Date   

The Passover Effect #general

Nicolas Trokiner
 

Dear all,

Whereas I usually receive a contact message >from JGFF (Family Finder)
once a month, this past week I received 5! I wonder if it due to
Passover and family discussions hold during the Seders?
Has anyone else experienced the same?

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris-France


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Passover Effect #general

Nicolas Trokiner
 

Dear all,

Whereas I usually receive a contact message >from JGFF (Family Finder)
once a month, this past week I received 5! I wonder if it due to
Passover and family discussions hold during the Seders?
Has anyone else experienced the same?

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris-France


Translation of "skladnik" please Yiddish #general

Neil <research13@...>
 

I will be grateful for any translation received.

Thank you for taking the time and effort to respond.

Neil Stein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation of "skladnik" please Yiddish #general

Neil <research13@...>
 

I will be grateful for any translation received.

Thank you for taking the time and effort to respond.

Neil Stein


Confusion about Ship's Manifests #general

Natalie & Ernie Hartz
 

For general interest: This is what I learned >from the feedback jewishgen
members gave me about ship's manifests, in addition to the tips offered in
the JewishGen's info files. Keep these tips in mind when searching.

There are many reasons for people's names to have been crossed off or not
indexed properly. People may have been crossed off if they missed the boat
or if they were listed on another page, for example, not necessarily held
for special inquiry or deported. There may be cousins, named after the same
ancestors, coming >from the same town or another town. They may have married
men and women of the same families. Since they had kids almost every year,
they may have a bunch of kids named the same thing. The practice continued
here in the U.S. as well. (such as my father's 2 brothers) My mother's
generation had 3 Normans, her brother and 2 of her cousins all with the same
first name. Because my grandmother and a sister and a brother had different
last names it helped keep the confusion to a minimum. One worked for NASA as
an engineer, one was a writer and poet, and one was a prominent lawyer. My
gm also named her daughter Lillian and had a sister in law named Lillian, so
the sister in law was referred to as "Lillie Morrises". (Morris's wife
Lillie) So much for names.

A reminder about indexes: These manifests were indexed by volunteers both
for Ellis Island and Ancestry. It is important (as I sometimes forget) to
keep in mind that volunteers are human and these indexes were created by
humans who make errors. The original microfilmed documents have been
digitized and are online and true copies of the originals, but the indexes
are not true copies, so reading everything on the digital copies is
extremely important, as that information can be more accurate than the
indexes, and yield much more information than the indexes provide. I have
begun to be extremely careful when reading these now that I have learned to
look at all markings and notes in addition to the obvious information. Many
times I need to save these images to my computer to look at (and zoom in on)
later.

Also, I've learned that searching other ports may yield more information
because not everyone came through New York. Many came through Boston,
Philadelphia, Baltimore and Canadian Border Crossings. This became apparent
from one relative's naturalization papers, if they can be found. (Women were
not always independently naturalized except through marriage.)

Finally, I liked Sally Bruckheimer's comment in her email to me that
expressed what a challenge it is to try and document our family's personal
history: "You wouldn't like genealogy if it were easy. It would all be done
by now."

And that is true, as it is the challenge and mystery that always draws me in
to these searches. The more I learn, the more curious I become. For me, it
is like Alice in Wonderland, "curiouser and curiouser". I hope these tips on
ship's manifests help the people who are new to this research.

Natalie Hartz
East Windsor NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Confusion about Ship's Manifests #general

Natalie & Ernie Hartz
 

For general interest: This is what I learned >from the feedback jewishgen
members gave me about ship's manifests, in addition to the tips offered in
the JewishGen's info files. Keep these tips in mind when searching.

There are many reasons for people's names to have been crossed off or not
indexed properly. People may have been crossed off if they missed the boat
or if they were listed on another page, for example, not necessarily held
for special inquiry or deported. There may be cousins, named after the same
ancestors, coming >from the same town or another town. They may have married
men and women of the same families. Since they had kids almost every year,
they may have a bunch of kids named the same thing. The practice continued
here in the U.S. as well. (such as my father's 2 brothers) My mother's
generation had 3 Normans, her brother and 2 of her cousins all with the same
first name. Because my grandmother and a sister and a brother had different
last names it helped keep the confusion to a minimum. One worked for NASA as
an engineer, one was a writer and poet, and one was a prominent lawyer. My
gm also named her daughter Lillian and had a sister in law named Lillian, so
the sister in law was referred to as "Lillie Morrises". (Morris's wife
Lillie) So much for names.

