Date   

Translation Needed #ukraine

AllanDolgow@...
 

Last month I returned >from the Ukraine with a 174 page unpublished
manuscript on the history of Kamenny Brod, Ukraine.

A translation to English has been a budget stopper.

If you have a solution, please contact me privately.

Allan Dolgow
West Sacramento, CA
allandolgow@aol.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Translation Needed #ukraine

AllanDolgow@...
 

Last month I returned >from the Ukraine with a 174 page unpublished
manuscript on the history of Kamenny Brod, Ukraine.

A translation to English has been a budget stopper.

If you have a solution, please contact me privately.

Allan Dolgow
West Sacramento, CA
allandolgow@aol.com


LAPATIN in Proskurov #ukraine

luc radu <lradu@...>
 

Hello Group,

I have very limited information on my GGF and looking for any suggestion on
how to pursue research. Berl LAPATIN, per his death certificate found in
Botosani (Romania) was born in Proskurov, cca 1855 and must have arrived in
Botosani in the late 1870s. There is no information on any siblings or
relatives in Botosani, so he must have come alone. I know >from a relative,
that his daughter was corresponding in 1920s with relatives in Russia but
that has stopped for obvious reasons (and apparently their surname was not
Lapatin). Proskurov is current day Khmielnytski (spelling) in Ukraine and in
1850s, this part of Podolia was Russia. The name does not appear to be very
common, but there are also Lopatins.

My question is: is there any way to access/request civil documents (like
birth certificates) >from 1850s in Ukraine/Khmielnytski)? Or any other idea?

Regards,

Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine LAPATIN in Proskurov #ukraine

luc radu <lradu@...>
 

Hello Group,

I have very limited information on my GGF and looking for any suggestion on
how to pursue research. Berl LAPATIN, per his death certificate found in
Botosani (Romania) was born in Proskurov, cca 1855 and must have arrived in
Botosani in the late 1870s. There is no information on any siblings or
relatives in Botosani, so he must have come alone. I know >from a relative,
that his daughter was corresponding in 1920s with relatives in Russia but
that has stopped for obvious reasons (and apparently their surname was not
Lapatin). Proskurov is current day Khmielnytski (spelling) in Ukraine and in
1850s, this part of Podolia was Russia. The name does not appear to be very
common, but there are also Lopatins.

My question is: is there any way to access/request civil documents (like
birth certificates) >from 1850s in Ukraine/Khmielnytski)? Or any other idea?

Regards,

Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY


Re: Kalinovsky #ukraine

dave_mason@juno.com <dave_mason@...>
 

Names ending in -sky or the feminine form -skaya are often
based on places of origin. A classic Russian example would
be Aleksandr Nevsky, the knight who acquired his last name
by defeating the Swedes in the year 1240 on the Neva River.
Just as French has family names de (place name), German has
von (place name) and Dutch has van (place name), so Russian
has (place name)-sky.

According to Wikipedia there is a town in Ukraine called Kalinov
in the Sumska region in northeastern Ukraine and in Russia proper
there are Kalinovs in six different regions. However because most
Russian Jews were Polish Jews who found themselves in the Ukraine
after the Tsars progressively dismembered eastern Poland, chances
are pretty good that Alexander had an ancestor >from Kalinov, Ukraine.

This could have happened long, long ago but it might not have been
so long ago if someone elected to change a conspicuously Jewish name
into something more "Russian". It could well have happened when the
ancestor moved to Kiev, or it may have happened at the point in time
that someone saw the liberating potential of becoming russified after
feeling cooped up in a Polish ghetto. The Polish state had a policy
of segregating Jews, whereas the Russian policy was to Russify minorities.
By taking on a name in the Russian style, learning the language and
joining the Orthodox Church, people effectively became Russian. If
you were Jewish you might balk at the last step, but the rest of it
could still make perfect sense. Having Alexander as a given name is c
onsistent with this notion because it's very Russian-sounding, no Jewish
associations. There's a good chance that a Jew with this name also had
another Jewish name.

David Mason, searching KOGAN >from Zvenigorodka


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Kalinovsky #ukraine

dave_mason@juno.com <dave_mason@...>
 

Names ending in -sky or the feminine form -skaya are often
based on places of origin. A classic Russian example would
be Aleksandr Nevsky, the knight who acquired his last name
by defeating the Swedes in the year 1240 on the Neva River.
Just as French has family names de (place name), German has
von (place name) and Dutch has van (place name), so Russian
has (place name)-sky.

According to Wikipedia there is a town in Ukraine called Kalinov
in the Sumska region in northeastern Ukraine and in Russia proper
there are Kalinovs in six different regions. However because most
Russian Jews were Polish Jews who found themselves in the Ukraine
after the Tsars progressively dismembered eastern Poland, chances
are pretty good that Alexander had an ancestor >from Kalinov, Ukraine.

