Date   

Pronounciation of Gisella #general

Judy Young <jy-abcd@...>
 

Re Judy Segal's question about the pronounciation of Gisella: actually the
Hungarian version of the name is usually Gizella and it is indeed pronounced
as Judy thought, just as it is written, where the G is hard as in Girl and
the z is like English zero.

I have not come across the nickname "Katie" for Gizella (and did not see the
discussion in H-sig); normally the nickname for it is Gizi.

It could be that your mother remembers it said like that >from childhood as
you suggest (just a personal preference, not explainable by normal usage).
(Or could it be that there was a Latin American connection where the s or z
would sound more like an h?) I assume you have asked your mother why she
pronounces it like that?

Judy Young Drache
Ottawa,
E-mail: jy-abcd@cyberus.ca


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pronounciation of Gisella #general

Judy Young <jy-abcd@...>
 

Re Judy Segal's question about the pronounciation of Gisella: actually the
Hungarian version of the name is usually Gizella and it is indeed pronounced
as Judy thought, just as it is written, where the G is hard as in Girl and
the z is like English zero.

I have not come across the nickname "Katie" for Gizella (and did not see the
discussion in H-sig); normally the nickname for it is Gizi.

It could be that your mother remembers it said like that >from childhood as
you suggest (just a personal preference, not explainable by normal usage).
(Or could it be that there was a Latin American connection where the s or z
would sound more like an h?) I assume you have asked your mother why she
pronounces it like that?

Judy Young Drache
Ottawa,
E-mail: jy-abcd@cyberus.ca


BURSTEEN in Argentina #general

Solna K. (Kandi) Wasser <skwasser@...>
 

Just became aware that one of my paternal grandmother's brothers Leon
BURSTEEN, born about 1889 in Peroslov, settled in Buenos Aires. Any tips
on where to start researching? His parents were Israel and Henny Edith
PASCHEN. I have no further information on whom he married or children's
names. One brother of this family (6 known siblings) settled in Philadelphia
where they came into this country.....the rest moved on to Chicago
Thank You for your time now and so much helpfulness in the past.
Kandi Wasser
New York, USA

Researching:
Piser/Pizer, Posisky, Pausisky, >from Virbaln
Corush and Getz >from Bialystok
Cohen/Kane, Elkin, Bursteen/Burstein/Burnstein and Paschen >from Charkov
near Kiev to
Philadelphia then Chicago


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BURSTEEN in Argentina #general

Solna K. (Kandi) Wasser <skwasser@...>
 

Just became aware that one of my paternal grandmother's brothers Leon
BURSTEEN, born about 1889 in Peroslov, settled in Buenos Aires. Any tips
on where to start researching? His parents were Israel and Henny Edith
PASCHEN. I have no further information on whom he married or children's
names. One brother of this family (6 known siblings) settled in Philadelphia
where they came into this country.....the rest moved on to Chicago
Thank You for your time now and so much helpfulness in the past.
Kandi Wasser
New York, USA

Researching:
Piser/Pizer, Posisky, Pausisky, >from Virbaln
Corush and Getz >from Bialystok
Cohen/Kane, Elkin, Bursteen/Burstein/Burnstein and Paschen >from Charkov
near Kiev to
Philadelphia then Chicago


Tombstone dilemma solved! #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dear Stewart,

Re your tombstone inscription at
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html, thanks are due to
Nick Landau's suggestion to me for reading the "blurred" letters. He
suggested they might be tet-aleph-gimel (meaning "day"). That makes
very good sense, because now we have the reading:
"gestorben 15 Tag in H. Heshvan 1930".

So now I would guess that " H." is an abbreviation for the Hebrew
word hodesh, meaning month, and the inscription means "died 15th
day of the month Heshvan 1930." 15th Heshvan in the year 1930
corresponded with November 6.

This is a good example of the value of teamwork, and (as the
moderator suggested) this time it actually paid off that we
discussed the inscription in the group as a whole!

Thank you again, Nick!

Judith Romney Wegner

MODERATOR NOTE: And thank you Judith, and Ury, for finishing this up.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tombstone dilemma solved! #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dear Stewart,

Re your tombstone inscription at
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html, thanks are due to
Nick Landau's suggestion to me for reading the "blurred" letters. He
suggested they might be tet-aleph-gimel (meaning "day"). That makes
very good sense, because now we have the reading:
"gestorben 15 Tag in H. Heshvan 1930".

