Date   

Amazon Donations for JewishGen

Nancy Siegel
 

If you shop online with Amazon.com, we encourage you to sign up for Amazon’s Smile program and designate JewishGen as your organization of choice. When you make purchases through smile.amazon.com, you will generate donations from Amazon for JewishGen.


You can use the Smile program for your holiday shopping and year-round. To sign up for the program, follow this link: https://smile.amazon.com/ch/76-0493072


To learn more about the Smile program, go to: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/chpf/about/


Happy shopping!


Nancy Siegel

Director of Communications

JewishGen.org



Re: Belchatow Kehillahlink, Roni Seibel Liebowitz #poland

Eleanor Richmond
 


A FAMILY STORY WAS THAT 3 BROTHERS CAME FROM ENGLAND TO CANADA  AND THE IMMIGRATION OFFICER GAVE EACH A DIFFERENT SURNAME  SEIBEL LEIBOWITZ JACKSON
YOU CAN CHECK JACKSON  - OR COOPERMAN TO FIND THEIR CHARTS
THEY ALSO DID A FAMILY TRACING
ELEANOR COOPER RICHMOND


JewishGen / ViewMate #france

phesske@...
 

Dear Genners,
=0A=
Could anyone explain how to upload a file on ViewMate ? Many thanks.

Kind regards,
Philip Hesske


French SIG #France JewishGen / ViewMate #france

phesske@...
 

Dear Genners,
=0A=
Could anyone explain how to upload a file on ViewMate ? Many thanks.

Kind regards,
Philip Hesske


Re: Male first name Babel

David Barrett
 

Probably he actual name was Zerubabel - Babel for short


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

jbonline1111@...
 

I believe that I am correct in stating that many of these records are already at the National Archives.  I recall finding some information there close to 30 years ago when I visited in person, when records were still on microfilm.  If I am wrong, I hope someone will correct me. 

Regardless, the fee increases are outrageous.  I appreciate Renee for bringing them to everyone's attention.  This is the issue, not how SIGs are operated. 


JewishGen / ViewMate #ukraine

Philip Hesske <phesske@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Could anyone explain how to upload a file on ViewMate ? Many thanks.

Kind regards,
Philip Hesske

MODERATOR NOTE: Instructions are at https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/topost.asp


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine JewishGen / ViewMate #ukraine

Philip Hesske <phesske@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Could anyone explain how to upload a file on ViewMate ? Many thanks.

Kind regards,
Philip Hesske

MODERATOR NOTE: Instructions are at https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/topost.asp


Re: Book - The Tattooist of Auschwitz

Merrill Paletz
 

Dont know if it is ok to recommend books but i love Inheritance by Shapiro true story about Ms Shapiro who thru Ancestry finds her assumed father is not-and leads her to discover thru research methods, who her biological father is Cant put the book down.


Veiewmate : Krugersdorp South Africa 1923 Yiddish Dramatic Society

Saul Issroff
 

I posted a photo  of the Krugersdorp, South Africa
Yiddish Dramatic Society 1923. This is for possible identification of
participants. Request is from Elona Steinfeld,.researcher at the  Country
Communities Project,  SA  Friends of Beth Hatfusoth.. The original was provided by Alex Marcus, kibbutz Tzora, whose mother is first female on the left.

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76020

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

If anyone has a clearer copy of the photo please send ..jpeg file to Elona at: 
Museum@...,
Thank you very much

Saul Issroff 
London


Re: Male first name Babel

Linda Kelley
 

Perhaps Velvel was the original name for the nickname Babel.
Linda Wolfe Kelley
Portland, OR, USA


How to obtain a court decision ? #lodz #poland

Dominique Merlet <dom.merlet@...>
 

Hello,

I would like to know how obtain a copy of a court decision in Lodz.

This document concerns my grandfather Mojzesz Izak GERSZONOWICZ,
but we don't know where to go to get it.

