Date   

KHARKOV PROVINCE: List of Medical Personnel #ukraine

Marilyn Robinson
 

On the Russian language forum IOP forum, at:

http://forum.vgd.ru/23/30058/20.htm?a=stdforum_view&o=

Posted by: "Vitaly" on 2/1/2011 ( 4/7/2011)

There is a list of medical personnel >from Kharkov Province ( taken >from the "Project Genesis" by A. Loshak), many of whom are Jews.

Use an online translator, such as Google Language Tools, to convert the
Russian website into English, if necessary:

http://www.google.com/language_tools

or download Google Toolbar (with translation capability for IE or
Firefox browsers):
http://www.google.com/toolbar/ff/index.html#tracking=1&utm_campaign=en&utm
_source=en-ha-na-us-bk&utm_medium=ha&utm_term=google%20tool%20bar&tbbrand=GZAG

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine KHARKOV PROVINCE: List of Medical Personnel #ukraine

Marilyn Robinson
 

On the Russian language forum IOP forum, at:

http://forum.vgd.ru/23/30058/20.htm?a=stdforum_view&o=

Posted by: "Vitaly" on 2/1/2011 ( 4/7/2011)

There is a list of medical personnel >from Kharkov Province ( taken >from the "Project Genesis" by A. Loshak), many of whom are Jews.

Use an online translator, such as Google Language Tools, to convert the
Russian website into English, if necessary:

http://www.google.com/language_tools

or download Google Toolbar (with translation capability for IE or
Firefox browsers):
http://www.google.com/toolbar/ff/index.html#tracking=1&utm_campaign=en&utm
_source=en-ha-na-us-bk&utm_medium=ha&utm_term=google%20tool%20bar&tbbrand=GZAG

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Re: Documents signed in Hebrew #general

Paul Silverstone
 

I have a naturalization certificate signed in Hebrew or Yiddish >from 1899.
Paul Silverstone

AGloger@... wrote:
I do not know about marriage certificates, but my great grandmother who
came to the USA in 1907, signed her name in Hebrew script on some legal
documents in 1909 that I just discovered.
Also, I volunteer at the local County archives and have seen signatures in
Hebrew script on naturalization documents.
It is probably more common than we realize.

Paul Silverstone
New York
please reply to paulh@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Documents signed in Hebrew #general

Paul Silverstone
 

I have a naturalization certificate signed in Hebrew or Yiddish >from 1899.
Paul Silverstone

AGloger@... wrote:
I do not know about marriage certificates, but my great grandmother who
came to the USA in 1907, signed her name in Hebrew script on some legal
documents in 1909 that I just discovered.
Also, I volunteer at the local County archives and have seen signatures in
Hebrew script on naturalization documents.
It is probably more common than we realize.

Paul Silverstone
New York
please reply to paulh@...


Mt. Zion cemetery, New York: Headstone pics #general

Jim Gutterman
 

If anyone is going to be at or near Mt.Zion cemetery in Maspeth, New
York, I would greatly appreciate if they could take pictures of
headstones for the following two people. Max Gritamann (date of death
5/1/1902) and Morris Guttman (1/1/1923). They are both located in row
11L of the Tichiner Society burial plot. Info is >from Mt.Zion site's
index, and suspect name/date info might not be totally correct. Please
reply privately, and I would greatly appreciate any help >from anyone.

Jim Gutterman (GUTTERMAN,GOODMAN,LANDESMAN,HERSHKOVITZ,GELLER)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mt. Zion cemetery, New York: Headstone pics #general

Jim Gutterman
 

If anyone is going to be at or near Mt.Zion cemetery in Maspeth, New
York, I would greatly appreciate if they could take pictures of
headstones for the following two people. Max Gritamann (date of death
5/1/1902) and Morris Guttman (1/1/1923). They are both located in row
11L of the Tichiner Society burial plot. Info is >from Mt.Zion site's
index, and suspect name/date info might not be totally correct. Please
reply privately, and I would greatly appreciate any help >from anyone.

