Date   

Cemteries tombstones and videos #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <Lmagyar@...>
 

Once again I turn to you for assistance. I have numerous videos of Jewish
cemeteries throughout Hungary, Slovakia and Subcarpathian Ruthenia. Included in these videos are many still photos taken with a JVC digital video camera. The camera is a Cyber Cam GR-DVM1 and uses DV sized film. It is about two and a half years old. I purchased a program that I thought
would help me get the film into my computer and edit it so that the
information shown on the tombstones would be able to be
transcribed and submitted to 1. Jewishgen WW cemetery database 2. H-sig
website and 3. to the individuals who have requested copies of the
film/tape. I was not successful in this endeavor. Plan B is to purchase a
Sony VAIO computer with all the built in capabilities of video transferring
and editing. However, there is something called a "firewire" which one must
connect >from the camera to the computer to transmit the video. My video
camera has no port for this type of connection. I am told that the newer
model JVC video cameras have this connection capability. I can't use a Sony
camera since that is for 8mm film only, and I have the DV size film. Can
someone enlighten me about this? 1. Am I correct about the technical
specifications mentioned here? 2. If my only option is to purchase a newer
JVC camera does anyone have a suggestion for the best place to purchase such
a camera? Can it be rented - if so, where? 3. Are there alternatives
available to get the data on the film into the hands of the public? Can
Jewishgen do it, if I send them a video copy (which I can do)? Please
respond privately.

Louis Schonfeld
Lmagyar@...

P.S. Unrelated to this message, but important for some of you: A copy of
the original Pinkas Hevra Kadisha (burial registry) of Ungvar/Uzhgorod has
been sent to the Washington D.C. Holocaust Memorial Museum. As mentioned
in an earlier message I hope to go to Israel later this year and at that
time find out the progress of the transcribing project for this Pinkas. LS


Hungary SIG #Hungary Cemteries tombstones and videos #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <Lmagyar@...>
 

Once again I turn to you for assistance. I have numerous videos of Jewish
cemeteries throughout Hungary, Slovakia and Subcarpathian Ruthenia. Included in these videos are many still photos taken with a JVC digital video camera. The camera is a Cyber Cam GR-DVM1 and uses DV sized film. It is about two and a half years old. I purchased a program that I thought
would help me get the film into my computer and edit it so that the
information shown on the tombstones would be able to be
transcribed and submitted to 1. Jewishgen WW cemetery database 2. H-sig
website and 3. to the individuals who have requested copies of the
film/tape. I was not successful in this endeavor. Plan B is to purchase a
Sony VAIO computer with all the built in capabilities of video transferring
and editing. However, there is something called a "firewire" which one must
connect >from the camera to the computer to transmit the video. My video
camera has no port for this type of connection. I am told that the newer
model JVC video cameras have this connection capability. I can't use a Sony
camera since that is for 8mm film only, and I have the DV size film. Can
someone enlighten me about this? 1. Am I correct about the technical
specifications mentioned here? 2. If my only option is to purchase a newer
JVC camera does anyone have a suggestion for the best place to purchase such
a camera? Can it be rented - if so, where? 3. Are there alternatives
available to get the data on the film into the hands of the public? Can
Jewishgen do it, if I send them a video copy (which I can do)? Please
respond privately.

Louis Schonfeld
Lmagyar@...

P.S. Unrelated to this message, but important for some of you: A copy of
the original Pinkas Hevra Kadisha (burial registry) of Ungvar/Uzhgorod has
been sent to the Washington D.C. Holocaust Memorial Museum. As mentioned
in an earlier message I hope to go to Israel later this year and at that
time find out the progress of the transcribing project for this Pinkas. LS


1886 pogrom in Ekaterinoslav? -TALALAY #ukraine

Alicia Jensen <aliciajens@...>
 

Hello all,
I am sending this query to the Ekaterinoslav Area Research Group as
well as this one, so I apologize if you subscribe to both and therefore
receive it twice.

Here is background of that I know:
My Gt.gt. grandfather, Nachum ben Nachman TALALAY, was born about 1856,
in Mogilev, Belarus.
He was married to Riva Ruchel bat Yosel (?), born about 1876, likely in
Mogilev, Belarus, also.
Their children were:
Yankel Moshe ben Nachum TALALAY, born Nov 1876, in Mogilev, Belarus (my
gt. grandfather);
Vishna bat Nachum TALALAY, born in 1882, in Mogilev, Belarus.

Nachum and Riva TALALAY died in a synogogue fire about 1886. After
this, the children (or perhaps only Yankel), went to live with Rabbi
Efraim DISKIN, also in Mogilev.

My problem (and thus will lead to the question) is that my
grandmother, Chiena TALALAY (born in 1914 in Mogilev, Belarus), has told
me that her father came >from Ekaterinoslav. We are trying to piece
together how she knew him to be >from Ekaterinoslav/Dnieperpetrovsk, when
we know >from the Mogilev Crown Rabbinate records that he was born in Mogilev.
We know there was some movement of Belarussian Jews to Ukraine in
this time period. They had made lands available there for settlers. That
possibly Yankel's parents went there after 1882, when their daughter was born.

So, the question:
Does anyone knows of any major pogroms about the time of 1886 when
Nachum and Riva TALALAY died? Perhaps, there is a record of a place or
a synagogue fire. I know most pogroms involved synagogue fires, but if
there are some in this time period in Ekaterinoslav/Dnieperpetrovsk,
then perhaps we can start looking there.

I will apreciate all help and / or suggestions.
Best Regards,
Alicia Jensen
Placentia, California, US
aliciajens@...

Always searching for:
TALALAY(I) / TAYLOR, DISKIN -Belarus to Michigan, US
WOHL, BROTT, FORTGANG -Austria / Poland to US
POTTER, BARROW, NEWSHAM -in England and to Canada to US
MADER , NIMPHER, KNAPP -Germany to US


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine 1886 pogrom in Ekaterinoslav? -TALALAY #ukraine

Alicia Jensen <aliciajens@...>
 

Hello all,
I am sending this query to the Ekaterinoslav Area Research Group as
well as this one, so I apologize if you subscribe to both and therefore
receive it twice.

