Date   

Yizkor Book Project-July 2007 report #ukraine

Joyce Field
 

For the month of July 2007, the Yizkor Book Project added four new
books, five new entries, and 10 updates. All translations can be
accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html where
the new material has been flagged for easy identification.

-New books:

-Bohemia, Czech Republic: Die Juden und Judengemeinde Bohmens in
Vergangenheit und Gegenwart (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/bohemia/bohemia.html
-Sasov, Ukraine: Tmimei Derech (The Innocent Ones),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sasov/sasov.html
-Schindler, Stepping Stone to Life: A Reconstruction of the Schindler
Story, original and unpublished manuscript by Robin O'Neil:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
-Zambrow, Poland: Sefer Zambrow; Zambrove (The Book of Zambrov),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zambrow/Zambrow.html

-New entries:

-Dorohoi, Romania: Pinkas HaKehillot Romania, vol. 1
-Golonog, Poland: Sefer Sosnowiec v'hasviva b'Zaglembie (Sosnowiec
and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie (Volume 1)
-Pinsk, Belarus: Pinkus HaKehillot Polin, vol. V
-Rawa Mazowiecka: Poland, Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 1
-Vidukle, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bukowina: The History of the Jewish Worker Movement in Bukovina,
vol. 1, pp. 129-144
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Duetos, Lithuania
-Goworowo, Poland
-Jaslo, Poland
-Podgaytsy (Podhajce), Poland: the translation of this book is now complete
-Przemysl, Poland
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Svencionys, Lithuania

JewishGen wishes to thank all the donors, translators, and volunteers
who work with the Yizkor Book Project. Projects that depend on
donations of money for translation are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
We urge you to support these projects so that translations can
continue.

Please contact me privately if you want to start a new translation
project or donate for the translation of an article in the Pinkas
HaKehillot.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition


Re: Phillip as a given name #ukraine

Sarah L Meyer
 

Genners,
The Jewish men that I know or have known, with the secular name
of Phillip, have had a Yiddish name of Feivel or Faivush. The Ukraine
Given Names database also suggested Fishel and Pesach.
Sarah L. M. Christiansen
USA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Yizkor Book Project-July 2007 report #ukraine

Joyce Field
 

For the month of July 2007, the Yizkor Book Project added four new
books, five new entries, and 10 updates. All translations can be
accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html where
the new material has been flagged for easy identification.

-New books:

-Bohemia, Czech Republic: Die Juden und Judengemeinde Bohmens in
Vergangenheit und Gegenwart (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/bohemia/bohemia.html
-Sasov, Ukraine: Tmimei Derech (The Innocent Ones),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sasov/sasov.html
-Schindler, Stepping Stone to Life: A Reconstruction of the Schindler
Story, original and unpublished manuscript by Robin O'Neil:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/schindler/schindler.html
-Zambrow, Poland: Sefer Zambrow; Zambrove (The Book of Zambrov),
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zambrow/Zambrow.html

-New entries:

-Dorohoi, Romania: Pinkas HaKehillot Romania, vol. 1
-Golonog, Poland: Sefer Sosnowiec v'hasviva b'Zaglembie (Sosnowiec
and the Surrounding Region in Zaglembie (Volume 1)
-Pinsk, Belarus: Pinkus HaKehillot Polin, vol. V
-Rawa Mazowiecka: Poland, Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 1
-Vidukle, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bukowina: The History of the Jewish Worker Movement in Bukovina,
vol. 1, pp. 129-144
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Duetos, Lithuania
-Goworowo, Poland
-Jaslo, Poland
-Podgaytsy (Podhajce), Poland: the translation of this book is now complete
-Przemysl, Poland
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Svencionys, Lithuania

JewishGen wishes to thank all the donors, translators, and volunteers
who work with the Yizkor Book Project. Projects that depend on
donations of money for translation are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
We urge you to support these projects so that translations can
continue.

