Date   

Jim Yarin #general

Fred Apel <fapel@...>
 

Sorry to bother the list, but I am unable to locate Jim Yarin
and ShtetLinks needs to get a hold of him.
Thanks,
Fred Apel

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


Searching for Marvin GOLDBERG, dentist #general

Webinquiry@...
 

Searching for Marvin GOLDBERG, a dentist, perhaps about 70 years old, son of
Louis GOLDBERG (also a dentist, New York area), and Faye GOLDBERG. Marvin
would be my second cousin. No listing on American Dental Association
website; too many Marvin GOLDBERGs out there to identify on various
people-finder sites. Any leads appreciated.

Please respond privately.

Howard Weinman
Chevy Chase, MD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jim Yarin #general

Fred Apel <fapel@...>
 

Sorry to bother the list, but I am unable to locate Jim Yarin
and ShtetLinks needs to get a hold of him.
Thanks,
Fred Apel

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for Marvin GOLDBERG, dentist #general

Webinquiry@...
 

Searching for Marvin GOLDBERG, a dentist, perhaps about 70 years old, son of
Louis GOLDBERG (also a dentist, New York area), and Faye GOLDBERG. Marvin
would be my second cousin. No listing on American Dental Association
website; too many Marvin GOLDBERGs out there to identify on various
people-finder sites. Any leads appreciated.

Please respond privately.

Howard Weinman
Chevy Chase, MD


Paying Belarus archive #general

Hanna K. Grossman <hannakg@...>
 

I have reeived many responses to my inquiry on this subject. Thank you
all. They fall into the following categories:

1. Your bank,no matter how small, will know how to do this. The
instructions are for them.

2, Please let us know, because we have had similar problems.

3. What could you posibly have asked for that would cost only $4? The
bank transfer will cost many times that.

I'm not sure about 1, but had thought 3 myself and will thus write to
the Archive to check, before I spend more time and money.

My inquiry was dated June, so it will probably be a long time before I
have an answer.

Hanna Grossman, Cornwall


one more about "senility" #general

Martin Kronman <mkronman@...>
 

The explanations about the use of the term "senility" which have been given
here are certainly correct. However, there is one other explanation which I
believe is probably more significant. In the context of a medical
examination at Ellis Island "senility" is just a clinical term which has
attached to it certain symptoms which define the state. The earmarks of
senility would include "confusion", "disorientation" an inability to respond
to ordinary questions, etc.. I would suggest that the stress of being
"processed" by the examiners at Ellis Island which might well generate these
symptoms in a person who is otherwise relatively normal. I am in my 70's and
I know that the experience of being treated as "cattle" in the atmosphere
generated by "processing" hundred and hundreds of immigrants, would produce
such symptoms in me.

Martin J. Kronman
Syracuse, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Paying Belarus archive #general

Hanna K. Grossman <hannakg@...>
 

I have reeived many responses to my inquiry on this subject. Thank you
all. They fall into the following categories:

1. Your bank,no matter how small, will know how to do this. The
instructions are for them.

2, Please let us know, because we have had similar problems.

3. What could you posibly have asked for that would cost only $4? The
bank transfer will cost many times that.

I'm not sure about 1, but had thought 3 myself and will thus write to
the Archive to check, before I spend more time and money.

My inquiry was dated June, so it will probably be a long time before I
have an answer.

Hanna Grossman, Cornwall


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen one more about "senility" #general

Martin Kronman <mkronman@...>
 

The explanations about the use of the term "senility" which have been given
here are certainly correct. However, there is one other explanation which I
believe is probably more significant. In the context of a medical
examination at Ellis Island "senility" is just a clinical term which has
attached to it certain symptoms which define the state. The earmarks of
senility would include "confusion", "disorientation" an inability to respond
to ordinary questions, etc.. I would suggest that the stress of being
"processed" by the examiners at Ellis Island which might well generate these
symptoms in a person who is otherwise relatively normal. I am in my 70's and
I know that the experience of being treated as "cattle" in the atmosphere
generated by "processing" hundred and hundreds of immigrants, would produce
such symptoms in me.

Martin J. Kronman
Syracuse, NY


Jeffrey Cohens, don't be alarmed! #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Stuart LeVine <sblevine@bezeqint.net> wrote...