Jim Gutterman (GUTTERMAN,GOODMAN,LANDESMAN,HERSHKOVITZ,GELLER)


ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

Robin Brown <rkb155@...>
 

I've posted two marriage certificates. I am looking for a direct
translation of both of them. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=19820

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=19821

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=19822

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=19823

Each certificate is uploaded in two pieces, so even though there are 4 links,
there are actually only two certificates. Please respond via the form
provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much for your time and trouble.

Robin Brown


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

Robin Brown <rkb155@...>
 

I've posted two marriage certificates. I am looking for a direct
translation of both of them. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=19820

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=19821

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=19822

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=19823

Each certificate is uploaded in two pieces, so even though there are 4 links,
there are actually only two certificates. Please respond via the form
provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much for your time and trouble.

Robin Brown


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Meir (Max) Weissberg #ukraine

Palekaiko
 

Meir (Max) Weissberg was my great great Uncle on my father's mother's
side. He was one of five siblings, born to Marcus and Freude
Weissberg in Bukaczowce, eastern Galicia. Of not, Max was a Judaic
scholar, prominent in the Haskala movement. After education in
Vienna, L'viv, Kheyder, Belekhov, and Tshemovits (Cernuati, Ukraine),
Stryj, he settled in Stanislawow >from 1926, where he was an educator
and principal of a local school. He died in Stanislawow in 1930. Of
note, one of his children, Jozef Karol Weissberg (later wrote under
the name of Jozef Bialogorski (Weissberg and Bialogorski translate
White Mountain) renounced Judaism, while living in L'viv, c1921. He
wrote and published several books (in Polish) with erotic themes and
titles.

As they say, I've hit the wall. I would appreciate any and all
suggestions as to where I can search for any details or photos of Meir
Weissberg or Jozef Weissberg.

My renewed interest in finding more details about this man comes from
the fact, that I am discovering more details about Max's nephew (son
of Max's brother, Selig), Samuel Morris Weissberg who was born in
Stanislawow and immigrated to the US, ending up in Cleveland.

Please respond privately, palekaiko@...

Thank you,

Michael Diamant
Hawaii


Meir (Max) Weissberg #ukraine

Palekaiko
 

Meir (Max) Weissberg was my great great Uncle on my father's mother's
side. He was one of five siblings, born to Marcus and Freude
Weissberg in Bukaczowce, eastern Galicia. Of not, Max was a Judaic
scholar, prominent in the Haskala movement. After education in
Vienna, L'viv, Kheyder, Belekhov, and Tshemovits (Cernuati, Ukraine),
Stryj, he settled in Stanislawow >from 1926, where he was an educator
and principal of a local school. He died in Stanislawow in 1930. Of
note, one of his children, Jozef Karol Weissberg (later wrote under
the name of Jozef Bialogorski (Weissberg and Bialogorski translate
White Mountain) renounced Judaism, while living in L'viv, c1921. He
wrote and published several books (in Polish) with erotic themes and
titles.

As they say, I've hit the wall. I would appreciate any and all
suggestions as to where I can search for any details or photos of Meir
Weissberg or Jozef Weissberg.

My renewed interest in finding more details about this man comes from
the fact, that I am discovering more details about Max's nephew (son
of Max's brother, Selig), Samuel Morris Weissberg who was born in
Stanislawow and immigrated to the US, ending up in Cleveland.

Please respond privately, palekaiko@...

Thank you,

Michael Diamant
Hawaii


Tracing New York BOROVSKY/BROOKS family #general

ALISON DUMBELL
 

I have been tracking down my great grandmother's BOROVSKY family who lived
in Boston and NYC in the 1890's. There were two brothers who went to NYC -
Theodore and Hyman BROOKS. Hyman was married to a Mamie ROSENBLOM (possible
maiden name) and her sister Stella married another BOROVSKY brother but
lived in Boston. Mamie and Stella ROSENBLOM may have been born in NYC, which
makes them earlier immigrants to the US. The Borovsky's were born in Liebau,
Latvia. I have found in the census, records of a Herman and Mamie BROOKS
and the dates seem to match up. This family is connected to Alexander
BOROVSKY, a pianist, as well as Joe Young and Ruth Brooks, well known
lyricists and relatives might have heard of these people. Herman lived
with his son William after he was widowed in the 1930 census. This Herman
had other children: Murray, Anna and Richard Brooks. I would like to make
contact with anyone >from this family or find out more, to confirm if they are
relatives. As this is a common name, I have had difficulty tracing them by
other means.
Many thanks,Alison Weinstein Dumbell, Northamptonshire, England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tracing New York BOROVSKY/BROOKS family #general

ALISON DUMBELL
 

I have been tracking down my great grandmother's BOROVSKY family who lived
in Boston and NYC in the 1890's. There were two brothers who went to NYC -
Theodore and Hyman BROOKS. Hyman was married to a Mamie ROSENBLOM (possible
maiden name) and her sister Stella married another BOROVSKY brother but
lived in Boston. Mamie and Stella ROSENBLOM may have been born in NYC, which
makes them earlier immigrants to the US. The Borovsky's were born in Liebau,
Latvia. I have found in the census, records of a Herman and Mamie BROOKS
and the dates seem to match up. This family is connected to Alexander
BOROVSKY, a pianist, as well as Joe Young and Ruth Brooks, well known
lyricists and relatives might have heard of these people. Herman lived
with his son William after he was widowed in the 1930 census. This Herman
had other children: Murray, Anna and Richard Brooks. I would like to make
contact with anyone >from this family or find out more, to confirm if they are
relatives. As this is a common name, I have had difficulty tracing them by
other means.
Many thanks,Alison Weinstein Dumbell, Northamptonshire, England


Re: Business Records in NYC #general

gilah@...
 

Jeff Malka wrote:
Where are 20th century NYC business records (registration, etc.) kept?
Try the NY State Division of Corporations
http://appext9.dos.state.ny.us/corp_public/corpsearch.entity_search_entry

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ

Lubin/Labun/Yurovshchina & Gritsev, Volhynia (Ukraine)- GARBER, MAZEWITSKY,
MACAVICKE (MORRIS), MALZMANN (MYERS), KESTLEMAN, ZABARSKY
Radauti (Romania), Zalishchyky, Ustechko & Torskie, Galicia (Ukraine)
LIEBROSS, WENKERT(WEINGART), ETT, BARATH
Kasan/Kozyany, Disna District, Vilna Province & Babroysk, Minsk Gub (Belarus)
WILENSKY/WILENSKI (WILSON), EPSTEIN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Business Records in NYC #general

gilah@...
 

Jeff Malka wrote:
Where are 20th century NYC business records (registration, etc.) kept?
Try the NY State Division of Corporations
http://appext9.dos.state.ny.us/corp_public/corpsearch.entity_search_entry

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ

Lubin/Labun/Yurovshchina & Gritsev, Volhynia (Ukraine)- GARBER, MAZEWITSKY,
MACAVICKE (MORRIS), MALZMANN (MYERS), KESTLEMAN, ZABARSKY
Radauti (Romania), Zalishchyky, Ustechko & Torskie, Galicia (Ukraine)
LIEBROSS, WENKERT(WEINGART), ETT, BARATH
Kasan/Kozyany, Disna District, Vilna Province & Babroysk, Minsk Gub (Belarus)
WILENSKY/WILENSKI (WILSON), EPSTEIN


NATHAN from Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar Kreis #germany

Steven Leof <sleof.sln25@...>
 

I am searching for information about the German origins of my
ancestors Joseph NATHAN and Victoria POHL lived in Ilvesheim,
Rhein-Neckar-Kreis, Baden-W=FCrttemberg (see below). A few questions: -

- Does the Matrikel/synagogue register for Ilvesheim exist (I believe
it does) and if so, is it available online?
- If it exists but is not online, would someone be kind enough to do a
look-up for me?
- I believe the cemetery in Mannheim was used until about 1860. Do the
burial records for Ilvesheim and Mannheim exist and if so, are they
available online?
- If the burial records exist but are not online, would someone be
kind enough to do a look-up for me?
- Have the graves in the cemeteries in Ilvesheim and Mannheim been
catalogued and photographed?
- If so, are photos available?