Please contact me privately if you want to start a new translation
project or donate for the translation of an article in the Pinkas
HaKehillot.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Phillip as a given name #ukraine

Sarah L Meyer
 

Genners,
The Jewish men that I know or have known, with the secular name
of Phillip, have had a Yiddish name of Feivel or Faivush. The Ukraine
Given Names database also suggested Fishel and Pesach.
Sarah L. M. Christiansen
USA


Given Name Filip #ukraine

hekenvin@...
 

One of the mavens wrote: "Philip is here a given name, not a surname. Anyway most
Jews had no surname yet in the 17 and 18th centuries. And no Jews wore the given
name Philip as well during this period. I never encountered this name in the 19th
century Polish civil records for the towns
I worked on. Nevertheless, the surname Filip existed among Jews at the beginning
of the 20th century; Alexander Beider found it in the districts of Kalisz and of
Brzeziny. He writes that the name was borrowed >from the Christians."

See the JRI birth record of my cousin FILIP, son of Shaindel WEISSMAN and Haskel
SHOR-MENCZEL, born 1872 in Skala, Tarnopol oblast; formerly Austro-Hungary, now
Ukraine. After the family moved to Czernowitz, he was called Philip Menchel and
was a prominent newspaper editor and Zionist in early-20th-century Bukovina.

His father Haskel was influenced by the Haskalah movement and thereby was somewhat
of a family scandal. I am not surprised that, in 19th century Ukraine --- when
Filip was an uncommon Jewish first-name -- he gave it to his son.

Helene Kenvin
Researching: WIESENTHAL (Skala); WEISSMAN (Trembovla-Semanov)


Re: the name Philip #ukraine

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Michelle Frager posted as follows:

"In our family, we've seen Philip replace both Pinchas and Fishel. I agree
with you that a direct connection to Leben seems unlikely."

and Kathryn Trupin posted as follows:

"On my grandmother's marriage certificate to her third husband in New York
City in 1914 she gave Philip SCHNETZKA as her father's name. My
grandmother was very creative, and the name Philip does not sound like a
name of a Jew in the Ukraine in the mid 1800s. Shortly before this
marriage my father had changed his first name >from Pinchas to Philip, which
may have been the spark for his mother's creativity. My father vaguely
recalled that his mother's father was named Leben. Is it reasonable to
assume that the marriage certificate name is a concoction?

And is the name Leben likely to have inspired the substitution of the name
Philip? On a list of first name alternatives I found nothing that
suggested such a substitution."

The name Philip was originally a German secular given name which was
adopted by male Jews in a number of other European countries, including
Ukraine, during the 19th century. The main purpose was for the individual
to have a name which was familiar to non-Jews and which was easier to
pronounce than Hebrew or Yiddish given names. The same was true for about
500 other German secular given names, like Albert, Alfred, Abraham, Adolf,
Arnold, Augusta, Berta, Ferdinand, Fritz, Herman, Harry, Ignatz, and others.

This tendency has been verified by statistical analysis, as was known by
the Divorce Rabbis of European countries, who gave these names Jewish legal
status by incorporating them into the Legal Jewish name in Gitin (Jewish
divorce contracts), for example, Pinchas haMechune Filip. (haMechune is a
Hebrew legal term meaning "alias, or known as".)

It was also the case that people who had chosen one of these secular names
also tended to adopt the same secular name upon immigrating to foreign
countries like the U.S., U.K., and Canada.

It was also true in Europe that Jews who had Hebrew or Yiddish names that
began with the Hebrew letter having either the hard "p" or soft "f" sounds
(e.g., Pinchas, Fish) had an enhanced tendency to adopt German secular
names like Philip or Filip with the same beginning letter, although,
really, the "500s" were used with nearly any Hebrew name, e.g., Avraham
haMechune Herman.

The German "500s" and secular names >from other countries can be found on
the JewishGen Given Names Data Bases web site for Ukraine and 16 other
European countries at:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Given Name Filip #ukraine

hekenvin@...
 

One of the mavens wrote: "Philip is here a given name, not a surname. Anyway most
Jews had no surname yet in the 17 and 18th centuries. And no Jews wore the given
name Philip as well during this period. I never encountered this name in the 19th
century Polish civil records for the towns
I worked on. Nevertheless, the surname Filip existed among Jews at the beginning
of the 20th century; Alexander Beider found it in the districts of Kalisz and of
Brzeziny. He writes that the name was borrowed >from the Christians."