A reminder about indexes: These manifests were indexed by volunteers both
for Ellis Island and Ancestry. It is important (as I sometimes forget) to
keep in mind that volunteers are human and these indexes were created by
humans who make errors. The original microfilmed documents have been
digitized and are online and true copies of the originals, but the indexes
are not true copies, so reading everything on the digital copies is
extremely important, as that information can be more accurate than the
indexes, and yield much more information than the indexes provide. I have
begun to be extremely careful when reading these now that I have learned to
look at all markings and notes in addition to the obvious information. Many
times I need to save these images to my computer to look at (and zoom in on)
later.

Also, I've learned that searching other ports may yield more information
because not everyone came through New York. Many came through Boston,
Philadelphia, Baltimore and Canadian Border Crossings. This became apparent
from one relative's naturalization papers, if they can be found. (Women were
not always independently naturalized except through marriage.)

Finally, I liked Sally Bruckheimer's comment in her email to me that
expressed what a challenge it is to try and document our family's personal
history: "You wouldn't like genealogy if it were easy. It would all be done
by now."

And that is true, as it is the challenge and mystery that always draws me in
to these searches. The more I learn, the more curious I become. For me, it
is like Alice in Wonderland, "curiouser and curiouser". I hope these tips on
ship's manifests help the people who are new to this research.

Natalie Hartz
East Windsor NJ


Photo Taking prohibited at Evergreen Cemetery Tucson AZ #general

lrl <biaxial@...>
 

I wanted to start a project to document the headstones in the several
Jewish sections of Evergreen Cemetery in Tucson. I asked the cemetery
about their policy for photo taking and received the following reply:
The policy for taking photographs of headstones anywhere within the
cemetery is prohibited. In the past, families have expressed concern of
people taking photos of headstones due to privacy issues, therefore,
Evergreen had to create the policy.

Is this policy common in other cities around the U.S.?

Lee Levin, Tucson, AZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Photo Taking prohibited at Evergreen Cemetery Tucson AZ #general

lrl <biaxial@...>
 

I wanted to start a project to document the headstones in the several
Jewish sections of Evergreen Cemetery in Tucson. I asked the cemetery
about their policy for photo taking and received the following reply:
The policy for taking photographs of headstones anywhere within the
cemetery is prohibited. In the past, families have expressed concern of
people taking photos of headstones due to privacy issues, therefore,
Evergreen had to create the policy.

Is this policy common in other cities around the U.S.?

Lee Levin, Tucson, AZ


Military Service Austria 1917 #general

Palekaiko
 

With the assistance of a kind contributor, a document I received from
the Ivano-Frankivsk Archives was posted on Viewmate and translated.
The translation is as follow:

Declaration
That the undersigned Meier Weisberg hereby confirms he is of Jewish origin.
from January 5 1917 to November 1918 he was a private in Zamosc in the
30th infantry regiment (of Austrian army).
Stanislawow, April 27, 1921

Where would I search for more information on my great-great-uncle
Meier Weissberg with regard to his military service?

Thanks in advance to all who will respond.

Michael Diamant
Hawaii


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Military Service Austria 1917 #general

Palekaiko
 

With the assistance of a kind contributor, a document I received from
the Ivano-Frankivsk Archives was posted on Viewmate and translated.
The translation is as follow:

Declaration
That the undersigned Meier Weisberg hereby confirms he is of Jewish origin.
from January 5 1917 to November 1918 he was a private in Zamosc in the
30th infantry regiment (of Austrian army).
Stanislawow, April 27, 1921

Where would I search for more information on my great-great-uncle
Meier Weissberg with regard to his military service?

Thanks in advance to all who will respond.

Michael Diamant
Hawaii


Re: What is Fiakierstwo (occupation - Polish)? #general

Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
 

Alexander Sharon wrote:

Fiakier, fiacre, cab, cab (fr. fiacre) - light vehicle for hire for
commercial purposes. The vehicle was equipped with a folding roof over
the rear (passenger) part.
Fiacre name comes >from the tavern St. Fiacre in Paris. In this tavern,
in the 17th century, one could rent a carriage. Fiakier was a carriage
cabby.
Not to be confused with balagula (>from Hebrew baal hagulah), a driver
of a less elegant vehicle.
Just to supplement my earlier post:

Fiakier and fiakarstwo was eventually phased out and replaced with
wording: doroz'ka (doroz'karz - a driver) and doroz'karstwo (a trade).
Russian words for this profession (used also in Central/Eastern Poland
and Ukraine/Lithuania) was "Izvozchick"

Jewish "balagula" was also known as a Furman (German origin), a driver
of vehicle transporing goods.

