family, but it's too large a
coincidence for them to be anything else. Simon Wolf was the father of
Amalie Wolf who married Moritz Nowak in Lostice and thus became my
great-grandmother.

Shalom

Robert Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@iinet.net.au
Searching:
NOWAK - Moravia, Austria/Vienna - >
EISINGER - Moravia - >
FINKELSTEIN - Galicia, Poland
NAGEL - Austria
KRAUTERBLUTH - ? Galicia


Re: Carciumari #romania

DVORAHSV@...
 

Carciumari would probably be a pub keeper or tavern proprietor.

In Romanian, carciuma = public house, pub; tavern; saloon
The word carciumar in my dictionary = "publican " and add 'i' for
plural form
And the world carciumareasa = innkeeper (also the same word is the
plant 'zinnia')

Hope that helps, maybe others will confirm (I read passably in
Romanian, but not fluent and not a native speaker, so I rely heavily
upon the rom-eng dictionary which has "idiosyncrasies"...)

Deborah Schafer
Massachusetts, USA

------------
I've found some possible relatives through the Roumanian Business
Directory. Their profession was 'carciumari'. Is there anyone who can
tell me what that means?

Thanks a lot,

Joke Kok,
Barendrecht, Holland


Romania SIG #Romania Re: Carciumari #romania

DVORAHSV@...
 

Carciumari would probably be a pub keeper or tavern proprietor.

In Romanian, carciuma = public house, pub; tavern; saloon
The word carciumar in my dictionary = "publican " and add 'i' for
plural form
And the world carciumareasa = innkeeper (also the same word is the
plant 'zinnia')

Hope that helps, maybe others will confirm (I read passably in
Romanian, but not fluent and not a native speaker, so I rely heavily
upon the rom-eng dictionary which has "idiosyncrasies"...)

Deborah Schafer
Massachusetts, USA

------------
I've found some possible relatives through the Roumanian Business
Directory. Their profession was 'carciumari'. Is there anyone who can
tell me what that means?

Thanks a lot,

Joke Kok,
Barendrecht, Holland


hebrew translation of tombstone needed #general

Shari Kantrow
 

Hello all,
I have 3 tombstones written in Hebrew that I needed
translated. Could someone help me with this and I
could forward the pictures to you.
Thanks,

Shari Kantrow
Bloomfield, New Jersey

researching:
MEYER, KAFKA, KUPFER, SCHAFF -Russian/Poland>NY
BLITZER,KARPET,JACOBSON,LANDSMAN, BLITZMAN,BLAZER
PLATZMAN, REYITTS (REIZ)Kamenets-Podolskiy, Podolia >NY
HABERMAN,DICKMAN,SZWARZ- Bukaczowce,Siemikowce>NY
SCHNEIDER, MILBAUER, MEYER - Austria
SCHWARTZ,,SHAPIRO- Bursztyn,Kuropatniki-Galicia>NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen hebrew translation of tombstone needed #general

Shari Kantrow
 

Hello all,
I have 3 tombstones written in Hebrew that I needed
translated. Could someone help me with this and I
could forward the pictures to you.
Thanks,

Shari Kantrow
Bloomfield, New Jersey

researching:
MEYER, KAFKA, KUPFER, SCHAFF -Russian/Poland>NY
BLITZER,KARPET,JACOBSON,LANDSMAN, BLITZMAN,BLAZER
PLATZMAN, REYITTS (REIZ)Kamenets-Podolskiy, Podolia >NY
HABERMAN,DICKMAN,SZWARZ- Bukaczowce,Siemikowce>NY
SCHNEIDER, MILBAUER, MEYER - Austria
SCHWARTZ,,SHAPIRO- Bursztyn,Kuropatniki-Galicia>NY


Re: WW I German military cemeteries #general

Nicole Heymans <nheymans@...>
 

I can't get into it at present, but it has (another site said) a link
to the German War Graves Commission for which the search site appears
to be (found via Google)
http://www.volksbund.de/graebersuche/

The German site seems to require the name and address of the enquirer.

Cecilia Nyleve
The Volksbund site does not _require_ information about the enquirer,
but _offers_ to relatives of the deceased the possibility of
receiving information about any change to the grave (if my knowledge
of German stretches far enough).