I believe Joseph was born in 1798 in Baden-Wuerttemberg and died on 18
Jan 1882 in Germany, perhaps in Ilvesheim or Mannheim. I believe
Victoria was born in France (though her siblings were supposedly born
in Germany) and died on 16 Nov 1864, perhaps in Ilvesheim. Joseph and
Victoria had the following children: -

Friederike Nathan, B: 11 Jul 1833 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, D: Mannheim, Hessen-Nassau, Preussen, Germany,
M: Jonas BUSECK, 16 Jun 1861 in Mannheim, Hessen-Nassau, Preussen
Johanna NATHAN, B: 31 Aug 1834 in Ilvesheim,
Rhein-Neckar-Kreis, Baden-Wuerttemberg

Julius NATHAN, B: 24 Nov 1836 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg D: 24 Sep 1897 in Memphis, Shelby,
Tennessee, USA, M: Johanna EHRMANN, Abt. 27 May 1864 in Memphis,
Shelby, Tennessee

Isidor NATHAN, B: 21 Aug 1838 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg D: 10 Oct 1922 in Memphis, Shelby,
Tennessee, M: Johannah GOLDSCHMID, 21 Aug 1861.

Emil NATHAN, B: 09 Jan 1840 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
D: 10 Apr 1912 in Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, USA. M: Sophie HOCHSTAEDTER

Leon NATHAN, B: 04 Oct 1841 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany. M: Mathilda BLOCH

Max NATHAN, B: 24 May 1843 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, D: 05 Apr 1906 in Memphis, Shelby,
Tennessee, M: Hedwig DOERNBERG, Abt. 17 Dec 1871 in Memphis,
Shelby, Tennessee, USA.

Henry NATHAN, B: 08 Mar 1846 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, D: 25 Jan 1896 in New York, New York, USA,
M: Johannah aka Hannah or Hannsche or Hannche LYONS, 10 Oct 1866 in
Memphis, Shelby, Tennessee, USA. Johanna LYONS was born on 16 May 1848
in Germany and died on 25 Jan 1896 in New York.

Adolph NATHAN, B: 17 Jan 1847 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, D: 13 Apr 1899 in Memphis, Shelby,
Tennessee,
USA. M: Josephine HILSHEIM Joseph and Victoria's sons emigrated to
Memphis, Tennessee, at various times probably >from 1860. Some remained
there; others moved on to Pine

Thank you. Regards, Steven Leof, London, UK steven.leof@...


German SIG #Germany NATHAN from Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar Kreis #germany

Steven Leof <sleof.sln25@...>
 

I am searching for information about the German origins of my
ancestors Joseph NATHAN and Victoria POHL lived in Ilvesheim,
Rhein-Neckar-Kreis, Baden-W=FCrttemberg (see below). A few questions: -

- Does the Matrikel/synagogue register for Ilvesheim exist (I believe
it does) and if so, is it available online?
- If it exists but is not online, would someone be kind enough to do a
look-up for me?
- I believe the cemetery in Mannheim was used until about 1860. Do the
burial records for Ilvesheim and Mannheim exist and if so, are they
available online?
- If the burial records exist but are not online, would someone be
kind enough to do a look-up for me?
- Have the graves in the cemeteries in Ilvesheim and Mannheim been
catalogued and photographed?
- If so, are photos available?

I believe Joseph was born in 1798 in Baden-Wuerttemberg and died on 18
Jan 1882 in Germany, perhaps in Ilvesheim or Mannheim. I believe
Victoria was born in France (though her siblings were supposedly born
in Germany) and died on 16 Nov 1864, perhaps in Ilvesheim. Joseph and
Victoria had the following children: -

Friederike Nathan, B: 11 Jul 1833 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, D: Mannheim, Hessen-Nassau, Preussen, Germany,
M: Jonas BUSECK, 16 Jun 1861 in Mannheim, Hessen-Nassau, Preussen
Johanna NATHAN, B: 31 Aug 1834 in Ilvesheim,
Rhein-Neckar-Kreis, Baden-Wuerttemberg

Julius NATHAN, B: 24 Nov 1836 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg D: 24 Sep 1897 in Memphis, Shelby,
Tennessee, USA, M: Johanna EHRMANN, Abt. 27 May 1864 in Memphis,
Shelby, Tennessee

Isidor NATHAN, B: 21 Aug 1838 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg D: 10 Oct 1922 in Memphis, Shelby,
Tennessee, M: Johannah GOLDSCHMID, 21 Aug 1861.

Emil NATHAN, B: 09 Jan 1840 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
D: 10 Apr 1912 in Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, USA. M: Sophie HOCHSTAEDTER

Leon NATHAN, B: 04 Oct 1841 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany. M: Mathilda BLOCH

Max NATHAN, B: 24 May 1843 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, D: 05 Apr 1906 in Memphis, Shelby,
Tennessee, M: Hedwig DOERNBERG, Abt. 17 Dec 1871 in Memphis,
Shelby, Tennessee, USA.

Henry NATHAN, B: 08 Mar 1846 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, D: 25 Jan 1896 in New York, New York, USA,
M: Johannah aka Hannah or Hannsche or Hannche LYONS, 10 Oct 1866 in
Memphis, Shelby, Tennessee, USA. Johanna LYONS was born on 16 May 1848
in Germany and died on 25 Jan 1896 in New York.

Adolph NATHAN, B: 17 Jan 1847 in Ilvesheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis,
Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, D: 13 Apr 1899 in Memphis, Shelby,
Tennessee,
USA. M: Josephine HILSHEIM Joseph and Victoria's sons emigrated to
Memphis, Tennessee, at various times probably >from 1860. Some remained
there; others moved on to Pine

Thank you. Regards, Steven Leof, London, UK steven.leof@...


My Ancestral Connection to this Group #subcarpathia

Alex Magocsi
 

After reading the recently published minutes of the inaugural meeting of
the Sub-Carpathia Research Group, I thought I should introduce myself
and why I am interested in this group.

I am Alex Magocsi and have been attempting to draw together basic family
history data regarding MAGOCSI, GROSZ, GREIF and KIRCHGRABER for a
number of years.

My Sub-Carpathia connection is the Grosz root of my tree, for my Great
Grandfather Samuel Grosz was born about 1850 - 1860 in Vynogradiv,
Ukraine, shown as Nagyszo"llo"s in the registry of his death. He died
in Nyirbator, Hungary on 24 May, 1899 and it is assummed that he is
buried in the Jewish Cemetery in that small city.
Nothing more is known about this person.


He married Karolina Greif about 1886; she reportedly was born in 1856 in
Presov, Slovakia (Eperjes). She was the daughter of Benjamin Greif and
Hanna Feuerlicht. She is buried in the Jewish Cemetery in Nyirbator,
having died there on 13 August 1922.

I am hoping to find more bits of data regarding Samuel's ancestry, or at
the least, to learn exactly where he was buried.

I have a very good understanding of their descendents, and also of
Karolina's siblings, in case any of the above sounds familiar to any
other researchers reading this.

Regards
Alex Magocsi
York, Maine USA


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia My Ancestral Connection to this Group #subcarpathia

Alex Magocsi
 

After reading the recently published minutes of the inaugural meeting of
the Sub-Carpathia Research Group, I thought I should introduce myself
and why I am interested in this group.

I am Alex Magocsi and have been attempting to draw together basic family
history data regarding MAGOCSI, GROSZ, GREIF and KIRCHGRABER for a
number of years.

My Sub-Carpathia connection is the Grosz root of my tree, for my Great
Grandfather Samuel Grosz was born about 1850 - 1860 in Vynogradiv,
Ukraine, shown as Nagyszo"llo"s in the registry of his death. He died
in Nyirbator, Hungary on 24 May, 1899 and it is assummed that he is
buried in the Jewish Cemetery in that small city.
Nothing more is known about this person.


He married Karolina Greif about 1886; she reportedly was born in 1856 in
Presov, Slovakia (Eperjes). She was the daughter of Benjamin Greif and
Hanna Feuerlicht. She is buried in the Jewish Cemetery in Nyirbator,
having died there on 13 August 1922.

I am hoping to find more bits of data regarding Samuel's ancestry, or at
the least, to learn exactly where he was buried.

I have a very good understanding of their descendents, and also of
Karolina's siblings, in case any of the above sounds familiar to any
other researchers reading this.

Regards
Alex Magocsi
York, Maine USA


Access to Records: Are German Archives Changing? #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSiggers

Since Roger has found time to share the URLs >from his talk with you,
it must be time for my own offering. Here are the URLs for things
that cropped up during my talk. I am using as the basis for this
email an edited version of the conference handout I submitted for my
talk. I have tried not to duplicate URLs for sites Roger has already
mentioned. I apologise in advance for the length of this email.

The starting point for my presentation was that the legal situation
relating records access in Germany changed >from January 2009. The law
now provides theoretical access to records as follows. Birth records
after 110 years, marriage and civil union records after 80 years and
death records after 30 years. However what actually happened has not
been as simple as that, and my presentation explored some of the
reasons why. These included:

_The collapse of the Cologne city archives in March 2009 and
subsequent conservation work undertaken by the Marburg Archive School
www.archivschule.de
_The growth and developments of the internet and trends in
digitisation of records
_The "Who Do You Think You Are?" effect or Das Geheimnis meiner
Familie which means My family secrets and which is the German
equivalent.
_The influence of the AG Juedische Sammlungen group in Germany and
beyond http://juedische-sammlungen.de
_Archival access to records where present day Jewish communities exist
in Germany, for example, The Central Archives for research into the
history of Jews in Germany in Heidelberg
www.uni-heidelberg.de/institute/sonst/aj/englisch.htm
_That many people are perpetuating mistakes in research and what
happens when people digitise and transcribe records they don't really
understand.

The presentation used examples drawn >from my personal experience of
genealogical research visits to Germany, where I have visited a
variety of different regional and local archives, some larger and some
smaller, some bureaucratic, and some very informal. The presentation
also signposted people to a number of more advanced and not
specifically Jewish Genealogy oriented resources, which included the
following books, in which I have no interest, other than as a reader.

Ribbe, Wolfgang and Henning, Eckart (2006, 13th Edition). Taschenbuch
fuer Familiengeschichtsforschung, Germany, Degener Verlag.

Brandt, Edward R. Ph.D., Bellingham, Mary, Cutkomp, Kent, Frye, Kermit
and Lowe, Patricia A.(1997, 3rd Edition). Germanic Genealogy A Guide
to Worldwide Sources and Migration Patterns, USA, Germanic Genealogy
Society.

Riemer, Shirley J, Minert, Roger P. and Anderson, Jennifer A (2010,
3rd Edition). The German Research Companion, USA, CA Lorelei Press.

Archive in Deutschland, Oesterreich und der Schweiz, by Verband
deutscher Archivarinnen und Archivare, published by Ardey Verlag.

By way of practical example, I described the current situation in
North Rhine-Westphalia, (NRW) where records are held on a centralised
basis, www.archive.nrw.de/index.html, and in Rhineland-Palatinate,
where the organisation is dissipated or fragmented, with records
remaining at local level. I also provided information about the
approach in Hessen, where a more hybrid approach operates, and in
Baden-Wuerttemberg, (Ba-Wu) where the emphasis has been towards free
online access. I explored also the way that local history is
impacting on archival access in Germany and how local museum-based
archives are contributing to broader access, giving details of an
example of good practice >from Weinheim in Baden
www.juden-in-weinheim.de

Resources >from NRW that I mentioned were Der richtige Weg zu Ihrem
Stammbaum "The right way to your family tree"
www.archive.nrw.de/LandesarchivNRW/abteilungOstwestfalenLippe/BilderKartenLogosDateien/LAV-Borsch-Gen-END-web.pdf
This contains details of finding aids P2 Detmold, P5 Arnsberg & P8
Muenster, with approximately 900 different record collections covering
the years >from 1801 to 1874.

Index to the Gatermann Films (Reproductions by the Reichssippenamt )
held at Landesarchiv NRW Abteilung Ostwestfalen-Lippe in Detmold.
Findbuch P10. The films cover Arnsberg, Detmold and Muenster for the
years 1697-1942.
www.archive.nrw.de/LAV_NRW/jsp/findbuch.jsp?archivNr=409&id=0152&tektId=988
The Gatermann diagram that I displayed came >from this website
www.papaworx.com/blog/2010/07/25/the-labyrinthine-trails-of-the-gatermann-films

My presentation also included a discussion of some of the ongoing
digitisation and conservation projects underway and insights into the
use of archival finding aids and also a tour of relevant archival
sources both in Germany and elsewhere, with particular emphasis on
access to Jewish communal records. The examples given signposted to
some of the lesser used sources for Jewish family research in Germany,
for example some of the classes of records identified by Angelika G
Ellmann-Krueger in Stammbaum (19) pp. 1, 4-8).
www.lbi.org/publications/periodicals/stammbaum/

1. Handelsregister (Trade registers)
2. Handwerksrolle und Lehrlingsrolle (Registers of Craftsmen and Apprentices)
3. Amtsblatt (Official Journals or Gazettes)
4. Fahndungsblatt (Wanted persons lists)
5. Hebammentagebücher (Midwife diaries)
6. Orts- und Verkehrs-Lexikon (Topographical and location directories
and gazetteers)

I also mentioned:
_ITS Arolsen records
_The online German Gedenkbuch
_Yad Vashem Central Database
_Germania Judaica library at Cologne, Germany
_The work undertaken by local history societies in Germany eg
www.geschichtsverein-aschaffenburg.de/
_The Wiener Library in the UK
_The Central Archives for the history of the Jewish People in Israel
_The Jewish Museums network, eg in Frankfurt

I raised the issue in passing that maybe at least some knowledge of
the German Language is a requirement for German Jewish Genealogy. I
left this as much for people to think about, as anything else, and
provided examples of options available if people do not speak German.
These included Portraits of Our Past by Emily Rose and Our Daily Bread
by Teva J Scheer.

My presentation ended with a short personal case study showing how I
have used some of the resources I have found in a Jewish Genealogy One
Name Study which is focussed on records >from NRW,
www.one-name.org/profiles/neugarten.html

Jeanette Rosenberg, GerSig Director Usually in London UK
Jeanette.R.Rosenberg@...


German SIG #Germany Access to Records: Are German Archives Changing? #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSiggers

Since Roger has found time to share the URLs >from his talk with you,
it must be time for my own offering. Here are the URLs for things
that cropped up during my talk. I am using as the basis for this
email an edited version of the conference handout I submitted for my
talk. I have tried not to duplicate URLs for sites Roger has already
mentioned. I apologise in advance for the length of this email.

The starting point for my presentation was that the legal situation
relating records access in Germany changed >from January 2009. The law
now provides theoretical access to records as follows. Birth records
after 110 years, marriage and civil union records after 80 years and
death records after 30 years. However what actually happened has not
been as simple as that, and my presentation explored some of the
reasons why. These included:

_The collapse of the Cologne city archives in March 2009 and
subsequent conservation work undertaken by the Marburg Archive School
www.archivschule.de
_The growth and developments of the internet and trends in
digitisation of records
_The "Who Do You Think You Are?" effect or Das Geheimnis meiner
Familie which means My family secrets and which is the German
equivalent.
_The influence of the AG Juedische Sammlungen group in Germany and
beyond http://juedische-sammlungen.de
_Archival access to records where present day Jewish communities exist
in Germany, for example, The Central Archives for research into the
history of Jews in Germany in Heidelberg
www.uni-heidelberg.de/institute/sonst/aj/englisch.htm
_That many people are perpetuating mistakes in research and what
happens when people digitise and transcribe records they don't really
understand.

The presentation used examples drawn >from my personal experience of
genealogical research visits to Germany, where I have visited a
variety of different regional and local archives, some larger and some
smaller, some bureaucratic, and some very informal. The presentation
also signposted people to a number of more advanced and not
specifically Jewish Genealogy oriented resources, which included the
following books, in which I have no interest, other than as a reader.

Ribbe, Wolfgang and Henning, Eckart (2006, 13th Edition). Taschenbuch
fuer Familiengeschichtsforschung, Germany, Degener Verlag.

Brandt, Edward R. Ph.D., Bellingham, Mary, Cutkomp, Kent, Frye, Kermit
and Lowe, Patricia A.(1997, 3rd Edition). Germanic Genealogy A Guide
to Worldwide Sources and Migration Patterns, USA, Germanic Genealogy
Society.

Riemer, Shirley J, Minert, Roger P. and Anderson, Jennifer A (2010,
3rd Edition). The German Research Companion, USA, CA Lorelei Press.

Archive in Deutschland, Oesterreich und der Schweiz, by Verband
deutscher Archivarinnen und Archivare, published by Ardey Verlag.

By way of practical example, I described the current situation in
North Rhine-Westphalia, (NRW) where records are held on a centralised
basis, www.archive.nrw.de/index.html, and in Rhineland-Palatinate,
where the organisation is dissipated or fragmented, with records
remaining at local level. I also provided information about the
approach in Hessen, where a more hybrid approach operates, and in
Baden-Wuerttemberg, (Ba-Wu) where the emphasis has been towards free
online access. I explored also the way that local history is
impacting on archival access in Germany and how local museum-based
archives are contributing to broader access, giving details of an
example of good practice >from Weinheim in Baden
www.juden-in-weinheim.de

Resources >from NRW that I mentioned were Der richtige Weg zu Ihrem
Stammbaum "The right way to your family tree"
www.archive.nrw.de/LandesarchivNRW/abteilungOstwestfalenLippe/BilderKartenLogosDateien/LAV-Borsch-Gen-END-web.pdf
This contains details of finding aids P2 Detmold, P5 Arnsberg & P8
Muenster, with approximately 900 different record collections covering
the years >from 1801 to 1874.

Index to the Gatermann Films (Reproductions by the Reichssippenamt )
held at Landesarchiv NRW Abteilung Ostwestfalen-Lippe in Detmold.
Findbuch P10. The films cover Arnsberg, Detmold and Muenster for the
years 1697-1942.
www.archive.nrw.de/LAV_NRW/jsp/findbuch.jsp?archivNr=409&id=0152&tektId=988
The Gatermann diagram that I displayed came >from this website
www.papaworx.com/blog/2010/07/25/the-labyrinthine-trails-of-the-gatermann-films

My presentation also included a discussion of some of the ongoing
digitisation and conservation projects underway and insights into the
use of archival finding aids and also a tour of relevant archival
sources both in Germany and elsewhere, with particular emphasis on
access to Jewish communal records. The examples given signposted to
some of the lesser used sources for Jewish family research in Germany,
for example some of the classes of records identified by Angelika G
Ellmann-Krueger in Stammbaum (19) pp. 1, 4-8).
www.lbi.org/publications/periodicals/stammbaum/

1. Handelsregister (Trade registers)
2. Handwerksrolle und Lehrlingsrolle (Registers of Craftsmen and Apprentices)
3. Amtsblatt (Official Journals or Gazettes)
4. Fahndungsblatt (Wanted persons lists)
5. Hebammentagebücher (Midwife diaries)
6. Orts- und Verkehrs-Lexikon (Topographical and location directories
and gazetteers)

I also mentioned:
_ITS Arolsen records
_The online German Gedenkbuch
_Yad Vashem Central Database
_Germania Judaica library at Cologne, Germany
_The work undertaken by local history societies in Germany eg
www.geschichtsverein-aschaffenburg.de/
_The Wiener Library in the UK
_The Central Archives for the history of the Jewish People in Israel
_The Jewish Museums network, eg in Frankfurt

I raised the issue in passing that maybe at least some knowledge of
the German Language is a requirement for German Jewish Genealogy. I
left this as much for people to think about, as anything else, and
provided examples of options available if people do not speak German.
These included Portraits of Our Past by Emily Rose and Our Daily Bread
by Teva J Scheer.

My presentation ended with a short personal case study showing how I
have used some of the resources I have found in a Jewish Genealogy One
Name Study which is focussed on records >from NRW,
www.one-name.org/profiles/neugarten.html

Jeanette Rosenberg, GerSig Director Usually in London UK
Jeanette.R.Rosenberg@...

191421 - 191440 of 673349