Date   

Velso Poland? #general

jeff Bock <res0jrt7@...>
 

After researching a WWII Registration Card, a relative wrote that their
place of birth was "Velso Poland". I can find no record of this place.
The same relative wrote on their SS Application, "Warsaw Poland". Could
Velso be part of Warsaw?

Thank you

Jeff Bock

Researching Berger,Berg,


Grandfather from Bialystock, Russia #general

Marilyn <mgreenberg@...>
 

I believe my grandfather came >from Grodno Gubernia. His name in the old
country was Eli A. CHICHANSKY (or some variation).

In the US he became Eli A. HARRIS and was born in 1892, died in New York in
August 1956. He joined the army soon after arriving in the US and served in
WWI (around 1917). His mother's name was Anna (no idea about his father's
name). He had sisters Rosie, Jenny and Pauline and brothers David and Abe.

Please email any information you might have to
mgreenberg@...

Thanks for your help.

Marilyn Greenberg


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Velso Poland? #general

jeff Bock <res0jrt7@...>
 

After researching a WWII Registration Card, a relative wrote that their
place of birth was "Velso Poland". I can find no record of this place.
The same relative wrote on their SS Application, "Warsaw Poland". Could
Velso be part of Warsaw?

Thank you

Jeff Bock

Researching Berger,Berg,


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Grandfather from Bialystock, Russia #general

Marilyn <mgreenberg@...>
 

I believe my grandfather came >from Grodno Gubernia. His name in the old
country was Eli A. CHICHANSKY (or some variation).

In the US he became Eli A. HARRIS and was born in 1892, died in New York in
August 1956. He joined the army soon after arriving in the US and served in
WWI (around 1917). His mother's name was Anna (no idea about his father's
name). He had sisters Rosie, Jenny and Pauline and brothers David and Abe.

Please email any information you might have to
mgreenberg@...

Thanks for your help.

Marilyn Greenberg


Electronic map of Israel #general

M & M. Schejtman <mario_m@...>
 

For those of you who want to find places in Israel this is a very good map
(in English)
which will let you search down to street address level. It is available, of
course, also in Hebrew.
http://www.emap.co.il/NewMezam/MGN/MGNindex_E.htm


Merav Schejtman (Ms)
Jerusalem Israel

Searching: DURLACHER Baden Germany, MICHAELIS Halle AS Germany
SILBERSZATZ Radomsko Poland HERTZ Wloszczowa Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Electronic map of Israel #general

M & M. Schejtman <mario_m@...>
 

For those of you who want to find places in Israel this is a very good map
(in English)
which will let you search down to street address level. It is available, of
course, also in Hebrew.
http://www.emap.co.il/NewMezam/MGN/MGNindex_E.htm


Merav Schejtman (Ms)
Jerusalem Israel

Searching: DURLACHER Baden Germany, MICHAELIS Halle AS Germany
SILBERSZATZ Radomsko Poland HERTZ Wloszczowa Poland


Ballin family & Lublin family #scandinavia

Henry Cohen <henry.cohen@...>
 

My great grandparents were Siegfriedt BALLIN born in Randers
on the 6th November 1841 and Hanna Birgithe (or Birgitte) LUBLIN
born in Sakskobing on the 9th September 1843.

They came to England (whether separately or together I do not know)
and were married in Southampton Synagogue on the 8th September 1869
According to the marriage certificate Siegfriedt's father was
Gerson Joel BALLIN who was a Wadding Manufacturer and Hanne's father
was Marcus LUBLIN who was a Builder.

I have subsequently ascertained that Marcus was married to Sara (family
name unknown) and had a brother called Ludvig.

I have also ascertained that there are people called BALLIN and LUBLIN
buried in the Mollegarde Cemetry and the Kirkgarde Cemetry.

Does anyone know how I can ascertain the names of these to see if I can
trace my families further back.

Henry Cohen


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Ballin family & Lublin family #scandinavia

Henry Cohen <henry.cohen@...>
 

My great grandparents were Siegfriedt BALLIN born in Randers
on the 6th November 1841 and Hanna Birgithe (or Birgitte) LUBLIN
born in Sakskobing on the 9th September 1843.