This could have happened long, long ago but it might not have been
so long ago if someone elected to change a conspicuously Jewish name
into something more "Russian". It could well have happened when the
ancestor moved to Kiev, or it may have happened at the point in time
that someone saw the liberating potential of becoming russified after
feeling cooped up in a Polish ghetto. The Polish state had a policy
of segregating Jews, whereas the Russian policy was to Russify minorities.
By taking on a name in the Russian style, learning the language and
joining the Orthodox Church, people effectively became Russian. If
you were Jewish you might balk at the last step, but the rest of it
could still make perfect sense. Having Alexander as a given name is c
onsistent with this notion because it's very Russian-sounding, no Jewish
associations. There's a good chance that a Jew with this name also had
another Jewish name.

David Mason, searching KOGAN >from Zvenigorodka


Researcher/Genealogist #belarus

Stephen <stephenab@...>
 

Greetings

I am searching for a researcher/genealogist for work in Belarus specifically
the National Historical Archives in Minsk. I have found references to
a few people online who have been involved in this but most instances
I've come across so far are searches that occurred a while ago. If anyone
has any recommendations or suggestions or for that matter warnings
I would be very grateful for any help you can provide.

Thanks

Stephen Boske
New York, New York

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply privately with information.


KALINOVSKY/AMIAS from Kiev area #ukraine

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Just a suggestion - with a little background. People at one time took a
family name based on the place they were >from formerly. My father was born
in Kalinovka Ukraine. I don't know the exact distance >from Kiev. I have
pieced together a small shetel site about it.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kalinovka/ Don't know if it will help,
but it may give you a direction.
Gemar Hatima Tova
Rose Feldman
Mscibow Belarus http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mscibow
Ruzhany Belarus http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ruzhany
Litin Ukraine http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Litin
Kalinovka Ukraine http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kalinovka


Belarus SIG #Belarus Researcher/Genealogist #belarus

Stephen <stephenab@...>
 

Greetings

I am searching for a researcher/genealogist for work in Belarus specifically
the National Historical Archives in Minsk. I have found references to
a few people online who have been involved in this but most instances
I've come across so far are searches that occurred a while ago. If anyone
has any recommendations or suggestions or for that matter warnings
I would be very grateful for any help you can provide.

Thanks

Stephen Boske
New York, New York

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply privately with information.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine KALINOVSKY/AMIAS from Kiev area #ukraine

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Just a suggestion - with a little background. People at one time took a
family name based on the place they were >from formerly. My father was born
in Kalinovka Ukraine. I don't know the exact distance >from Kiev. I have
pieced together a small shetel site about it.
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kalinovka/ Don't know if it will help,
but it may give you a direction.
Gemar Hatima Tova
Rose Feldman
Mscibow Belarus http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mscibow
Ruzhany Belarus http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ruzhany
Litin Ukraine http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Litin
Kalinovka Ukraine http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kalinovka


Re: nickname #france

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 10/4/2008 5:52:38 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
_pierre28@pacbell.net_ (mailto:pierre28@pacbell.net) writes:
<< I have an ancestor who was nicknamed (AKA) "pied de boeuf" . What
connotation is attached to such a name ? >>

==It might have helped if you mentioned the approximate date and location.
And the language in which he was given that name.

The surname Ochsenfuss is not listed by Lars Menk in his dictionary. The
OCHS surname, however, is associated with YOSEF (Joseph), because that is how
the tribe of Yosef was blessed by Moses in the penultimate chapter of
Deuteronomy (Dvarim) which will be read in the synagogue on Simchat Torah
in about 9 days. The Ochs name was changed to Oakes by some immigrants
in the USA.

But nicknames can develop in unlimited variety of ways. Your ancestor may
have been clubfooted or otherwise injured in the foot, may have been kicked by
a bull's foot, may have had a quarrel with the local butcher over a beef
bone, may have been a lousy dancer, may have been a bone dealer, may have lived
next to an inn named "pied de boeuf" or originate >from a place named
Ochesnfuss, or been the subject of some joke or scandal associated with a bull's
foot, or . . . . . .

Michael Bernet, New York
mbernet@aol.com

www.mem-Ber.net


French SIG #France Re: nickname #france

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 10/4/2008 5:52:38 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
_pierre28@pacbell.net_ (mailto:pierre28@pacbell.net) writes:
<< I have an ancestor who was nicknamed (AKA) "pied de boeuf" . What
connotation is attached to such a name ? >>

==It might have helped if you mentioned the approximate date and location.
And the language in which he was given that name.

