Date   

Melykut Synagogue #hungary

Jbacskai@...
 

1. There is a web site for Melykut in the internet. In the geography section
it says:

"Melykut is located near Baja (40km), Kiskunhalas (36km) and Szeged (65
km)". Janoshalma is the adjacent community on the North.
Melykut village web site:

http://www.melykut.com/modules.php?name=tortenelme

On the history page there is one sentence concerning the Jewish community:
" in 1875 a Jewish Elementary school was established"

2. There is a book in Hungarian by
Somodi Henrietta: Zsidok Bacs-Kiskun Megyeben (Jews in Bacs-Kis-Kun County).
A brief history of the Jewish community of Melykut is on p. 137--139.
English translation of p. 137-138: "... The community was founded around
1890, more specific information on this is unavailable. The holidays and prayer
times were celebrated in the home of one of the members of the community,
they did not have an independent synagogue. The community probably joined the
Janoshalma community."

Judy Bacskai
Kensington, California


Hungary SIG #Hungary Melykut Synagogue #hungary

Jbacskai@...
 

1. There is a web site for Melykut in the internet. In the geography section
it says:

"Melykut is located near Baja (40km), Kiskunhalas (36km) and Szeged (65
km)". Janoshalma is the adjacent community on the North.
Melykut village web site:

http://www.melykut.com/modules.php?name=tortenelme

On the history page there is one sentence concerning the Jewish community:
" in 1875 a Jewish Elementary school was established"

2. There is a book in Hungarian by
Somodi Henrietta: Zsidok Bacs-Kiskun Megyeben (Jews in Bacs-Kis-Kun County).
A brief history of the Jewish community of Melykut is on p. 137--139.
English translation of p. 137-138: "... The community was founded around
1890, more specific information on this is unavailable. The holidays and prayer
times were celebrated in the home of one of the members of the community,
they did not have an independent synagogue. The community probably joined the
Janoshalma community."

Judy Bacskai
Kensington, California


Book recommendation #general

Elsebeth Paikin
 

"Norman S. Poser:
"Escape. A Jewish Scandinavian family in the Second World War".
Sareve Press, New York. 2006. 304 pages. Illustrated.
ISBN: 0-9785910-0-3

Now available on JewishGen Mall http://www.jewishgenmall.org/

On April 9, 1940, Germany invaded Norway and Denmark. By the end of WWII
more than a third of the Norwegian Jews would be dead at the hand of the Nazis
and their collaborators, but most of the Danish Jews were saved by the Danish
People. This is the story of a Jewish-Scandinavian family who, all but one,
escaped the death camps. It is also a story of the Jews in Scandinavia from
medieval times through the upheavals of the 20th Century, told in the context
of the national movements, attitudes, and policies that are inseparable from
both collective and individual history.

The Salomons were descended >from two Jewish Danish-born brothers who
established
a shoe factory in Norway in the 19th Century. At the time of the invasion most
members were still living in Norway or Denmark. Their routes of
escape >from their
Nazi-occupied homelands weave a mixed pattern of strategies,
reactions, good and
bad luck, and debts to the kindness of strangers that mirrors on an intimate
scale the experience of Holocaust survivors in Scandinavia.

Johanna, the widowed matriarch of the family, refused to flee Norway and was
imprisoned there, stubbornly clinging to Norwegian citizenship. Because of an
equal determined diplomat, who interceded for her, she escaped deportation to
Auschwitz, by fleeing to Denmark - only to have to flee once more in October
1943 >from Denmark to Sweden. One of Johanna's sons survived the occupation in
a mental asylum. Two sons and a cousin were able to reach Sweden, a daughter
fled alone with her little girl along a circuitous path via Sweden, Moscow and
Tokyo that ended in New York City.

But the history unfolded here is more than a tale of physical escape. It
reverberates through multiple levels with the many meanings of what
is lost and
what is gained when lives are overturned. For one brother, escape >from Norway
meant a chance, at last, to do work he seemed meant to do. Escape for
one sister
freed her >from the direct control of a domineering mother. In the strangest and
saddest saga, the only sister not endangered my the Nazis escaped her own life
by leaping >from an oceanliner window.

Escape is a family story and much, much more.

It is an exciting story, easily read (and hard to put down before the
last page) and free form sentimentality, but it is also an academic
work with bibliography, notes and index.

A formidable book that I warmly recommend.