The direct link to the search form is
http://www.volksbund.de/graebersuche/content_suche.asp

By clicking on the name of the deceased, more information appears if
available, also a link to information about the cemetary ("hier") and
to the optional form if you are related and wish for an update ("formular").

Another interesting site already mentioned in this forum is
http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/Verlustlisten/rjf_wk1.htm which I
understand is specifically Jewish.

Interestingly, my great uncle Wilhelm LIEBES appears in both
databases but has a stone cross on his grave, so the information that
he was Jewish must have got lost somewhere. (His first grave already
had a wooden cross). A second LIEBES (Walter, 1897-1916) appears in
the Denkmalprojekt database, which does not specify the cemetary. So
it's well worth looking in both.

Nicole Heymans, Brussels, Belgium


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: WW I German military cemeteries #general

Nicole Heymans <nheymans@...>
 

I can't get into it at present, but it has (another site said) a link
to the German War Graves Commission for which the search site appears
to be (found via Google)
http://www.volksbund.de/graebersuche/

The German site seems to require the name and address of the enquirer.

Cecilia Nyleve
The Volksbund site does not _require_ information about the enquirer,
but _offers_ to relatives of the deceased the possibility of
receiving information about any change to the grave (if my knowledge
of German stretches far enough).

The direct link to the search form is
http://www.volksbund.de/graebersuche/content_suche.asp

By clicking on the name of the deceased, more information appears if
available, also a link to information about the cemetary ("hier") and
to the optional form if you are related and wish for an update ("formular").

Another interesting site already mentioned in this forum is
http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/Verlustlisten/rjf_wk1.htm which I
understand is specifically Jewish.

Interestingly, my great uncle Wilhelm LIEBES appears in both
databases but has a stone cross on his grave, so the information that
he was Jewish must have got lost somewhere. (His first grave already
had a wooden cross). A second LIEBES (Walter, 1897-1916) appears in
the Denkmalprojekt database, which does not specify the cemetary. So
it's well worth looking in both.

Nicole Heymans, Brussels, Belgium


Our visit to Lodz #poland #lodz

LyndaKraar@...
 

Dear Chaveyrim,

My husband Marty and I just returned last night >from a whirwind trip in which we
started out in Poland, went to the Baltics and Israel, and then returned
to Poland to round out our visit there. Mum and I had always wanted to go
to Lodz together, but alas, she became ill, and it was not to be. So this
was an homage to my late mum, who kept an impeccable and very moving memoir
of her childhood years, which were spent in her hometown Lodz. We visited
every one of my mother's homes up until 1939 when Mum went to Siberia with her
brother.

I would say that the second generation of us Lodzers are somewhat fortunate
in that most of the city has been preserved just as it always has been. In
fact, some of the original restaurants and places of business are still
operational. It's almost like I was walking in her world.

We stayed at the Grand Hotel on Piotrokowska Street, which still has an air
of its former grandeur -- my mother's aunt who visited >from Berlin used to go
there to use the toilet since there was no indoor plumbing in my mother's
family's apartment in Baluty. The marble interior and the restaurant have been
preserved as have many of the brass signs and woodwork. With the exception of
my mother, who was born in Lodz (Dad was >from Kionske), everyone was wiped
out and so I had no connection to any of them other than through my mother's
stories and her memoirs. Now I was able to run my hand along the same handrail
that was used by her aunt, and see the cinemas that Mum frequented, sample
her favourite ice cream and even walk around the same lake in Helenow Park that
she remembered so fondly.

We walked to Plac Wolnoci and headed to the Jewish area of Baluty. I was
able to see and photograph all of my mother's homes >from her childhood,
including 1 Stary Rynek, which overlooks the once-crowded, lively marketplace.
Mum was born into an attic apartment on the square. We saw her old school,
storefronts that she had described.

Despite the graffiti and neglect, it felt really good to come to Lodz and
"reclaim" it for my family. I soon learned that the neglect is something that is
a holdover >from the Communist era, which can be felt throughout Poland, and
particularly in the poorer metropolitan areas such as Lodz. Buildings are
filthy and run down (some are abandoned), streetcars are outdated and thunder
through the streets with no shock absorbers. They are known to run off the
tracks and tip over.