So now I would guess that " H." is an abbreviation for the Hebrew
word hodesh, meaning month, and the inscription means "died 15th
day of the month Heshvan 1930." 15th Heshvan in the year 1930
corresponded with November 6.

This is a good example of the value of teamwork, and (as the
moderator suggested) this time it actually paid off that we
discussed the inscription in the group as a whole!

Thank you again, Nick!

Judith Romney Wegner

MODERATOR NOTE: And thank you Judith, and Ury, for finishing this up.


Re: Tombstoner #general

Ury Link
 

Dear Genners,

The mystery of the date on the tomb stone is not a mystery, You must to read
it as:

On the 15 day of the month Cheswan. (Gestorben 15 Tag in C' Cheshwan)

The word after the digit 15 is Tag (Teit - Alef - Gimel) and it mean a day.

The letter Cheit is a shortening of the word Chodesh what mean a month.

So this man is die on 6 November 1930

from my experience I know that this text is usual on some tombstones
Best regards

Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html
# VM 7930-Tombstone inscription, probably in Yiddishor Hebrew.
Inscription may have the name Niestempoweras part of the text.
The date is a bit of a mystery; it says 15th of something or other
1930, but he month is blurred in this photograph and hard to read.
It looks like mem aleph bet, which could stand for the Hebrew month
Menahem-Av (which is the full name of the month of Av). If so, this
corresponded with August 9th in 1930. But the next line seems to
contradict that date, it appears to say 8th Heshvan (which corresponded
with 30th October in 1930). I can't explain this discrepancy, does anyone
have any ideas?>>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Tombstoner #general

Ury Link
 

Dear Genners,

The mystery of the date on the tomb stone is not a mystery, You must to read
it as:

On the 15 day of the month Cheswan. (Gestorben 15 Tag in C' Cheshwan)

The word after the digit 15 is Tag (Teit - Alef - Gimel) and it mean a day.

The letter Cheit is a shortening of the word Chodesh what mean a month.

So this man is die on 6 November 1930

from my experience I know that this text is usual on some tombstones
Best regards

Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html
# VM 7930-Tombstone inscription, probably in Yiddishor Hebrew.
Inscription may have the name Niestempoweras part of the text.
The date is a bit of a mystery; it says 15th of something or other
1930, but he month is blurred in this photograph and hard to read.
It looks like mem aleph bet, which could stand for the Hebrew month
Menahem-Av (which is the full name of the month of Av). If so, this
corresponded with August 9th in 1930. But the next line seems to
contradict that date, it appears to say 8th Heshvan (which corresponded
with 30th October in 1930). I can't explain this discrepancy, does anyone
have any ideas?>>


Re: Name Index for Lichtenstein's book #poland #danzig #gdansk #germany

Tamar Amit <tamar.amit@...>
 

Hi,

I would be grateful if someone can send me the details on:

"Becker, Gert 233
Becker, Julius 102, 168, 208, 209"

Thanks,
Tamar Amit
ISRAEL

On 6/6/06, Danzig SIG digest <danzig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:
DANZIG Digest for Monday, June 05, 2006.

1. Name Index for Lichtenstein's book

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Name Index for Lichtenstein's book
From: "Logan J. Kleinwaks" <kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu>
Date: Mon, 5 Jun 2006 14:33:49 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

The Name Index for Erwin Lichtenstein's book, "Die Juden der Freien Stadt
Danzig unter der Herrschaft des Nationalsozialismus," is now online in the
Articles section of our SIG website. If you find a name of interest to you,
but cannot find an accessible copy of this book, please post a message here,
and, hopefully, someone will be able to help you.


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Re: Name Index for Lichtenstein's book #gdansk #germany #poland #danzig

Tamar Amit <tamar.amit@...>
 

Hi,

I would be grateful if someone can send me the details on:

"Becker, Gert 233
Becker, Julius 102, 168, 208, 209"

Thanks,
Tamar Amit
ISRAEL

On 6/6/06, Danzig SIG digest <danzig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:
DANZIG Digest for Monday, June 05, 2006.

1. Name Index for Lichtenstein's book

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Name Index for Lichtenstein's book
From: "Logan J. Kleinwaks" <kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu>
Date: Mon, 5 Jun 2006 14:33:49 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

The Name Index for Erwin Lichtenstein's book, "Die Juden der Freien Stadt
Danzig unter der Herrschaft des Nationalsozialismus," is now online in the
Articles section of our SIG website. If you find a name of interest to you,
but cannot find an accessible copy of this book, please post a message here,
and, hopefully, someone will be able to help you.


