Date   

Jacob and Vicki KARNO relocated to Destin, Florida #general

Eileen Polakoff <eileenpolakoff@...>
 

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

I've just heard >from Vicki and they are fine. They had a front row seat to
Hurricane Katrina but managed to get out of New Orleans to avoid the
devastation that followed. They have relocated to Destin for at least 2 or 3
months where they are renting an apartment. Their friends are pleased to
hear they are fine and as Vicki says "we'll survive" as we all know is the
hope for everyone on the Gulf Coast.

Some of you may not know that JewishGen's president and founder Susan King
called New Orleans home for a very long time. I don't know if any family are
still living there but they certainly must be. I do know that her heart is
hurting as she sees the devastation everywhere in her hometown.

Two of my colleagues >from the world of professional genealogy have missing
family members. Professional genealogist Jane Aprill, also a member of the
JGS of New Orleans, reports her doctor husband is missing. He stayed in NO
during the hurricane to help keep medical facilities open and functioning.
And John and Barbara Wylie, professional genealogists >from Houston, have not
heard >from their 35 year old son Joe since Monday right after the storm.
There are certainly others >from the wide world of genealogists who are in
similar or worse circumstances. We are all praying for them and that they
are all found safe soon.

My prayers are with everyone in America today as this devastation hits all
of us.

Eileen Polakoff

MODERATOR NOTE: Last night genner Susan Bergman Meehan reported that her
son had been helping his New Orleans neighbors to safety, but had not been
heard >from afterward. Please keep them in your thoughts as well.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jacob and Vicki KARNO relocated to Destin, Florida #general

Eileen Polakoff <eileenpolakoff@...>
 

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

I've just heard >from Vicki and they are fine. They had a front row seat to
Hurricane Katrina but managed to get out of New Orleans to avoid the
devastation that followed. They have relocated to Destin for at least 2 or 3
months where they are renting an apartment. Their friends are pleased to
hear they are fine and as Vicki says "we'll survive" as we all know is the
hope for everyone on the Gulf Coast.

Some of you may not know that JewishGen's president and founder Susan King
called New Orleans home for a very long time. I don't know if any family are
still living there but they certainly must be. I do know that her heart is
hurting as she sees the devastation everywhere in her hometown.

Two of my colleagues >from the world of professional genealogy have missing
family members. Professional genealogist Jane Aprill, also a member of the
JGS of New Orleans, reports her doctor husband is missing. He stayed in NO
during the hurricane to help keep medical facilities open and functioning.
And John and Barbara Wylie, professional genealogists >from Houston, have not
heard >from their 35 year old son Joe since Monday right after the storm.
There are certainly others >from the wide world of genealogists who are in
similar or worse circumstances. We are all praying for them and that they
are all found safe soon.

My prayers are with everyone in America today as this devastation hits all
of us.

Eileen Polakoff

MODERATOR NOTE: Last night genner Susan Bergman Meehan reported that her
son had been helping his New Orleans neighbors to safety, but had not been
heard >from afterward. Please keep them in your thoughts as well.


Simon Segal #unitedkingdom

elisabeth segal <darla1504@...>
 

My husband has been given the name of a village outside Warsaw in Poland.
This cannot be the right spelling as the village was called Mogalids. That
is the only spelling his cousin Hymie knows. He is trying to trace Segal
family. His grandfather Simon Segal was born in this village. He is
believed to have come to the U.K. to live at the end of the 19th century. He
was married and his first wife died in Poland (age unknown).
Simon married again, apparently his wife's sister. (name unknown). Second
wife had three children, Louis, Sarah and Jack. Jack was the only child born
in this country. Louis married Leah and had three daughters, Betty, Frieda
and Stella. Sarah married Samuel Rosenberg. They had two sons, Harvey and
Anthony (my husband). Contact has been lost with all family members, except
his brother Harvey and cousin Hymie. We understand that most of the family
left in Poland did perish in the Holocast. But we have no way of tracing
this. Can someone please make sense of the village name. Or does anyone know
of any decendants of the above.
Thank you all so much.
regards

Elisabeth
U.K. (Essex)


