Date   

Re: ukraine digest: May 13, 2016 #ukraine

Ernie Fine <efine@...>
 

Thinking back, I think you might want to check the book, "The Moses of
Rovno"

Ernie Fine

Subject: re: a puzzle
From: Toby Glickman <tglickman@...>
Date: Fri, 13 May 2016 12:29:24 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Genners,
Thank you all who responded to my posting. I now have several new directions
to go in my research.
Toby Glickman

On 5/3/2016 8:37 AM, Toby Glickman wrote:

Dear Genners,
My grandmother emigrated to New York in 1921 >from Dubno, where my
mother and her sisters were born. In many years of searching, I have
been unable to find any records whatsoever for the family, even under
alternate spellings of the family name, BUNIS. I have discovered
other Bunises, but none of the given names or dates match. I know
that the Jewish population was destroyed in the Holocaust, but I don't
understand how there can be no trace at all of the family, given that
Dubno is a well-known and well-researched city. Can anyone help me
with this?
Thank you.
Toby Glickman
Queens, New York
researching BUNIS, EISENGART, AJZENGARD


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: ukraine digest: May 13, 2016 #ukraine

Ernie Fine <efine@...>
 

Thinking back, I think you might want to check the book, "The Moses of
Rovno"

Ernie Fine

Subject: re: a puzzle
From: Toby Glickman <tglickman@...>
Date: Fri, 13 May 2016 12:29:24 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Genners,
Thank you all who responded to my posting. I now have several new directions
to go in my research.
Toby Glickman

On 5/3/2016 8:37 AM, Toby Glickman wrote:

Dear Genners,
My grandmother emigrated to New York in 1921 >from Dubno, where my
mother and her sisters were born. In many years of searching, I have
been unable to find any records whatsoever for the family, even under
alternate spellings of the family name, BUNIS. I have discovered
other Bunises, but none of the given names or dates match. I know
that the Jewish population was destroyed in the Holocaust, but I don't
understand how there can be no trace at all of the family, given that
Dubno is a well-known and well-researched city. Can anyone help me
with this?
Thank you.
Toby Glickman
Queens, New York
researching BUNIS, EISENGART, AJZENGARD


Re: Inferences from marker comparisons #dna

awestreich@...
 

The approach I have seen to compare markers within a group of (possible)
cousins is to: (1) calculate a "modal haplotype" which approximates the
haplotype of the Most Recent Common Ancestor; and then (2) calculate
each member's genetic distance >from that haplotype. (For a fuller
explanation of this, google "Maurice Gleeson modal haplotype.") I
suspect that the resulting genetic distances will be less than the ones
you have previously calculated.

Allan Westreich

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ralph Baer" <ursusminor@...>
Date: Wed, 11 May 2016 15:00:02 -0400

For several reasons, I had two of my fourth cousins take Y-chromosome
tests at the 37-marker level. That is, the three of us are great-great-
grandsons of three brothers, Abraham BAER, David BAER, and Lazarus BAER
(me). It turns out that I differ by a genetic distance of 3 and 4 >from
the two them, and they differ by 3 >from each other, which is more than
what would be expected.

On all but one marker where we don't all agree, two of us agree and one
doesn't. E.g., on marker one, our values are 12, 13, and 12. Would it
be a safe bet that the value common between the two us that agree is
also the value which our mutual great-great-great-grandfather, Marx
Nathan BAER had? I would think that even if two us had mutations in the
same marker in the last five generations, it would not be the same
mutation.

The marker where we all differ is #35. The three of us have in
combination with #34 values of 34-35-37, 34-35, and 34-38. Can anything
be said of what the most likely value for our mutual ancestor was?

It would be interesting if I could find a male-line descendant of the
last brother, Kaufmann BAER, of my great-great-grandfather.


DNA Research #DNA Re: Inferences from marker comparisons #dna

awestreich@...
 