The surname Ochsenfuss is not listed by Lars Menk in his dictionary. The
OCHS surname, however, is associated with YOSEF (Joseph), because that is how
the tribe of Yosef was blessed by Moses in the penultimate chapter of
Deuteronomy (Dvarim) which will be read in the synagogue on Simchat Torah
in about 9 days. The Ochs name was changed to Oakes by some immigrants
in the USA.

But nicknames can develop in unlimited variety of ways. Your ancestor may
have been clubfooted or otherwise injured in the foot, may have been kicked by
a bull's foot, may have had a quarrel with the local butcher over a beef
bone, may have been a lousy dancer, may have been a bone dealer, may have lived
next to an inn named "pied de boeuf" or originate >from a place named
Ochesnfuss, or been the subject of some joke or scandal associated with a bull's
foot, or . . . . . .

Michael Bernet, New York
mbernet@aol.com

www.mem-Ber.net


Re: nickname #france

Lifshitz-Krams Anne
 

I found this in an onomastic dictionary, maybe it can help:
"Ochsenbein, name existing in the Haut-Rhin, meaning "pied-de-boeuf" (maybe
a shopsign for an inn)".
Maybe your ancestor had an inn or a shop with this shopsign?

Anne Lifshitz-Krams
CGJ - Paris France

----- Original Message -----
From: "Pierre Hahn" <pierre28@pacbell.net>
To: "French SIG" <frenchsig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Saturday, October 04, 2008 8:19 PM
Subject: [frenchsig] nickname


I have an ancestor who was nicknamed (AKA) "pied de boeuf" . What
connotation is attached to such a name ?

Pierre M Hahn, San Francisco


French SIG #France Re: nickname #france

Lifshitz-Krams Anne
 

I found this in an onomastic dictionary, maybe it can help:
"Ochsenbein, name existing in the Haut-Rhin, meaning "pied-de-boeuf" (maybe
a shopsign for an inn)".
Maybe your ancestor had an inn or a shop with this shopsign?

Anne Lifshitz-Krams
CGJ - Paris France

----- Original Message -----
From: "Pierre Hahn" <pierre28@pacbell.net>
To: "French SIG" <frenchsig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Saturday, October 04, 2008 8:19 PM
Subject: [frenchsig] nickname


I have an ancestor who was nicknamed (AKA) "pied de boeuf" . What
connotation is attached to such a name ?

Pierre M Hahn, San Francisco


MERCEDES cars & typewriters #germany

Ilan Ganot <iganot@...>
 

An article, which attracted my attention as a child, was a hugh
MERCEDES typewriter that belonged to my grandfather. It was stored in a
large wooden box, and >from time to time, my grandfather used it for typing
letters to his siblings and friends in the USA.
Does anyone have any idea if the Mercedes typewriter factory has any
connection to the Mercedes-Benz automobile firm?

According to the Wikipedia, most ironically, the German Mercedes car brand
name has Jewish roots. It was named after the daughter of a rich Austrian
Jewish automobile entrepreneur, named Emil Jellinek. Among many other
occupations, he was a car dealer, selling large number of Daimler-Benz cars
under his daughter's name, Mercedes.
See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emil_Jellinek

Shana Tova and Gmar Hatima Tova, Ilan Ganot, iganot@alumni.technion.ac.il
Co-Webmaster, Mazheik Memorial Website
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mazeikiai/introduction.html


German SIG #Germany MERCEDES cars & typewriters #germany

Ilan Ganot <iganot@...>
 

An article, which attracted my attention as a child, was a hugh
MERCEDES typewriter that belonged to my grandfather. It was stored in a
large wooden box, and >from time to time, my grandfather used it for typing
letters to his siblings and friends in the USA.
Does anyone have any idea if the Mercedes typewriter factory has any
connection to the Mercedes-Benz automobile firm?

According to the Wikipedia, most ironically, the German Mercedes car brand
name has Jewish roots. It was named after the daughter of a rich Austrian
Jewish automobile entrepreneur, named Emil Jellinek. Among many other
occupations, he was a car dealer, selling large number of Daimler-Benz cars
under his daughter's name, Mercedes.
See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emil_Jellinek

Shana Tova and Gmar Hatima Tova, Ilan Ganot, iganot@alumni.technion.ac.il
Co-Webmaster, Mazheik Memorial Website
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mazeikiai/introduction.html


Jennie POSNER #unitedkingdom

robin@...
 

Dear All,

I am having trouble tracing records of my great-aunt Jennie POSNER, daughter of Jacob POSNER and Mary or Esther DOBROWLSKI or DOBROULSKI . According to the 1901 census she is recorded as named Jane POSNER, aged 7 years old and born in Whitechapel. However I have not been able to find a Jane, Jennie or anything sounding similiar in the birth records. The only POSNER girl whose birth was registered in 1894 in Whitechapel is Minnie and that is not her. There is Leah POSNER who is registered in the following year in Whitechapel. The nearest older sibling was born in Whitechapel and the nearest younger sibling was born in St George in the East. I would be interested to hear >from anyone who might have any suggestions as to how to find her, what other name she might be listed under or even news of her descendants.