See the JRI birth record of my cousin FILIP, son of Shaindel WEISSMAN and Haskel
SHOR-MENCZEL, born 1872 in Skala, Tarnopol oblast; formerly Austro-Hungary, now
Ukraine. After the family moved to Czernowitz, he was called Philip Menchel and
was a prominent newspaper editor and Zionist in early-20th-century Bukovina.

His father Haskel was influenced by the Haskalah movement and thereby was somewhat
of a family scandal. I am not surprised that, in 19th century Ukraine --- when
Filip was an uncommon Jewish first-name -- he gave it to his son.

Helene Kenvin
Researching: WIESENTHAL (Skala); WEISSMAN (Trembovla-Semanov)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: the name Philip #ukraine

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Michelle Frager posted as follows:

"In our family, we've seen Philip replace both Pinchas and Fishel. I agree
with you that a direct connection to Leben seems unlikely."

and Kathryn Trupin posted as follows:

"On my grandmother's marriage certificate to her third husband in New York
City in 1914 she gave Philip SCHNETZKA as her father's name. My
grandmother was very creative, and the name Philip does not sound like a
name of a Jew in the Ukraine in the mid 1800s. Shortly before this
marriage my father had changed his first name >from Pinchas to Philip, which
may have been the spark for his mother's creativity. My father vaguely
recalled that his mother's father was named Leben. Is it reasonable to
assume that the marriage certificate name is a concoction?

And is the name Leben likely to have inspired the substitution of the name
Philip? On a list of first name alternatives I found nothing that
suggested such a substitution."

The name Philip was originally a German secular given name which was
adopted by male Jews in a number of other European countries, including
Ukraine, during the 19th century. The main purpose was for the individual
to have a name which was familiar to non-Jews and which was easier to
pronounce than Hebrew or Yiddish given names. The same was true for about
500 other German secular given names, like Albert, Alfred, Abraham, Adolf,
Arnold, Augusta, Berta, Ferdinand, Fritz, Herman, Harry, Ignatz, and others.

This tendency has been verified by statistical analysis, as was known by
the Divorce Rabbis of European countries, who gave these names Jewish legal
status by incorporating them into the Legal Jewish name in Gitin (Jewish
divorce contracts), for example, Pinchas haMechune Filip. (haMechune is a
Hebrew legal term meaning "alias, or known as".)

It was also the case that people who had chosen one of these secular names
also tended to adopt the same secular name upon immigrating to foreign
countries like the U.S., U.K., and Canada.

It was also true in Europe that Jews who had Hebrew or Yiddish names that
began with the Hebrew letter having either the hard "p" or soft "f" sounds
(e.g., Pinchas, Fish) had an enhanced tendency to adopt German secular
names like Philip or Filip with the same beginning letter, although,
really, the "500s" were used with nearly any Hebrew name, e.g., Avraham
haMechune Herman.

The German "500s" and secular names >from other countries can be found on
the JewishGen Given Names Data Bases web site for Ukraine and 16 other
European countries at:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Re: Conversion of Galician Currencies #galicia

Mark Heckman
 

A few years ago I made a page for the Gesher Galicia web site that
gives Austrian Empire currency exchange rates relative to English,
American, and German currencies, taken >from the 1905 Baedeker's
Austria-Hungary Handbook.

http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/exch__rates.html

There are links to other sites about Austrian Empire currency on
that page as well.

Travel guidebooks for other years likely have similar tables.

Mark Heckman
Davis, California
--------------------------------

Subject: Conversion of Galician Currencies
From: "Alan Weiser" <alanboy@starpower.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 08:15:22 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

I am conducting research on the price of household and personal
goods and wages of common labor that existed in Galicia during the
period 1872-1914. I have found considerable data. The prices and
wages are stated in the currency (marks, krones, zlotys, etc.) of
those times. I want to convert that Galician currency to US dollars
for that time period.

Can anyone help with this effort and/or direct me to web sites or
other sources which will help me make that conversion? Please
respond directly to me.


