Date   

Re: Women emigrating alone #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

Dear Barbara,
In trying different variations, have you tried "Ra" or Ro"? In
handwriting, "Passin" could look like "Rassin" or "Rossin".

You might also try to find her in the 1905 or 1915 NY State Censuses,
and try to find her voter registrations - they might have more clues.
(The JGen Discussion Group Archives will have more information on voter
registrations.)

You might also try pulling everyone >from Mogilev (and its own spelling
variations!). If you have Excel, you could copy the results into a
spreadsheet, and then you could "play with" sorting the list different
ways. She might surface that way.

As for the direct answer to your question, women did travel alone, but
they had to have someone waiting for them when they arrived. Unescorted
women with no sponsor could be labeled "LPC" (Likely to become a Public
Charge) and detained or refused entry. If they didn't have a "real"
relative already here, they likely had the name of someone to use - a
friend or agent. I'm not aware of any immigration papers other than
those created at Ellis Island - and if you had those, you'd know when
she traveled <g>.)

Good luck in your search --

Hilary Henkin


John Saunders FORD #general

Kirk Owen <imperial@...>
 

Hello, this is my first posting and my first question too.

I see that most of you live in America or Israel so I not sure that anyone
will be able to assist me but here goes. I am looking for great grandfather
John Saunders Ford. This was not his real name but the name he assumed when
he came to England in the 1870s I know where he lived. I think I know
where he came from. I know when he died and when he was born. I know his
wife and his children but I know nothing about his ancestors.

So, this is what I know.
That he was born in 1851 in either Poland or Russia (which is a rather like
looking a for a needle)
That he died in the St George Infirmary, St George-in-the-East in 1910 aged
59
That his wife was Isabella Carver who was a Protestant and shunned by her
family for marrying a Jew and a non British person.
That he was married in the Church of England in 1874 under his assumed name
but that to him this was a mere formality.
That he always told a different story to the census takers and other
government officials so that you never can tell if he is telling the truth
about himself or not - in each census he said that he was born in a
different place - always somewhere in England even though we know he was
born in eastern Europe.
That he lived for most of his life in 18 Buross Street in East London, a
street that had a high proportion of Jewish families living in it. This
street is no longer there having been obliterated in the bombing of World
War Two when the bulk of my Jewish family were killed.

How can I find out where he came >from and who his ancestors were?

I presume that he must have attended a synagogue and somewhere his real name
must be recorded together with the assumed one.

Can anyone assist me?

Cheers

Kirk


VEKSELSTEIN and circuses #general

David Magasiner <david_magasiner@...>
 

There is story in my family of my G-G-Grandfather who owned a circus in or
around Odessa in the Ukraine in the 19th century. The story goes that it was
destroyed in a fire and he was killed trying to rescue the animals. His name
was possibly Vekselstein or something similar. Does anybody have any
information or knowledge of this, or can they point me to where I may find
it.

Many thanks

David Magasiner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Women emigrating alone #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

Dear Barbara,
In trying different variations, have you tried "Ra" or Ro"? In
handwriting, "Passin" could look like "Rassin" or "Rossin".

You might also try to find her in the 1905 or 1915 NY State Censuses,
and try to find her voter registrations - they might have more clues.
(The JGen Discussion Group Archives will have more information on voter
registrations.)

You might also try pulling everyone >from Mogilev (and its own spelling
variations!). If you have Excel, you could copy the results into a
spreadsheet, and then you could "play with" sorting the list different
ways. She might surface that way.

As for the direct answer to your question, women did travel alone, but
they had to have someone waiting for them when they arrived. Unescorted
women with no sponsor could be labeled "LPC" (Likely to become a Public
Charge) and detained or refused entry. If they didn't have a "real"
relative already here, they likely had the name of someone to use - a
friend or agent. I'm not aware of any immigration papers other than
those created at Ellis Island - and if you had those, you'd know when
she traveled <g>.)

Good luck in your search --

Hilary Henkin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen John Saunders FORD #general

Kirk Owen <imperial@...>
 

Hello, this is my first posting and my first question too.

I see that most of you live in America or Israel so I not sure that anyone
will be able to assist me but here goes. I am looking for great grandfather
John Saunders Ford. This was not his real name but the name he assumed when
he came to England in the 1870s I know where he lived. I think I know
where he came from. I know when he died and when he was born. I know his
wife and his children but I know nothing about his ancestors.