Here is background of that I know:
My Gt.gt. grandfather, Nachum ben Nachman TALALAY, was born about 1856,
in Mogilev, Belarus.
He was married to Riva Ruchel bat Yosel (?), born about 1876, likely in
Mogilev, Belarus, also.
Their children were:
Yankel Moshe ben Nachum TALALAY, born Nov 1876, in Mogilev, Belarus (my
gt. grandfather);
Vishna bat Nachum TALALAY, born in 1882, in Mogilev, Belarus.

Nachum and Riva TALALAY died in a synogogue fire about 1886. After
this, the children (or perhaps only Yankel), went to live with Rabbi
Efraim DISKIN, also in Mogilev.

My problem (and thus will lead to the question) is that my
grandmother, Chiena TALALAY (born in 1914 in Mogilev, Belarus), has told
me that her father came >from Ekaterinoslav. We are trying to piece
together how she knew him to be >from Ekaterinoslav/Dnieperpetrovsk, when
we know >from the Mogilev Crown Rabbinate records that he was born in Mogilev.
We know there was some movement of Belarussian Jews to Ukraine in
this time period. They had made lands available there for settlers. That
possibly Yankel's parents went there after 1882, when their daughter was born.

So, the question:
Does anyone knows of any major pogroms about the time of 1886 when
Nachum and Riva TALALAY died? Perhaps, there is a record of a place or
a synagogue fire. I know most pogroms involved synagogue fires, but if
there are some in this time period in Ekaterinoslav/Dnieperpetrovsk,
then perhaps we can start looking there.

I will apreciate all help and / or suggestions.
Best Regards,
Alicia Jensen
Placentia, California, US
aliciajens@...

Always searching for:
TALALAY(I) / TAYLOR, DISKIN -Belarus to Michigan, US
WOHL, BROTT, FORTGANG -Austria / Poland to US
POTTER, BARROW, NEWSHAM -in England and to Canada to US
MADER , NIMPHER, KNAPP -Germany to US


Migration from the Russian Empire - Indexes #latvia

Phillip and Lisa Seeberg <plml.seeberg@...>
 

I have recently returned >from a trip to the Allen County Library in Ft.
Wayne, Indiana.

I found a series of books that gives indexes of immigrants to the USA. I
found my ancestors (>from Latvia) listed as coming >from the port of Hamburg,
so I will pass the information on. The indexes had almost everyone that I
was looking for (within the given time period) and some that I wasn't even
looking for. (I was just looking up my surname).

The book is called "Migration >from the Russian Empire.
Lists of Passengers Arriving at the Port of New York" (some say "at U.S.
Ports")

by Ira A. Glazier

Volume 1: January 1875-September 1882

Volume 2: October 1882-April 1886

Volume 3: May 1886-December 1887

Volume 4: January 1888-June 1889

Volume 5: June 1889-July 1890

Volume 6: August 1890-June 1891

I would recommend that people searching these time periods take the time to
search an index such as this. The index gives the ship, date of arrival, and
port of departure. With this information you can look up the actual ship
records on microfilm.

Has anyone had success with any other Indexes of this sort? I'm waiting for
something that will cover the rest of the 1890's.

I have almost completed my search for my family's immigration to the USA.

For the record, here is my family, >from Sassmacken (Valdemarpils), Latvia.

The family as I know it is as follows (4 columns separated by '/'):

Parents / Born / Died / Immigrated
Levin (or Louis or Lebe) Seeberg / 1829 / 1 January 1917 / 8 July 1890
Esther Gleke Seeberg / 1840 / 9 January 1929 / 8 July 1890

Children / Born / Died / Immigrated
Chave Seeberg / abt. 1857 / ? / ?
Kalman (Charles) Seeberg / 15 September 1859 / 20 September 1948 / 1877 ?
Sarah Seeberg / abt. 1860 / ? / ?
Israel (Jacob) Seeberg / 7 March 1862 / 4 May 1954 / 30 November 1886
Blume (Bertha) Seeberg / 17 May 1865 / 15 December 1954 / 24 November 1888
Hersh Seeberg / 8 November 1867 / 3 July 1870
Olga (Goldie) Seeberg / 8 August 1870 / ?/ 8 July 1890
Joshua (Selig) Seeberg / 25 July 1873 / ? / 24 November 1888
Hase (Clara) Seeberg / 15 January 1876 / 17 November 1916 / 8 July 1890
Isak Seeberg / 21 September 1878 / 6 May 1879


Latvia SIG #Latvia Migration from the Russian Empire - Indexes #latvia

Phillip and Lisa Seeberg <plml.seeberg@...>
 

I have recently returned >from a trip to the Allen County Library in Ft.
Wayne, Indiana.

I found a series of books that gives indexes of immigrants to the USA. I
found my ancestors (>from Latvia) listed as coming >from the port of Hamburg,
so I will pass the information on. The indexes had almost everyone that I
was looking for (within the given time period) and some that I wasn't even
looking for. (I was just looking up my surname).

The book is called "Migration >from the Russian Empire.
Lists of Passengers Arriving at the Port of New York" (some say "at U.S.
Ports")

by Ira A. Glazier

Volume 1: January 1875-September 1882

Volume 2: October 1882-April 1886

Volume 3: May 1886-December 1887

Volume 4: January 1888-June 1889

Volume 5: June 1889-July 1890

Volume 6: August 1890-June 1891

I would recommend that people searching these time periods take the time to
search an index such as this. The index gives the ship, date of arrival, and
port of departure. With this information you can look up the actual ship
records on microfilm.

Has anyone had success with any other Indexes of this sort? I'm waiting for
something that will cover the rest of the 1890's.