Mojzesz's birth was declared twice: once by his mother Chaja Mariem
in 1914 when she named her son Moshe and said he was born on
14-10-1910 and a second time by his father Jankiel in 1922 when
he named his son Mojzesz Isak and said he was born on 01-05-1911.
Jankiel was not present when her son was born (probably in the army...)

In 1932, the Court of Justice of Lodz issued a decision annulling the
1st birth certificate in favour of the 2nd. I would like to recover
this court decision and know the motivation that gave priority to
the father's statement.

A few weeks ago, I submitted an online request on the website of
The States Archive in Lodz but I don't have an answer. Is this the
organization to be solicited?

Do you know how to obtain this document? Who should we contact?
Who can obtain it and what proof of identity do we need to produce?

Thank you for your help.

Best regards.


Mme Dominique MERLET


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland How to obtain a court decision ? #lodz #poland

Dominique Merlet <dom.merlet@...>
 

Hello,

I would like to know how obtain a copy of a court decision in Lodz.

This document concerns my grandfather Mojzesz Izak GERSZONOWICZ,
but we don't know where to go to get it.

Mojzesz's birth was declared twice: once by his mother Chaja Mariem
in 1914 when she named her son Moshe and said he was born on
14-10-1910 and a second time by his father Jankiel in 1922 when
he named his son Mojzesz Isak and said he was born on 01-05-1911.
Jankiel was not present when her son was born (probably in the army...)

In 1932, the Court of Justice of Lodz issued a decision annulling the
1st birth certificate in favour of the 2nd. I would like to recover
this court decision and know the motivation that gave priority to
the father's statement.

A few weeks ago, I submitted an online request on the website of
The States Archive in Lodz but I don't have an answer. Is this the
organization to be solicited?

Do you know how to obtain this document? Who should we contact?
Who can obtain it and what proof of identity do we need to produce?

Thank you for your help.

Best regards.


Mme Dominique MERLET


Theresian Cadaster Revisited #austria-czech

Paul King
 

Theresian Cadaster (Tereziansky katastr)

In a private correspondence replying to my SIG posting of November 27,
"Randy Schoenberg's Prague Visit", Randy corrects my chronological
boundaries for the Theresian Cadastre by giving a time span of
1748-1754, I had given the time span as c 1714 - c 1748. Randy cites
an article by a Dr. Kosir accompanied by a URL.
http://www2.arnes.si/~krsrd1/conference/Speeches/Kosir_Land_Records.htm

I believe that the Kosir dates refer to the PUBLISHING of the Cadastre
and not the contents which began more than two decades earlier. I wish
to elaborate because I think the following information is very
important for SIG Austria-Czech family researchers seeking to identify
Bohemian ancestors during the reigns of Charles VI and Maria Theresia

1. "The enumerations in the Theresian cadastre were begun in 1715 and
completed during the period 1727-1729. The majority of the
enumerations were collected in 1723; the district of Bechni and
Konigratz after 1723." Ruth Kestenberg-Gladstein, The Non-Metropolitan
1724 Census of the Jewish Population in Bohemia, Zion 9 (1)1943, fn.
11. [Hebrew]

2. According to an entry in an abbreviated version of the 1748
Theresian cadastre published in 1964, a Jewish resident registered on
the Zduchovice estate (no name given) was a wine distiller, butcher,
and merchant in corn, cattle and cloth. Two servants were living with
him. In the original edition of the Theresian cadastre, a Jakob Lobl
is named as the referent of the 1964 citing and the cadastre entry is
dated 1718. It reads that he is collecting the taxes, has 2 horses, 2
cows, 3 sheep, and that he has been resident on the estate for 40
years. His taxes amount to 50 kreuzers and another 100 kr. schutzgeld.
This information was supplied to me by Prague genealogist, Julius
Muller. Jakob Lobl also appears in the 1724 census, resident in
Zduchovice.

3. "The convoluted collection of Bohemia's second cadastral survey is
traditionally referred to as the "Theresian Cadastre", although the
preparatory work commences in 1710-1711, the first processing phase in
1713-1714, and the revision in the year 1722, that is, largely in the
reign of Charles VI. The final elaboration of the collected data comes
from the years 1748 and 1756, the actual reign of Maria Theresia,"
Michaela Kral, Auswirkungen des Familiantengesetzes auf eine judische
Familie in der sudbohmischen Stadt Patzau zwischen 1726 und 1849. Eine
Fallstudie, [Effects of the Family Decree on a Jewish Family in the
South Bohemian Town of Patzau (Pacov)] between 1726 and 1849. A Case
Study], Zeitschrift f=C3=BCr Ostmitteleuropa-Forschung 53/1 (2004), S. 83 -
98, fn. 25. The text notes that "In the Theresian cadastre (data from
1734) eight Jewish families are listed in Patzau."

4. For a recent applied use of the Cadastre with a description of what
its content entailed, see "Was Domar Right? Serfdom and Factor
Endowments in Bohemia," Alexander Klein and Sheilagh Ogilvie, October
2017. https://www.kent.ac.uk/economics/documents/research/papers/2017/1717.pdf
Neither this article nor other micro socio-economic studies of Ogilvie
touch on Jewish residents of Bohemia but are splendid investigations
of what could and should be done regarding the role of Jews in
commerce and communication in the Bohemian Crown Lands.

5. In a publication of the Jewish Museum on the Radobyl Cemetery near
Kamyk nad Vltavou in Beroun District, one finds the following remark:
"In 1719, first written evidence on Jews, in cadastre Terezianskeho."
Dated 31 May 1719. About Jews in nearby Drazkov.

Theresian Cadastre is a generic term for material gathered >from the
beginning of the second decade of the 18th c. in the reign of Charles
VI. Its material was collected until at least the 1740s under the
regime of Maria Theresa. It appears to embrace both census and
cadastre material, that is, enumeration of the population (census) and
enumeration of the mobile and immobile property (cadastre) of
household heads in specific municipal locations.

I welcome comments and corrections but I hope I have briefly
demonstrated that stuff relevant to Jewish genealogy can be turned up
in this Habsburg mania for documenting and re-documenting.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Theresian Cadaster Revisited #austria-czech

Paul King
 

Theresian Cadaster (Tereziansky katastr)

In a private correspondence replying to my SIG posting of November 27,
"Randy Schoenberg's Prague Visit", Randy corrects my chronological
boundaries for the Theresian Cadastre by giving a time span of
1748-1754, I had given the time span as c 1714 - c 1748. Randy cites
an article by a Dr. Kosir accompanied by a URL.
http://www2.arnes.si/~krsrd1/conference/Speeches/Kosir_Land_Records.htm

I believe that the Kosir dates refer to the PUBLISHING of the Cadastre
and not the contents which began more than two decades earlier. I wish
to elaborate because I think the following information is very
important for SIG Austria-Czech family researchers seeking to identify
Bohemian ancestors during the reigns of Charles VI and Maria Theresia

1. "The enumerations in the Theresian cadastre were begun in 1715 and
completed during the period 1727-1729. The majority of the
enumerations were collected in 1723; the district of Bechni and
Konigratz after 1723." Ruth Kestenberg-Gladstein, The Non-Metropolitan
1724 Census of the Jewish Population in Bohemia, Zion 9 (1)1943, fn.
11. [Hebrew]

2. According to an entry in an abbreviated version of the 1748
Theresian cadastre published in 1964, a Jewish resident registered on
the Zduchovice estate (no name given) was a wine distiller, butcher,
and merchant in corn, cattle and cloth. Two servants were living with
him. In the original edition of the Theresian cadastre, a Jakob Lobl
is named as the referent of the 1964 citing and the cadastre entry is
dated 1718. It reads that he is collecting the taxes, has 2 horses, 2
cows, 3 sheep, and that he has been resident on the estate for 40
years. His taxes amount to 50 kreuzers and another 100 kr. schutzgeld.
This information was supplied to me by Prague genealogist, Julius
Muller. Jakob Lobl also appears in the 1724 census, resident in
Zduchovice.