So, this is what I know.
That he was born in 1851 in either Poland or Russia (which is a rather like
looking a for a needle)
That he died in the St George Infirmary, St George-in-the-East in 1910 aged
59
That his wife was Isabella Carver who was a Protestant and shunned by her
family for marrying a Jew and a non British person.
That he was married in the Church of England in 1874 under his assumed name
but that to him this was a mere formality.
That he always told a different story to the census takers and other
government officials so that you never can tell if he is telling the truth
about himself or not - in each census he said that he was born in a
different place - always somewhere in England even though we know he was
born in eastern Europe.
That he lived for most of his life in 18 Buross Street in East London, a
street that had a high proportion of Jewish families living in it. This
street is no longer there having been obliterated in the bombing of World
War Two when the bulk of my Jewish family were killed.

How can I find out where he came >from and who his ancestors were?

I presume that he must have attended a synagogue and somewhere his real name
must be recorded together with the assumed one.

Can anyone assist me?

Cheers

Kirk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen VEKSELSTEIN and circuses #general

David Magasiner <david_magasiner@...>
 

There is story in my family of my G-G-Grandfather who owned a circus in or
around Odessa in the Ukraine in the 19th century. The story goes that it was
destroyed in a fire and he was killed trying to rescue the animals. His name
was possibly Vekselstein or something similar. Does anybody have any
information or knowledge of this, or can they point me to where I may find
it.

Many thanks

David Magasiner


Re: Names - duplicate? #galicia

Yekkey@...
 

Could the mother have died in childbirth and the child be named after her?

Best regards,

Dan Nussbaum

Searching for
NUSSBAUM, KATZENSTEIN-Raboldshausen, Bad Hersfeld and Rhina Germany
TEPLITZKY, BENDERSKY, KASZKIET, KASHKET, GREENBERG-Uman, Ukraine
ROSENTHAL, S(C)HENK(EL)MAN-Zinkov, Ukraine
BILD, KASHLEVSKY-anywhere


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Names - duplicate? #ukraine

Yekkey@...
 

Could the mother have died in childbirth and the child be named after her?

Best regards,

Dan Nussbaum

Searching for
NUSSBAUM, KATZENSTEIN-Raboldshausen, Bad Hersfeld and Rhina Germany
TEPLITZKY, BENDERSKY, KASZKIET, KASHKET, GREENBERG-Uman, Ukraine
ROSENTHAL, S(C)HENK(EL)MAN-Zinkov, Ukraine
BILD, KASHLEVSKY-anywhere


Re: Names - duplicate? #galicia

Steve Franklin <franklin@...>
 

| A cousin of mine, in Bolszowce, Galicia (currently Bolshovtsy,
Ukr), was
| named Chana. On one of her brother's passenger manifests, their
mother's
| name appears to be Chana Liba; on another, their mother' name is
(typed)
| Chana Sabo.
|
| Either way, it appears that both mother and daughter were named
Chana, an
| oddity in Ashkenazic naming! Has anyone run into this? Is it
likely?
| Nowadays, we look at at second name as a "middle name" but is it
possible
| that Chana Sabo or Chana Liba would be considered a different
name than just
| Chana? Any idea what the "meaning" of Chana "Sabo" or Chana
"Liba" might be?
|
Hi,

In answer to the last two posts, there's a Moshe Nisan ben Moshe
Nisan in my family. I have a photo of the tombstone. Moshe (I) was
my great great grandfather. His son, Moshe (II) (Morris) Franklin
was my great grandfather Hersh Franklin's brother. There are
numerous Morrises and Nathans all apparently named after Moshe
Nisan (I). I can only assume that Moshe Nisan (I) died before
Moshe Nisan (II) was born, or he was sick enough to warrant an
exception. Keep in mind that this isn't a religiously mandated
system, just a custom. By the way, Morris (II) had a son named
Morton, his Hebrew name being Mordecai. ;o)

Steve Franklin, Baltimore
www.stevefranklin.net


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Names - duplicate? #ukraine

Steve Franklin <franklin@...>
 

| A cousin of mine, in Bolszowce, Galicia (currently Bolshovtsy,
Ukr), was
| named Chana. On one of her brother's passenger manifests, their
mother's
| name appears to be Chana Liba; on another, their mother' name is
(typed)
| Chana Sabo.
|
| Either way, it appears that both mother and daughter were named
Chana, an
| oddity in Ashkenazic naming! Has anyone run into this? Is it
likely?
| Nowadays, we look at at second name as a "middle name" but is it
possible
| that Chana Sabo or Chana Liba would be considered a different
name than just
| Chana? Any idea what the "meaning" of Chana "Sabo" or Chana
"Liba" might be?
|
Hi,