I have almost completed my search for my family's immigration to the USA.

For the record, here is my family, >from Sassmacken (Valdemarpils), Latvia.

The family as I know it is as follows (4 columns separated by '/'):

Parents / Born / Died / Immigrated
Levin (or Louis or Lebe) Seeberg / 1829 / 1 January 1917 / 8 July 1890
Esther Gleke Seeberg / 1840 / 9 January 1929 / 8 July 1890

Children / Born / Died / Immigrated
Chave Seeberg / abt. 1857 / ? / ?
Kalman (Charles) Seeberg / 15 September 1859 / 20 September 1948 / 1877 ?
Sarah Seeberg / abt. 1860 / ? / ?
Israel (Jacob) Seeberg / 7 March 1862 / 4 May 1954 / 30 November 1886
Blume (Bertha) Seeberg / 17 May 1865 / 15 December 1954 / 24 November 1888
Hersh Seeberg / 8 November 1867 / 3 July 1870
Olga (Goldie) Seeberg / 8 August 1870 / ?/ 8 July 1890
Joshua (Selig) Seeberg / 25 July 1873 / ? / 24 November 1888
Hase (Clara) Seeberg / 15 January 1876 / 17 November 1916 / 8 July 1890
Isak Seeberg / 21 September 1878 / 6 May 1879


Montreal help #general

NEIL185@...
 

Would like to have someone check the Montreal Gazette for me for
obituaries of the Ditkowski family >from Montreal. Covers the period
from about 1940-1970. They were the owners of the Crescent Dairy there.
Dr. Neil Rosenstein.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Montreal help #general

NEIL185@...
 

Would like to have someone check the Montreal Gazette for me for
obituaries of the Ditkowski family >from Montreal. Covers the period
from about 1940-1970. They were the owners of the Crescent Dairy there.
Dr. Neil Rosenstein.


Rose Krane-Passport(1925) NYC & Grodno #general

Maria Krane
 

Dear Genners,
I have a passport application for a Rose Krane >from New York who
unfortunately is not mine. I obtained this copy of the passport
application >from the Russian Consular records. The address on the passport
application is 299 Mount Eden Avenue, NYC and there's a photo attached.
The passport was >from 1925 and she was 45 years old at the time. She was
born in Svislich (?), Grodno (the handwriting is not very clear). If you
think this record belongs to your family, please contact me personally and
I will mail it to you. The name of the witnesses on the passport
application were Moses Smolevitz and Abraham Gael (the writing isn't very
clear).
Regards,
Maria Krane, Pembroke Pines, Fl. USA
Maria Krane@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rose Krane-Passport(1925) NYC & Grodno #general

Maria Krane
 

Dear Genners,
I have a passport application for a Rose Krane >from New York who
unfortunately is not mine. I obtained this copy of the passport
application >from the Russian Consular records. The address on the passport
application is 299 Mount Eden Avenue, NYC and there's a photo attached.
The passport was >from 1925 and she was 45 years old at the time. She was
born in Svislich (?), Grodno (the handwriting is not very clear). If you
think this record belongs to your family, please contact me personally and
I will mail it to you. The name of the witnesses on the passport
application were Moses Smolevitz and Abraham Gael (the writing isn't very
clear).
Regards,
Maria Krane, Pembroke Pines, Fl. USA
Maria Krane@...


Natalie MASTERS -- re:SEGAL #general

Bubylu@...
 

Hello,
I am trying to reach Natalie Masters who resides in England. We are
both searching the name SEGAL. I sent an e-mail to her but the address
bounced back to me. If anyone knows Natalie's email address please
forward it to me privately or send this message to her and she can reach
me at : Bubylu@...
Thanks to all,
Lois SEGAL Friedman
Bubylu@...
PS: Any SEGAL's or SEGALL's feel free to contact me


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Natalie MASTERS -- re:SEGAL #general

Bubylu@...
 

Hello,
I am trying to reach Natalie Masters who resides in England. We are
both searching the name SEGAL. I sent an e-mail to her but the address
bounced back to me. If anyone knows Natalie's email address please
forward it to me privately or send this message to her and she can reach
me at : Bubylu@...
Thanks to all,
Lois SEGAL Friedman
Bubylu@...
PS: Any SEGAL's or SEGALL's feel free to contact me


Change of Countries #poland

garymaher@...
 

Maurine-

In northeastern Poland at least, official records are in Polish until
about 1868. >from that date forward, they are in Russian. At some point,
they switch back to Polish. I'm not sure when, as they don't let you
browse those records.

Hope this helps!

Gary Maher
NJ / USA

On Tue, 17 Oct 2000 00:00:30 -0500 "JRI-Poland digest"
<jri-pl@...> writes:
My husband's father was born in Lutsk. At the time of his emigration,
Lutsk
was in Poland. By the time he applied for naturalization, Luts was a
part of
Russia. I'm not sure if Lutsk is part of the Ukraine or Russia itself.

Would his birth records be in Polish or Russian?
________________________________________________________________
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JRI Poland #Poland Change of Countries #poland

garymaher@...
 

Maurine-

In northeastern Poland at least, official records are in Polish until
about 1868. >from that date forward, they are in Russian. At some point,
they switch back to Polish. I'm not sure when, as they don't let you
browse those records.

Hope this helps!

Gary Maher
NJ / USA

On Tue, 17 Oct 2000 00:00:30 -0500 "JRI-Poland digest"
<jri-pl@...> writes:
My husband's father was born in Lutsk. At the time of his emigration,
Lutsk
was in Poland. By the time he applied for naturalization, Luts was a
part of
Russia. I'm not sure if Lutsk is part of the Ukraine or Russia itself.

Would his birth records be in Polish or Russian?
________________________________________________________________
YOU'RE PAYING TOO MUCH FOR THE INTERNET!
Juno now offers FREE Internet Access!
Try it today - there's no risk! For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.