Re: Conversion of Galician Currencies #galicia

Fay Bussgang <fbussgang@...>
 

For a brief history of the Polish monetary system, go to:

http://www.bakk.com/BlazeK/monetary.php

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA

Alan Weiser <alanboy@starpower.net> wrote...

I am conducting research on the price of household and personal
goods and wages of common labor that existed in Galicia during the
period 1872-1914. I have found considerable data. The prices and
wages are stated in the currency (marks, krones, zlotys, etc.) of
those times. I want to convert that Galician currency to US dollars
for that time period....


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Conversion of Galician Currencies #galicia

Mark Heckman
 

A few years ago I made a page for the Gesher Galicia web site that
gives Austrian Empire currency exchange rates relative to English,
American, and German currencies, taken >from the 1905 Baedeker's
Austria-Hungary Handbook.

http://www.jewishgen.org/galicia/exch__rates.html

There are links to other sites about Austrian Empire currency on
that page as well.

Travel guidebooks for other years likely have similar tables.

Mark Heckman
Davis, California
--------------------------------

Subject: Conversion of Galician Currencies
From: "Alan Weiser" <alanboy@starpower.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 08:15:22 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

I am conducting research on the price of household and personal
goods and wages of common labor that existed in Galicia during the
period 1872-1914. I have found considerable data. The prices and
wages are stated in the currency (marks, krones, zlotys, etc.) of
those times. I want to convert that Galician currency to US dollars
for that time period.

Can anyone help with this effort and/or direct me to web sites or
other sources which will help me make that conversion? Please
respond directly to me.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Conversion of Galician Currencies #galicia

Fay Bussgang <fbussgang@...>
 

For a brief history of the Polish monetary system, go to:

http://www.bakk.com/BlazeK/monetary.php

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA

Alan Weiser <alanboy@starpower.net> wrote...

I am conducting research on the price of household and personal
goods and wages of common labor that existed in Galicia during the
period 1872-1914. I have found considerable data. The prices and
wages are stated in the currency (marks, krones, zlotys, etc.) of
those times. I want to convert that Galician currency to US dollars
for that time period....


Yankovitch #ukraine

Binnieyeates@...
 

Dear Genners,

This is my first attempt at sending a Plain Text message, so I hope I've got
it right.

My query is about the name YANKOVITCH, that I grew up with. All my paternal
grandfather's relations who had come to England (>from Berdichev) were
HYMOVITCH. My grandfather's given name was YAKOV. My hunch is that he told the
immigration people here in England (in about 1901 or 2) that his name was
YAKOVHYMOVITCH, and they wrote down variations of what they could hear. On my father's
birth certificate it's YAKOMOVITCH.
My question is: Was YANKOVITCH even a Jewish name? There's absolutely no
question about my grandfather being Jewish - that's certain. So, if it wasn't
Jewish, that takes me back to HYMOVITCH again.

Any thoughts on this?

Binnie Yeates

Researching: BRAND (Zborow and Pomorzhany) SHAPIRO (Podhajce - now
Podgaytsy) YANKOVITCH and HYMOVITCH (Berdichev) PRAGER (Zborow and Zloczow) ZAMUSCH
(Poland)


Yankovitch #ukraine

Binnieyeates@...
 

Dear Genners,

This is my first attempt at sending a Plain Text message, so I hope I've got
it right.

My query is about the name YANKOVITCH, that I grew up with. All my paternal
grandfather's relations who had come to England (>from Berdichev) were
HYMOVITCH. My grandfather's given name was YAKOV. My hunch is that he told the
immigration people here in England (in about 1901 or 2) that his name was
YAKOVHYMOVITCH, and they wrote down variations of what they could hear. On my father's
birth certificate it's YAKOMOVITCH.
My question is: Was YANKOVITCH even a Jewish name? There's absolutely no
question about my grandfather being Jewish - that's certain. So, if it wasn't
Jewish, that takes me back to HYMOVITCH again.

Any thoughts on this?

Binnie Yeates

Researching: BRAND (Zborow and Pomorzhany) SHAPIRO (Podhajce - now
Podgaytsy) YANKOVITCH and HYMOVITCH (Berdichev) PRAGER (Zborow and Zloczow) ZAMUSCH
(Poland) WASSERMAN (Zborow and Pomorzhany)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Yankovitch #ukraine

Binnieyeates@...
 

Dear Genners,

This is my first attempt at sending a Plain Text message, so I hope I've got
it right.

My query is about the name YANKOVITCH, that I grew up with. All my paternal
grandfather's relations who had come to England (>from Berdichev) were
HYMOVITCH. My grandfather's given name was YAKOV. My hunch is that he told the
immigration people here in England (in about 1901 or 2) that his name was
YAKOVHYMOVITCH, and they wrote down variations of what they could hear. On my father's
birth certificate it's YAKOMOVITCH.
My question is: Was YANKOVITCH even a Jewish name? There's absolutely no
question about my grandfather being Jewish - that's certain. So, if it wasn't
Jewish, that takes me back to HYMOVITCH again.

Any thoughts on this?

Binnie Yeates

Researching: BRAND (Zborow and Pomorzhany) SHAPIRO (Podhajce - now
Podgaytsy) YANKOVITCH and HYMOVITCH (Berdichev) PRAGER (Zborow and Zloczow) ZAMUSCH
(Poland)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Yankovitch #ukraine

Binnieyeates@...
 

Dear Genners,

This is my first attempt at sending a Plain Text message, so I hope I've got
it right.

My query is about the name YANKOVITCH, that I grew up with. All my paternal
grandfather's relations who had come to England (>from Berdichev) were
HYMOVITCH. My grandfather's given name was YAKOV. My hunch is that he told the
immigration people here in England (in about 1901 or 2) that his name was
YAKOVHYMOVITCH, and they wrote down variations of what they could hear. On my father's
birth certificate it's YAKOMOVITCH.
My question is: Was YANKOVITCH even a Jewish name? There's absolutely no
question about my grandfather being Jewish - that's certain. So, if it wasn't
Jewish, that takes me back to HYMOVITCH again.

Any thoughts on this?

Binnie Yeates

Researching: BRAND (Zborow and Pomorzhany) SHAPIRO (Podhajce - now
Podgaytsy) YANKOVITCH and HYMOVITCH (Berdichev) PRAGER (Zborow and Zloczow) ZAMUSCH
(Poland) WASSERMAN (Zborow and Pomorzhany)


Re: town Puchowitz near Minsk #ukraine

annsel <annsel@...>
 

In a posting >from 7/30/07 a member mentions the town of Puchowitz (near
Minsk) . This is the first I have heard of this shetel since a family
member told me that our GGGrandfather resided in Puchowitz. The name was
described as sounding like a gargling sound. If anyone has any information
on this place I would love to hear >from you. Our ancestor was a blacksmith
in the town.

Anne Selikov
So Ca Researching MELTZER, PRESS


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: town Puchowitz near Minsk #ukraine

annsel <annsel@...>
 

In a posting >from 7/30/07 a member mentions the town of Puchowitz (near
Minsk) . This is the first I have heard of this shetel since a family
member told me that our GGGrandfather resided in Puchowitz. The name was
described as sounding like a gargling sound. If anyone has any information
on this place I would love to hear >from you. Our ancestor was a blacksmith
in the town.

Anne Selikov
So Ca Researching MELTZER, PRESS


George Anticoni #sephardic

Gerald Gaffin <gerald.shirley@...>
 

I am trying to contact George Anticoni, in London, regarding the
Mallah family >from Salonica ~ but cannot find his e-mail address. Can
some kind SephardiSigger either let me have George's address or ask
him to contact me at this address ? Thank you in advance for your
much appreciated co-operation.

Gerald Gaffin
gerald.shirley@virgin.net


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim George Anticoni #sephardic

Gerald Gaffin <gerald.shirley@...>
 

I am trying to contact George Anticoni, in London, regarding the
Mallah family >from Salonica ~ but cannot find his e-mail address. Can
some kind SephardiSigger either let me have George's address or ask
him to contact me at this address ? Thank you in advance for your
much appreciated co-operation.

Gerald Gaffin
gerald.shirley@virgin.net