P.S. I have no economic interest in the book

Best regards



Elsebeth Paikin, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/
&
SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Book recommendation #general

Elsebeth Paikin
 

"Norman S. Poser:
"Escape. A Jewish Scandinavian family in the Second World War".
Sareve Press, New York. 2006. 304 pages. Illustrated.
ISBN: 0-9785910-0-3

Now available on JewishGen Mall http://www.jewishgenmall.org/

On April 9, 1940, Germany invaded Norway and Denmark. By the end of WWII
more than a third of the Norwegian Jews would be dead at the hand of the Nazis
and their collaborators, but most of the Danish Jews were saved by the Danish
People. This is the story of a Jewish-Scandinavian family who, all but one,
escaped the death camps. It is also a story of the Jews in Scandinavia from
medieval times through the upheavals of the 20th Century, told in the context
of the national movements, attitudes, and policies that are inseparable from
both collective and individual history.

The Salomons were descended >from two Jewish Danish-born brothers who
established
a shoe factory in Norway in the 19th Century. At the time of the invasion most
members were still living in Norway or Denmark. Their routes of
escape >from their
Nazi-occupied homelands weave a mixed pattern of strategies,
reactions, good and
bad luck, and debts to the kindness of strangers that mirrors on an intimate
scale the experience of Holocaust survivors in Scandinavia.

Johanna, the widowed matriarch of the family, refused to flee Norway and was
imprisoned there, stubbornly clinging to Norwegian citizenship. Because of an
equal determined diplomat, who interceded for her, she escaped deportation to
Auschwitz, by fleeing to Denmark - only to have to flee once more in October
1943 >from Denmark to Sweden. One of Johanna's sons survived the occupation in
a mental asylum. Two sons and a cousin were able to reach Sweden, a daughter
fled alone with her little girl along a circuitous path via Sweden, Moscow and
Tokyo that ended in New York City.

But the history unfolded here is more than a tale of physical escape. It
reverberates through multiple levels with the many meanings of what
is lost and
what is gained when lives are overturned. For one brother, escape >from Norway
meant a chance, at last, to do work he seemed meant to do. Escape for
one sister
freed her >from the direct control of a domineering mother. In the strangest and
saddest saga, the only sister not endangered my the Nazis escaped her own life
by leaping >from an oceanliner window.

Escape is a family story and much, much more.

It is an exciting story, easily read (and hard to put down before the
last page) and free form sentimentality, but it is also an academic
work with bibliography, notes and index.

A formidable book that I warmly recommend.

P.S. I have no economic interest in the book

Best regards



Elsebeth Paikin, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/
&
SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk


Phila. Orphans Court or Archive Office #general

Steve Pickoltz
 

Is there a Genner going to Phila. that could stop in at the City's Marriage
Bureau (a part of the Phila. Orphans Court, 4th floor at City Hall) or the
City's Archive Office located on Market St?

I am trying to find a marriage record between the years of 1891 and 1901.
The couple in question are Berisch (Bernard) Pickholtz and Bluma Bernstein.
At either location, the records are free to the public for viewing. To make
it easy to locate people, the record books are by year and in alphabetical
order for both the bride and groom.

Any help is appreciated.

Steve Pickholtz
Tabernacle, NJ
searching---- PICKHOLTZ (all spellings), WINITSKY (all spellings),
and KLEIN/KLINE (of the Phila. JCC family).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Phila. Orphans Court or Archive Office #general

Steve Pickoltz
 

Is there a Genner going to Phila. that could stop in at the City's Marriage
Bureau (a part of the Phila. Orphans Court, 4th floor at City Hall) or the
City's Archive Office located on Market St?

I am trying to find a marriage record between the years of 1891 and 1901.
The couple in question are Berisch (Bernard) Pickholtz and Bluma Bernstein.
At either location, the records are free to the public for viewing. To make
it easy to locate people, the record books are by year and in alphabetical
order for both the bride and groom.

Any help is appreciated.

Steve Pickholtz
Tabernacle, NJ
searching---- PICKHOLTZ (all spellings), WINITSKY (all spellings),
and KLEIN/KLINE (of the Phila. JCC family).


Re: finding grandfather's town #general

Joanne Saltman <js24saltman@...>
 

Most birth records list the place of birth of the parents-if you know the
name and date of birth of his children you can get the birth record.
This is how I found the town of origin for my ancestors.
Joanne Saltman
Belchertown, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: finding grandfather's town #general

Joanne Saltman <js24saltman@...>
 

Most birth records list the place of birth of the parents-if you know the
name and date of birth of his children you can get the birth record.
This is how I found the town of origin for my ancestors.
Joanne Saltman
Belchertown, MA


2007 IAJGS Conference Registration Open #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Elsebeth Paikin
 

2007 IAJGS Conference Registration Open

I am delighted to announce that registration is now open for the Conference. '
It is scheduled for July 15-20, 2007 (Tamuz 29-Av 5, 5767) at the Hilton Salt
Lake City Center. Please visit the conference website at
http://www.slc2007.org
to register, submit speaking proposals, book rooms at the Hilton,
plan your travel
and learn more about what the conference and Salt Lake City have to offer.