3. "The convoluted collection of Bohemia's second cadastral survey is
traditionally referred to as the "Theresian Cadastre", although the
preparatory work commences in 1710-1711, the first processing phase in
1713-1714, and the revision in the year 1722, that is, largely in the
reign of Charles VI. The final elaboration of the collected data comes
from the years 1748 and 1756, the actual reign of Maria Theresia,"
Michaela Kral, Auswirkungen des Familiantengesetzes auf eine judische
Familie in der sudbohmischen Stadt Patzau zwischen 1726 und 1849. Eine
Fallstudie, [Effects of the Family Decree on a Jewish Family in the
South Bohemian Town of Patzau (Pacov)] between 1726 and 1849. A Case
Study], Zeitschrift f=C3=BCr Ostmitteleuropa-Forschung 53/1 (2004), S. 83 -
98, fn. 25. The text notes that "In the Theresian cadastre (data from
1734) eight Jewish families are listed in Patzau."

4. For a recent applied use of the Cadastre with a description of what
its content entailed, see "Was Domar Right? Serfdom and Factor
Endowments in Bohemia," Alexander Klein and Sheilagh Ogilvie, October
2017. https://www.kent.ac.uk/economics/documents/research/papers/2017/1717.pdf
Neither this article nor other micro socio-economic studies of Ogilvie
touch on Jewish residents of Bohemia but are splendid investigations
of what could and should be done regarding the role of Jews in
commerce and communication in the Bohemian Crown Lands.

5. In a publication of the Jewish Museum on the Radobyl Cemetery near
Kamyk nad Vltavou in Beroun District, one finds the following remark:
"In 1719, first written evidence on Jews, in cadastre Terezianskeho."
Dated 31 May 1719. About Jews in nearby Drazkov.

Theresian Cadastre is a generic term for material gathered >from the
beginning of the second decade of the 18th c. in the reign of Charles
VI. Its material was collected until at least the 1740s under the
regime of Maria Theresa. It appears to embrace both census and
cadastre material, that is, enumeration of the population (census) and
enumeration of the mobile and immobile property (cadastre) of
household heads in specific municipal locations.

I welcome comments and corrections but I hope I have briefly
demonstrated that stuff relevant to Jewish genealogy can be turned up
in this Habsburg mania for documenting and re-documenting.

Paul King
Jerusalem


The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler #southafrica

geraldine.auerbach@...
 

Smouse is a term that was often used to describe an itinerant Jewish peddler in
South Africa. It seemed to me to be used almost as a badge of pride for some
early settlers who started their livelihood in South Africa providing goods for
the farmers and shopkeepers in the country areas.

The Jewish digital archive for Graaff Reinet says:
The Mosenthals set up trading stores, promoted the mohair industry and supported
the Jewish peddlers ("smouse"). A monument to these "smouse" was erected in
Graaff-Reinet in 1989.

South African Jewish Museum Cape Town, website says: 'Known as smouse (or
peddlers) they fanned out across the country into the small rural communities.
They travelled in wagons with goods for sale and many settled in these tiny towns
and villages that once had thriving Jewish communities (although this is no
longer the case).

I also have included a paragraph below >from THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF NAMAQUALAND
mentioning smouse and how they were welcomed by the Dutch farmers.

However, I was concerned to hear >from one of our Kimberley ex-pats, that being
called a 'smouse' was not a complementary word - and that many Jewish traders did
not appreciate this term. He said: People use the word smuk or smow in Yiddish
but these are derogatory words. There was nothing complimentary by calling a
Jewish trader a smouse. He said, 'The Afrikaners used this term because they
also believed that the Jews exploited them by over charging for their goods. My
parents who spoke only Yiddish at home told me never to use this word as it was
insulting. The Afrikaners many of whom were anti-Semitic during the war years
enjoyed using this derogatory word to label many of the Jewish businesses.'

I just wonder if anyone has any views on the term 'Smouse' and how it was used,
and whether it was mainly a derogatory or neutral term.