Re: Lithuanian Jews in Sweden #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

You are right: Many Jews lived for a shorter or longer period
in Scandinavia (mostly Sweden or Denmark) until they had saved
enough money for the fare to America.

Many moved around >from Sweden to Denmark or vice versa simply
staying where there was work to be had.

So I suggest that you give us some more detailed information:
Names, dates, occupations, etc.

Then we might be able to help you.

Best regards

Elsebeth


Elsebeth Paikin, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/
&
SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk

At 14:22 29-05-2006, you wrote:
My great grandfather came to America in 1886. He was
probably >from Lithuania. However, the ship manifest
lists his previous residence as Stockholm.
Originally, I assumed that Stockholm was merely a
way-station on the way to America, but I have read
that Russian Empire Jews moved to Sweden during this
time to avoid pogroms. Would you think that it is
more likely that Stockholm was just a transfer point
for a Russian Jew in 1886 or do you think that it is
at least possible that my ancestor lived in Sweden for
some extended period? I have also read that about
this time, most Lithuanian Jews who migrated to Sweden
came >from the Suwalki area.

My great grandfather's surname, SUSSMAN (or ZUSMAN),
was somewhat common in that area.

Lloyd Appel
lapp15@yahoo.com


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Re: Lithuanian Jews in Sweden #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

You are right: Many Jews lived for a shorter or longer period
in Scandinavia (mostly Sweden or Denmark) until they had saved
enough money for the fare to America.

Many moved around >from Sweden to Denmark or vice versa simply
staying where there was work to be had.

So I suggest that you give us some more detailed information:
Names, dates, occupations, etc.

Then we might be able to help you.

Best regards

Elsebeth


Elsebeth Paikin, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/
&
SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk

At 14:22 29-05-2006, you wrote:
My great grandfather came to America in 1886. He was
probably >from Lithuania. However, the ship manifest
lists his previous residence as Stockholm.
Originally, I assumed that Stockholm was merely a
way-station on the way to America, but I have read
that Russian Empire Jews moved to Sweden during this
time to avoid pogroms. Would you think that it is
more likely that Stockholm was just a transfer point
for a Russian Jew in 1886 or do you think that it is
at least possible that my ancestor lived in Sweden for
some extended period? I have also read that about
this time, most Lithuanian Jews who migrated to Sweden
came >from the Suwalki area.

My great grandfather's surname, SUSSMAN (or ZUSMAN),
was somewhat common in that area.

Lloyd Appel
lapp15@yahoo.com


If you want information / help! #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Dear Scand-genners!

I have noticed that many have subscribed to this list recently
and I want to welcome all!

However, very few *USE* this list:
----------------------------------
1. Very few write about their research or ask for information
2. Almost none of the new subscribers write and introductory
message about the names and places they are researching.

In that way we are all sitting in a little hole without a
view to the greater world or research. If we want to help
each other and/or get in contact with others who are researching
the same areas or names we *must* communicate.

I have seen subscribers come and go without ever writing one
single message. And when I have contacted them some say that
there is no point in being subscribed to list where there is
nothing going on - that can't help them!

I know very well that the situation is different in some other
(large) mailing lists where there are several messages each day,
so you can just lean back and learn a lot >from just reading what
others write. But that is not the case when subscribed to small
mailing lists (or rather mailing lists for small areas).

Another thing: Even though you might have sent your "Intro" when
you subscribed, you should re-send it at intervals, because some
unsubscribe and new subscribers join the list. And very few use
the archive to see if anything has been written there of interest.

So send an introductory message about your research and let's get
this mailing list go live!

Best regards


Elsebeth Paikin, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/
&
SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia If you want information / help! #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Dear Scand-genners!

I have noticed that many have subscribed to this list recently
and I want to welcome all!

However, very few *USE* this list:
----------------------------------
1. Very few write about their research or ask for information
2. Almost none of the new subscribers write and introductory
message about the names and places they are researching.

In that way we are all sitting in a little hole without a
view to the greater world or research. If we want to help
each other and/or get in contact with others who are researching
the same areas or names we *must* communicate.

I have seen subscribers come and go without ever writing one
single message. And when I have contacted them some say that
there is no point in being subscribed to list where there is
nothing going on - that can't help them!

I know very well that the situation is different in some other
(large) mailing lists where there are several messages each day,
so you can just lean back and learn a lot >from just reading what
others write. But that is not the case when subscribed to small
mailing lists (or rather mailing lists for small areas).

Another thing: Even though you might have sent your "Intro" when
you subscribed, you should re-send it at intervals, because some
unsubscribe and new subscribers join the list. And very few use
the archive to see if anything has been written there of interest.

So send an introductory message about your research and let's get
this mailing list go live!

Best regards


Elsebeth Paikin, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/
&
SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk


EPSTEIN Family Y-DNA Study #belarus

Itzhak Epstein
 

Several EPSTEINs have joined in a Family Tree DNA JewishGen surname project.
Painless mouth
swab genetic testing procedures are being used as
a promising tool for breaking through our
genealogical brick walls. It might help you to
greatly expand your family tree, and may also help our surname project.

So far, most of the project's members' recent
direct male ancestors are >from Belarus or nearby
areas in Poland, Lithuania, and the Ukraine. A
rough count of JewishGen Family Finder listings
for southwestern Belarus indicates that EPSTEIN
is the third most frequently researched surname
-- just behind KAPLAN and LEVINE, and just ahead of LIFSHITZ and GOLDBERG.

We have identified members of one paternal
lineage that has borne the Epstein surname for
several centuries. There are hints of another old
line. Most of the project's current members,
however, are patrilineally unrelated to each
other. In addition, most of us have discovered
patrilineal relationships to men whose surnames are not Epstein.

We are working on identifying the various
branches of our principal cluster, on exploring
additional clusters, and on connecting our
unrelated members to cousins. To accomplish these
goals and to create as broad a search as
possible, we need more male Epsteins to
contribute a cheek swab as a DNA sample. If you
are female EPSTEIN or an EPSTEIN through female
ancestors, a sample >from an EPSTEIN male relative
can represent your family in the test. If you are
not an EPSTEIN, please share this message with
EPSTEINs who may want to participate in this project.

To join, go to
http://www.familytreedna.com/surname_join.asp?code=3DR56553&;special=3Dtrue
The basic, and most affordable, twelve marker
test will indicate to whom you are probably
related. The more advanced tests could help to
identify closer and more certain relationships.
You can start with the 12 marker test and add to
it at a later date, using the same sample.

If you have any questions, please contact Marsha
Epstein, our project's volunteer administrator at
mailto:epsteindna_admin@earthlink.net

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY
mailto:iegen@earthlink.net


Belarus SIG #Belarus EPSTEIN Family Y-DNA Study #belarus

Itzhak Epstein
 

Several EPSTEINs have joined in a Family Tree DNA JewishGen surname project.
Painless mouth
swab genetic testing procedures are being used as
a promising tool for breaking through our
genealogical brick walls. It might help you to
greatly expand your family tree, and may also help our surname project.

So far, most of the project's members' recent
direct male ancestors are >from Belarus or nearby
areas in Poland, Lithuania, and the Ukraine. A
rough count of JewishGen Family Finder listings
for southwestern Belarus indicates that EPSTEIN
is the third most frequently researched surname
-- just behind KAPLAN and LEVINE, and just ahead of LIFSHITZ and GOLDBERG.

We have identified members of one paternal
lineage that has borne the Epstein surname for
several centuries. There are hints of another old
line. Most of the project's current members,
however, are patrilineally unrelated to each
other. In addition, most of us have discovered
patrilineal relationships to men whose surnames are not Epstein.

We are working on identifying the various
branches of our principal cluster, on exploring
additional clusters, and on connecting our
unrelated members to cousins. To accomplish these
goals and to create as broad a search as
possible, we need more male Epsteins to
contribute a cheek swab as a DNA sample. If you
are female EPSTEIN or an EPSTEIN through female
ancestors, a sample >from an EPSTEIN male relative
can represent your family in the test. If you are
not an EPSTEIN, please share this message with
EPSTEINs who may want to participate in this project.

To join, go to
http://www.familytreedna.com/surname_join.asp?code=3DR56553&;special=3Dtrue
The basic, and most affordable, twelve marker
test will indicate to whom you are probably
related. The more advanced tests could help to
identify closer and more certain relationships.
You can start with the 12 marker test and add to
it at a later date, using the same sample.