The approach I have seen to compare markers within a group of (possible)
cousins is to: (1) calculate a "modal haplotype" which approximates the
haplotype of the Most Recent Common Ancestor; and then (2) calculate
each member's genetic distance >from that haplotype. (For a fuller
explanation of this, google "Maurice Gleeson modal haplotype.") I
suspect that the resulting genetic distances will be less than the ones
you have previously calculated.

Allan Westreich

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ralph Baer" <ursusminor@...>
Date: Wed, 11 May 2016 15:00:02 -0400

For several reasons, I had two of my fourth cousins take Y-chromosome
tests at the 37-marker level. That is, the three of us are great-great-
grandsons of three brothers, Abraham BAER, David BAER, and Lazarus BAER
(me). It turns out that I differ by a genetic distance of 3 and 4 >from
the two them, and they differ by 3 >from each other, which is more than
what would be expected.

On all but one marker where we don't all agree, two of us agree and one
doesn't. E.g., on marker one, our values are 12, 13, and 12. Would it
be a safe bet that the value common between the two us that agree is
also the value which our mutual great-great-great-grandfather, Marx
Nathan BAER had? I would think that even if two us had mutations in the
same marker in the last five generations, it would not be the same
mutation.

The marker where we all differ is #35. The three of us have in
combination with #34 values of 34-35-37, 34-35, and 34-38. Can anything
be said of what the most likely value for our mutual ancestor was?

It would be interesting if I could find a male-line descendant of the
last brother, Kaufmann BAER, of my great-great-grandfather.


Re: Inferences from marker comparisons #dna

Rachel Unkefer <rachelunkefer@...>
 

Ralph,

What we are learning about the reliability of STR markers in predicting
TMRCA (time to most recent common ancestor) now that we have Next
Generation testing is that STRs can often be a much cruder took than we
thought. It is entirely possible that the common markers you cite
between two of your cousins are the "ancestral" values, i.e. the ones
your ancestor had and passed down. The problem is that other scenarios
are also possible. Mutations are random, unpredictable, and thus
impossible to interpret 100% accurately post facto. As the admin and
co-admin of several projects since 2009, I have looked at thousands of
sets of markers in multiple haplogroups and have come to the conclusion
that we can't be sure about as much as we would like. Our inferences
seem to make sense until they don't.

First, it depends on a lot of factors. Some of these are: the age of
the testers' fathers and grandfathers at the age of conception of their
children. Older fathers can be prone to generating more mutations in
there offspring. Another factor can be the mutation rates of the
particular markers compared. They are not all alike. And then 37 marker
tests are a somewhat minimum standard at this stage.

There are some extremely interesting things happening at the haplogroup
subclade analysis right now, which are going to help also with closer
relationships, I think.

Which is not to say we should give up, but that the technology continues
to advance as does our understanding of the test results. I will
actually be talking about some of these issues at my session in Seattle
in August.

Rachel Unkefer
ru@...
Central Virginia, USA


DNA Research #DNA Re: Inferences from marker comparisons #dna

Rachel Unkefer <rachelunkefer@...>
 

Ralph,

What we are learning about the reliability of STR markers in predicting
TMRCA (time to most recent common ancestor) now that we have Next
Generation testing is that STRs can often be a much cruder took than we
thought. It is entirely possible that the common markers you cite
between two of your cousins are the "ancestral" values, i.e. the ones
your ancestor had and passed down. The problem is that other scenarios
are also possible. Mutations are random, unpredictable, and thus
impossible to interpret 100% accurately post facto. As the admin and
co-admin of several projects since 2009, I have looked at thousands of
sets of markers in multiple haplogroups and have come to the conclusion
that we can't be sure about as much as we would like. Our inferences
seem to make sense until they don't.

First, it depends on a lot of factors. Some of these are: the age of
the testers' fathers and grandfathers at the age of conception of their
children. Older fathers can be prone to generating more mutations in
there offspring. Another factor can be the mutation rates of the
particular markers compared. They are not all alike. And then 37 marker
tests are a somewhat minimum standard at this stage.