I look forward to hearing >from you.
Best wishes
Geraldine


Geraldine Auerbach MBE
T: 020 8907 1905 M: 07971 818 262
geraldine.auerbach@...

.........................................
THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF NAMAQUALAND
Peddlers appeared in South Africa in the late nineteenth century, and
the name smous or bondeldraers (men carrying bundles) were given to
them by the Dutch. These itinerant travellers arrived on foot >from the
Cape carrying items for trading on their backs. They made their way
from farm to farm selling jewellery, sewing necessities such as
needles, buttons, thread, thimbles, pins and an assortment of
material, as well as herbs, medicines and beauty products. They were
welcomed on the farms, given food and accommodation and sometimes had
their washing done for them. Travelling over the rough terrain of
Namaqualand was dangerous, especially while descending the steep Kammiesberg.
This community of Jewish traders in Namaqualand came >from the shtetls
of Eastern Europe and at its peak in the 1930s there were about 200
peddlers, and the numbers subsequently declined until the peddlers
became a part of the formal economy of the region. Fleeing repression,
the peddlers started off supplying necessities -- and later luxuries --
to isolated farmers. Many years later they became proprietors of
country hotels, spotting the need to provide hospitality to travellers
in these inhospitable parts. Having been attracted to the region by
the development of copper mining in the 1850s and the discovery of
diamonds in the 1920s, these Jews became the area's middlemen --
traders, shopkeepers and hoteliers -- rather than being involved in the mining
itself.
.......................................................

In the city of Graaf-Reinet, there was a plaque on the main street
honoring the "smouse," the itinerant merchant who peddled wares >from town to town.
The smouse would travel with a cart filled with supplies that often
served as a lifeline for these tiny outposts in the wilderness. Yet
every city I stop in now, a whole litany of places like Grahamstown,
Ladybrand, Kroonstad, Colesburg, Ficksburg and Bethlehem (yes, same
name), there are communities that have dried up, and synagogues that
are now closed. Some synagogues have been bought out by private
business like the one in Colesburg that is now an ABSA bank office.
............................................
Some crossed the countryside as smouse (itinerant peddlers), where
devout Boer farmers who regarded them as the "people of the book"
received them warmly. These entrepreneurs were significant agents of
the commercial revolution that transformed the South African
countryside in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They acted
as intermediates between the dorps and the producers, both black and
white. Jewish storekeepers and smouse bought wool, maize and skins
from Boer landowners and black sharecroppers and then sent them to
urban markets and wholesalers. In turn the Jewish country stores met
the growing needs of these emergent rural consumers.


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler #southafrica

geraldine.auerbach@...
 

Smouse is a term that was often used to describe an itinerant Jewish peddler in
South Africa. It seemed to me to be used almost as a badge of pride for some
early settlers who started their livelihood in South Africa providing goods for
the farmers and shopkeepers in the country areas.

The Jewish digital archive for Graaff Reinet says:
The Mosenthals set up trading stores, promoted the mohair industry and supported
the Jewish peddlers ("smouse"). A monument to these "smouse" was erected in
Graaff-Reinet in 1989.

South African Jewish Museum Cape Town, website says: 'Known as smouse (or
peddlers) they fanned out across the country into the small rural communities.
They travelled in wagons with goods for sale and many settled in these tiny towns
and villages that once had thriving Jewish communities (although this is no
longer the case).

I also have included a paragraph below >from THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF NAMAQUALAND
mentioning smouse and how they were welcomed by the Dutch farmers.

However, I was concerned to hear >from one of our Kimberley ex-pats, that being
called a 'smouse' was not a complementary word - and that many Jewish traders did
not appreciate this term. He said: People use the word smuk or smow in Yiddish
but these are derogatory words. There was nothing complimentary by calling a
Jewish trader a smouse. He said, 'The Afrikaners used this term because they
also believed that the Jews exploited them by over charging for their goods. My
parents who spoke only Yiddish at home told me never to use this word as it was
insulting. The Afrikaners many of whom were anti-Semitic during the war years
enjoyed using this derogatory word to label many of the Jewish businesses.'