Alexander Sharon


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What is Fiakierstwo (occupation - Polish)? #general

Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
 

Alexander Sharon wrote:

Fiakier, fiacre, cab, cab (fr. fiacre) - light vehicle for hire for
commercial purposes. The vehicle was equipped with a folding roof over
the rear (passenger) part.
Fiacre name comes >from the tavern St. Fiacre in Paris. In this tavern,
in the 17th century, one could rent a carriage. Fiakier was a carriage
cabby.
Not to be confused with balagula (>from Hebrew baal hagulah), a driver
of a less elegant vehicle.
Just to supplement my earlier post:

Fiakier and fiakarstwo was eventually phased out and replaced with
wording: doroz'ka (doroz'karz - a driver) and doroz'karstwo (a trade).
Russian words for this profession (used also in Central/Eastern Poland
and Ukraine/Lithuania) was "Izvozchick"

Jewish "balagula" was also known as a Furman (German origin), a driver
of vehicle transporing goods.

Alexander Sharon


Re: What is Fiakierstwo (occupation - Polish)? #general

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

I couldn't find a translation for "fiakierstwo" either, but -- thanks to
Wikipedia -- I did find that "fiakr" or "fiakier" is apparently a
horse-drawn cab (i.e. a carriage for hire). So it looks as if your
gr-grandfather's brother was an old-style cabbie.

Two tips I have found useful:

A) In trying to translate Polish words, it's often wise to drop the last
syllable and then Google them. Polish has declensions (different endings on
words depending on gender, number and context in the sentence) and these can
confuse a search.
B) It often pays to look up Wikipedia in a foreign language, even if you
can't understand it, and then use Google Translate or some other translation
tool to render it into English (however awkward the result may be). There
are many original foreign-language pages in Wikipedia that do not have
English equivalents.

All the best,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.

Researching: BULWAR/BULWER (Rawa Mazowiecka, Lodz); PELCMAN (Rawa
Mazowiecka); FRENKIEL, FELIPTER (Belz); KALUSZYNER, KUSMIERSKI, KASZKIET
(Kaluszyn, Lodz); KUZKA, RZETELNY, SIENNICKI, WROBEL, JABLONKA (Kaluszyn);
KRYSKA, HABIELSKA (Sieradz, Lodz); LICHTENSZTAJN (Wyszogrod, Sieradz, Lodz);
NAJFELD (Lodz; family of Szulem Berek & Ester); WAKS, BEKER, ENGEL (Nowe
Miasto nad Pilica); ROSENBERG, WEISKOPF (Przedborz, Lodz); BORNSZTAJN (Lodz;


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: What is Fiakierstwo (occupation - Polish)? #general

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

I couldn't find a translation for "fiakierstwo" either, but -- thanks to
Wikipedia -- I did find that "fiakr" or "fiakier" is apparently a
horse-drawn cab (i.e. a carriage for hire). So it looks as if your
gr-grandfather's brother was an old-style cabbie.

Two tips I have found useful:

A) In trying to translate Polish words, it's often wise to drop the last
syllable and then Google them. Polish has declensions (different endings on
words depending on gender, number and context in the sentence) and these can
confuse a search.
B) It often pays to look up Wikipedia in a foreign language, even if you
can't understand it, and then use Google Translate or some other translation
tool to render it into English (however awkward the result may be). There
are many original foreign-language pages in Wikipedia that do not have
English equivalents.

All the best,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.

Researching: BULWAR/BULWER (Rawa Mazowiecka, Lodz); PELCMAN (Rawa
Mazowiecka); FRENKIEL, FELIPTER (Belz); KALUSZYNER, KUSMIERSKI, KASZKIET
(Kaluszyn, Lodz); KUZKA, RZETELNY, SIENNICKI, WROBEL, JABLONKA (Kaluszyn);
KRYSKA, HABIELSKA (Sieradz, Lodz); LICHTENSZTAJN (Wyszogrod, Sieradz, Lodz);
NAJFELD (Lodz; family of Szulem Berek & Ester); WAKS, BEKER, ENGEL (Nowe
Miasto nad Pilica); ROSENBERG, WEISKOPF (Przedborz, Lodz); BORNSZTAJN (Lodz;


New JewishGen Education Class starts April 12 #latvia

Nancy Holden
 

This is a Four Week Course focusing on your immigrant ancestors and
their immediate families in the United States.

The course is a personal mentoring program which features an online
FORUM open 24/7. Students post an ancestral branch (one surname), set
objectives for their research, and work one-on-one with the instructor.
The BASIC course does not include research beyond what is available in
United States. Requirements: Students must be comfortable browsing the
Internet and downloading files. To best utilize this class, we suggest
students have 8-10 hours per week to read the lessons, search online and
interact with the instructor on the Forum.

Tuition for Basic Genealogy is $80, This fee is waived if you qualify
for the Value Added Services having made a $100 donation to
JewishGen's General Fund within the past 12 months. You are
welcome to enroll at no additional charge (the system will recognize you
and will not ask for a credit card). Registration is open.

To Register or for more information

Go to http://www.jewishgen.org/education

For questions, please email JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org

Nancy Holden


New JewishGen Education Class starts April 12 #rabbinic

Nancy Holden
 

This is a Four Week Course focusing on your immigrant ancestors and
their immediate families in the United States.