There are some extremely interesting things happening at the haplogroup
subclade analysis right now, which are going to help also with closer
relationships, I think.

Which is not to say we should give up, but that the technology continues
to advance as does our understanding of the test results. I will
actually be talking about some of these issues at my session in Seattle
in August.

Rachel Unkefer
ru@...
Central Virginia, USA


Re: Inferences from marker comparisons #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

"Ralph Baer" <ursusminor@...> wrote he had two of his fourth
cousins take Y-chromosome tests at the 37-marker level. It turns out that
the genetic distance of were 3, 3 and 4 between them, which is more than
what would be expected. Marker 1 DYS393 is a slow mutating marker, about
one in every 1300 passing, so the value with the most should be that of
the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) because the lines are know.
However, in a project when the lines back to the MRCA are unknown, this
may not be the case as it is for the project of J2b with DYS455 = 8.

The other marker #35 CDY is the fastest mutating marker, average once
mutate in 28 passing per copy and it has multiple copies. In several
studies that I looked at, sometime I did not use it because it had several
mutations that were not the normal plus or minus one repeat. One of Bears
has an additional copy. There are also other types of mutations that
cause the markers values to change more than one repeat at a time. When
this happened, the genetic distance for the marker may be wrong. That is
the reason Family Tree DNA use the number of mismatch markers instead of
genetic distances in their estimate when a MRCA lived.

There is no good method of knowing what were Baers MCRA's value for CDY
from his offsprings alone. However it may help by joining the proper
haplogroup project(s). It was >from a haplogroup project that I found that
the modal value on marker 1 mentioned in the J2b group above were not that
of its progenitor.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton VA


DNA Research #DNA Re: Inferences from marker comparisons #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

"Ralph Baer" <ursusminor@...> wrote he had two of his fourth
cousins take Y-chromosome tests at the 37-marker level. It turns out that
the genetic distance of were 3, 3 and 4 between them, which is more than
what would be expected. Marker 1 DYS393 is a slow mutating marker, about
one in every 1300 passing, so the value with the most should be that of
the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) because the lines are know.
However, in a project when the lines back to the MRCA are unknown, this
may not be the case as it is for the project of J2b with DYS455 = 8.

The other marker #35 CDY is the fastest mutating marker, average once
mutate in 28 passing per copy and it has multiple copies. In several
studies that I looked at, sometime I did not use it because it had several
mutations that were not the normal plus or minus one repeat. One of Bears
has an additional copy. There are also other types of mutations that
cause the markers values to change more than one repeat at a time. When
this happened, the genetic distance for the marker may be wrong. That is
the reason Family Tree DNA use the number of mismatch markers instead of
genetic distances in their estimate when a MRCA lived.

There is no good method of knowing what were Baers MCRA's value for CDY
from his offsprings alone. However it may help by joining the proper
haplogroup project(s). It was >from a haplogroup project that I found that
the modal value on marker 1 mentioned in the J2b group above were not that
of its progenitor.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton VA


Berthe Clementine ACKERMANN HENLEIN KAHN #general

Linda Berkowitz
 

I am searching for information on Berthe Clementine ACKERMANN, born
19 August 1894 in Bad Schwalbach to Julius ACKERMAN and Rosa
BLUMENTHAL ACKERMANN; she died in April 1962 and was buried in the
Tablada Cemetery in Argentina.

I know that she married a Hugo HENLEIN and they had a daughter
Ingeborg HENLEIN (b. 1921). At some point she divorced Hugo and was
able to leave Germany, arriving in Argentina in 1941; Ingeborg, her
daughter, did not want to leave with her and perish in the Holocaust
(circa 1941).

In Argentina Berthe married Sally KAHN who was also originally >from
Germany.

I have lost track of Berthe and Sally in Argentina. I know that Sally
had children who also were able to immigrate to Argentina and believe
that Sally's descendants are still there.

Any information on Berthe Clementine or Sally KAHN and their life in
Argentina would be greatly appreciated.