I just wonder if anyone has any views on the term 'Smouse' and how it was used,
and whether it was mainly a derogatory or neutral term.

I look forward to hearing >from you.
Best wishes
Geraldine


Geraldine Auerbach MBE
T: 020 8907 1905 M: 07971 818 262
geraldine.auerbach@...

.........................................
THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF NAMAQUALAND
Peddlers appeared in South Africa in the late nineteenth century, and
the name smous or bondeldraers (men carrying bundles) were given to
them by the Dutch. These itinerant travellers arrived on foot >from the
Cape carrying items for trading on their backs. They made their way
from farm to farm selling jewellery, sewing necessities such as
needles, buttons, thread, thimbles, pins and an assortment of
material, as well as herbs, medicines and beauty products. They were
welcomed on the farms, given food and accommodation and sometimes had
their washing done for them. Travelling over the rough terrain of
Namaqualand was dangerous, especially while descending the steep Kammiesberg.
This community of Jewish traders in Namaqualand came >from the shtetls
of Eastern Europe and at its peak in the 1930s there were about 200
peddlers, and the numbers subsequently declined until the peddlers
became a part of the formal economy of the region. Fleeing repression,
the peddlers started off supplying necessities -- and later luxuries --
to isolated farmers. Many years later they became proprietors of
country hotels, spotting the need to provide hospitality to travellers
in these inhospitable parts. Having been attracted to the region by
the development of copper mining in the 1850s and the discovery of
diamonds in the 1920s, these Jews became the area's middlemen --
traders, shopkeepers and hoteliers -- rather than being involved in the mining
itself.
.......................................................

In the city of Graaf-Reinet, there was a plaque on the main street
honoring the "smouse," the itinerant merchant who peddled wares >from town to town.
The smouse would travel with a cart filled with supplies that often
served as a lifeline for these tiny outposts in the wilderness. Yet
every city I stop in now, a whole litany of places like Grahamstown,
Ladybrand, Kroonstad, Colesburg, Ficksburg and Bethlehem (yes, same
name), there are communities that have dried up, and synagogues that
are now closed. Some synagogues have been bought out by private
business like the one in Colesburg that is now an ABSA bank office.
............................................
Some crossed the countryside as smouse (itinerant peddlers), where
devout Boer farmers who regarded them as the "people of the book"
received them warmly. These entrepreneurs were significant agents of
the commercial revolution that transformed the South African
countryside in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They acted
as intermediates between the dorps and the producers, both black and
white. Jewish storekeepers and smouse bought wool, maize and skins
from Boer landowners and black sharecroppers and then sent them to
urban markets and wholesalers. In turn the Jewish country stores met
the growing needs of these emergent rural consumers.


Re: Khashchevate - Chashivater Aid Society

yael polat
 

Hi!
we are aware of the plot and the Izkor book.
We are looking for information about the society itself, who was in it, which activities did they organize. I found the book recommended, but it is about landmanshaften in general.


View Mate: Krugersdorp, South Africa Yiddish Drama Society 1923 #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

I have posted on View Mate a photo of the Krugersdorp, South Africa
Yiddish Drama Society 1923. This is for possible identification of
participants. Request is >from Elona Steinfeld of the Country
Communities Project, SA Friends of Beth Hatfusoth.

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76020

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

If anyone has a clearer copy of the photo please send .jpeg file to
museum@... . Thank you very much

Saul Issroff
London


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica View Mate: Krugersdorp, South Africa Yiddish Drama Society 1923 #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

I have posted on View Mate a photo of the Krugersdorp, South Africa
Yiddish Drama Society 1923. This is for possible identification of
participants. Request is >from Elona Steinfeld of the Country
Communities Project, SA Friends of Beth Hatfusoth.

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76020

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

If anyone has a clearer copy of the photo please send .jpeg file to
museum@... . Thank you very much

Saul Issroff
London