In answer to the last two posts, there's a Moshe Nisan ben Moshe
Nisan in my family. I have a photo of the tombstone. Moshe (I) was
my great great grandfather. His son, Moshe (II) (Morris) Franklin
was my great grandfather Hersh Franklin's brother. There are
numerous Morrises and Nathans all apparently named after Moshe
Nisan (I). I can only assume that Moshe Nisan (I) died before
Moshe Nisan (II) was born, or he was sick enough to warrant an
exception. Keep in mind that this isn't a religiously mandated
system, just a custom. By the way, Morris (II) had a son named
Morton, his Hebrew name being Mordecai. ;o)

Steve Franklin, Baltimore
www.stevefranklin.net


Re: The name "ZISEL" #ukraine

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Freya Blitstein Maslov posted as follows"

"Can anyone tell me about the name "Zisel" ? My Grandmother
Rose (Riwke) age 18 and her sister Sophie (Zisel), age 23 left
Miropol and came to the U.S on the USS Birma June 23 1913.
On the EI manifest, it looks like "Disel""

The Yiddish nickname Zisl was used by Ukranian women, along with several
related names, e.g., Zisa and Zisha. In Yiddish this means "sweet". And
women having one of these names did adopt the name Sophie upon immigration
to the US, according to my Given Names Data Base for Ukraine.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: The name "ZISEL" #ukraine

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Freya Blitstein Maslov posted as follows"

"Can anyone tell me about the name "Zisel" ? My Grandmother
Rose (Riwke) age 18 and her sister Sophie (Zisel), age 23 left
Miropol and came to the U.S on the USS Birma June 23 1913.
On the EI manifest, it looks like "Disel""

The Yiddish nickname Zisl was used by Ukranian women, along with several
related names, e.g., Zisa and Zisha. In Yiddish this means "sweet". And
women having one of these names did adopt the name Sophie upon immigration
to the US, according to my Given Names Data Base for Ukraine.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


100 shtetls of Ukraine volume 2 #ukraine

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

I came across this new book, while researching for the shtetl page I am
doing on Litin and Kalinovka, Ukraine. I don't know if it has been
mentioned here, but it may interest some of you.
"One Hundred Shtetls of Ukraine. Vol. 2. Podolia"
The Russian title of the book is the following:
"Sto evreiskih mestechek Ukraini. Vypusk 2. Podolia".
You may also get some information about this book at the site of Research
center "Petersburg Judaica", where one of the authors now work.
www.judaica.spb.ru

Rose Feldman
rosef@post.tau.ac.il
EPSTEIN/BOYARSKY Amstiveva, Mstibov or Mstibovo or Mscibow (Belarus);
Ruzhany or maybe Rozhno; Petach Tikvah, Chicago, Argentine
GITNER/LULKIN/REZNIK Litin (Lityn) Ukraine,Kalinovka Ukraine, Israel,
Chicago
ILEWICKI/ILIWITSKY/ELEVITSKY Kusava Grodno Belarus
TREPMAN/SOJCHER/SLOVIK Warsaw, Israel
FELDMAN/LICHT Warsaw, Israel


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine 100 shtetls of Ukraine volume 2 #ukraine

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

I came across this new book, while researching for the shtetl page I am
doing on Litin and Kalinovka, Ukraine. I don't know if it has been
mentioned here, but it may interest some of you.
"One Hundred Shtetls of Ukraine. Vol. 2. Podolia"
The Russian title of the book is the following:
"Sto evreiskih mestechek Ukraini. Vypusk 2. Podolia".
You may also get some information about this book at the site of Research
center "Petersburg Judaica", where one of the authors now work.
www.judaica.spb.ru

Rose Feldman
rosef@post.tau.ac.il
EPSTEIN/BOYARSKY Amstiveva, Mstibov or Mstibovo or Mscibow (Belarus);
Ruzhany or maybe Rozhno; Petach Tikvah, Chicago, Argentine
GITNER/LULKIN/REZNIK Litin (Lityn) Ukraine,Kalinovka Ukraine, Israel,
Chicago
ILEWICKI/ILIWITSKY/ELEVITSKY Kusava Grodno Belarus
TREPMAN/SOJCHER/SLOVIK Warsaw, Israel
FELDMAN/LICHT Warsaw, Israel


Yismach Moshe #rabbinic

moishe@langsam.com <moishe@...>
 

Hi,

In a shul in my neighborhood I noticed that the "paroches", the
curtain in front of the ark, was donated by a R' Yerachmiel
TEITELBAUM, described as a descendent of the Yismach Moshe. If
anybody is researching this branch and wants me to try and find
out more, please feel free to drop me a line.