We will keep you informed as the website is updated with additional
information,
including scheduled speakers, computer workshops, SIG luncheons and much, much
more.

The conference will include a special showing of "Lives Remembered:
A Shtetl Through A Photographer's Eye". This photographic, museum
exhibit has been displayed internationally. It depicts a vibrant and
modern life in an Eastern European shtetl >from 1898-1939.

Conference Co-Chairs Hal Bookbinder and Michael Brenner, and the
entire conference committee, look forward to sharing this exciting
experience with all of you.

Jan Meisels Allen
Registration Chair


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland 2007 IAJGS Conference Registration Open #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Elsebeth Paikin
 

2007 IAJGS Conference Registration Open

I am delighted to announce that registration is now open for the Conference. '
It is scheduled for July 15-20, 2007 (Tamuz 29-Av 5, 5767) at the Hilton Salt
Lake City Center. Please visit the conference website at
http://www.slc2007.org
to register, submit speaking proposals, book rooms at the Hilton,
plan your travel
and learn more about what the conference and Salt Lake City have to offer.

We will keep you informed as the website is updated with additional
information,
including scheduled speakers, computer workshops, SIG luncheons and much, much
more.

The conference will include a special showing of "Lives Remembered:
A Shtetl Through A Photographer's Eye". This photographic, museum
exhibit has been displayed internationally. It depicts a vibrant and
modern life in an Eastern European shtetl >from 1898-1939.

Conference Co-Chairs Hal Bookbinder and Michael Brenner, and the
entire conference committee, look forward to sharing this exciting
experience with all of you.

Jan Meisels Allen
Registration Chair


2007 IAJGS Conference Registration Open #latvia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Next conference:

I am delighted to announce that registration is now open for the Conference.
It is scheduled for July 15-20, 2007 (Tamuz 29-Av 5, 5767) at the Hilton Salt
Lake City Center. Please visit the conference website at
http://www.slc2007.org
to register, submit speaking proposals, book rooms at the Hilton,
plan your travel
and learn more about what the conference and Salt Lake City have to offer.

We will keep you informed as the website is updated with additional
information,
including scheduled speakers, computer workshops, SIG luncheons and much, much
more.

The conference will include a special showing of "Lives Remembered:
A Shtetl Through A Photographer's Eye". This photographic, museum
exhibit has been displayed internationally. It depicts a vibrant and
modern life in an Eastern European shtetl >from 1898-1939.

Conference Co-Chairs Hal Bookbinder and Michael Brenner, and the
entire conference committee, look forward to sharing this exciting
experience with all of you.

Jan Meisels Allen
Registration Chair


Latvia SIG #Latvia 2007 IAJGS Conference Registration Open #latvia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Next conference:

I am delighted to announce that registration is now open for the Conference.
It is scheduled for July 15-20, 2007 (Tamuz 29-Av 5, 5767) at the Hilton Salt
Lake City Center. Please visit the conference website at
http://www.slc2007.org
to register, submit speaking proposals, book rooms at the Hilton,
plan your travel
and learn more about what the conference and Salt Lake City have to offer.

We will keep you informed as the website is updated with additional
information,
including scheduled speakers, computer workshops, SIG luncheons and much, much
more.

The conference will include a special showing of "Lives Remembered:
A Shtetl Through A Photographer's Eye". This photographic, museum
exhibit has been displayed internationally. It depicts a vibrant and
modern life in an Eastern European shtetl >from 1898-1939.

Conference Co-Chairs Hal Bookbinder and Michael Brenner, and the
entire conference committee, look forward to sharing this exciting
experience with all of you.

Jan Meisels Allen
Registration Chair


Re: Origin of the name Beines #latvia

Gary Mokotoff: <mokotoff@...>
 

According to "A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names", Beines is a variant
of Bendit which has its origins in the Christian name Benedictus (blessed).
The Hebrew equivalent would be Boruch (blessed). I had a granduncle named
Beines.