Best wishes,

Robin Altwarg
Hertfordshire, United Kingdom

Researching: ALTWARG (Brest, Belarus), DOBROULSKI or DOBROWLSKI (Poland), JACOBS (Sakiai, Lithuania), LEVIN or LEVY (Poland), MILYUNASKI or VILYUNASKI
(Marijampole, Lithuania), POMERANTZ (Brest, Belarus), POSENER (Poland), POSNER (Poland), WEINBERG (Poland).


More on BARTAK, BARDAK, etc. #lithuania

sbloom@...
 

Thanks to those who answered regarding BARTAK and BARTAKOV, etc.

I have another question (or maybe its just a comment).

It seems as if all of the BARBAK, BARDAK and BARTAK of 19th century
Lithuania (mentioned in Revision Lists) were in what is now Druja,
Belarus. This is also true of BARTAKOV, and there is one BARDAKOV who
is >from Disna, Belarus (same district as Druja).

Alexander Beider suggests that these names are acronyms of the form:
Ben Reb [appropriate given name] Kolonymous. For BARBAK, the given
name would be Benjamin, David for BARDAK, and probably Tevye for BARTAK
(though my version of Beider doesn't have this name, my relatives say it
was probably Tevye--though going back to 1770 there appears to be no
Tevye ancestor).

So I am befuddled to see that all of the names of this form appear
in one district of what is now Belarus, and nowhere else in
Lithuania! Since these surnames seems to all refer to a different
prominent ancestor, I wouldn't suppose all BARBAK, BARDAK, BARTAK are
related, but I can't see why there would be this sort
of concentration.

I do know that BARTAK is a common non-Jewish name in parts of Hungary
and the Czech Republic, but this appears to be unrelated. Also JRI-Poland
shows a number of BARDAK >from Bialystok (not far >from Belarus, actually).

Thoughts?

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Jennie POSNER #unitedkingdom

robin@...
 

Dear All,

I am having trouble tracing records of my great-aunt Jennie POSNER, daughter of Jacob POSNER and Mary or Esther DOBROWLSKI or DOBROULSKI . According to the 1901 census she is recorded as named Jane POSNER, aged 7 years old and born in Whitechapel. However I have not been able to find a Jane, Jennie or anything sounding similiar in the birth records. The only POSNER girl whose birth was registered in 1894 in Whitechapel is Minnie and that is not her. There is Leah POSNER who is registered in the following year in Whitechapel. The nearest older sibling was born in Whitechapel and the nearest younger sibling was born in St George in the East. I would be interested to hear >from anyone who might have any suggestions as to how to find her, what other name she might be listed under or even news of her descendants.

Best wishes,

Robin Altwarg
Hertfordshire, United Kingdom

Researching: ALTWARG (Brest, Belarus), DOBROULSKI or DOBROWLSKI (Poland), JACOBS (Sakiai, Lithuania), LEVIN or LEVY (Poland), MILYUNASKI or VILYUNASKI
(Marijampole, Lithuania), POMERANTZ (Brest, Belarus), POSENER (Poland), POSNER (Poland), WEINBERG (Poland).


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania More on BARTAK, BARDAK, etc. #lithuania

sbloom@...
 

Thanks to those who answered regarding BARTAK and BARTAKOV, etc.

I have another question (or maybe its just a comment).

It seems as if all of the BARBAK, BARDAK and BARTAK of 19th century
Lithuania (mentioned in Revision Lists) were in what is now Druja,
Belarus. This is also true of BARTAKOV, and there is one BARDAKOV who
is >from Disna, Belarus (same district as Druja).

Alexander Beider suggests that these names are acronyms of the form:
Ben Reb [appropriate given name] Kolonymous. For BARBAK, the given
name would be Benjamin, David for BARDAK, and probably Tevye for BARTAK
(though my version of Beider doesn't have this name, my relatives say it
was probably Tevye--though going back to 1770 there appears to be no
Tevye ancestor).

So I am befuddled to see that all of the names of this form appear
in one district of what is now Belarus, and nowhere else in
Lithuania! Since these surnames seems to all refer to a different
prominent ancestor, I wouldn't suppose all BARBAK, BARDAK, BARTAK are
related, but I can't see why there would be this sort
of concentration.

I do know that BARTAK is a common non-Jewish name in parts of Hungary
and the Czech Republic, but this appears to be unrelated. Also JRI-Poland
shows a number of BARDAK >from Bialystok (not far >from Belarus, actually).

Thoughts?

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia