Date   

More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery website
(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery website
(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Iasi, Romania Book now online #romania

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

I am happy to announce that the book "Contribution to the History of
Jews in Iasi" by Itic Svart-Kara (1997) has now been translated and is
available on the Jewishgen Yizkor book site. It can be viewed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/iasi/iasi.html

This book was translated through the volunteer efforts of Rony Shaham,
Susanna Vendel, Alma Barozzi, Marcel Bratu and Avi Klammer. They
deserve all the credit for making this all possible. I would also like
to thank Lance Ackerfeld who did a lot of work getting this book up on
the JewishGen site.

Terry Lasky
Project Coordinator
Colorado, USA


Romania SIG #Romania Iasi, Romania Book now online #romania

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

I am happy to announce that the book "Contribution to the History of
Jews in Iasi" by Itic Svart-Kara (1997) has now been translated and is
available on the Jewishgen Yizkor book site. It can be viewed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/iasi/iasi.html

This book was translated through the volunteer efforts of Rony Shaham,
Susanna Vendel, Alma Barozzi, Marcel Bratu and Avi Klammer. They
deserve all the credit for making this all possible. I would also like
to thank Lance Ackerfeld who did a lot of work getting this book up on
the JewishGen site.

Terry Lasky
Project Coordinator
Colorado, USA


More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #romania

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Romania SIG #Romania More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #romania

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #belarus

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #belarus

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #general

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #general

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


New Town Leader for Nowa Slupia #poland

Erez Gotlieb <erezgot@...>
 

The Kielce Archive team is happy to announce that Sam
Lenger is now the Town Leader for the town of Nowa
Slupia, Poland.

In addition, the Kielce Archive has recently received
index files for the following towns: Bodzentyn,
Daleszyce, Konskie, Radoszyce, and Nowa Slupia and the
fundraising goals have been set.

We are seeking volunteers to serve as Town Leaders for
Bodzentyn, Daleszyce, and Radoszyce.

For additional information, please contact Erez
Gotlieb, Archive Coordinator.

Erez Gotlieb
Kielce Archive Coordinator
Researching GOTLIB, GOLDLUST, LEWI, CZALCZYNSKI >from Kielce, Checiny


More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #poland

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.

Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


JRI Poland #Poland New Town Leader for Nowa Slupia #poland

Erez Gotlieb <erezgot@...>
 

The Kielce Archive team is happy to announce that Sam
Lenger is now the Town Leader for the town of Nowa
Slupia, Poland.

In addition, the Kielce Archive has recently received
index files for the following towns: Bodzentyn,
Daleszyce, Konskie, Radoszyce, and Nowa Slupia and the
fundraising goals have been set.

We are seeking volunteers to serve as Town Leaders for
Bodzentyn, Daleszyce, and Radoszyce.

For additional information, please contact Erez
Gotlieb, Archive Coordinator.

Erez Gotlieb
Kielce Archive Coordinator
Researching GOTLIB, GOLDLUST, LEWI, CZALCZYNSKI >from Kielce, Checiny


JRI Poland #Poland More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #poland

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.

Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


families LEWINSKI, JAKUBOWICZ, AKERMAN, ABERSZTAJN #poland

Richard J. Astor <richardastor@...>
 

I am researching my paternal relations ABERSZTAJN and wonder if anyone can
help.

(1) my great-aunt Estera Abersztajn (b.1850), of Poddebice/Sieradz, married
(~1884) Icek Garbacz vel Lewinski of Blaszki. she brought to that marriage a
son, Zelik (b. february 4, 1880, Sieradz), >from her previous marriage (to
Zelik Szerkowski of Sieradz; d.1879/80). so i'm looking for ZELIK LEWINSKI
and his family.

(2) my great-aunt Sura Abersztajn (b.1870), of Sieradz and Lodz, married
(1900) Lejzor Akerman (b.1876) of Slawno (Wolanowskie). they lived in
Lodz-Baluty. so i'm looking for my great-aunt's AKERMAN family.

(3) my cousin Estera Abersztajn (b.1898; died chelmno 1942), of Lodz,
married (1925) Abram Salomon Jakubowicz (b. ~1896). they had a son, Pawel
(?) Fajwel; b. march 15, 1928). all three were in the lodz ghetto. so i'm
looking for PAWEL / FAJWEL JAKUBOWICZ and his family.

(4) Ajzek Abersztajn (b.1915), of Lodz, married, ~1936-7, Helena xxxxxxxx
(her maiden name is illegible). they had a son, Josef, b.~1937/8. Ajzek went
off to fight in the Polish Army and Helena and Josef have not been heard of.
apparently they were not in the Lodz ghetto. perhaps she married again. so
i'm looking for HELENA and JOSEF ABERSZTAJN -- but she probably acquired
another married name during the war or shortly after, if she survived.

any help on any of my family wld be most gratefully received. thank you.

Richard Astor
richardastor@astorlaw.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please send any family information privately, but
suggestions for research resources may be shared with the list.


JRI Poland #Poland families LEWINSKI, JAKUBOWICZ, AKERMAN, ABERSZTAJN #poland

Richard J. Astor <richardastor@...>
 

I am researching my paternal relations ABERSZTAJN and wonder if anyone can
help.

(1) my great-aunt Estera Abersztajn (b.1850), of Poddebice/Sieradz, married
(~1884) Icek Garbacz vel Lewinski of Blaszki. she brought to that marriage a
son, Zelik (b. february 4, 1880, Sieradz), >from her previous marriage (to
Zelik Szerkowski of Sieradz; d.1879/80). so i'm looking for ZELIK LEWINSKI
and his family.

(2) my great-aunt Sura Abersztajn (b.1870), of Sieradz and Lodz, married
(1900) Lejzor Akerman (b.1876) of Slawno (Wolanowskie). they lived in
Lodz-Baluty. so i'm looking for my great-aunt's AKERMAN family.

(3) my cousin Estera Abersztajn (b.1898; died chelmno 1942), of Lodz,
married (1925) Abram Salomon Jakubowicz (b. ~1896). they had a son, Pawel
(?) Fajwel; b. march 15, 1928). all three were in the lodz ghetto. so i'm
looking for PAWEL / FAJWEL JAKUBOWICZ and his family.

(4) Ajzek Abersztajn (b.1915), of Lodz, married, ~1936-7, Helena xxxxxxxx
(her maiden name is illegible). they had a son, Josef, b.~1937/8. Ajzek went
off to fight in the Polish Army and Helena and Josef have not been heard of.
apparently they were not in the Lodz ghetto. perhaps she married again. so
i'm looking for HELENA and JOSEF ABERSZTAJN -- but she probably acquired
another married name during the war or shortly after, if she survived.

any help on any of my family wld be most gratefully received. thank you.

Richard Astor
richardastor@astorlaw.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please send any family information privately, but
suggestions for research resources may be shared with the list.


More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #poland

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.

Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #poland

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.

Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #lithuania

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.

Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #lithuania

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.

Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com