If you have any questions, please contact Marsha
Epstein, our project's volunteer administrator at
mailto:epsteindna_admin@earthlink.net

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY
mailto:iegen@earthlink.net


BLOOM, SHER, GLICKSMAN from Riga #latvia

Jeremy Bloom <jeremy_bloom@...>
 

Note to ALL >from moderator:
Please remember to write all surnames in CAPITAL LETTERES!
**********************************************************

I am researching the above family names who came >from Riga originally
and settled in Manchester, UK in c.1880.

The original spellings may be different >from those I have used above.
In addition, I believe the original family name of the BLOOM's was SHER
(or possible SCHER). BLOOM may have been taken >from a maternal line.

I would be grateful if anyone who has any conections to the following
could email me:

1. Nathan (Nissan) BLOOM, b. c.1855 in Riga. Father possibly called
Michael (or variant)

2. Rebecca Tobe (nee SHER), b. c. 1860

3. Barnett BLOOM b. 1870s (father Isaac?)

4. Abraham (Alec) SHER, b Liverpool c 1900. Moved to Leeds.

5. Akeeva BLOOM. d Manchester c. 1938.

Any information on these gratefully received.

Jeremy Bloom (Leeds UK)


Latvia SIG #Latvia BLOOM, SHER, GLICKSMAN from Riga #latvia

Jeremy Bloom <jeremy_bloom@...>
 

Note to ALL >from moderator:
Please remember to write all surnames in CAPITAL LETTERES!
**********************************************************

I am researching the above family names who came >from Riga originally
and settled in Manchester, UK in c.1880.

The original spellings may be different >from those I have used above.
In addition, I believe the original family name of the BLOOM's was SHER
(or possible SCHER). BLOOM may have been taken >from a maternal line.

I would be grateful if anyone who has any conections to the following
could email me:

1. Nathan (Nissan) BLOOM, b. c.1855 in Riga. Father possibly called
Michael (or variant)

2. Rebecca Tobe (nee SHER), b. c. 1860

3. Barnett BLOOM b. 1870s (father Isaac?)

4. Abraham (Alec) SHER, b Liverpool c 1900. Moved to Leeds.

5. Akeeva BLOOM. d Manchester c. 1938.

Any information on these gratefully received.

Jeremy Bloom (Leeds UK)


Re: ukraine digest: June 06, 2006 #ukraine

Anita <anitac47@...>
 

Subject: Field Guide to Visiting a Jewish Cemetery
From: Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@jewishgen.org>
Date: Tue, 06 Jun 2006 09:08:55 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

Snowbound cemeteries are now cleared for visiting and genealogical
sleuthing!

Be sure to include your camera, hedgeclippers, notebook, pencils, whisk
broom and Rabbi Joshua Segal's "Field Guide to Visiting a Jewish
Cemetery"....the quintessential tool for unlocking tombstone inscriptions,
decoding dates and deciphering many of the more common inscriptions.
For those who don't get the book but will go to cemeteries, I would like to
add, and MOST importantly (I always warn of this) protection >from poison
ivy. Long sleeves, pants tucked in socks, gloves, a vial of Dawn (the
reaction to poison ivy is caused by an oil so any degreaser is a good
idea). It stays on your clothing so be careful when removing same. Poison
ivy can develop into way more than a rash. There was just a news story
that global warming could be making it even more virulent.

Regards,
Anita Citron
Hicksville, NY


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: ukraine digest: June 06, 2006 #ukraine

Anita <anitac47@...>
 

Subject: Field Guide to Visiting a Jewish Cemetery
From: Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@jewishgen.org>
Date: Tue, 06 Jun 2006 09:08:55 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

Snowbound cemeteries are now cleared for visiting and genealogical
sleuthing!

Be sure to include your camera, hedgeclippers, notebook, pencils, whisk
broom and Rabbi Joshua Segal's "Field Guide to Visiting a Jewish
Cemetery"....the quintessential tool for unlocking tombstone inscriptions,
decoding dates and deciphering many of the more common inscriptions.
For those who don't get the book but will go to cemeteries, I would like to
add, and MOST importantly (I always warn of this) protection >from poison
ivy. Long sleeves, pants tucked in socks, gloves, a vial of Dawn (the
reaction to poison ivy is caused by an oil so any degreaser is a good
idea). It stays on your clothing so be careful when removing same. Poison
ivy can develop into way more than a rash. There was just a news story
that global warming could be making it even more virulent.

Regards,
Anita Citron
Hicksville, NY