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn NY


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Yismach Moshe #rabbinic

moishe@langsam.com <moishe@...>
 

Hi,

In a shul in my neighborhood I noticed that the "paroches", the
curtain in front of the ark, was donated by a R' Yerachmiel
TEITELBAUM, described as a descendent of the Yismach Moshe. If
anybody is researching this branch and wants me to try and find
out more, please feel free to drop me a line.

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn NY


Peddlers #belarus

Jack R. Braverman <jbraverman1@...>
 

Since so much interest has been shown in the occupation "peddler," I can'=
t
resist adding one light-hearted story told me by a distant, first
generation cousin whose parents came >from a farming village in Belarus so=

obscure that they referred to it as, simply, "mud."

This may be an urban legend, yet, with all the coincidences and surprises=

the millions of immigrants experienced in America, one wonders if it real=
ly
didn't happen not only once, but many times.

And so, my _kinder_, listen up: Once upon a time in America...

A certain man whose name I forget now had been born in a small shtetl on
the Polish-Russian border. Around the turn of the century he left and cam=
e
to America, but he always remembered his boyhood friend, whom we will cal=
l
Katz here. Later this man heard Katz had also come to the States and that=

he had landed in Boston.

The first man began sending messages to others living in Boston, yet no o=
ne
had heard of this Katz. On trips to the East Coast, the man always tried =
to
stop in Boston and to ask after his lost friend. And for years he
continually asked after him. There was never anyone who had ever even hea=
rd
of this Katz.

Then, many, many years later, the first man came across Katz by accident =
on
a Boston street. He was overjoyed, but very puzzled. Why had it been so
difficult to find him, he asked? Katz replied with the following
explanation.

When Katz got off the boat in Boston, he immediately began looking for a
job. He met a friend, Levinson, >from the shtetl in the Old Country.
Levinson had a pushcart. He recommended to Katz that peddlingt was a way =
to
make some money. Katz decided to take the advice. But then Levinson warne=
d
him he needed a license >from the City of Boston. It would cost $5.00. Kat=
z
responded, "That's a lot of geld!" gasp Katz. He thought more, and was
indecisive.

The friend added the comment that Katz could share his peddler's license,=

but the names would be wrong. However, if Katz changed his name to
Levinson, it would all work out.

Katz thought. Then he asked how one changed his name. Levinson replied th=
at
it was necessary to go to the court house and do it legally. Katz though
more. Then he asked, "How much does that cost?" Levinson answered, "One
dollar." Katz shouted, "I'll do it!"

Thus in one stroke, Katz "put bread on the table" and confounded his
genealogy-minded descendants.

* * * * * =


On a more serious note, my local PBS station recently rebroadcast the old=

Abba Eban "Heritage: Civilization and the Jews" series >from seveal decade=
s
ago. In one of the later segemnts, one dealing with the Jew's arrival in
Ameica, there were many minutes devoted to the experience of the peddler =
as
he wandered >from one frontier settlement to another. There were some
interesting stills and movie clips backing up the dialogue. (I assume tha=
t
the series can be borrowed >from a decent library.)

Eventually the backpack became a wagon--or pushcart in cities--, which th=
en
became a general store, which may have then have become a department stor=
e,
which then evolved into a chain of well-known stores. The daughter of one=

former peddler told me how her father, an educated man >from Grodno, walke=
d
the railroad tracks in West Virginia and southern Ohio with a backpack. T=
he
tracks were the only "roads" into the isolated mining communities at that=

time. He slept in the woods, and was constantly on alert for bears. This
was about 1900. Finally he opened a store on the banks of the Ohio River.=

It catered to the miners, but was driven out of business by the "company
store concept" initiated by the large mining companies, including the Han=
na
Mining Co. So he bought a local diary, then another, and then.... But you=

grasp the experience, no?

* * * * * =


Peddler has an interesting etym.

* * * * * =


Regards to all,

Jack Braverman
Cleveland OH


Names #belarus

Plutsk@...
 

In a message dated 11/18/2001 1:19:13 AM Eastern Standard Time, Alice
Gillihan writes:

What about the name Max in Russia about 1800s? Is there a Hebrew version?
How
about a Hebrew version of Madison?
Alice, this topic has been discussed at enormous length in the main JewishGen
Discussion Group list and in this and other SIG lists. All the questions and
answers are to be found in the appropriate Archives. There is also relevant
and informative information in the JewishGen InfoFiles.

Steve Gold
Detroit area


Re: Peddlars' licenses #belarus

MALKA1234@...
 

In a post 11/16 Steve Gold mentions Chicago lists of peddlar's licenses in
the late 19thc. does any one know how common a requirement for a license
might have been earlier -say the 1850's or 60's - and outside the very large
cities? Would peddlars who travelled among small towns or even interstate
have left any trail of licenses or other official papers?

My peddlars would have been in upper NY state and maybe Wisconsin and Montana
...

thank you for any guidance
Meg Power
McLean, VA


Belarus SIG #Belarus Peddlers #belarus

Jack R. Braverman <jbraverman1@...>
 

Since so much interest has been shown in the occupation "peddler," I can'=
t
resist adding one light-hearted story told me by a distant, first
generation cousin whose parents came >from a farming village in Belarus so=

obscure that they referred to it as, simply, "mud."

This may be an urban legend, yet, with all the coincidences and surprises=

the millions of immigrants experienced in America, one wonders if it real=
ly
didn't happen not only once, but many times.

And so, my _kinder_, listen up: Once upon a time in America...

A certain man whose name I forget now had been born in a small shtetl on
the Polish-Russian border. Around the turn of the century he left and cam=
e
to America, but he always remembered his boyhood friend, whom we will cal=
l
Katz here. Later this man heard Katz had also come to the States and that=

he had landed in Boston.

The first man began sending messages to others living in Boston, yet no o=
ne
had heard of this Katz. On trips to the East Coast, the man always tried =
to
stop in Boston and to ask after his lost friend. And for years he
continually asked after him. There was never anyone who had ever even hea=
rd
of this Katz.

Then, many, many years later, the first man came across Katz by accident =
on
a Boston street. He was overjoyed, but very puzzled. Why had it been so
difficult to find him, he asked? Katz replied with the following
explanation.

When Katz got off the boat in Boston, he immediately began looking for a
job. He met a friend, Levinson, >from the shtetl in the Old Country.
Levinson had a pushcart. He recommended to Katz that peddlingt was a way =
to
make some money. Katz decided to take the advice. But then Levinson warne=
d
him he needed a license >from the City of Boston. It would cost $5.00. Kat=
z
responded, "That's a lot of geld!" gasp Katz. He thought more, and was
indecisive.

The friend added the comment that Katz could share his peddler's license,=

but the names would be wrong. However, if Katz changed his name to
Levinson, it would all work out.

Katz thought. Then he asked how one changed his name. Levinson replied th=
at
it was necessary to go to the court house and do it legally. Katz though
more. Then he asked, "How much does that cost?" Levinson answered, "One
dollar." Katz shouted, "I'll do it!"

Thus in one stroke, Katz "put bread on the table" and confounded his
genealogy-minded descendants.

* * * * * =


On a more serious note, my local PBS station recently rebroadcast the old=

Abba Eban "Heritage: Civilization and the Jews" series >from seveal decade=
s
ago. In one of the later segemnts, one dealing with the Jew's arrival in
Ameica, there were many minutes devoted to the experience of the peddler =
as
he wandered >from one frontier settlement to another. There were some
interesting stills and movie clips backing up the dialogue. (I assume tha=
t
the series can be borrowed >from a decent library.)

Eventually the backpack became a wagon--or pushcart in cities--, which th=
en
became a general store, which may have then have become a department stor=
e,
which then evolved into a chain of well-known stores. The daughter of one=

former peddler told me how her father, an educated man >from Grodno, walke=
d
the railroad tracks in West Virginia and southern Ohio with a backpack. T=
he
tracks were the only "roads" into the isolated mining communities at that=

time. He slept in the woods, and was constantly on alert for bears. This
was about 1900. Finally he opened a store on the banks of the Ohio River.=

It catered to the miners, but was driven out of business by the "company
store concept" initiated by the large mining companies, including the Han=
na
Mining Co. So he bought a local diary, then another, and then.... But you=

grasp the experience, no?

* * * * * =


Peddler has an interesting etym.

* * * * * =


Regards to all,

Jack Braverman
Cleveland OH