Gary Mokotoff
mokotoff@earthlink.net


Latvia SIG #Latvia RE: Origin of the name Beines #latvia

Gary Mokotoff: <mokotoff@...>
 

According to "A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names", Beines is a variant
of Bendit which has its origins in the Christian name Benedictus (blessed).
The Hebrew equivalent would be Boruch (blessed). I had a granduncle named
Beines.

Gary Mokotoff
mokotoff@earthlink.net


2007 IAJGS Conference Registration Open #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

I am delighted to announce that registration is now open for the Conference. '
It is scheduled for July 15-20, 2007 (Tamuz 29-Av 5, 5767) at the Hilton Salt
Lake City Center. Please visit the conference website at
http://www.slc2007.org
to register, submit speaking proposals, book rooms at the Hilton,
plan your travel
and learn more about what the conference and Salt Lake City have to offer.

We will keep you informed as the website is updated with additional
information,
including scheduled speakers, computer workshops, SIG luncheons and much, much
more.

The conference will include a special showing of "Lives Remembered:
A Shtetl Through A Photographer's Eye". This photographic, museum
exhibit has been displayed internationally. It depicts a vibrant and
modern life in an Eastern European shtetl >from 1898-1939.

Conference Co-Chairs Hal Bookbinder and Michael Brenner, and the
entire conference committee, look forward to sharing this exciting
experience with all of you.

Jan Meisels Allen
Registration Chair


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia 2007 IAJGS Conference Registration Open #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

I am delighted to announce that registration is now open for the Conference. '
It is scheduled for July 15-20, 2007 (Tamuz 29-Av 5, 5767) at the Hilton Salt
Lake City Center. Please visit the conference website at
http://www.slc2007.org
to register, submit speaking proposals, book rooms at the Hilton,
plan your travel
and learn more about what the conference and Salt Lake City have to offer.

We will keep you informed as the website is updated with additional
information,
including scheduled speakers, computer workshops, SIG luncheons and much, much
more.

The conference will include a special showing of "Lives Remembered:
A Shtetl Through A Photographer's Eye". This photographic, museum
exhibit has been displayed internationally. It depicts a vibrant and
modern life in an Eastern European shtetl >from 1898-1939.

Conference Co-Chairs Hal Bookbinder and Michael Brenner, and the
entire conference committee, look forward to sharing this exciting
experience with all of you.

Jan Meisels Allen
Registration Chair


Frankfurt Rat-Beil Str. Cemetery Database images #germany

Larry E.Oppenheimer <leoppen7@...>
 

I am interested in the inscriptions on 6 gravestones at the
Rat-Beil-Strasse cemetery, Frankfurt aM. I went to the Leo Baeck
Institute library to view their copies of the Norbert Heyeckhaus
database DVD set. I couldn't figure out how to find the high resolution
images I needed, and the librarians were not of much help. >from the
on-line database at http://www.jcdp.de I have the field numbers and ID
numbers. How do I get >from there to the correct high resolution images
on the DVDs?

I would really appreciate any help you could give me.

Larry Oppenheimer Sarasota, Florida <leoppen7@verizon.net>


German SIG #Germany Frankfurt Rat-Beil Str. Cemetery Database images #germany

Larry E.Oppenheimer <leoppen7@...>
 

I am interested in the inscriptions on 6 gravestones at the
Rat-Beil-Strasse cemetery, Frankfurt aM. I went to the Leo Baeck
Institute library to view their copies of the Norbert Heyeckhaus
database DVD set. I couldn't figure out how to find the high resolution
images I needed, and the librarians were not of much help. >from the
on-line database at http://www.jcdp.de I have the field numbers and ID
numbers. How do I get >from there to the correct high resolution images
on the DVDs?

I would really appreciate any help you could give me.

Larry Oppenheimer Sarasota, Florida <leoppen7@verizon.net>


Re: puzzling results of GUGENHEIM research #germany

buckidstein@...
 

The pieces of information, which Dottie J. Miller gives about the GUGENHEIM
or GUGENHEIMB or GUGGENHEIMER and about the GEISMAR families may be fit
together in the following way. However, since too often the localities are not
mentioned and the context in which these names are used is missing, only be an
attempt can be made by someone who regularly works with this sort of material.

Jacob Geismar in Ihringen had at least three daughters. First one of them
married Marx G. not long before 1739. He was allowed to move to Ihringen. In
1738, he was called Marx G. >from T in order to make clear >from where this new
person had come. ">from T" can be a hint that he was not yet a resident in
Ihringen. He might have been a servant of his future father-in-law. In later
entries, his new residence was added.