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Simon Segal #unitedkingdom

elisabeth segal <darla1504@...>
 

My husband has been given the name of a village outside Warsaw in Poland.
This cannot be the right spelling as the village was called Mogalids. That
is the only spelling his cousin Hymie knows. He is trying to trace Segal
family. His grandfather Simon Segal was born in this village. He is
believed to have come to the U.K. to live at the end of the 19th century. He
was married and his first wife died in Poland (age unknown).
Simon married again, apparently his wife's sister. (name unknown). Second
wife had three children, Louis, Sarah and Jack. Jack was the only child born
in this country. Louis married Leah and had three daughters, Betty, Frieda
and Stella. Sarah married Samuel Rosenberg. They had two sons, Harvey and
Anthony (my husband). Contact has been lost with all family members, except
his brother Harvey and cousin Hymie. We understand that most of the family
left in Poland did perish in the Holocast. But we have no way of tracing
this. Can someone please make sense of the village name. Or does anyone know
of any decendants of the above.
Thank you all so much.
regards

Elisabeth
U.K. (Essex)


Re: jcr-uk digest: August 22, 2005 - SWANSEA #unitedkingdom

Hazel Dakers
 

Robert and the list

Sorry for the belated reply. I knew at the back of my mind I had checked out
Swansea for the possibility of some of my early family coming >from there
and have now found a note in my files:

The Jews of South Wales:historical studies. Cardiff: University of Wales
Press 1993. Ursula Henriques is the editor and wrote a number of the
chapters.

The first known settled community (as opposed to visiting pedlars and a
few individual residents) was in the third quarter of the eighteenth
century in Swansea - then a flourishing seaport.

There were quite a few pawnborkers there, one of whom was Greenbone Jacobs
of Swansea who was accused in the 1868 Midsummer Quarter Sessions of
receiving stolen rope p.81). He was born in 1796 and Michael Jacobs (late
C19th was probably descended >from him).

Swansea was an older Jewish community than that of Cardiff. According to a
reference (NH Saunders Swansea Hebrew Congregation 1830-1980, Centenary
pamphlet 1980, 209 - apparently not in British Library collection) the
lease of the first Swansea congregation dates back to 1768.

I then followed up and arranged for some research to be undertaken for me by
the local archives http://www.swansea.gov.uk/westglamorganarchives/ who were
very helpful.

Regards
Hazel Dakers, London UK

Researching: NORDEN (London & South Africa); HEIMANN (Luegde, Germany and
South Africa); GOLD (Zgierz and Lodz, Poland), BIRNBAUM (Zgierz and Lodz,
Poland)
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: ABRAHAMs in Wales
From: "robert fraser" <robertandginafraser@iinet.net.au>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2005 09:15:34 +0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi guys -

I seems unlikely to me that a rural area such as Llangyfelach (although
today it's part of Swansea) would have seen any Jewish presence in 1749, let
alone any families settling in the area.

Bear in mind that in rural/farming areas, much of the population would have
been unable to read. But if they were literate, the Bible would have been
their only literature (probably in Welsh) and they would likely have
obtained surnames and given names >from this book. So a biblical name does
not necessarily indicate a Jewish background.

Robert W Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@iinet.net.au
(ex-Merthyr Tydfil)


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom RE: jcr-uk digest: August 22, 2005 - SWANSEA #unitedkingdom

Hazel Dakers
 

Robert and the list

Sorry for the belated reply. I knew at the back of my mind I had checked out
Swansea for the possibility of some of my early family coming >from there
and have now found a note in my files:

The Jews of South Wales:historical studies. Cardiff: University of Wales
Press 1993. Ursula Henriques is the editor and wrote a number of the
chapters.

The first known settled community (as opposed to visiting pedlars and a
few individual residents) was in the third quarter of the eighteenth
century in Swansea - then a flourishing seaport.

There were quite a few pawnborkers there, one of whom was Greenbone Jacobs
of Swansea who was accused in the 1868 Midsummer Quarter Sessions of
receiving stolen rope p.81). He was born in 1796 and Michael Jacobs (late
C19th was probably descended >from him).

Swansea was an older Jewish community than that of Cardiff. According to a
reference (NH Saunders Swansea Hebrew Congregation 1830-1980, Centenary
pamphlet 1980, 209 - apparently not in British Library collection) the
lease of the first Swansea congregation dates back to 1768.

I then followed up and arranged for some research to be undertaken for me by
the local archives http://www.swansea.gov.uk/westglamorganarchives/ who were
very helpful.

Regards
Hazel Dakers, London UK

Researching: NORDEN (London & South Africa); HEIMANN (Luegde, Germany and
South Africa); GOLD (Zgierz and Lodz, Poland), BIRNBAUM (Zgierz and Lodz,
Poland)
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: ABRAHAMs in Wales
From: "robert fraser" <robertandginafraser@iinet.net.au>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2005 09:15:34 +0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi guys -

I seems unlikely to me that a rural area such as Llangyfelach (although
today it's part of Swansea) would have seen any Jewish presence in 1749, let
alone any families settling in the area.

Bear in mind that in rural/farming areas, much of the population would have
been unable to read. But if they were literate, the Bible would have been
their only literature (probably in Welsh) and they would likely have
obtained surnames and given names >from this book. So a biblical name does
not necessarily indicate a Jewish background.

Robert W Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@iinet.net.au
(ex-Merthyr Tydfil)


Petition for Naturalization papers #general

Herb Derman <dermanh@...>
 

Alan Glick advised that a good way to look for ancestor arrivals is by
checking Petitions for Naturalization and Declarations of Intent. Where
does one go to accomplish this?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Petition for Naturalization papers #general

Herb Derman <dermanh@...>
 

Alan Glick advised that a good way to look for ancestor arrivals is by
checking Petitions for Naturalization and Declarations of Intent. Where
does one go to accomplish this?


Re: Seeking Death Place For Isadore Rakoff-New Montefiore #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

If Isadore's wife was Rose and their children were Adele, Allan, and Shirley
(ages 40, 39, 15, 11, and 5), they lived in the Bronx at the time of the 1930
census - which doesn't prove that he lived (or died) there in 1938.

For various reasons that we may or may not know, residents of New York City
traveled outside of the city and outside of the state - and even outside of the
U.S. to visit their countries of origin, as entries for the same person on
more than one passenger list show.

For people whose deaths occurred in any of the five boroughs of New York City
through 1949, the Municipal Archives has indexes and death certificates issued
by the Department of Health. The indexes also include deaths of New York City
residents who died outside of the city, as long as those entities notified the
NYC Department of Health. A letter code appears in place of the death certificate
number indicating where the death took place - the state of New York, any other
state, and, if I remember correctly, outside the U.S.

If you want to hazard a guess that he died in New York City, you can go to the
website of the Municipal Archives at
http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/html/vitalrecords/death.shtml for instructions
for ordering online. It helps that you have a death date.

Or if you or someone else can look at the index and a code number indicates that
he died outside of New York City:

-- for a death in New York State but outside of New York City, go to
http://www.health.state.ny.us/vital_records/genealogy.htm to see whether to
order the DC >from the New York State Archives or elsewhere in the state. Also,
the National Archives branch in Manhattan has microfiche of the death indexes
for the state of New York outside of New York City. They're arranged by year.
For a genealogy question, call (212) 401-1620 or e-mail newyork.archives@nara.gov
and find out if they will accept a request for a lookup in the 1938 New York
State death index. The death index will tell you which town he died
in and what his death certificate number is. You can then contact the appropriate
agency in that town.

-- if the death occurred outside of New York State (maybe New Jersey or
Connecticut, for instance), go to Cyndi's List at
http://www.cyndislist.com/usvital.htm#States for contact information for each
state.

-- if the death occurred outside of the U.S., go to the NARA website at
http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/vital-records/american-deaths-overseas.html.

His probate file would show where he died, whether he left a will or not. But
you then have the predicament of deciding which probate court to contact!

Joy Rich
Brooklyn, NY
--

Hello To All

I am trying to get a death record for a great-great-uncle of mine, but
am having trouble. His name was Isadore RAKOFF. He was brother to my
great-grandfather David RAKOFF. I have found out that Isadore is buried
along with his son in New Montefiore Cemetery in Suffolk County New
York. I also have his date of death provided by the
cemetery(6/14/1938), But they could not provide the place of death. I
am assuming he died in new york, since he is buried in New york, but
that is not always the case. I am seeking help >from anyone who might be
able to help me in this area. He was 50 years of age when he died, and
was originally >from russia.

Sarah Greenberg
sacredsisters3@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Seeking Death Place For Isadore Rakoff-New Montefiore #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

If Isadore's wife was Rose and their children were Adele, Allan, and Shirley
(ages 40, 39, 15, 11, and 5), they lived in the Bronx at the time of the 1930
census - which doesn't prove that he lived (or died) there in 1938.

For various reasons that we may or may not know, residents of New York City
traveled outside of the city and outside of the state - and even outside of the
U.S. to visit their countries of origin, as entries for the same person on
more than one passenger list show.

For people whose deaths occurred in any of the five boroughs of New York City
through 1949, the Municipal Archives has indexes and death certificates issued
by the Department of Health. The indexes also include deaths of New York City
residents who died outside of the city, as long as those entities notified the
NYC Department of Health. A letter code appears in place of the death certificate
number indicating where the death took place - the state of New York, any other
state, and, if I remember correctly, outside the U.S.

If you want to hazard a guess that he died in New York City, you can go to the
website of the Municipal Archives at
http://www.nyc.gov/html/records/html/vitalrecords/death.shtml for instructions
for ordering online. It helps that you have a death date.

Or if you or someone else can look at the index and a code number indicates that
he died outside of New York City:

-- for a death in New York State but outside of New York City, go to
http://www.health.state.ny.us/vital_records/genealogy.htm to see whether to
order the DC >from the New York State Archives or elsewhere in the state. Also,
the National Archives branch in Manhattan has microfiche of the death indexes
for the state of New York outside of New York City. They're arranged by year.
For a genealogy question, call (212) 401-1620 or e-mail newyork.archives@nara.gov
and find out if they will accept a request for a lookup in the 1938 New York
State death index. The death index will tell you which town he died
in and what his death certificate number is. You can then contact the appropriate
agency in that town.

-- if the death occurred outside of New York State (maybe New Jersey or
Connecticut, for instance), go to Cyndi's List at
http://www.cyndislist.com/usvital.htm#States for contact information for each
state.

-- if the death occurred outside of the U.S., go to the NARA website at
http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/vital-records/american-deaths-overseas.html.

His probate file would show where he died, whether he left a will or not. But
you then have the predicament of deciding which probate court to contact!

Joy Rich
Brooklyn, NY
--

Hello To All

I am trying to get a death record for a great-great-uncle of mine, but
am having trouble. His name was Isadore RAKOFF. He was brother to my
great-grandfather David RAKOFF. I have found out that Isadore is buried
along with his son in New Montefiore Cemetery in Suffolk County New
York. I also have his date of death provided by the
cemetery(6/14/1938), But they could not provide the place of death. I
am assuming he died in new york, since he is buried in New york, but
that is not always the case. I am seeking help >from anyone who might be
able to help me in this area. He was 50 years of age when he died, and
was originally >from russia.

Sarah Greenberg
sacredsisters3@aol.com


Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 1 Sep 2005 18:13:53 UTC, hilary@proppersource.com (Hilary
Henkin) opined:

Dear Howie,

You might want to consider trying to get copies of his naturalization
file. Unless he became a citizen very early (1880-90s, for example),
the documents could have his arrival details. At least, they'll
probably have other information you'll find interesting and useful.

You'l want to narrow down your search as much as possible.

If he lived in a certain area most of his live, for the time being,
assume he became a citizen there. But remember this is only an
assumption,and you may have to consider other regions as well

You'll want to find him in as many US censuses as you
can. Generally, they asked the year the person became a citizen, and
if not a citizen, whether they'd applied ("Pa") or were still a
foreigner ("Al"). If you're lucky, you'll find concensus, and have a
specific year or two to search.
Censuses, of course, can be tricky, because the information is the
unsubstantiated word of the interviewee. An example is that of my late
grandparents. In the 1900 census, they informed the numerator that
they arrived in 1898. In 1910, their arrival date was in 1896, and
they had been US citizens since 1902 (two years earlier than would
have been possible had they stuck with the 1898 arrival date; these
data were repeated in the 1920 census. One might think the difference
represents a subterfuge to enable them to become citizens a little
earlier than the calendar would otherwise warrant.

Oddly enough however, a thorough search of the records of the various
courts by which they might have been naaturalized (conducted by
another of their grandchildren who is an attorney practicing in those
courts) failed to find any evidence of naturalization whatever.

You can tell an enumerator anything, and he will write it down; that's
the nature of censuses. Census data needs to be confirmed by an
independent source of the same information.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 1 Sep 2005 18:13:53 UTC, hilary@proppersource.com (Hilary
Henkin) opined:

Dear Howie,

You might want to consider trying to get copies of his naturalization
file. Unless he became a citizen very early (1880-90s, for example),
the documents could have his arrival details. At least, they'll
probably have other information you'll find interesting and useful.

You'l want to narrow down your search as much as possible.

If he lived in a certain area most of his live, for the time being,
assume he became a citizen there. But remember this is only an
assumption,and you may have to consider other regions as well

You'll want to find him in as many US censuses as you
can. Generally, they asked the year the person became a citizen, and
if not a citizen, whether they'd applied ("Pa") or were still a
foreigner ("Al"). If you're lucky, you'll find concensus, and have a
specific year or two to search.
Censuses, of course, can be tricky, because the information is the
unsubstantiated word of the interviewee. An example is that of my late
grandparents. In the 1900 census, they informed the numerator that
they arrived in 1898. In 1910, their arrival date was in 1896, and
they had been US citizens since 1902 (two years earlier than would
have been possible had they stuck with the 1898 arrival date; these
data were repeated in the 1920 census. One might think the difference
represents a subterfuge to enable them to become citizens a little
earlier than the calendar would otherwise warrant.

Oddly enough however, a thorough search of the records of the various
courts by which they might have been naaturalized (conducted by
another of their grandchildren who is an attorney practicing in those
courts) failed to find any evidence of naturalization whatever.

You can tell an enumerator anything, and he will write it down; that's
the nature of censuses. Census data needs to be confirmed by an
independent source of the same information.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

Hi Judith -

There is excellent information about the US naturalization process
at the NARA website.
http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/naturalization/naturalization.html

Generally, a person had to live in the US for 2 yrs before being eligible
to file a declaration of intent, then wait an additional 3 years before the
process could be finalized. Over the years, these requirements were
changed, and there were different rules for women and minors.

A good book on the subject is They Became Americans, by Loretto Szucs.

Not all people who filed a declaration of intent followed through
to become a citizen. My 2nd great grandfather never became
a citizen although he did file a declaration 1899.

As far as the dates given by our ancestors in census and other
records, we can't always rely on them to be correct.

The best we can do is use these dates as a guideline to finding
the passenger records, then branch out systematically to other
years and other locations. Unfortunately, there were many ports
in addition to Ellis Island where they could have arrived. Although
there are many records on line now, there are also many that are
only on film at NARA, and others which have been lost.

My great grandmother arrived in Providence RI around 1908, but
the records for the Port of Providence at this time do not exist
[or at least they have not been found yet]

Lisa

----- Original Message -----
From: "Judith Lipmanson" <lipmanson@verizon.net>

Alan's post brings up an interesting question: what was the average
amount of time between Declarations of Intent and Petition for
Naturalization -- in NY, app. 1900?

Judith Lipmanson

--
Subject: Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US

Naturalization Papers. In my own case my GF's Declaration of Intent
(first papers) had the date off by one week, but the Petition for
Naturalization (final papers) had the correct date. In addition to port of
entry, these papers told me the date of arrival, the approximate date of
departure, the name of the ship, where the ship embarked from, the
birthplace of my GF, his birthdate, current residence, occupation, age, his
original name, and his wife's birthyear. For me, most of this was a
treasure trove of new information.
I had also spent much time on the Ellis Island web site with a fruitless
search, until his Naturalization Papers told me he arrived in Boston. With
the info >from his papers I've ordered the passenger list >from my local FHL
branch and it should be arriving any day now.
Alan Glick >>>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Re:Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US #general

Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

Hi Judith -

There is excellent information about the US naturalization process
at the NARA website.
http://www.archives.gov/genealogy/naturalization/naturalization.html

Generally, a person had to live in the US for 2 yrs before being eligible
to file a declaration of intent, then wait an additional 3 years before the
process could be finalized. Over the years, these requirements were
changed, and there were different rules for women and minors.

A good book on the subject is They Became Americans, by Loretto Szucs.

Not all people who filed a declaration of intent followed through
to become a citizen. My 2nd great grandfather never became
a citizen although he did file a declaration 1899.

As far as the dates given by our ancestors in census and other
records, we can't always rely on them to be correct.

The best we can do is use these dates as a guideline to finding
the passenger records, then branch out systematically to other
years and other locations. Unfortunately, there were many ports
in addition to Ellis Island where they could have arrived. Although
there are many records on line now, there are also many that are
only on film at NARA, and others which have been lost.

My great grandmother arrived in Providence RI around 1908, but
the records for the Port of Providence at this time do not exist
[or at least they have not been found yet]

Lisa

----- Original Message -----
From: "Judith Lipmanson" <lipmanson@verizon.net>

Alan's post brings up an interesting question: what was the average
amount of time between Declarations of Intent and Petition for
Naturalization -- in NY, app. 1900?

Judith Lipmanson

--
Subject: Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US

Naturalization Papers. In my own case my GF's Declaration of Intent
(first papers) had the date off by one week, but the Petition for
Naturalization (final papers) had the correct date. In addition to port of
entry, these papers told me the date of arrival, the approximate date of
departure, the name of the ship, where the ship embarked from, the
birthplace of my GF, his birthdate, current residence, occupation, age, his
original name, and his wife's birthyear. For me, most of this was a
treasure trove of new information.
I had also spent much time on the Ellis Island web site with a fruitless
search, until his Naturalization Papers told me he arrived in Boston. With
the info >from his papers I've ordered the passenger list >from my local FHL
branch and it should be arriving any day now.
Alan Glick >>>


Antwerp Emigration Index email bounced #general

Bubby <yeruchem18@...>
 

I tried to email the contact person whose email is listed on the
Belgian-roots project website and the email bounced. Does anyone know a
corrected email address for Kim Potier?
Thank you.
(If the number 18 appears in my return email address, please remove it
before replying. Or please reply through the newsgroup.)
Fraida Cohen


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Antwerp Emigration Index email bounced #general

Bubby <yeruchem18@...>
 

I tried to email the contact person whose email is listed on the
Belgian-roots project website and the email bounced. Does anyone know a
corrected email address for Kim Potier?
Thank you.
(If the number 18 appears in my return email address, please remove it
before replying. Or please reply through the newsgroup.)
Fraida Cohen


Re: Naturalization, #southafrica

Miltone@...
 

In a message dated 09 02 2005 2:19:25 AM, safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

<< Applications for Naturalization, >from the National Archives of South
Africa, >>


How do I obtain a naturalization?


Milton E. Botwinick
botwinick@aol.com
Phila., PA USA


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Re:Naturalization, #southafrica

Miltone@...
 

In a message dated 09 02 2005 2:19:25 AM, safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

<< Applications for Naturalization, >from the National Archives of South
Africa, >>


How do I obtain a naturalization?


Milton E. Botwinick
botwinick@aol.com
Phila., PA USA


Re: Naturalization Applications, early 1900's (BERELOWITZ) #southafrica

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

I am curious whether you have posted on this digest about your relatives
from the Ukraine? How do you know they came to South Africa? When did they
come? Were they perhaps part of the Ochberg Orphans group >from the Ukraine?

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica RE: Naturalization Applications, early 1900's (BERELOWITZ) #southafrica

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

I am curious whether you have posted on this digest about your relatives
from the Ukraine? How do you know they came to South Africa? When did they
come? Were they perhaps part of the Ochberg Orphans group >from the Ukraine?

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net