The course is a personal mentoring program which features an online
FORUM open 24/7. Students post an ancestral branch (one surname), set
objectives for their research, and work one-on-one with the instructor.
The BASIC course does not include research beyond what is available in
United States. Requirements: Students must be comfortable browsing the
Internet and downloading files. To best utilize this class, we suggest
students have 8-10 hours per week to read the lessons, search online and
interact with the instructor on the Forum.

Tuition for Basic Genealogy is $80, This fee is waived if you qualify
for the Value Added Services having made a $100 donation to
JewishGen's General Fund within the past 12 months. You are
welcome to enroll at no additional charge (the system will recognize you
and will not ask for a credit card). Registration is open.

To Register or for more information

Go to http://www.jewishgen.org/education

For questions, please email JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org

Nancy Holden


Latvia SIG #Latvia New JewishGen Education Class starts April 12 #latvia

Nancy Holden
 

This is a Four Week Course focusing on your immigrant ancestors and
their immediate families in the United States.

The course is a personal mentoring program which features an online
FORUM open 24/7. Students post an ancestral branch (one surname), set
objectives for their research, and work one-on-one with the instructor.
The BASIC course does not include research beyond what is available in
United States. Requirements: Students must be comfortable browsing the
Internet and downloading files. To best utilize this class, we suggest
students have 8-10 hours per week to read the lessons, search online and
interact with the instructor on the Forum.

Tuition for Basic Genealogy is $80, This fee is waived if you qualify
for the Value Added Services having made a $100 donation to
JewishGen's General Fund within the past 12 months. You are
welcome to enroll at no additional charge (the system will recognize you
and will not ask for a credit card). Registration is open.

To Register or for more information

Go to http://www.jewishgen.org/education

For questions, please email JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org

Nancy Holden


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic New JewishGen Education Class starts April 12 #rabbinic

Nancy Holden
 

This is a Four Week Course focusing on your immigrant ancestors and
their immediate families in the United States.

The course is a personal mentoring program which features an online
FORUM open 24/7. Students post an ancestral branch (one surname), set
objectives for their research, and work one-on-one with the instructor.
The BASIC course does not include research beyond what is available in
United States. Requirements: Students must be comfortable browsing the
Internet and downloading files. To best utilize this class, we suggest
students have 8-10 hours per week to read the lessons, search online and
interact with the instructor on the Forum.

Tuition for Basic Genealogy is $80, This fee is waived if you qualify
for the Value Added Services having made a $100 donation to
JewishGen's General Fund within the past 12 months. You are
welcome to enroll at no additional charge (the system will recognize you
and will not ask for a credit card). Registration is open.

To Register or for more information

Go to http://www.jewishgen.org/education

For questions, please email JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org

Nancy Holden


New JewishGen Education Class starts April 12 #scandinavia

Nancy Holden
 

This is a Four Week Course focusing on your immigrant ancestors and
their immediate families in the United States.

The course is a personal mentoring program which features an online
FORUM open 24/7. Students post an ancestral branch (one surname), set
objectives for their research, and work one-on-one with the instructor.
The BASIC course does not include research beyond what is available in
United States. Requirements: Students must be comfortable browsing the
Internet and downloading files. To best utilize this class, we suggest
students have 8-10 hours per week to read the lessons, search online and
interact with the instructor on the Forum.

Tuition for Basic Genealogy is $80, This fee is waived if you qualify
for the Value Added Services having made a $100 donation to
JewishGen's General Fund within the past 12 months. You are
welcome to enroll at no additional charge (the system will recognize you
and will not ask for a credit card). Registration is open.

To Register or for more information

Go to http://www.jewishgen.org/education

For questions, please email JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org

Nancy Holden


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia New JewishGen Education Class starts April 12 #scandinavia

Nancy Holden
 

This is a Four Week Course focusing on your immigrant ancestors and
their immediate families in the United States.

The course is a personal mentoring program which features an online
FORUM open 24/7. Students post an ancestral branch (one surname), set
objectives for their research, and work one-on-one with the instructor.
The BASIC course does not include research beyond what is available in
United States. Requirements: Students must be comfortable browsing the
Internet and downloading files. To best utilize this class, we suggest
students have 8-10 hours per week to read the lessons, search online and
interact with the instructor on the Forum.

Tuition for Basic Genealogy is $80, This fee is waived if you qualify
for the Value Added Services having made a $100 donation to
JewishGen's General Fund within the past 12 months. You are
welcome to enroll at no additional charge (the system will recognize you
and will not ask for a credit card). Registration is open.

To Register or for more information

Go to http://www.jewishgen.org/education

For questions, please email JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org

Nancy Holden

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