About the same time, a second daughter married Samuel >from a different
place. His father-in-law's second attempt to make him Schutzjude in Ihringen was
successful in 1740. Out of unknown reasons, Samuel's family did not move to
Ihringen. There are plausible rasons. Sometimes Jews rejected their Schutzbrief.
Samuel may have changed his mind and did no longer want to leave his
hometown. Or he had moved to another locality, or he had died. I have found all
these reasons. Or did he move later and is hidden behind the phrase "another
Gugenheim"?

A third daughter married in or before 1744. Her husband was not allowed to
move to Ihringen.

I regard Marx or Mardechai and Samuel as two persons, first because of their
two different Jewish given names. I see no reason why one should mistrust
the document of 1739. On the contrary, why should a father-in-law apply for a
second Schutzbrief, if he had already recently received one for this
son-in-law? The fact that there are no entries in 18th century registers does
not prove that someone did not exist. This person might have been exempted
from paying taxes in his first year, he might have been exempted from
paying in later years because of poverty.

I remember a Jew near Wiesbaden who became Schutzjude in 1777; he paid
some of his duties in the first years and nearly nothing for more than
20 years. Widows often disappear >from the Schutzgeld records,
not because they had died, but because the obligation to pay had ended.

There is no general rule how many sons and daughters of one couple were
conceded a Schutzbrief. That was different >from state to state and >from time to
time. It depended e.g. on the influence a father had. The economic situation
in a locality could cause Gentiles and Jews to protest against new Jewish
families as a result of a newly granted Schutzbrief.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany (mailto:buckidstein@aol.com)

MODERATOR NOTE: Gerhard Buck is the author of several books and numerous
articles on Jewish communities in Hesse Nassau. He is compiling a database
which, he hopes, will eventually include all Jewish residents of the towns
in that region. His two articles in the most recent issues of "Stammbaum,
the Journal of German Jewish Genealogy" describe the techniques that he uses
to comb archival records for information.


German SIG #Germany Re: puzzling results of GUGENHEIM research #germany

buckidstein@...
 

The pieces of information, which Dottie J. Miller gives about the GUGENHEIM
or GUGENHEIMB or GUGGENHEIMER and about the GEISMAR families may be fit
together in the following way. However, since too often the localities are not
mentioned and the context in which these names are used is missing, only be an
attempt can be made by someone who regularly works with this sort of material.

Jacob Geismar in Ihringen had at least three daughters. First one of them
married Marx G. not long before 1739. He was allowed to move to Ihringen. In
1738, he was called Marx G. >from T in order to make clear >from where this new
person had come. ">from T" can be a hint that he was not yet a resident in
Ihringen. He might have been a servant of his future father-in-law. In later
entries, his new residence was added.

About the same time, a second daughter married Samuel >from a different
place. His father-in-law's second attempt to make him Schutzjude in Ihringen was
successful in 1740. Out of unknown reasons, Samuel's family did not move to
Ihringen. There are plausible rasons. Sometimes Jews rejected their Schutzbrief.
Samuel may have changed his mind and did no longer want to leave his
hometown. Or he had moved to another locality, or he had died. I have found all
these reasons. Or did he move later and is hidden behind the phrase "another
Gugenheim"?

A third daughter married in or before 1744. Her husband was not allowed to
move to Ihringen.

I regard Marx or Mardechai and Samuel as two persons, first because of their
two different Jewish given names. I see no reason why one should mistrust
the document of 1739. On the contrary, why should a father-in-law apply for a
second Schutzbrief, if he had already recently received one for this
son-in-law? The fact that there are no entries in 18th century registers does
not prove that someone did not exist. This person might have been exempted
from paying taxes in his first year, he might have been exempted from
paying in later years because of poverty.

I remember a Jew near Wiesbaden who became Schutzjude in 1777; he paid
some of his duties in the first years and nearly nothing for more than
20 years. Widows often disappear >from the Schutzgeld records,
not because they had died, but because the obligation to pay had ended.

There is no general rule how many sons and daughters of one couple were
conceded a Schutzbrief. That was different >from state to state and >from time to
time. It depended e.g. on the influence a father had. The economic situation
in a locality could cause Gentiles and Jews to protest against new Jewish
families as a result of a newly granted Schutzbrief.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany (mailto:buckidstein@aol.com)

MODERATOR NOTE: Gerhard Buck is the author of several books and numerous
articles on Jewish communities in Hesse Nassau. He is compiling a database
which, he hopes, will eventually include all Jewish residents of the towns
in that region. His two articles in the most recent issues of "Stammbaum,
the Journal of German Jewish Genealogy" describe the techniques that he uses
to comb archival records for information.