<<23 Jeffrey Cohens in the SSDI and only 1 lived past 50 (that one lived
until until 54). The average life expectancy for someone with this name
appears to be about 38.>>

Jeffrey Cohens in the Social Security Death Index appear to be short-lived
because the name Jeffrey first became popular in the United States in the
1940's. Enter the name "Jeffrey Cohen" into the 1930 US census index, and
only one listing comes up; enter "Morris Cohen" and you get 1300 matches!
If most Jeffrey Cohens were born after 1940, there can't be any
octogenarians by that name in the SSDI.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills (Long Island), New York, USA
RSteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us

MODERATOR NOTE:
Any further messages on this subject will
be considered for posting only if they
have a reasonable genealogical content.
Any other comments should be sent privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jeffrey Cohens, don't be alarmed! #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Stuart LeVine <sblevine@bezeqint.net> wrote...

<<23 Jeffrey Cohens in the SSDI and only 1 lived past 50 (that one lived
until until 54). The average life expectancy for someone with this name
appears to be about 38.>>

Jeffrey Cohens in the Social Security Death Index appear to be short-lived
because the name Jeffrey first became popular in the United States in the
1940's. Enter the name "Jeffrey Cohen" into the 1930 US census index, and
only one listing comes up; enter "Morris Cohen" and you get 1300 matches!
If most Jeffrey Cohens were born after 1940, there can't be any
octogenarians by that name in the SSDI.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills (Long Island), New York, USA
RSteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us

MODERATOR NOTE:
Any further messages on this subject will
be considered for posting only if they
have a reasonable genealogical content.
Any other comments should be sent privately


Poor Jeffrey Cohen #general

HENKEN9@...
 

Genners,

Despite not having definitive proof, I tend to believe that this particular
spelling of Jeffrey is of fairly recent usage. I don't remember seeing many
Jewish Jeffrey's on the EIDB or generally running into any elderly Jewish
Jeffrey's in my youth. I suspect that almost all the unfortunate Jeffrey
COHENs on the Death Index were likely of the boomer generation, and
therefore, met early demises.

Happy Holiday.

Ty Henken
Centennial, Colo.
Henken9@aol.com

HENKEN,SMOLINSKY>Vitebsk
POLCHINIKOFF/POLTINIKOW>Gomel, Mogilev
PECKEL>Ushachi, Vitebsk
LEVIN,LEVITT>Cherven, Minsk
WOLODARSKY>Riga,Svetlovodsk,Kherson,Astrahkan
INTRELEGATOR>Siauliai, Kaunas
GUTMAN>Jaunjelgava, Latvia


Re: Warning: Jeffrey Cohen Name is Cursed! #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <3de51213$1@news.bezeqint.net>,
Stuart LeVine <sblevine@bezeqint.net> wrote:

23 Jeffrey Cohens in the SSDI and only 1 lived past 50 (that one lived until
until 54). The average life expectancy for someone with this name appears
to be about 38. My cousin Jeffrey Cohen only made it til 18 and died by his
own hand.
Obviously, only dead people are in the SSDI. The ones that are still
alive are not, so this is a very biased sample. I'm guessing that Jeffrey
was not a common name for Jews more than 54 years ago, so you don't
get lots of older ones in the database. If it only became a popular
name 40 years ago, then most of the Jeffreys were born less than 40 years
ago, and those in the database will have died at age less than 40.

Just for fun I tried "Jeffrey Israel", and got only one (who died at age
25 in 1996).

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z2


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Poor Jeffrey Cohen #general

HENKEN9@...
 

Genners,

Despite not having definitive proof, I tend to believe that this particular
spelling of Jeffrey is of fairly recent usage. I don't remember seeing many
Jewish Jeffrey's on the EIDB or generally running into any elderly Jewish
Jeffrey's in my youth. I suspect that almost all the unfortunate Jeffrey
COHENs on the Death Index were likely of the boomer generation, and
therefore, met early demises.

Happy Holiday.

Ty Henken
Centennial, Colo.
Henken9@aol.com

HENKEN,SMOLINSKY>Vitebsk
POLCHINIKOFF/POLTINIKOW>Gomel, Mogilev
PECKEL>Ushachi, Vitebsk
LEVIN,LEVITT>Cherven, Minsk
WOLODARSKY>Riga,Svetlovodsk,Kherson,Astrahkan
INTRELEGATOR>Siauliai, Kaunas
GUTMAN>Jaunjelgava, Latvia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Warning: Jeffrey Cohen Name is Cursed! #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <3de51213$1@news.bezeqint.net>,
Stuart LeVine <sblevine@bezeqint.net> wrote:

23 Jeffrey Cohens in the SSDI and only 1 lived past 50 (that one lived until
until 54). The average life expectancy for someone with this name appears
to be about 38. My cousin Jeffrey Cohen only made it til 18 and died by his
own hand.
Obviously, only dead people are in the SSDI. The ones that are still
alive are not, so this is a very biased sample. I'm guessing that Jeffrey
was not a common name for Jews more than 54 years ago, so you don't
get lots of older ones in the database. If it only became a popular
name 40 years ago, then most of the Jeffreys were born less than 40 years
ago, and those in the database will have died at age less than 40.

Just for fun I tried "Jeffrey Israel", and got only one (who died at age
25 in 1996).

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z2


Wishing everyone "Senility" #general

Nachum <nachum@...>
 

Dear Steve and other Genners,

If the dictionary definition is the correct answer to the 'senility'
question, then I wish that it be handed down to all of us.

So, may we all have a very 'senile' (long) life.

Nachum Tuchman
Tekoa, Israel

Researching:

TUCHMAN/KLARMAN/ASPIS? >from Busko-Zdroj, Poland (Kielce Gubernia) to US
-
LIEBERMAN/ZYSSMAN >from Lowicz, Poland to US
RAIDER/all spellings/GINSBERG - >from Smorgon/Soly, Belarus (Vilna
Gubernia) to US -
SHUB/BERNSTEIN/ROSINSKY/BAYLETT >from Lituania?/Estonia? to London -
KIWI/AVRAHAM/BUETOW/RHODE/ZAHLMAN from
Samter/Wronki,Posen/Koenigsberg?/Berlin, Germany

-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Orlen [mailto:sorlen@email.arizona.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, November 27, 2002 5:14 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: "Senility"


One respondent had the good sense to look the
word up in the dictionary, and found that a secondary definition was,
simply, "old age."

"My grandfather was listed as having died >from
senility!" It is good to know, >from all this, that senility wasn't
necessarily a condition that would be handed down to me, and to you.

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, Arizona


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Wishing everyone "Senility" #general

Nachum <nachum@...>
 

Dear Steve and other Genners,

If the dictionary definition is the correct answer to the 'senility'
question, then I wish that it be handed down to all of us.

So, may we all have a very 'senile' (long) life.

Nachum Tuchman
Tekoa, Israel

Researching:

TUCHMAN/KLARMAN/ASPIS? >from Busko-Zdroj, Poland (Kielce Gubernia) to US
-
LIEBERMAN/ZYSSMAN >from Lowicz, Poland to US
RAIDER/all spellings/GINSBERG - >from Smorgon/Soly, Belarus (Vilna
Gubernia) to US -
SHUB/BERNSTEIN/ROSINSKY/BAYLETT >from Lituania?/Estonia? to London -
KIWI/AVRAHAM/BUETOW/RHODE/ZAHLMAN from
Samter/Wronki,Posen/Koenigsberg?/Berlin, Germany

-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Orlen [mailto:sorlen@email.arizona.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, November 27, 2002 5:14 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: "Senility"


One respondent had the good sense to look the
word up in the dictionary, and found that a secondary definition was,
simply, "old age."

"My grandfather was listed as having died >from
senility!" It is good to know, >from all this, that senility wasn't
necessarily a condition that would be handed down to me, and to you.

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, Arizona


New book on Sephardic Genealogy #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Posted for Jeff Malka
---------------------

Dear fellow newslist members,

I am pleased to announce the publication of my new book:
"Sephardic Genealogy: Discover your Ancestors and their World",
Avotaynu, 2002 (for ordering information see
http://www.avotaynu.com/books/sephardic.htm
and
http://www.avotaynu.com/catalog.htm)

The first and only book in English to focus on Sephardic genealogy,
this 384 page, extensively documented book is divided into 4 parts
and would be of benefit to both the beginner and advanced researcher
of Sephardic genealogy.

Part I deals with a brief review of Sephardic history, the status of
Jews under Islam, Sephardic languages, and the evolution of Sephardic
names >from biblical times to the present.

Part II covers the methodology for valid genealogical research including
record keeping and date conversions >from a variety of calendars.

Part III discusses the known archives and resources for genealogical
research in 20 countries where Sephardim have lived, >from pre-expulsion
Spain to North Africa, Turkey, the Balkans, Egypt, Syria, and more.

Part IV contains a directory, sorted by country, of internet sites and
resources of interest to Sephardic genealogists.

An appendix provides a dictionary of many Sephardic surnames giving
their etymological meanings and origins. Eleven other appendixes offer
reference tables of Arabic and of Sephardic Hebrew cursive alphabets,
Islamic calendars, genealogy forms, archival resources, and similar.
An extensive bibliography, 19 illustrations and maps, 8 tables, separate
person and topic indexes make for easy reference and use.

Jeff Malka, M.D., F.A.C.S., F.A.A.O.S. <malkajef@orthohelp.com>
"SefardSIG: Sephardic Genealogy at JewishGen" website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/sefardsig/

"Resources for Sephardic Genealogy" website:
http://www.orthohelp.com/geneal/sefardim.htm
(Jewish Agency for Israel TOP TEN; Britannica 2 STARS)


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia New book on Sephardic Genealogy #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Posted for Jeff Malka
---------------------

Dear fellow newslist members,

I am pleased to announce the publication of my new book:
"Sephardic Genealogy: Discover your Ancestors and their World",
Avotaynu, 2002 (for ordering information see
http://www.avotaynu.com/books/sephardic.htm
and
http://www.avotaynu.com/catalog.htm)

The first and only book in English to focus on Sephardic genealogy,
this 384 page, extensively documented book is divided into 4 parts
and would be of benefit to both the beginner and advanced researcher
of Sephardic genealogy.

Part I deals with a brief review of Sephardic history, the status of
Jews under Islam, Sephardic languages, and the evolution of Sephardic
names >from biblical times to the present.

Part II covers the methodology for valid genealogical research including
record keeping and date conversions >from a variety of calendars.

Part III discusses the known archives and resources for genealogical
research in 20 countries where Sephardim have lived, >from pre-expulsion
Spain to North Africa, Turkey, the Balkans, Egypt, Syria, and more.

Part IV contains a directory, sorted by country, of internet sites and
resources of interest to Sephardic genealogists.

An appendix provides a dictionary of many Sephardic surnames giving
their etymological meanings and origins. Eleven other appendixes offer
reference tables of Arabic and of Sephardic Hebrew cursive alphabets,
Islamic calendars, genealogy forms, archival resources, and similar.
An extensive bibliography, 19 illustrations and maps, 8 tables, separate
person and topic indexes make for easy reference and use.

Jeff Malka, M.D., F.A.C.S., F.A.A.O.S. <malkajef@orthohelp.com>
"SefardSIG: Sephardic Genealogy at JewishGen" website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/sefardsig/

"Resources for Sephardic Genealogy" website:
http://www.orthohelp.com/geneal/sefardim.htm
(Jewish Agency for Israel TOP TEN; Britannica 2 STARS)


1930 U.S. Census - Missing Image? #general

Debbie Raff
 

Well, I finally located an elusive relative via the 1930 U.S. Census. He
lived in Spring Valley, NY (Rockland County) and happens to be one of those
folks on ancestry.com who does not have an image attached to his name in its
'index' section.

But, since I now know the 'enumeration district number' and the 'page
number', I went to the non-indexed database to locate my guy. As luck would
have it, this is the only page number missing, of course! ;-(

So, here's my question...if I were to obtain the microfilm, should that image
be there? Or does ancestry's information reflect the microfilm exactly?

If anyone out there has run across this problem, and can answer me, I would
really appreciate it. I never thought I would actually find this person,
and now that I am so close, it seems a shame that I can't see more details
to possibly determine his specific relationship to me.

TIA,
Debbie Raff
California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1930 U.S. Census - Missing Image? #general

Debbie Raff
 

Well, I finally located an elusive relative via the 1930 U.S. Census. He
lived in Spring Valley, NY (Rockland County) and happens to be one of those
folks on ancestry.com who does not have an image attached to his name in its
'index' section.

But, since I now know the 'enumeration district number' and the 'page
number', I went to the non-indexed database to locate my guy. As luck would
have it, this is the only page number missing, of course! ;-(

So, here's my question...if I were to obtain the microfilm, should that image
be there? Or does ancestry's information reflect the microfilm exactly?

If anyone out there has run across this problem, and can answer me, I would
really appreciate it. I never thought I would actually find this person,
and now that I am so close, it seems a shame that I can't see more details
to possibly determine his specific relationship to me.

TIA,
Debbie Raff
California