FW: Hanusovce nad Toplou #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <Lmagyar@...>
 

The following is a transcription of an oral report, in Slovak, given to
Marian Brown and Sylvia Wittman by Hanosovce museum director, Mgr. Agata
Krupova about the history of the Jews >from that town. The tape was
transcribed into English by Slvia Wittman of Prague, and therefore the
English may be a bit rough. However, it is very understandable as it is,
and no
editing has been done. Please see my comments at the end.LS

SLOVAKIA - SEPTEMBER, 2000

TRIP TO HANOSOVCE NAD TOPLOU, THE BIRTHPLACE OF MOSES HIRSCH HUEBSCHMAN,
MY GREAT, GREAT GRANDFATHER

TAPE #1, NUMBERS 398 - 427

Marian: We are in Hanosovce nad Toplou in a museum in a very lovely
chateau in a lovely office talking to the Director, Mgr. Agáta Krupová,
and she is
going to tell us a little about the history of this town where Moses
Huebschman was
born in either 1807 or 1809 -- my great, great grandfather.

Sylvie (translating the Director's words): This is a town and it was a
town. The city was Catholic and the Hungarian nobility was uprising.
In 1717
the Protestants had it and then it was given back to the Catholics. So in
the
period of Joseph II the Protestants build another church

TAPE #2, NUMBERS 1 - 227

Sylvie: We were saying that the city is based on agriculture, that the
city began in the 14th century, originally a Catholic city, then it was
Protestant in the times of uprising against the Hapsburg empire, then
it was Catholized
again by force in the period of Joseph II. In the period of the Edict
of
Tolerance, 1781-84, the city was again getting a new Protestant church.

Marian: Where did the Jews come from?

Sylvie: The book that the Director handed to me says that the Jews who
came to Hanusovce were namely running the Korcsma, Inns or pubs, and the
ones who
were doing handel which means the exchange business. They were also
carpenters, bakers, glass makers, and they worked with wires. They most
probably came
in the second half of the 18th century in the period of the enlightened
emperor Joseph II. As I said after the Edict of Tolerance.

Here is a picture in the book of a Jewish seal of the Jewish community
in
the second half of the 19th century in Hanusovce. We also know the
names of
the rabbis since 1786. Here is Rabbi Moishe Frankel and most probably it
was
he who started the local chevra kadisha meaning Society of Holiness that
was the
burial brotherhood. In 1888 there was a small Jewish religious
community of 338
members and in 1930 they had only 270 members. In the period of the
second World War in 1942, they deported all the Jews and also the rabbi,
Ergon
Adler.
The synagogue in Hanusovce was made out of wood and there are very few
of
these that survived. In the year 1850 the mayor of the Jewish
community was
Bertran ben Zion who built a new synagogue. The Hanusovce town de Juffe
donated a
piece of land and also 5,000 dehal and 50 florins (?). To build a
synagogue they
also need donations >from bigger Jewish community in Saros County. The
synagogue was demolished during the second World War but we know >from the
walls that
were surrounding the synagogue that it was 8.5 by 11 meters. It was
similar to
the synagogue in SarisskeLuky (Sebes Kellemes). It had a beautiful
facade 5-6
steps 3 meters long, etc.

In 1941 some crazy engineering student, seduced some workers to burn
down
the synagogue. Here there is also a Jewish synagogue 40 x 45 meters.
It had
a special wall entry and the new cemetery has a separate entry. Al the
stones are oriented to the east and the cemetery is right in the city.
It is not
destroyed at all. The old people >from Hanusovce remember the Yeshiva
where the
bochar were studying to be the rabbis. So here is a word calling the
Synagogue
Buzsna. Buzsna is a Polish or Ruthenian word. It means that the Jews
had
to come either >from Poland or >from the area of the Ruthenians because
it is
not a Slovak expression, no a Jewish expression. The Director is saying
something very interesting. The local dialect has a lot of words coming
from
Ruthenian, Polish, German and even, English. Certain food dishes they
call
"dinnerAmerica" and this comes >from dinner because they had a lot of
people who emigrated
to American, made money and came back to buy a piece of land. They mixed
the
English they learned with local dialect.

The book says that as the Jewish community was growing they had their
shochet (kosher butcher). So they had a Yeshiva, kosher butcher and a
mikva.
So now I have in my hands a private book that a local man wrote about
the
history of Hanusovce and his memories of the city. He was not Jewish
and
he was not any big friend of the Jews. His name was Andre Skrinak and his
book
is called The Truth of Hanusovce, a History of a City, written in 1995,
the
time of the 50th anniversary of the end of the second World War. There
is a
section about the Jews which I will translate for you. H says that all
the shops
were in the hands of the Jews who pushed out all the others >from the
shops,
even the Hungarianized Christians. According to the census of the 14th
century,
there were two Jewish families living in Hanusovce. But the new
Czechoslovak
Republic was such a tolerant place, much better than the surrounding
countries,
that many Jews moved there. Hanusovce had a very strong Jewish center
with a rabbi,
synagogue, and a Yeshiva high school. The shops were divided in such a
way
that they wouldn't compete one with another. Not only the businesses
but also
the life of our ancestors (meaning the Christians) they had in their
hands!
This we can easily prove >from the information about their occupations:

Lefkovich, Maximilian Notary
Dr. Greenstein Voiteck Medical doctor
Altman, Mark Apothecary
Unitan, Alvin Rabbi
Bloomfield, Jacov Textile business
Friedman, Nathaniel Mixed goods shop
Friedman, David Educational tools
Friedman, Yoshe Agent
Gottesman, Samuel Agent
Ziebler, Moricz Mixed goods shop
Licht, Elgan Furs
Wall, Alexander Curing herbs
Wall, Adar (called Schmuel) Inn/Restaurant
Miller, Salamon Iron
Neuman, Izaak Butcher
Schachner, William Eggs
Schonfeld, Leopold Greens
Gutman, Ladislav Mixed goods
Zipser, Frankiczech Restaurant (the pub still exists)
Zerholtz, Alexander Real estate
Hindeman, Ladislav Cows and cutlery
Cohn, Ludwig Goldsmith

The poor Jews were apprentices but none of them ever worked in the
fields.
Rosenwasser Alexander was involved in the fields but to such a great
extent that he could be called a "great" farmer or someone who is running
a lot
of agricultural businesses. Bieder and Neuman were tailors. Chaim
(unfortunately I don't know his second name) was fixing shoes. Ladomer
had 16 children
and he was just schlepping around with a buggy behind his very skinny and
poor
horse. He was buying old clothing. I can't put the entire list of the
Jews in the period of the First
Republic of Masaryk. But at this time there were at least 20 person who
were Jewish
living in Hanusovce. They were not the poorest ones, however some of
the local
Christians looked down on them. According to the Masaryk First
Republic,
everyone had to go to school. That was the law. First four years and
then the Ministry decided six years which was the elementary education.

In the 19th century Hanusovce somehow was no longer considered to be a
city; it was considered to be a village. Their economy was based on
agriculture.
But they had one big plus and it was the Notary because the Notary was
working
for 40 villages and that is almost like a county. The Notary had power
in the
19th century. He made sure that your signature was your signature,
that
papers were original papers, He was recording all the marriages, the
metrics, and
practically all the census. He was the one who had to stamp and seal
every civil record, as well as all synagogue records.

Marian: Another thing I am thinking about is about my Huebschman
ancestors
and where they lived after they were married. My great, great
grandfather,
Moses Huebschman, born in Hanusovce, married Rachel Friedman >from Circ
and he
moved to that town with the wife's family. And again, his son, Marcus,
married
Marie Glueck, and he moved around a lot before he emigrated to Cleveland,
but he
also moved to the towns of his wife's family which at that point was
Sarisske
Luky.

Sylvie: This is a typical classic thing because every Jewish boy has to
study. He has to learn. When he marries, he typically goes to the house
of her parents and the parents support the two young people, either
because
he has to study or else he will inherit the business of the wife's father.
So
most of the men moved to the family of the bride.

Marian: Another question. How did people travel? By boat on the
rivers?
By horse?

Sylvie: The Director is telling me that Hanusovce is actually on the
crossroad of four passes and the main business roads are the road going
north to
Poland and the road going to the Ukraine. This is why . >from Presov it
is about
25 km and that is the distance a horse can travel without being
terribly
exhausted. After about 25 km you have to feed and water them and let
them sleep so
where would they go? To an inn. This is why the Jews had the inns like
your
ancestors. The horses were taken care of and the travelers slept and
ate
at the inn.

So how did they travel? With horse and buggy or on horses. And they
also
traveled in the Post trucks. In the 19th century, there was a big
wooden
truck, four horses, and one section would be for people to travel and
another
section would be for the postal letters and packages. Like in America,
stagecoaches which was the post also. Again about the inns, or Korcsma,
the count owns
it and rents it to a Jew. The Jews is running production of the
alcohol, the
production of soda water (a very old thing). He doesn't have it only as
a
restaurant but also as an inn with rooms, stables for the horses - a
total
cavaransari like in Turkey. He serves food and is very independent from
the Jewish community. He is not viewed by the leaders of the Jewish
community
as a "righteous Jew" because he was often open on Saturday because he
deals all
the time with gentiles, etc. >from this inn, later it converts to the
post
office which has horses and also an inn and a restaurant. And then the
same
building converts to the post office exclusively.
mod. - There are many forms of anti-Semitism. After all, the concept, if
not the term, has been around for several thousand years. Andre Skrinak in
his
book called The Truth of Hanusovce, a History of a City, written in 1995,
exhibits an overt form of verbal
anti-Semitism (see above). There are more subtle forms of anti-Semitism. I
would like to point out two statements made
WITHOUT MALICE that INADVERTENTLY exhibit this more genteel form of
anti-Semitism. However, before I do, I would like to
state that just as it is possible to witness expressions of
anti-Semitism
without Jews (as Poland is often time accused), it is also possible to
express anti-Semitic statements without being an anti-Semite. This can
happen when the culture in which one lives has absorbed anti-Semitic
stereotypes, information and falsehoods. For example: 1. "In the period
of
the second World War in 1942, they deported all the Jews and also the
rabbi, Ergon Adler." In 1942 it was possible for
those who were there to state that the Jews were deported. By 1945, the
war
was over and the Jews didn't return; they knew, by then, that they had
been murdered, not just deported. I
have heard >from people in various parts of Eastern Europe, in responding
to the probing question of what ultimately happened to the deported Jews,
the
chilling response that they all left for America and Israel. That is one
way to avoid culpability in the matter of the murder of the Jewish
population
of Hanusovce, not to mention, a satisfactory method of legitimizing the
theft
of all their property.

Disconcerting statement number 2: "The synagogue was demolished during
the
second World War." Followed by the statement: "In 1941 some crazy
engineering student, seduced some workers to burn down the synagogue."
I
can accept the latter sentence, even though all societies try to blame
aberrant behavior within their midst by defining the offending person as
insane, how does a crazy student seduce workers to burn down the
synagogue? The answer is simple - lawlessness against Jews and their
institutions
were permitted by the authorities. And what is worse, the other residents
of
Hanuscovce who were not crazy and were not workers allowed them
to do it. There is no record of the populace trying to stop them or even
to attemt to douse the flames once the fire started. More startling are
the
words of the preceding sentence, "The synagogue was demolished during the
second
World War". Why was it demolished? Was it in the way of a proposed
superhighway? Did the authorities try to move the building first, prior
to
demolishing? Did the Jewish population object? No, they were already
gone
or confined. Did the non-Jewish residents object? There is no record of
such
a protest. LS
--
--
Marian Brown
Cincinnati, Ohio

Searching SLOVAKIA: GLUECK, Hazlin/Kohanovce/Kurima/Bardejov/Sarisske Luky
Cleveland, OH 1879; HUEBSCHMAN, Circ/Hanusovce nad Toplou/Presov,Sarisske
Luky >
Cleveland, OH 1879; HEIMOWITZ, Lemesany > Cleveland, OH 1873; HOLSTEIN,
Kosice/Rozhanovce > New York, NY 1887; LISSAUER, Budulov, Janok, Peder,
Kosice >
Oklahoma/Texas 1883; NEWMAN, Bohdanovce, Licartovce, Presov > Cleveland, OH
1873; PAUKER/PARKER, Dravce/Spisska Nova Ves; TURK, Turna nad Bodvou,
Bodrogkeresztur, Sarospatak, Satoraljaujhely > Oklahoma 1879; ZINNER,
Huncovce,
Dravce, Spisska Nova Ves > New York City & Oklahoma 1895


Hungary SIG #Hungary FW: Hanusovce nad Toplou #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <Lmagyar@...>
 

The following is a transcription of an oral report, in Slovak, given to
Marian Brown and Sylvia Wittman by Hanosovce museum director, Mgr. Agata
Krupova about the history of the Jews >from that town. The tape was
transcribed into English by Slvia Wittman of Prague, and therefore the
English may be a bit rough. However, it is very understandable as it is,
and no
editing has been done. Please see my comments at the end.LS

SLOVAKIA - SEPTEMBER, 2000

TRIP TO HANOSOVCE NAD TOPLOU, THE BIRTHPLACE OF MOSES HIRSCH HUEBSCHMAN,
MY GREAT, GREAT GRANDFATHER

TAPE #1, NUMBERS 398 - 427

Marian: We are in Hanosovce nad Toplou in a museum in a very lovely
chateau in a lovely office talking to the Director, Mgr. Agáta Krupová,
and she is
going to tell us a little about the history of this town where Moses
Huebschman was
born in either 1807 or 1809 -- my great, great grandfather.

Sylvie (translating the Director's words): This is a town and it was a
town. The city was Catholic and the Hungarian nobility was uprising.
In 1717
the Protestants had it and then it was given back to the Catholics. So in
the
period of Joseph II the Protestants build another church

TAPE #2, NUMBERS 1 - 227

Sylvie: We were saying that the city is based on agriculture, that the
city began in the 14th century, originally a Catholic city, then it was
Protestant in the times of uprising against the Hapsburg empire, then
it was Catholized
again by force in the period of Joseph II. In the period of the Edict
of
Tolerance, 1781-84, the city was again getting a new Protestant church.

Marian: Where did the Jews come from?

Sylvie: The book that the Director handed to me says that the Jews who
came to Hanusovce were namely running the Korcsma, Inns or pubs, and the
ones who
were doing handel which means the exchange business. They were also
carpenters, bakers, glass makers, and they worked with wires. They most
probably came
in the second half of the 18th century in the period of the enlightened
emperor Joseph II. As I said after the Edict of Tolerance.

Here is a picture in the book of a Jewish seal of the Jewish community
in
the second half of the 19th century in Hanusovce. We also know the
names of
the rabbis since 1786. Here is Rabbi Moishe Frankel and most probably it
was
he who started the local chevra kadisha meaning Society of Holiness that
was the
burial brotherhood. In 1888 there was a small Jewish religious
community of 338
members and in 1930 they had only 270 members. In the period of the
second World War in 1942, they deported all the Jews and also the rabbi,
Ergon
Adler.
The synagogue in Hanusovce was made out of wood and there are very few
of
these that survived. In the year 1850 the mayor of the Jewish
community was
Bertran ben Zion who built a new synagogue. The Hanusovce town de Juffe
donated a
piece of land and also 5,000 dehal and 50 florins (?). To build a
synagogue they
also need donations >from bigger Jewish community in Saros County. The
synagogue was demolished during the second World War but we know >from the
walls that
were surrounding the synagogue that it was 8.5 by 11 meters. It was
similar to
the synagogue in SarisskeLuky (Sebes Kellemes). It had a beautiful
facade 5-6
steps 3 meters long, etc.

In 1941 some crazy engineering student, seduced some workers to burn
down
the synagogue. Here there is also a Jewish synagogue 40 x 45 meters.
It had
a special wall entry and the new cemetery has a separate entry. Al the
stones are oriented to the east and the cemetery is right in the city.
It is not
destroyed at all. The old people >from Hanusovce remember the Yeshiva
where the
bochar were studying to be the rabbis. So here is a word calling the
Synagogue
Buzsna. Buzsna is a Polish or Ruthenian word. It means that the Jews
had
to come either >from Poland or >from the area of the Ruthenians because
it is
not a Slovak expression, no a Jewish expression. The Director is saying
something very interesting. The local dialect has a lot of words coming
from
Ruthenian, Polish, German and even, English. Certain food dishes they
call
"dinnerAmerica" and this comes >from dinner because they had a lot of
people who emigrated
to American, made money and came back to buy a piece of land. They mixed
the
English they learned with local dialect.

The book says that as the Jewish community was growing they had their
shochet (kosher butcher). So they had a Yeshiva, kosher butcher and a
mikva.
So now I have in my hands a private book that a local man wrote about
the
history of Hanusovce and his memories of the city. He was not Jewish
and
he was not any big friend of the Jews. His name was Andre Skrinak and his
book
is called The Truth of Hanusovce, a History of a City, written in 1995,
the
time of the 50th anniversary of the end of the second World War. There
is a
section about the Jews which I will translate for you. H says that all
the shops
were in the hands of the Jews who pushed out all the others >from the
shops,
even the Hungarianized Christians. According to the census of the 14th
century,
there were two Jewish families living in Hanusovce. But the new
Czechoslovak
Republic was such a tolerant place, much better than the surrounding
countries,
that many Jews moved there. Hanusovce had a very strong Jewish center
with a rabbi,
synagogue, and a Yeshiva high school. The shops were divided in such a
way
that they wouldn't compete one with another. Not only the businesses
but also
the life of our ancestors (meaning the Christians) they had in their
hands!
This we can easily prove >from the information about their occupations:

Lefkovich, Maximilian Notary
Dr. Greenstein Voiteck Medical doctor
Altman, Mark Apothecary
Unitan, Alvin Rabbi
Bloomfield, Jacov Textile business
Friedman, Nathaniel Mixed goods shop
Friedman, David Educational tools
Friedman, Yoshe Agent
Gottesman, Samuel Agent
Ziebler, Moricz Mixed goods shop
Licht, Elgan Furs
Wall, Alexander Curing herbs
Wall, Adar (called Schmuel) Inn/Restaurant
Miller, Salamon Iron
Neuman, Izaak Butcher
Schachner, William Eggs
Schonfeld, Leopold Greens
Gutman, Ladislav Mixed goods
Zipser, Frankiczech Restaurant (the pub still exists)
Zerholtz, Alexander Real estate
Hindeman, Ladislav Cows and cutlery
Cohn, Ludwig Goldsmith

The poor Jews were apprentices but none of them ever worked in the
fields.
Rosenwasser Alexander was involved in the fields but to such a great
extent that he could be called a "great" farmer or someone who is running
a lot
of agricultural businesses. Bieder and Neuman were tailors. Chaim
(unfortunately I don't know his second name) was fixing shoes. Ladomer
had 16 children
and he was just schlepping around with a buggy behind his very skinny and
poor
horse. He was buying old clothing. I can't put the entire list of the
Jews in the period of the First
Republic of Masaryk. But at this time there were at least 20 person who
were Jewish
living in Hanusovce. They were not the poorest ones, however some of
the local
Christians looked down on them. According to the Masaryk First
Republic,
everyone had to go to school. That was the law. First four years and
then the Ministry decided six years which was the elementary education.

In the 19th century Hanusovce somehow was no longer considered to be a
city; it was considered to be a village. Their economy was based on
agriculture.
But they had one big plus and it was the Notary because the Notary was
working
for 40 villages and that is almost like a county. The Notary had power
in the
19th century. He made sure that your signature was your signature,
that
papers were original papers, He was recording all the marriages, the
metrics, and
practically all the census. He was the one who had to stamp and seal
every civil record, as well as all synagogue records.

Marian: Another thing I am thinking about is about my Huebschman
ancestors
and where they lived after they were married. My great, great
grandfather,
Moses Huebschman, born in Hanusovce, married Rachel Friedman >from Circ
and he
moved to that town with the wife's family. And again, his son, Marcus,
married
Marie Glueck, and he moved around a lot before he emigrated to Cleveland,
but he
also moved to the towns of his wife's family which at that point was
Sarisske
Luky.

Sylvie: This is a typical classic thing because every Jewish boy has to
study. He has to learn. When he marries, he typically goes to the house
of her parents and the parents support the two young people, either
because
he has to study or else he will inherit the business of the wife's father.
So
most of the men moved to the family of the bride.

Marian: Another question. How did people travel? By boat on the
rivers?
By horse?

Sylvie: The Director is telling me that Hanusovce is actually on the
crossroad of four passes and the main business roads are the road going
north to
Poland and the road going to the Ukraine. This is why . >from Presov it
is about
25 km and that is the distance a horse can travel without being
terribly
exhausted. After about 25 km you have to feed and water them and let
them sleep so
where would they go? To an inn. This is why the Jews had the inns like
your
ancestors. The horses were taken care of and the travelers slept and
ate
at the inn.

So how did they travel? With horse and buggy or on horses. And they
also
traveled in the Post trucks. In the 19th century, there was a big
wooden
truck, four horses, and one section would be for people to travel and
another
section would be for the postal letters and packages. Like in America,
stagecoaches which was the post also. Again about the inns, or Korcsma,
the count owns
it and rents it to a Jew. The Jews is running production of the
alcohol, the
production of soda water (a very old thing). He doesn't have it only as
a
restaurant but also as an inn with rooms, stables for the horses - a
total
cavaransari like in Turkey. He serves food and is very independent from
the Jewish community. He is not viewed by the leaders of the Jewish
community
as a "righteous Jew" because he was often open on Saturday because he
deals all
the time with gentiles, etc. >from this inn, later it converts to the
post
office which has horses and also an inn and a restaurant. And then the
same
building converts to the post office exclusively.
mod. - There are many forms of anti-Semitism. After all, the concept, if
not the term, has been around for several thousand years. Andre Skrinak in
his
book called The Truth of Hanusovce, a History of a City, written in 1995,
exhibits an overt form of verbal
anti-Semitism (see above). There are more subtle forms of anti-Semitism. I
would like to point out two statements made
WITHOUT MALICE that INADVERTENTLY exhibit this more genteel form of
anti-Semitism. However, before I do, I would like to
state that just as it is possible to witness expressions of
anti-Semitism
without Jews (as Poland is often time accused), it is also possible to
express anti-Semitic statements without being an anti-Semite. This can
happen when the culture in which one lives has absorbed anti-Semitic
stereotypes, information and falsehoods. For example: 1. "In the period
of
the second World War in 1942, they deported all the Jews and also the
rabbi, Ergon Adler." In 1942 it was possible for
those who were there to state that the Jews were deported. By 1945, the
war
was over and the Jews didn't return; they knew, by then, that they had
been murdered, not just deported. I
have heard >from people in various parts of Eastern Europe, in responding
to the probing question of what ultimately happened to the deported Jews,
the
chilling response that they all left for America and Israel. That is one
way to avoid culpability in the matter of the murder of the Jewish
population
of Hanusovce, not to mention, a satisfactory method of legitimizing the
theft
of all their property.

Disconcerting statement number 2: "The synagogue was demolished during
the
second World War." Followed by the statement: "In 1941 some crazy
engineering student, seduced some workers to burn down the synagogue."
I
can accept the latter sentence, even though all societies try to blame
aberrant behavior within their midst by defining the offending person as
insane, how does a crazy student seduce workers to burn down the
synagogue? The answer is simple - lawlessness against Jews and their
institutions
were permitted by the authorities. And what is worse, the other residents
of
Hanuscovce who were not crazy and were not workers allowed them
to do it. There is no record of the populace trying to stop them or even
to attemt to douse the flames once the fire started. More startling are
the
words of the preceding sentence, "The synagogue was demolished during the
second
World War". Why was it demolished? Was it in the way of a proposed
superhighway? Did the authorities try to move the building first, prior
to
demolishing? Did the Jewish population object? No, they were already
gone
or confined. Did the non-Jewish residents object? There is no record of
such
a protest. LS
--
--
Marian Brown
Cincinnati, Ohio

Searching SLOVAKIA: GLUECK, Hazlin/Kohanovce/Kurima/Bardejov/Sarisske Luky
Cleveland, OH 1879; HUEBSCHMAN, Circ/Hanusovce nad Toplou/Presov,Sarisske
Luky >
Cleveland, OH 1879; HEIMOWITZ, Lemesany > Cleveland, OH 1873; HOLSTEIN,
Kosice/Rozhanovce > New York, NY 1887; LISSAUER, Budulov, Janok, Peder,
Kosice >
Oklahoma/Texas 1883; NEWMAN, Bohdanovce, Licartovce, Presov > Cleveland, OH
1873; PAUKER/PARKER, Dravce/Spisska Nova Ves; TURK, Turna nad Bodvou,
Bodrogkeresztur, Sarospatak, Satoraljaujhely > Oklahoma 1879; ZINNER,
Huncovce,
Dravce, Spisska Nova Ves > New York City & Oklahoma 1895


Hungarian Village of Galgocz ? #general

Yedinitz@...
 

Has anyone ever heard of a city, village or shtetl in Hungary
named "Galgocz"?

My great-grandmother Rosa Widder Polack may have emigrated >from this
village to NYC in the 1880's. The name of the village was gleaned from
Rosa's sister Josephine Widder Kleinman Lederer's 1916 Manhattan marriage
certificate. The spelling may be wrong as it was written in script on the
certificate. It is the first lead I have as to what village Rosa,
Josephine and their sister Sallie (Sarah) may have come from.

Any assistance would be appreciated if you have an idea as to what village
"Galgocz" might actually be.

Shalom,

Eric Schwartzman
Yedinitz@... Personal Genealogical Correspondence
Yedintsy@... Yedintsy (Bessarabia) Monthly Discussion Group

Researching:

from Yedintsy: Schwartzman, Goldberg, Abrahams, Fuchs
from Rohatyn: Price (Preiss)
from Hamburg: Polack
from Hungary: Widder, Zink, Schwartz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hungarian Village of Galgocz ? #general

Yedinitz@...
 

Has anyone ever heard of a city, village or shtetl in Hungary
named "Galgocz"?

My great-grandmother Rosa Widder Polack may have emigrated >from this
village to NYC in the 1880's. The name of the village was gleaned from
Rosa's sister Josephine Widder Kleinman Lederer's 1916 Manhattan marriage
certificate. The spelling may be wrong as it was written in script on the
certificate. It is the first lead I have as to what village Rosa,
Josephine and their sister Sallie (Sarah) may have come from.

Any assistance would be appreciated if you have an idea as to what village
"Galgocz" might actually be.

Shalom,

Eric Schwartzman
Yedinitz@... Personal Genealogical Correspondence
Yedintsy@... Yedintsy (Bessarabia) Monthly Discussion Group

Researching:

from Yedintsy: Schwartzman, Goldberg, Abrahams, Fuchs
from Rohatyn: Price (Preiss)
from Hamburg: Polack
from Hungary: Widder, Zink, Schwartz


Western Galician Web Pages...Zmigrod, Dukla, Frysztak, Strzyzow #general

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

Just to let you all know that we've updated the Zmigrod/Dulka
Shtetlinks page...
and added pages for Frysztak and Strzyzow.

Our next project is an area wide page for Krosno, which should be
ready in November.

Happy Hunting,
Phyllis (phylliskramer1@...) of Wilton & Savannah
Searching KRAMER, WISNER, BEIM >from JASIENICA, Galicia
STECHER, TRACHMAN, FEIR, KORNREICH >from ZMIGROD,Galicia
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/zmigrod/zmigrod.htm
LINDNER, MAUER, BERLIN, EICHEL >from ROHATYN, Galicia and YASI
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/rohatyn/rohatyn.htm
SCHEINER, KANDEL, SCHIMMEL >from Strzyzow, Dubieko,Galicia
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/strzyzow/strzyzow.htm
GUMBRECHT, ZIEGLER >from Hannover, Germany


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Western Galician Web Pages...Zmigrod, Dukla, Frysztak, Strzyzow #general

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

Just to let you all know that we've updated the Zmigrod/Dulka
Shtetlinks page...
and added pages for Frysztak and Strzyzow.

Our next project is an area wide page for Krosno, which should be
ready in November.

Happy Hunting,
Phyllis (phylliskramer1@...) of Wilton & Savannah
Searching KRAMER, WISNER, BEIM >from JASIENICA, Galicia
STECHER, TRACHMAN, FEIR, KORNREICH >from ZMIGROD,Galicia
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/zmigrod/zmigrod.htm
LINDNER, MAUER, BERLIN, EICHEL >from ROHATYN, Galicia and YASI
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/rohatyn/rohatyn.htm
SCHEINER, KANDEL, SCHIMMEL >from Strzyzow, Dubieko,Galicia
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/strzyzow/strzyzow.htm
GUMBRECHT, ZIEGLER >from Hannover, Germany