The local Jewish community, headed by Hazzan Symcha Keller, was welcoming
and warm. The community is housed in the original Jewish community building
which dates back to 1840 and can be found at the gemina on Pomorska Street.
Coincidentally we arrived in Lodz on Tisha B'Av. We were invited to have dinner
with them before evening, and then we went to shul in the gmina that night.
Services were led by Symcha, who chanted a haunting Lodzer nusach of Eichah
that he learned >from an elderly hazzan who had remained in Lodz, recently
deceased.

I'm sure many of you know that Symcha is an expert on Lodz when it comes to
the Jewish cemetery and finding Jewish geneological records.

During the course of that day I learned that the city of Lodz would be
hosting a group of children >from Nahariya who were coming to get some relief >from
their shell-shocked city. I contacted the Jewish Telegraphic Agency and fed
them the story. I have posted it on my blog, which can be found at
_www.guitargirlsdigitaldiary.blogspot.com_
(http://www.guitargirlsdigitaldiary.blogspot.com) .

The rest of our stay was spent talking with people and getting a feel for
the city and the country. We were hosted by Jewish friends -- she is Lodz-born
and bred married to a Canadian. They returned to Lodz together this year to
take care of her elderly mother who never left the city except for imprisonment
in Auschwitz. I had the very rare opportunity to spend time with her and get
to hear about what life was like >from someone who never left.

Overall, it was a good feeling to "come home" to Lodz and get to know and
understand the city and its people. It is a complicated place which on one hand
has preserved the Jewish ghetto area for its occasional interested groups
and meanderers like me. On the other hand, it boasts the Manifaktura, a huge,
world-class shopping mall in the old textile mill area. It was there that "Di
Kinder Fun Lodzer Ghetto / Dzieci z lodzkiego getta," a moving musical
commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the ghetto by Andrzej Krauze, was
recorded.

I was also impressed to hear that Lodz Mayor Jerzy Kropiwnicki is an
outspoken advocate on behalf of Jewish causes and a good friend of the Jewish
community. Even better -- he is popular with the electorate.

I hope this note has been helpful to anyone who is planning a trip to Lodz.
Feel free to write if there's anything else about my trip that you would like
to know.

Sincerely,
Lynda Kraar


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Our visit to Lodz #lodz #poland

LyndaKraar@...
 

Dear Chaveyrim,

My husband Marty and I just returned last night >from a whirwind trip in which we
started out in Poland, went to the Baltics and Israel, and then returned
to Poland to round out our visit there. Mum and I had always wanted to go
to Lodz together, but alas, she became ill, and it was not to be. So this
was an homage to my late mum, who kept an impeccable and very moving memoir
of her childhood years, which were spent in her hometown Lodz. We visited
every one of my mother's homes up until 1939 when Mum went to Siberia with her
brother.

I would say that the second generation of us Lodzers are somewhat fortunate
in that most of the city has been preserved just as it always has been. In
fact, some of the original restaurants and places of business are still
operational. It's almost like I was walking in her world.

We stayed at the Grand Hotel on Piotrokowska Street, which still has an air
of its former grandeur -- my mother's aunt who visited >from Berlin used to go
there to use the toilet since there was no indoor plumbing in my mother's
family's apartment in Baluty. The marble interior and the restaurant have been
preserved as have many of the brass signs and woodwork. With the exception of
my mother, who was born in Lodz (Dad was >from Kionske), everyone was wiped
out and so I had no connection to any of them other than through my mother's
stories and her memoirs. Now I was able to run my hand along the same handrail
that was used by her aunt, and see the cinemas that Mum frequented, sample
her favourite ice cream and even walk around the same lake in Helenow Park that
she remembered so fondly.

We walked to Plac Wolnoci and headed to the Jewish area of Baluty. I was
able to see and photograph all of my mother's homes >from her childhood,
including 1 Stary Rynek, which overlooks the once-crowded, lively marketplace.
Mum was born into an attic apartment on the square. We saw her old school,
storefronts that she had described.

Despite the graffiti and neglect, it felt really good to come to Lodz and
"reclaim" it for my family. I soon learned that the neglect is something that is
a holdover >from the Communist era, which can be felt throughout Poland, and
particularly in the poorer metropolitan areas such as Lodz. Buildings are
filthy and run down (some are abandoned), streetcars are outdated and thunder
through the streets with no shock absorbers. They are known to run off the
tracks and tip over.