They came to England (whether separately or together I do not know)
and were married in Southampton Synagogue on the 8th September 1869
According to the marriage certificate Siegfriedt's father was
Gerson Joel BALLIN who was a Wadding Manufacturer and Hanne's father
was Marcus LUBLIN who was a Builder.

I have subsequently ascertained that Marcus was married to Sara (family
name unknown) and had a brother called Ludvig.

I have also ascertained that there are people called BALLIN and LUBLIN
buried in the Mollegarde Cemetry and the Kirkgarde Cemetry.

Does anyone know how I can ascertain the names of these to see if I can
trace my families further back.

Henry Cohen


Re: Lenin's embalming #general

Stan Goodman <safeqNOT_HERE@...>
 

On Sun, 24 Nov 2002 03:59:32 UTC, mrl@... (Marilyn
Feingold) opined:

Does anyone know about the committee that was in charge of embalming Lenin?
I have just read a book about the subject, entitled Lenin's Embalmers by
Ilya Zbarsky and Samuel Hutchinson. It's a treasure of a book because in
just 200 pages it gives one a feel of what life was like in Russia during
the Stalin years.
Does anyone have a suggestion as to how I could contact the authors
directly? Do I begin by going through the publisher of the book? Thanks for
your ideas. Please answer privately.
Mrilyn Feingold Atlanta Georgia USA
Kudos for sticking so very closely to the topic. The message quoted
above is bang on the subject of Jewish Genealogy. Kol haKavod!

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

Please remove the capital letters >from my address in order to send
me email.


Records in Barnstable, Massachusetts #general

Joan Rosen <jrosen@...>
 

I am looking for someone to do about 30 minutes-worth of record checking and
copying for me at the courthouse in Barnstable, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod.
I was there this past September, and did not complete the research. I have a
copy of the index, and therefore know the number of the records I would
like. They are easy to find and to copy.

I tried writing to the facility with an offer to pay, but did not receive a
response.

Please reply directly to me. Thanks.

Joan
Joan Rosen
Elkins Park, PA, outside Philadelphia
jrosen@...


What is an Uncle, exactly? #general

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

Roger Lustig <trovato@...> wrote
However, in your case the term is Fetter/Vetter, which means
"cousin......"

I disagree, "Fetter" means "Uncle" in Yiddish.

Where I do agree is that the terms was used for:
- male siblings of the parents
- husbands of parent's sisters
- male siblings of grandparents
- husbands of the grandparent's sisters
- as a respectful term for close family friends
- godfathers
- etc....

The fact the NY and Chicago families had a relationship (wrote, visited) and
shared the same last name is what I would consider a good clue to their
probable relationship. It is certainly not a sure thing, but one suggestion
is to find out if the males are of the same tribe. As an example, in
researching my HANTMAN/HARTMAN family >from Smilovichi, it was popinted out
that some were Levites and others were Israelites. This was pointed out when
I sent a photo of my ggf's tombstone to another researcher. He remarked that
the symbol of the Levites - the pitcher, was on my ggf's marker. It is not
on my gf's marker. We would have lost that information. More importantly,
this other HANTMAN researcher's family is also Levites and while we cannot
prove a relationship, perhaps someday we will.

Regards,
Marlene Bishow
Rockville, MD
KATZ: Zhuravno (Galicia), Ukraine, NYC
DEUTSCHER & NUSSBAUM: Rozniatow (Galicia), Ukraine, NYC
YARMISH, PETT, GOLDSTEIN: I'vya & Wolpa, Belarus, Newtown,CT, NYC
KULPE, SOMMERS: Lithuania, Whales, Birmingham AL, Baltimore, MD
HANTMAN/GANTMAN: Smilovichi, Sverhen', Belarus
HANTMAN/HARTMAN: Norwich, CT, NYC


Tzotze=Tyotya #general

David Goldman <davic1@...>
 

I have followed some of the postings about tzotze, but assumed that this
word for aunt simply represented the Russian term for aunt, tyotya.

David Goldman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Lenin's embalming #general

Stan Goodman <safeqNOT_HERE@...>
 

On Sun, 24 Nov 2002 03:59:32 UTC, mrl@... (Marilyn
Feingold) opined:

Does anyone know about the committee that was in charge of embalming Lenin?
I have just read a book about the subject, entitled Lenin's Embalmers by
Ilya Zbarsky and Samuel Hutchinson. It's a treasure of a book because in
just 200 pages it gives one a feel of what life was like in Russia during
the Stalin years.
Does anyone have a suggestion as to how I could contact the authors
directly? Do I begin by going through the publisher of the book? Thanks for
your ideas. Please answer privately.
Mrilyn Feingold Atlanta Georgia USA
Kudos for sticking so very closely to the topic. The message quoted
above is bang on the subject of Jewish Genealogy. Kol haKavod!

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

Please remove the capital letters >from my address in order to send
me email.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Records in Barnstable, Massachusetts #general

Joan Rosen <jrosen@...>
 

I am looking for someone to do about 30 minutes-worth of record checking and
copying for me at the courthouse in Barnstable, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod.
I was there this past September, and did not complete the research. I have a
copy of the index, and therefore know the number of the records I would
like. They are easy to find and to copy.

I tried writing to the facility with an offer to pay, but did not receive a
response.

Please reply directly to me. Thanks.

Joan
Joan Rosen
Elkins Park, PA, outside Philadelphia
jrosen@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen What is an Uncle, exactly? #general

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

Roger Lustig <trovato@...> wrote
However, in your case the term is Fetter/Vetter, which means
"cousin......"

I disagree, "Fetter" means "Uncle" in Yiddish.

Where I do agree is that the terms was used for:
- male siblings of the parents
- husbands of parent's sisters
- male siblings of grandparents
- husbands of the grandparent's sisters
- as a respectful term for close family friends
- godfathers
- etc....

The fact the NY and Chicago families had a relationship (wrote, visited) and
shared the same last name is what I would consider a good clue to their
probable relationship. It is certainly not a sure thing, but one suggestion
is to find out if the males are of the same tribe. As an example, in
researching my HANTMAN/HARTMAN family >from Smilovichi, it was popinted out
that some were Levites and others were Israelites. This was pointed out when
I sent a photo of my ggf's tombstone to another researcher. He remarked that
the symbol of the Levites - the pitcher, was on my ggf's marker. It is not
on my gf's marker. We would have lost that information. More importantly,
this other HANTMAN researcher's family is also Levites and while we cannot
prove a relationship, perhaps someday we will.

Regards,
Marlene Bishow
Rockville, MD
KATZ: Zhuravno (Galicia), Ukraine, NYC
DEUTSCHER & NUSSBAUM: Rozniatow (Galicia), Ukraine, NYC
YARMISH, PETT, GOLDSTEIN: I'vya & Wolpa, Belarus, Newtown,CT, NYC
KULPE, SOMMERS: Lithuania, Whales, Birmingham AL, Baltimore, MD
HANTMAN/GANTMAN: Smilovichi, Sverhen', Belarus
HANTMAN/HARTMAN: Norwich, CT, NYC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tzotze=Tyotya #general

David Goldman <davic1@...>
 

I have followed some of the postings about tzotze, but assumed that this
word for aunt simply represented the Russian term for aunt, tyotya.

David Goldman


Re: More tante--and checking the record #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 11/23/2002 1:38:22 PM Eastern Standard Time,
susserl@... writes:

<< We all know that Tante comes >from German Tzotze comes >from Polish "ciocia"
==Well, I'm one of the ignorant ones who didn't know that, and my
Langenscheidt New College German Dictionary shares in the ignorance, drawing
a total blank on Tzotze (actually, no German word begins with Tz). The German
word for aunt is exactly the same as the current French word for aunt, Tante
(pron in Ger., and by many Yiddish speakers as Tan-Teh). The English word
"aunt" comes >from Old French "ante" which is >from the Latin "amita," meaning
"father's sister" (derived >from the term "beloved" or >from a child's term for
"mother"--depending on which dictionary you consult).

Weinreich's Yiddish dictionary gives "mumme" as the translation of aunt and
adds an interesting term for aunt-by-marriage (is there such a term in any
other language?) "kalte mumme" which suggests the meaning of "cold" aunt
(perhaps "cool," like Aunt Mamie?).

I don't know where the modern French "tante" originates but I assume it's
derived >from OF "ante," too. Any Francoxpert out there to help us?

It's always nice to speculate and to rake up old memories, but we should
always be careful to check our facts and qualify our limitations when passing
on information to others who would like to trust what they hear.

There's been much talk here about names for relatives. Please remember that
such affectionate terms for mother, aunt and grandmother (and their male
equivalents to a lesser extent) tend to be handed down in the family through
a number of generations and are often idisyncratic within a specific family,
whether it's in Yiddish, Russian, German, English, French or Andalusian. If
you want to know the "correct" term for a relative in a given language, it's
always best to consult a dictionary. If you want to talk about your own
Mishpoche, it would probably be best to phrase your posting with its specific
limitations: "In my family, we called a maternal aunt's first cousin
Tshinshike. Does anyone else know such an expression?"

Michael Bernet New York mBernet@....


Re: What is an Uncle, exactly? #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 11/23/2002 2:08:50 PM Eastern Standard Time,
grdn@... writes:

<< My second cousin Mollie of the NY Goldsholls remembers meeting Lazer
Goldsholl >from Chicago. She and her siblings called him "Fetter Lazer".
Does this mean that he was a surely a brother of Mollie's and my
grandfathers? Would Fetter be used for a granduncle as well? Was it
also a courtesy title? Could it have been used for an older cousin? I
think probably the answer is "all of the above", but I was hoping that
there might be a more precise answer. >>

Weinreich gives Kusin as Yiddish for cousin; the nearest Yiddish word to
Fetter means "inner tube." I assume therefore we're talking about the
German word Vetter (pron. Fetter) which means (male) cousin. It's
impossible to generalize about familial-relationship terms used in a
specific family. I know of a grandfather who was called Brother Morris by
all. As a child I called many people Onkel this and Tante that, who were
no relations at all.

The only honest aswer to your specific question is "any of the above."

Michael Bernet New York mBernet@....


Oops, Fetter is Yiddish for "uncle" #general

MBernet@...
 

My sincere aologies, I goofed.

I had checked my dictionary, but somehow I missed it until my error was
pointed out to me. Weinreich's dictionary does, indeed, show that the Yiddish
word Fetter means "uncle" (and Fetter Shneyer [Shne'or] is, punningly, Old
Man Winter). My apologies to all, and a red face for me--(and I couldn't
even find the nearby innertube this time around).

We should remember that Yiddish is a variant on High German (largely
understandable today by those who speak other High German dialects) with a
varied admixture of Hebrew, Aramaic, and Slavic words and phrases, and some
borrowed more recently >from French and English. Yiddish vocabulary and
pronunciation varied widely by country of residence and by social class. The
better educated Yiddish speakers tended to use more contemporaneous Germanic
terms in preference to the more medieval words originally absorbed by
Yiddish. Hence Tante became a common Yiddish word for aunt, despite the
Yiddish word Mumme.

The terms for family relationships have changed gradually in most European
languages. Cousin is derived >from a Latin term for a mother's sister and I
guess that Fetter may be derived >from the German for Father

Michael Bernet New York mBernet@....


Chazanov family of Klimovich #general

Chaim freedman
 

Seeking Chazanov family of Klimovich, Belarus.

Manush, son of Manush, died before 1910; son Yerakhmiel Moshe, born 1880's,
died 1941. Surname changed to Chait, then Howitt when the family settled in
the UK. (Ireland, England and Israel).
Is any one familiar with 19th century Klimovich records ?

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
email: chaimjan@...