Linda Berkowitz
Deerfield, IL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Berthe Clementine ACKERMANN HENLEIN KAHN #general

Linda Berkowitz
 

I am searching for information on Berthe Clementine ACKERMANN, born
19 August 1894 in Bad Schwalbach to Julius ACKERMAN and Rosa
BLUMENTHAL ACKERMANN; she died in April 1962 and was buried in the
Tablada Cemetery in Argentina.

I know that she married a Hugo HENLEIN and they had a daughter
Ingeborg HENLEIN (b. 1921). At some point she divorced Hugo and was
able to leave Germany, arriving in Argentina in 1941; Ingeborg, her
daughter, did not want to leave with her and perish in the Holocaust
(circa 1941).

In Argentina Berthe married Sally KAHN who was also originally >from
Germany.

I have lost track of Berthe and Sally in Argentina. I know that Sally
had children who also were able to immigrate to Argentina and believe
that Sally's descendants are still there.

Any information on Berthe Clementine or Sally KAHN and their life in
Argentina would be greatly appreciated.

Linda Berkowitz
Deerfield, IL


Google Search Engines by Country #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Many of us are familiar with Google for searches which help with our
genealogy research Google runs different search engines by country.
Searches will result in different results depending on which Google search
engine one uses.

GenealogyInTime has posted the 192 search engines by country and region.
The list will be updated periodically to reflect the latest changes on
Google, and therefore, you may wish to bookmark this website:
http://tinyurl.com/z84397z
original url:
http://www.genealogyintime.com/articles/country-guide-to-google-search-engines-page3.html

To read the entire article see: http://tinyurl.com/hfhudrc
Original url:
http://www.genealogyintime.com/articles/country-guide-to-google-search-engines-page1.html

The Google country engines are in the language of the country. If an English
version of the search engine is available or is already in English it listed
n/a.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Google Search Engines by Country #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Many of us are familiar with Google for searches which help with our
genealogy research Google runs different search engines by country.
Searches will result in different results depending on which Google search
engine one uses.

GenealogyInTime has posted the 192 search engines by country and region.
The list will be updated periodically to reflect the latest changes on
Google, and therefore, you may wish to bookmark this website:
http://tinyurl.com/z84397z
original url:
http://www.genealogyintime.com/articles/country-guide-to-google-search-engines-page3.html

To read the entire article see: http://tinyurl.com/hfhudrc
Original url:
http://www.genealogyintime.com/articles/country-guide-to-google-search-engines-page1.html

The Google country engines are in the language of the country. If an English
version of the search engine is available or is already in English it listed
n/a.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


1816/18 Revision Lists translated for Orlya, Rozhanka and Zheludok (in the Lida District #belarus

Jrbaston
 

Dear fellow Lida District researchers:

I've just uploaded to the LitvakSIG Lida District site
(https://lidadistrict.shutterfly.com)
the translations of the 1816/18 Revision List for the towns of Orlya, Rozhanka and
Zheludok. There are 249 listings for Orlya, 300 for Rozhanka and 372 for Zheludok.

The surnames for these lists are on the site's homepage under the section marked
Surname Lists. Because this was early in the time Jews in this area were getting
surnames, I cross-checked the names in this file with the translation of the 1834
Revision List for those towns. When I could confirm the listings were for the same
family, I indicated spelling variants, putting the 1834 version in square brackets,
i.e., BORODICH / [BORODZITSKI].

Although these translations will eventually be publicly searchable in the LitvakSIG
All Lithuania Database and JewishGen Belarus Database, they are currently
available only to qualified participants of the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group.

To become part of the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group, go to
https://www.litvaksig.org/membership-and-contributions/join-and-contribute/
click on "Research Groups for Districts and Gubernias" and choose the Lida District.

A contribution of $100 US will guarantee you immediate access to translations of
records >from all Lida District towns -- new and old -- through December 31, 2020.
So far the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group has translated records for more
than 85,000 of our Lida District family members.

The Orlya, Rozhanka and Zheludok lists make nine of the 12 official towns of
registration in the Lida District for which the 1816/16 Revision List has been translated.
Still remaining are the lists for Belitsa, Novy Dwor and Shchuchin. Your contribution to
the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group will help ensure that we can complete
the 1816/18 Revision List, as well as translating additional records for Lida District
towns.

Please do let me know if you have any questions about this list or about
the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group
JRBaston@...


Belarus SIG #Belarus 1816/18 Revision Lists translated for Orlya, Rozhanka and Zheludok (in the Lida District #belarus

Jrbaston
 

Dear fellow Lida District researchers:

I've just uploaded to the LitvakSIG Lida District site
(https://lidadistrict.shutterfly.com)
the translations of the 1816/18 Revision List for the towns of Orlya, Rozhanka and
Zheludok. There are 249 listings for Orlya, 300 for Rozhanka and 372 for Zheludok.

The surnames for these lists are on the site's homepage under the section marked
Surname Lists. Because this was early in the time Jews in this area were getting
surnames, I cross-checked the names in this file with the translation of the 1834
Revision List for those towns. When I could confirm the listings were for the same
family, I indicated spelling variants, putting the 1834 version in square brackets,
i.e., BORODICH / [BORODZITSKI].

Although these translations will eventually be publicly searchable in the LitvakSIG
All Lithuania Database and JewishGen Belarus Database, they are currently
available only to qualified participants of the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group.

To become part of the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group, go to
https://www.litvaksig.org/membership-and-contributions/join-and-contribute/
click on "Research Groups for Districts and Gubernias" and choose the Lida District.

A contribution of $100 US will guarantee you immediate access to translations of
records >from all Lida District towns -- new and old -- through December 31, 2020.
So far the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group has translated records for more
than 85,000 of our Lida District family members.

The Orlya, Rozhanka and Zheludok lists make nine of the 12 official towns of
registration in the Lida District for which the 1816/16 Revision List has been translated.
Still remaining are the lists for Belitsa, Novy Dwor and Shchuchin. Your contribution to
the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group will help ensure that we can complete
the 1816/18 Revision List, as well as translating additional records for Lida District
towns.

Please do let me know if you have any questions about this list or about
the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group
JRBaston@...


Update: Benye records conservation #hungary

Jake Jacobs
 

I want to thank the many of you who responded to my query about handling f=
ragile old documents. As several of you suggested, I have called the US Hol=
ocaust Memorial Museum in DC. I hope they will take and conserve the record=
s.

Y'all are a great bunch!

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas


Hungary SIG #Hungary Update: Benye records conservation #hungary

Jake Jacobs
 

I want to thank the many of you who responded to my query about handling f=
ragile old documents. As several of you suggested, I have called the US Hol=
ocaust Memorial Museum in DC. I hope they will take and conserve the record=
s.

Y'all are a great bunch!

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas


Upcoming JGSCT Program #general

gkreynolds
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut presents Jewish
Records Indexing - Poland: Small Miracles Continue on Sunday, May 15,
2016 at 1:30 pm at Temple Sinai, 41 West Hartford Road, Newington, CT
06111. Hadassah Lipsius will speak about the status of Polish Jewish
records for use in genealogical searches. This program is free and
open to the public.

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland online searchable database of
indices to more than five million records has enabled researchers to
trace their families' growth and migration inside Poland. Hadassah
Lipsius will share techniques for searching the JRI-Poland database as
well as information on how to navigate and utilize the many features
on the JRI-Poland website. An in-depth examination of vital records
(e.g., birth, death, marriage) will reveal the information contained
in the records, identify the records having the most genealogical
value, and discover surprises found in many of these records. With
actual images of thousands of Polish Jewish records now available
online and linked >from JRI-Poland search results, the presentation
will also focus on how a search of the JRI-Poland online database can
connect a researcher directly to those digital images.

Hadassah Lipsius is a board member of Jewish Records Indexing-Poland,
a Member of the Board of Governors of JewishGen, the Database Manager
for the Warszawa Research Group and a member of the Executive Council
of the Jewish Genealogical Society, Inc. She is also a full time
Supplier Quality Engineering Manager for a Major Defense Contractor.

For additional information, please visit www.jgsct.org .

Gail K Reynolds, Publicity Chair
Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Upcoming JGSCT Program #general

gkreynolds
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut presents Jewish
Records Indexing - Poland: Small Miracles Continue on Sunday, May 15,
2016 at 1:30 pm at Temple Sinai, 41 West Hartford Road, Newington, CT
06111. Hadassah Lipsius will speak about the status of Polish Jewish
records for use in genealogical searches. This program is free and
open to the public.

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland online searchable database of
indices to more than five million records has enabled researchers to
trace their families' growth and migration inside Poland. Hadassah
Lipsius will share techniques for searching the JRI-Poland database as
well as information on how to navigate and utilize the many features
on the JRI-Poland website. An in-depth examination of vital records
(e.g., birth, death, marriage) will reveal the information contained
in the records, identify the records having the most genealogical
value, and discover surprises found in many of these records. With
actual images of thousands of Polish Jewish records now available
online and linked >from JRI-Poland search results, the presentation
will also focus on how a search of the JRI-Poland online database can
connect a researcher directly to those digital images.

Hadassah Lipsius is a board member of Jewish Records Indexing-Poland,
a Member of the Board of Governors of JewishGen, the Database Manager
for the Warszawa Research Group and a member of the Executive Council
of the Jewish Genealogical Society, Inc. She is also a full time
Supplier Quality Engineering Manager for a Major Defense Contractor.

For additional information, please visit www.jgsct.org .

Gail K Reynolds, Publicity Chair
Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut


(US) May is Jewish American Heritage Month #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

May is Jewish American Heritage Month by both Congressional and Presidential
proclamation.

History

On April 20, 2006 President George W. Bush proclaimed May would be Jewish
American Heritage Month (JAHM). JAHM was an effort by the Jewish Museum of
Florida and South Florida community leaders that resulted in Congressional
resolutions introduced by Congressman Debbie Wasserman Schultz (F-FL) and
Senator Arlen Spector ( R-PA) urging the president to proclaim a month that
would recognize the more than 350-year history of Jewish contributions to
American culture. Since 2006 JAHM programs have taken place across the
United States.

Activities

For a list of activities across the US see:
http://www.jewishamericanheritagemonth.us/view_events.aspx

If your organization is planning an event to celebrate JAHM you can submit
it at:
http://www.jewishamericanheritagemonth.us/events.aspx

There is also a site on the JAHM website, 50 states/50 stories where you can
submit a story about a Jewish American contribution. See:
http://www.jewishamericanheritagemonth.us/statestories.aspx

For more information about JAHM see:
http://www.jewishamericanheritagemonth.us/about_us.aspx

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (US) May is Jewish American Heritage Month #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

May is Jewish American Heritage Month by both Congressional and Presidential
proclamation.

History

On April 20, 2006 President George W. Bush proclaimed May would be Jewish
American Heritage Month (JAHM). JAHM was an effort by the Jewish Museum of
Florida and South Florida community leaders that resulted in Congressional
resolutions introduced by Congressman Debbie Wasserman Schultz (F-FL) and
Senator Arlen Spector ( R-PA) urging the president to proclaim a month that
would recognize the more than 350-year history of Jewish contributions to
American culture. Since 2006 JAHM programs have taken place across the
United States.

Activities

For a list of activities across the US see:
http://www.jewishamericanheritagemonth.us/view_events.aspx

If your organization is planning an event to celebrate JAHM you can submit
it at:
http://www.jewishamericanheritagemonth.us/events.aspx

There is also a site on the JAHM website, 50 states/50 stories where you can
submit a story about a Jewish American contribution. See:
http://www.jewishamericanheritagemonth.us/statestories.aspx

For more information about JAHM see:
http://www.jewishamericanheritagemonth.us/about_us.aspx

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

82441 - 82460 of 669651