The local Jewish community, headed by Hazzan Symcha Keller, was welcoming
and warm. The community is housed in the original Jewish community building
which dates back to 1840 and can be found at the gemina on Pomorska Street.
Coincidentally we arrived in Lodz on Tisha B'Av. We were invited to have dinner
with them before evening, and then we went to shul in the gmina that night.
Services were led by Symcha, who chanted a haunting Lodzer nusach of Eichah
that he learned >from an elderly hazzan who had remained in Lodz, recently
deceased.

I'm sure many of you know that Symcha is an expert on Lodz when it comes to
the Jewish cemetery and finding Jewish geneological records.

During the course of that day I learned that the city of Lodz would be
hosting a group of children >from Nahariya who were coming to get some relief >from
their shell-shocked city. I contacted the Jewish Telegraphic Agency and fed
them the story. I have posted it on my blog, which can be found at
_www.guitargirlsdigitaldiary.blogspot.com_
(http://www.guitargirlsdigitaldiary.blogspot.com) .

The rest of our stay was spent talking with people and getting a feel for
the city and the country. We were hosted by Jewish friends -- she is Lodz-born
and bred married to a Canadian. They returned to Lodz together this year to
take care of her elderly mother who never left the city except for imprisonment
in Auschwitz. I had the very rare opportunity to spend time with her and get
to hear about what life was like >from someone who never left.

Overall, it was a good feeling to "come home" to Lodz and get to know and
understand the city and its people. It is a complicated place which on one hand
has preserved the Jewish ghetto area for its occasional interested groups
and meanderers like me. On the other hand, it boasts the Manifaktura, a huge,
world-class shopping mall in the old textile mill area. It was there that "Di
Kinder Fun Lodzer Ghetto / Dzieci z lodzkiego getta," a moving musical
commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the ghetto by Andrzej Krauze, was
recorded.

I was also impressed to hear that Lodz Mayor Jerzy Kropiwnicki is an
outspoken advocate on behalf of Jewish causes and a good friend of the Jewish
community. Even better -- he is popular with the electorate.

I hope this note has been helpful to anyone who is planning a trip to Lodz.
Feel free to write if there's anything else about my trip that you would like
to know.

Sincerely,
Lynda Kraar


New York, New York #ukraine

Freya <freyab@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Having arrived at the airport early, thought I would take this opportunity
thank JGS New York, Linda Cantor, Hadassah Lipsius, Gloria Freund, and Roni
Liebowitz for a wonderful seminar. I have been to all of them and keep
wondering how on earth they could top the previous one. They always manage
to do so with grace, style and a jam-packed agenda. It’s a good thing the
schedules were published early because it gave us the opportunity to set
lecture priorities even tho there were times I wished I could clone myself
and attend them all! But ordering the CD took care of the ones I missed.

The opening session gave us a chance to reconnect with friends >from
previous seminars and make new ones. It set the tone for a super week of
finding aids, introduced us to little known records and where to find
them, new and improved databases, hints, tips and everything in-between.
If you WERE a novice – you graduated by the end of the week!
And for the more advanced genealogist – you really have your work cut out
for you now!

THANK YOU AGAIN!

Freya Blitstein Maslov
Coordinator UkraineSIG

P.S. On a personal note to Linda and Hadassah -
Lucille was "mingling" and so very proud of you all.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine New York, New York #ukraine

Freya <freyab@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Having arrived at the airport early, thought I would take this opportunity
thank JGS New York, Linda Cantor, Hadassah Lipsius, Gloria Freund, and Roni
Liebowitz for a wonderful seminar. I have been to all of them and keep
wondering how on earth they could top the previous one. They always manage
to do so with grace, style and a jam-packed agenda. It’s a good thing the
schedules were published early because it gave us the opportunity to set
lecture priorities even tho there were times I wished I could clone myself
and attend them all! But ordering the CD took care of the ones I missed.

The opening session gave us a chance to reconnect with friends >from
previous seminars and make new ones. It set the tone for a super week of
finding aids, introduced us to little known records and where to find
them, new and improved databases, hints, tips and everything in-between.
If you WERE a novice – you graduated by the end of the week!
And for the more advanced genealogist – you really have your work cut out
for you now!

THANK YOU AGAIN!

Freya Blitstein Maslov
Coordinator UkraineSIG

P.S. On a personal note to Linda and Hadassah -
Lucille was "mingling" and so very proud of you all.


VM8351: Handwritten Names on Vienna Death Record #austria-czech

Ed Zwieback <ezwieback@...>
 

I recently received a very useful 1921 Death Record (Todfallsaufnahme) from
the MA8 Archives in Vienna. The Death Record was for Julie BOCK, dies at
age 72 in 1921, widowed.

Section 10 lists some great new info for me; 7 living adult children.
Included are the given and surnames, married names, ages, occupations, and
addresses.

However, the handwriting is hard for me to read and I would appreciate help
to get the info right so I can search on this info. I have posted the
Section 10 scan on viewmate as file - VM8351 ;
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html .

Please send responses directly to me- NOT to the SIG.

Thanks for your help,
Regards,
Ed Zwieback
Long Beach, CA
with personal family at http://ezwieback.com/ZPK-p/index.htm


More from the Prague Museum #austria-czech

Henry Wellisch <henry.kelwel@...>
 

Analytical Table 3 has now been added to our website.
This is an index of hundreds of names which consists essentially of a
breakdown of the data found in columns 19, 22 and 41 of Analytical
Table 1. They are mainly a collection of papers, endowments and
individual correspondence of individuals. The place names refer to the
archives concerned, the number to the catalogue of the Jewish
community archives of Bohemia and Moravia and the dates to the period
of time covered.
Here are a few random entries >from the list:

Adler Joseph, Slavkov, 161, 1881-1939.
Eisenschimmel, familv, Mlada Boleslav, 180, 1897-1930.
Kulka, Jacub, Prerov, 88, 1922-1940
Nelos family, Lovosice, 1, 1765-1893.
Singer, family, Prostejov, 234, 1849-1939.
Weiner, family, Velke Mezirici, 56 57, 1870-1901.

Some 10 years ago, several months before I travelled to Prague, I
requested copies of the contents of one file of the list. I received a
letter >from the museum that the file would be ready when I arrived in
Prague. It was.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech VM8351: Handwritten Names on Vienna Death Record #austria-czech

Ed Zwieback <ezwieback@...>
 

I recently received a very useful 1921 Death Record (Todfallsaufnahme) from
the MA8 Archives in Vienna. The Death Record was for Julie BOCK, dies at
age 72 in 1921, widowed.

Section 10 lists some great new info for me; 7 living adult children.
Included are the given and surnames, married names, ages, occupations, and
addresses.

However, the handwriting is hard for me to read and I would appreciate help
to get the info right so I can search on this info. I have posted the
Section 10 scan on viewmate as file - VM8351 ;
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html .

Please send responses directly to me- NOT to the SIG.

Thanks for your help,
Regards,
Ed Zwieback
Long Beach, CA
with personal family at http://ezwieback.com/ZPK-p/index.htm


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech More from the Prague Museum #austria-czech

Henry Wellisch <henry.kelwel@...>
 

Analytical Table 3 has now been added to our website.
This is an index of hundreds of names which consists essentially of a
breakdown of the data found in columns 19, 22 and 41 of Analytical
Table 1. They are mainly a collection of papers, endowments and
individual correspondence of individuals. The place names refer to the
archives concerned, the number to the catalogue of the Jewish
community archives of Bohemia and Moravia and the dates to the period
of time covered.
Here are a few random entries >from the list:

Adler Joseph, Slavkov, 161, 1881-1939.
Eisenschimmel, familv, Mlada Boleslav, 180, 1897-1930.
Kulka, Jacub, Prerov, 88, 1922-1940
Nelos family, Lovosice, 1, 1765-1893.
Singer, family, Prostejov, 234, 1849-1939.
Weiner, family, Velke Mezirici, 56 57, 1870-1901.

Some 10 years ago, several months before I travelled to Prague, I
requested copies of the contents of one file of the list. I received a
letter >from the museum that the file would be ready when I arrived in
Prague. It was.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


Jews in Harbin #austria-czech

Joyce Field
 

515 Jewish burials in Harbin, China are included in JOWBR--JewishGen
Online Worldwide Burial Registry. Five burials >from Shanghai's Soong
Ching Ling Memorial Park, Foreigners' Tomb Area, are also included in
JOWBR.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Jews in Harbin #austria-czech

Joyce Field
 

515 Jewish burials in Harbin, China are included in JOWBR--JewishGen
Online Worldwide Burial Registry. Five burials >from Shanghai's Soong
Ching Ling Memorial Park, Foreigners' Tomb Area, are also included in
JOWBR.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition