Date   

Re: given names #hungary

smartlines@...
 

Dear Tom,
until about the early 1900s, in the absence of official identification
documents, the registration of names (and other data, as well) was done =
by
verbal statements. How a Jewish or German name appeared in the registry
depended largely on the education level, language skills and hearing =
ability
of the rabbi. In the 1840s Jews tended to demonstrate their =
nationalistic
feelings by writing their German names in Hungarian orthography
(phonetically) and giving the Hungarian version of the given names =
(Erzs=E9bet
for Elisabeth for instance). For German or Hebrew names which had no
Hungarian equivalent something similar was chosen. It is therefore =
possible
that your Betti, at one point, was entered as Berta or vice versa. Given
names, unfortunately give no clues at all to researchers of Jewish =
families.
Andras Hirschler
Budapest, Hungary

Subject: Re: Given Names Pepi and Betti
From: tomchatt@earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 26 Dec 2017 08:39:56 -0800 (GMT-08:00)
X-Message-Number: 3

from my own family research, I can tell you that I found "diminutive" =
names
on official records in Hungary (or at least the northern reaches of the
empire in the 1860s). My great-grandmother, Betty Littman, was born in =
the
county of Szepes in the Kingdom of Hungary (today it is the Spi=C5=A5 =
region of
Slovakia). On her 1864 civil birth record, her name is recorded as =
"Betty".
(That birth registry is in German, which was the prevalent language of =
that
region, even though part of Kingdom of Hungary.) On the 1869 census of =
the
family (records in Hungarian), she is listed as "Bethy". Many of her
siblings on the same census have diminutive names, including "Josi"
(Joseph), "Leny" (Lena), "Esti", and "Resi" (Rose). Betty's Hebrew name =
was
Bluma, and on later records in America, she appears as Bertha, but to my
knowledge she always went by Betty in person throughout her life. I do =
not
know whether the name Bertha had any use in her early life in Hungary, =
or if
it was improvised after she came to America at age 23, not yet married.

Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA
Researching LITTMAN in Hungary; BRAUTMAN in Kishinev


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE:given names #hungary

smartlines@...
 

Dear Tom,
until about the early 1900s, in the absence of official identification
documents, the registration of names (and other data, as well) was done =
by
verbal statements. How a Jewish or German name appeared in the registry
depended largely on the education level, language skills and hearing =
ability
of the rabbi. In the 1840s Jews tended to demonstrate their =
nationalistic
feelings by writing their German names in Hungarian orthography
(phonetically) and giving the Hungarian version of the given names =
(Erzs=E9bet
for Elisabeth for instance). For German or Hebrew names which had no
Hungarian equivalent something similar was chosen. It is therefore =
possible
that your Betti, at one point, was entered as Berta or vice versa. Given
names, unfortunately give no clues at all to researchers of Jewish =
families.
Andras Hirschler
Budapest, Hungary

Subject: Re: Given Names Pepi and Betti
From: tomchatt@earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 26 Dec 2017 08:39:56 -0800 (GMT-08:00)
X-Message-Number: 3

from my own family research, I can tell you that I found "diminutive" =
names
on official records in Hungary (or at least the northern reaches of the
empire in the 1860s). My great-grandmother, Betty Littman, was born in =
the
county of Szepes in the Kingdom of Hungary (today it is the Spi=C5=A5 =
region of
Slovakia). On her 1864 civil birth record, her name is recorded as =
"Betty".
(That birth registry is in German, which was the prevalent language of =
that
region, even though part of Kingdom of Hungary.) On the 1869 census of =
the
family (records in Hungarian), she is listed as "Bethy". Many of her
siblings on the same census have diminutive names, including "Josi"
(Joseph), "Leny" (Lena), "Esti", and "Resi" (Rose). Betty's Hebrew name =
was
Bluma, and on later records in America, she appears as Bertha, but to my
knowledge she always went by Betty in person throughout her life. I do =
not
know whether the name Bertha had any use in her early life in Hungary, =
or if
it was improvised after she came to America at age 23, not yet married.

Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA
Researching LITTMAN in Hungary; BRAUTMAN in Kishinev


Issue #132 of Genealo-J , the Journal of the French Genealogical Society, has just been published #france

georges.graner@...
 

*** Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 132, winter 2017 has just been published.

Bernard Lyon-Caen writes a paper about the Leven family, a rather famous
family. The name of Leven first evokes several characters who played a
leading role in the creation of the Alliance Israelite Universelle. We
also know that several descendants identified themselves with this institution
during their whole life while others carry on the same task now. Other members
of the family yesterday and today invested in other fields. We first
transcribe a family history note written in 1929 by the lawyer Maurice
Leven, then we try to locate this family who lived in the 18th century and
early 19th in Uerdingen, on the edge of the Lower Rhine, then came to Paris
and Saint-Denis. In all these places, the name has for a long time been
attached to leather production and then to mineral waters. Starting >from the
first Levens arrived in Paris in 1838, the paper attempts to list their
descendants until today, gathering as much information on each of them as
possible, resulting in a great diversity.

The life of Antal Weiner (1878-1955) can be reconstructed thanks to a diary
found by his family. He is born in Senta, now in Serbia but which was then in
Hungary. Georges Graner relates how Weiner, after a youth in a modest family,
obtained a high school diploma, spent a happy year in the Austro-Hungarian
army and was recruited by the Hungarian railways. He was then and remained
during his whole life a patriot so that he felt a frustration when he was
ousted >from the railways in 1923 by the antisemitic laws. As every good
Hungarian, he had seen with sorrow the mutilation of Hungary after the World
War and was delighted when Hitler gave back some lost territories to his
country. The year 1944 was terrible for Jews in Hungary. Weiner’s daughter
was deported and almost all his family perished in the Holocaust but Antal
survived the hardships of the ghetto and of the siege of Budapest.

About the Coblentz family of Haguenau (Alsace) in the 18th century,
Pierre-Andre Meyer asks some genealogical questions. >from the legal problems
encountered in 1733 by Emanuel Coblentz, a young Jew of Haguenau accused of
having falsely shown his intention of converting to catholicism, and, before
him, by Lowel Coblentz, his father, in conflict for a long time with the
merchants and the magistrates of Haguenau, the article asks several questions
relating to the genealogy of this family. Disputing different statements by
Elie Scheid, the historian of the Jewish community of Haguenau, the author
shows a relationship between Lowel Coblentz and the great Zay (or Coblenz)
family of Metz. He also wonders about the family connections between Coblentz
and Feistel Moch, parnass of the Jewish community of Los Angeles, whose date
of death (largely erased on his grave in the Jewish cemetery in the city) has
been restored.

In 1928, a 'rags-to-riches' Greek Vlach emigrant to Sweden built and then
donated a school, adorned with a beautiful Swiss tower clock, to his native
mountain village of Nymfaion in Macedonia, Greece. Until recently no one knew
the real story behind it.The clock's four faces are marked (in Greek) with
the words "Omega" and "Bourla", so everyone assumed that the Swiss clock was
built by Omega, Switzerland. No one could recall what the word "Bourla" meant
or why it was there. Andonis Godis reveals the real identity of the complex
Swiss "Omega" clock and the fascinating family story of the Bourlas, one of
the Balkans most famous diamond and watch merchants, who escaped Salonica and
Greece during WWII and were thought to have perished in the Shoah without
leaving a trace. The author was fortunate to trace their improbable escape
to Palestine and locate the unsuspecting Sephardic family's descendants in
France.

Georges Graner, Paris


French SIG #France Issue #132 of Genealo-J , the Journal of the French Genealogical Society, has just been published #france

georges.graner@...
 

*** Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 132, winter 2017 has just been published.

Bernard Lyon-Caen writes a paper about the Leven family, a rather famous
family. The name of Leven first evokes several characters who played a
leading role in the creation of the Alliance Israelite Universelle. We
also know that several descendants identified themselves with this institution
during their whole life while others carry on the same task now. Other members
of the family yesterday and today invested in other fields. We first
transcribe a family history note written in 1929 by the lawyer Maurice
Leven, then we try to locate this family who lived in the 18th century and
early 19th in Uerdingen, on the edge of the Lower Rhine, then came to Paris
and Saint-Denis. In all these places, the name has for a long time been
attached to leather production and then to mineral waters. Starting >from the
first Levens arrived in Paris in 1838, the paper attempts to list their
descendants until today, gathering as much information on each of them as
possible, resulting in a great diversity.

The life of Antal Weiner (1878-1955) can be reconstructed thanks to a diary
found by his family. He is born in Senta, now in Serbia but which was then in
Hungary. Georges Graner relates how Weiner, after a youth in a modest family,
obtained a high school diploma, spent a happy year in the Austro-Hungarian
army and was recruited by the Hungarian railways. He was then and remained
during his whole life a patriot so that he felt a frustration when he was
ousted >from the railways in 1923 by the antisemitic laws. As every good
Hungarian, he had seen with sorrow the mutilation of Hungary after the World
War and was delighted when Hitler gave back some lost territories to his
country. The year 1944 was terrible for Jews in Hungary. Weiner’s daughter
was deported and almost all his family perished in the Holocaust but Antal
survived the hardships of the ghetto and of the siege of Budapest.

About the Coblentz family of Haguenau (Alsace) in the 18th century,
Pierre-Andre Meyer asks some genealogical questions. >from the legal problems
encountered in 1733 by Emanuel Coblentz, a young Jew of Haguenau accused of
having falsely shown his intention of converting to catholicism, and, before
him, by Lowel Coblentz, his father, in conflict for a long time with the
merchants and the magistrates of Haguenau, the article asks several questions
relating to the genealogy of this family. Disputing different statements by
Elie Scheid, the historian of the Jewish community of Haguenau, the author
shows a relationship between Lowel Coblentz and the great Zay (or Coblenz)
family of Metz. He also wonders about the family connections between Coblentz
and Feistel Moch, parnass of the Jewish community of Los Angeles, whose date
of death (largely erased on his grave in the Jewish cemetery in the city) has
been restored.

In 1928, a 'rags-to-riches' Greek Vlach emigrant to Sweden built and then
donated a school, adorned with a beautiful Swiss tower clock, to his native
mountain village of Nymfaion in Macedonia, Greece. Until recently no one knew
the real story behind it.The clock's four faces are marked (in Greek) with
the words "Omega" and "Bourla", so everyone assumed that the Swiss clock was
built by Omega, Switzerland. No one could recall what the word "Bourla" meant
or why it was there. Andonis Godis reveals the real identity of the complex
Swiss "Omega" clock and the fascinating family story of the Bourlas, one of
the Balkans most famous diamond and watch merchants, who escaped Salonica and
Greece during WWII and were thought to have perished in the Shoah without
leaving a trace. The author was fortunate to trace their improbable escape
to Palestine and locate the unsuspecting Sephardic family's descendants in
France.

Georges Graner, Paris


ViewMate translation request #poland

magijak@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

I've posted 4 vital records in Russian, >from Mogielnica Poland, for which I
need extraction of all genealogical data (names, dates, places).

I'd appreciate as complete a translation as possible.

It is on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62708
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62651
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62650
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62649

Thank you very much,
magijak@gmail.com

Jacob Hammer

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the ViewMate form.


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate translation request #poland

magijak@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

I've posted 4 vital records in Russian, >from Mogielnica Poland, for which I
need extraction of all genealogical data (names, dates, places).

I'd appreciate as complete a translation as possible.

It is on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62708
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62651
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62650
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62649

Thank you very much,
magijak@gmail.com

Jacob Hammer

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the ViewMate form.


Family name query -- NICKI #lithuania

Andrea Nicki <nicandr4@...>
 

Dear list members, I have been for long trying to get more information
about my family name NICKI. My grandfather--John Nicki--came >from
Lithuania in 1913 to NY. He told his son--my father--that our original
last name was NAGOSOTZKI and that he had shortened it. However, there
is no information on this last name. And other documents refer to him by
the last name NICKI and say he had a brother with the last name NICKI.
I found a number of people listed with the last name NICKI in Poland
who had been in Jewish ghettos. I'm thinking now that maybe he was
trying to hide his Jewish identity and sound more Russian.

Does anyone know if this was something LIthuanian Jews did at that
time? I am not knowledgeable about the cultural pressures at that
time. My grandfather was always very silent about his lineage and
would not share any information, but called my father Litvak.

Thanks for any thoughts,
Andrea Nicki
Vancouver, Canada


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Family name query -- NICKI #lithuania

Andrea Nicki <nicandr4@...>
 

Dear list members, I have been for long trying to get more information
about my family name NICKI. My grandfather--John Nicki--came >from
Lithuania in 1913 to NY. He told his son--my father--that our original
last name was NAGOSOTZKI and that he had shortened it. However, there
is no information on this last name. And other documents refer to him by
the last name NICKI and say he had a brother with the last name NICKI.
I found a number of people listed with the last name NICKI in Poland
who had been in Jewish ghettos. I'm thinking now that maybe he was
trying to hide his Jewish identity and sound more Russian.

Does anyone know if this was something LIthuanian Jews did at that
time? I am not knowledgeable about the cultural pressures at that
time. My grandfather was always very silent about his lineage and
would not share any information, but called my father Litvak.

Thanks for any thoughts,
Andrea Nicki
Vancouver, Canada


JGS of Greater Orlando program Tues, Jan. 2, 2018 #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando presents: "How Your Library Can
Help You With Genealogical Research," on Tuesday, January 2nd, 2018 at 6:30 P.M. at
the Seminole County Central Library in Casselberry. Our speaker is librarian and
genealogical expert Patricia Russell. The program is free and open to the public.
It is also available via live streaming webinar.

Seminole County libraries offer free access to five genealogy databases that make
finding lost relatives and vital records easier. You may have used "Ancestry.com"
(Library Edition) and "HeritageQuest," but you can also use the library's newest
databases, "America's Genealogy Bank," historical newspapers, books and documents
as old as 1690, and "America's Obituaries," a comprehensive collection of national
death records, or the powerful people-finder "ReferenceUSA.com."

Join us to get an overview of what all five databases cover, tips on using them
for genealogical research, and then explore them in a hands-on setting, using your
own laptop, tablet, or smart-phone. If you are unable to bring a device, there are
a limited number of computers available. Reference librarians will answer
questions, and are there to help, if needed. No library card is required to use the
library computers during this free workshop, and wifi access is always free in
Seminole County libraries.

Pat Russell began working in libraries when she was in middle school. She has been
a librarian in Central Florida libraries since 2000, completing her Master of
Library Science degree at Florida State University.

In 2015, she began the Genealogy 101 classes at the Jean Rhein Central Branch. She
also taught in other Seminole library branches. In 2016, she began a library
Genealogy Club, which meets monthly, and features knowledgeable speakers and gives
family historians another place to collaborate.

Since 2017, the Central Florida Genealogical Society has collaborated with the
library in running this club. This year also saw the library's first annual
Genealogy Fair, which brought together many of the area's most accessible and
extensively-experienced genealogical and historical groups and individuals to
speak on basic genealogical topics.

Using only the library's genealogical databases, free online trees on Ancestry, and
Family Search, Pat Russell has been able to trace her family back six generations
on both sides.

Registration is required. The program will also be available for live
streaming. Register here: http://jgsgo.org/programs-jgsgo/.

The library is located at: 215 Oxford Road, Casselberry, FL 32707.
For more information contact Lin Herz at: info@jgsgo.org.
Respectfully submitted,
Lin Herz
JGSGO Publicity and Information


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Greater Orlando program Tues, Jan. 2, 2018 #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando presents: "How Your Library Can
Help You With Genealogical Research," on Tuesday, January 2nd, 2018 at 6:30 P.M. at
the Seminole County Central Library in Casselberry. Our speaker is librarian and
genealogical expert Patricia Russell. The program is free and open to the public.
It is also available via live streaming webinar.

Seminole County libraries offer free access to five genealogy databases that make
finding lost relatives and vital records easier. You may have used "Ancestry.com"
(Library Edition) and "HeritageQuest," but you can also use the library's newest
databases, "America's Genealogy Bank," historical newspapers, books and documents
as old as 1690, and "America's Obituaries," a comprehensive collection of national
death records, or the powerful people-finder "ReferenceUSA.com."

Join us to get an overview of what all five databases cover, tips on using them
for genealogical research, and then explore them in a hands-on setting, using your
own laptop, tablet, or smart-phone. If you are unable to bring a device, there are
a limited number of computers available. Reference librarians will answer
questions, and are there to help, if needed. No library card is required to use the
library computers during this free workshop, and wifi access is always free in
Seminole County libraries.

Pat Russell began working in libraries when she was in middle school. She has been
a librarian in Central Florida libraries since 2000, completing her Master of
Library Science degree at Florida State University.

In 2015, she began the Genealogy 101 classes at the Jean Rhein Central Branch. She
also taught in other Seminole library branches. In 2016, she began a library
Genealogy Club, which meets monthly, and features knowledgeable speakers and gives
family historians another place to collaborate.

Since 2017, the Central Florida Genealogical Society has collaborated with the
library in running this club. This year also saw the library's first annual
Genealogy Fair, which brought together many of the area's most accessible and
extensively-experienced genealogical and historical groups and individuals to
speak on basic genealogical topics.

Using only the library's genealogical databases, free online trees on Ancestry, and
Family Search, Pat Russell has been able to trace her family back six generations
on both sides.

Registration is required. The program will also be available for live
streaming. Register here: http://jgsgo.org/programs-jgsgo/.

The library is located at: 215 Oxford Road, Casselberry, FL 32707.
For more information contact Lin Herz at: info@jgsgo.org.
Respectfully submitted,
Lin Herz
JGSGO Publicity and Information


Polish translation requested for 2 birth records. #poland

Debbie Terman
 

I've posted 2 vital records in Polish for which I need a translation.
They are on ViewMate at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63355

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63356

I believe that these are the birth records of my great-grandfather and
possibly one of his siblings, >from the period 1875-1880, in Pultusk.

I would especially like to know if parents' names (including mother's
maiden name) are mentioned, as well as any other family members.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Debbie Terman, Massachusetts, USA


JRI Poland #Poland Polish translation requested for 2 birth records. #poland

Debbie Terman
 

I've posted 2 vital records in Polish for which I need a translation.
They are on ViewMate at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63355

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63356

I believe that these are the birth records of my great-grandfather and
possibly one of his siblings, >from the period 1875-1880, in Pultusk.

I would especially like to know if parents' names (including mother's
maiden name) are mentioned, as well as any other family members.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Debbie Terman, Massachusetts, USA


"UNION - Blaetter der Emigration" Digitized and on the Web. #southafrica

David Lewin
 

Parallel to the "Aufbau" publication in England and the USA, "UNION -
Blaetter der Emigration" was published in South Africa under the
editorship of Dr H.O. Simon between 1939 and 1948. It is a depiction
of the life of those Jews who managed to escape Nazi Germany and who
began life anew in the South African refuge.

I am delighted to be able to report that I have finally managed
it! It can be reached from

http://remember.org/unite/union/union_index.html

where I have more of the background of this publication and directly at

http://remember.org/unite/union/Union_Blaetter_OCR_Prepare_Dec_2017_1_1153.pdf

Where only possible the text is fully searchable

The file is LARGE! and will take a little while to download. I am
still hoping that someone can teach me how to improve that. I am
equally hoping that rather than be mounted on the Search and Unite
site, it will find a home on a more suitable server where the history
of German Jewish refugees >from Nazi Germany is centered.

The quality of the microfilm which I worked >from was relatively
poor. It took a great deal of coaxing my ABBYY FineReader 12
software to produce the outcome - but now, after two-and-a-half years
it is finally done.

I see the site also as a memorial to those who brought UNION to the
public and will welcome any comments, additions and corrections of
the data I have assembled.

There is a paper version UNION is available at the Deutsche National
Bibliothek and the post-war only issued at the South African National Library.

Be well, have a healthy 2018
David Lewin
London


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica "UNION - Blaetter der Emigration" Digitized and on the Web. #southafrica

David Lewin
 

Parallel to the "Aufbau" publication in England and the USA, "UNION -
Blaetter der Emigration" was published in South Africa under the
editorship of Dr H.O. Simon between 1939 and 1948. It is a depiction
of the life of those Jews who managed to escape Nazi Germany and who
began life anew in the South African refuge.

I am delighted to be able to report that I have finally managed
it! It can be reached from

http://remember.org/unite/union/union_index.html

where I have more of the background of this publication and directly at

http://remember.org/unite/union/Union_Blaetter_OCR_Prepare_Dec_2017_1_1153.pdf

Where only possible the text is fully searchable

The file is LARGE! and will take a little while to download. I am
still hoping that someone can teach me how to improve that. I am
equally hoping that rather than be mounted on the Search and Unite
site, it will find a home on a more suitable server where the history
of German Jewish refugees >from Nazi Germany is centered.

The quality of the microfilm which I worked >from was relatively
poor. It took a great deal of coaxing my ABBYY FineReader 12
software to produce the outcome - but now, after two-and-a-half years
it is finally done.

I see the site also as a memorial to those who brought UNION to the
public and will welcome any comments, additions and corrections of
the data I have assembled.

There is a paper version UNION is available at the Deutsche National
Bibliothek and the post-war only issued at the South African National Library.

Be well, have a healthy 2018
David Lewin
London


ViewMate Translation requests - Russian & Polish #general

Louise Goldstein <lgoldstein@...>
 

I'm exploring my grandfather's extended family, so far mostly in Terespol,
Poland. I don't need a word-for-word translation of these vital records,
but am interested in all the details: names, dates, locations, occupations,
witnesses' names, maiden names, marital status, age and anything else that
might be mentioned. Many, many heartfelt thanks to those who have already
translated documents for me! The documents are in ViewMate at the following
addresses. Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Russian:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63280 Birth of
Hershko Goldshtern, 1901

Polish:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63281 Birth of
Icko Hersch Rozensummen, 1841
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63282 Death of
Usher Rozensummen, 1845
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63283 Birth of
Judko Rozensummen, 1936
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63284 Marriage of
Berko Hershenfeld and Hindy Hershenfeld, 1850

Thank you so very much!
Louise Goldstein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Translation requests - Russian & Polish #general

Louise Goldstein <lgoldstein@...>
 

I'm exploring my grandfather's extended family, so far mostly in Terespol,
Poland. I don't need a word-for-word translation of these vital records,
but am interested in all the details: names, dates, locations, occupations,
witnesses' names, maiden names, marital status, age and anything else that
might be mentioned. Many, many heartfelt thanks to those who have already
translated documents for me! The documents are in ViewMate at the following
addresses. Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Russian:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63280 Birth of
Hershko Goldshtern, 1901

Polish:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63281 Birth of
Icko Hersch Rozensummen, 1841
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63282 Death of
Usher Rozensummen, 1845
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63283 Birth of
Judko Rozensummen, 1936
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63284 Marriage of
Berko Hershenfeld and Hindy Hershenfeld, 1850

Thank you so very much!
Louise Goldstein


A troubling question #germany

amgreene@...
 

In researching a family member who fled Germany in 1939, I have found a
Munich parking citation (of all things) >from 23 Jan 1936, which includes a
"statement >from the accused" in which he acknowledges a lesser offense
(standing in a no-standing zone instead of parking in a no-parking zone)
but which ends:

"Ich bin Mitglied des N.S.D.A.P."

("I am a member of the Nazi Party")

Needless to say, this comes as quite a shock.

It's definitely the right person, not someone else with the same name. (Every
personal detail is correct.)

Of course, I can imagine several possible ways for this statement to be untrue.
The statement is not in his handwriting, so it could have been an interpolation
on the part of the police. It could have been a lie on his part to
gamble and try to get more favorable treatment.

Or, could it actually be true?

How, 80 years later, can I try to (dis)prove it?

* Did the NSDAP even allow Jews to be members in Jan 1936? (Not that this
would be conclusive either way.)
* Does a membership list exist; if so, is it available online or to researchers?

Any other suggestions? Thanks in advance,

Andrew Greene amgreene@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany A troubling question #germany

amgreene@...
 

In researching a family member who fled Germany in 1939, I have found a
Munich parking citation (of all things) >from 23 Jan 1936, which includes a
"statement >from the accused" in which he acknowledges a lesser offense
(standing in a no-standing zone instead of parking in a no-parking zone)
but which ends:

"Ich bin Mitglied des N.S.D.A.P."

("I am a member of the Nazi Party")

Needless to say, this comes as quite a shock.

It's definitely the right person, not someone else with the same name. (Every
personal detail is correct.)

Of course, I can imagine several possible ways for this statement to be untrue.
The statement is not in his handwriting, so it could have been an interpolation
on the part of the police. It could have been a lie on his part to
gamble and try to get more favorable treatment.

Or, could it actually be true?

How, 80 years later, can I try to (dis)prove it?

* Did the NSDAP even allow Jews to be members in Jan 1936? (Not that this
would be conclusive either way.)
* Does a membership list exist; if so, is it available online or to researchers?

Any other suggestions? Thanks in advance,

Andrew Greene amgreene@gmail.com


Issue #132 of Genealo-J , the Journal of the French Genealogical Society, has just been published #germany

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of
France, Issue 132, winter 2017 has just been published.
Issue 132 contents include:

About the Coblentz family of Haguenau (Alsace) in the 18th century,
Pierre-André Meyer asks some genealogical questions.

from the legal problems encountered in 1733 by Emanuel Coblentz, a
young Jew of Haguenau accused of having falsely shown his intention of
converting to catholicism, and, before him, by Lowel Coblentz, his father,
in conflict for a long time with the merchants and the magistrates of
Haguenau.

The article asks several questions relating to the genealogy of this
family. Disputing different statements by Elie Scheid, the historian of
the Jewish community of Haguenau, the author shows a relationship
between Lowel Coblentz and the great Zay (or Coblenz) family of Metz.

He also wonders about the family connections between Coblentz and Feistel
Moch, parnass of the Jewish community of Los Angeles, whose date of death
(largely erased on his grave in the Jewish cemetery in the city)
has been restored.

Request summaries of other articles in the current issue by Email to:

Georges Graner georges.graner@wanadoo.fr


German SIG #Germany Issue #132 of Genealo-J , the Journal of the French Genealogical Society, has just been published #germany

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of
France, Issue 132, winter 2017 has just been published.
Issue 132 contents include:

About the Coblentz family of Haguenau (Alsace) in the 18th century,
Pierre-André Meyer asks some genealogical questions.

from the legal problems encountered in 1733 by Emanuel Coblentz, a
young Jew of Haguenau accused of having falsely shown his intention of
converting to catholicism, and, before him, by Lowel Coblentz, his father,
in conflict for a long time with the merchants and the magistrates of
Haguenau.

The article asks several questions relating to the genealogy of this
family. Disputing different statements by Elie Scheid, the historian of
the Jewish community of Haguenau, the author shows a relationship
between Lowel Coblentz and the great Zay (or Coblenz) family of Metz.

He also wonders about the family connections between Coblentz and Feistel
Moch, parnass of the Jewish community of Los Angeles, whose date of death
(largely erased on his grave in the Jewish cemetery in the city)
has been restored.

Request summaries of other articles in the current issue by Email to:

Georges Graner georges.graner@wanadoo.fr

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