Date   

Aaron David Planer of Geneva #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to make contact with the family of Aaron David Planer, son of
Simon Planer who was born in Mad, Hungary in 1894 and married Channah
Krakovics. He posted a Page of Testimony at Yad Vashem in 2014 from
Geneva.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Aaron David Planer of Geneva #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to make contact with the family of Aaron David Planer, son of
Simon Planer who was born in Mad, Hungary in 1894 and married Channah
Krakovics. He posted a Page of Testimony at Yad Vashem in 2014 from
Geneva.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Aaron David Planer of Geneva #general

Neil@...
 

Looking to make contact with the family of Aaron David Planer, son of
Simon Planer who was born in Mad, Hungary in 1894 and married Channah
Krakovics. He posted a Page of Testimony at Yad Vashem in 2014 from
Geneva.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Aaron David Planer of Geneva #general

Neil@...
 

Looking to make contact with the family of Aaron David Planer, son of
Simon Planer who was born in Mad, Hungary in 1894 and married Channah
Krakovics. He posted a Page of Testimony at Yad Vashem in 2014 from
Geneva.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


WIZO in Radomsko, not Radom -- Correction #general

ingrid rockberger
 

Dear Genners,

My apologies, I made a mistake in my posting of yesterday. The Open Air
Museum is in Radomsko, not Radom.

Therefore I am looking for information and/or an address for a WIZO
branch/club in Radomsko.

Thanks in advance,

Sincerely, Ingrid

Ingrid Rockberger,
Chair, Publicity & Communications Division, World WIZO, Tel Aviv.

Chair, Sharon Branch Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA)
Researching: ROCHVERGER:Lowicz, Krakow and Lodz,Poland,
KONIARSKI:Zloczew, Poland, LAJZEROWICZ:Lutotow, Poland,
SCZNAJDER, Kozow Lacki, Poland, MONKA, Sokolow Podlaski, Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen WIZO in Radomsko, not Radom -- Correction #general

ingrid rockberger
 

Dear Genners,

My apologies, I made a mistake in my posting of yesterday. The Open Air
Museum is in Radomsko, not Radom.

Therefore I am looking for information and/or an address for a WIZO
branch/club in Radomsko.

Thanks in advance,

Sincerely, Ingrid

Ingrid Rockberger,
Chair, Publicity & Communications Division, World WIZO, Tel Aviv.

Chair, Sharon Branch Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA)
Researching: ROCHVERGER:Lowicz, Krakow and Lodz,Poland,
KONIARSKI:Zloczew, Poland, LAJZEROWICZ:Lutotow, Poland,
SCZNAJDER, Kozow Lacki, Poland, MONKA, Sokolow Podlaski, Poland


Looking for immigration records #general

Jerry Small
 

My grandmother Jennie immigrated as a single person >from Rypin Poland.
The year according to 1910 census was 1906, according to 1920 census
was 1903, according to 1930 census was 1905. Also according to a 1911
passport was 1903. She had brothers and sister who came later with
surname Wabik, so I assume she used the same. I have searched using
Ancestry.com and Family Search with no success. A record >from the
Maryland State Archives leads me to believe she married John Small in
1906, although the surname given on that record is Philips. Puzzling!
John Small did have a brother Philip Small, who immigrated with him in
1891, living in Baltimore and the 1906 city directory does list him
and a Jennie Small at the same address. Maybe the name Philips on the
marriage entry was short lived since she became Jennie Small
thereafter. Whether she arrived in Baltimore or somewhere else I do
not know. At some point in 1906 she and John moved to Clarksdale
Mississippi and my father was born in December of that year. So, am I
at the end of my search or where else can I look. All people who would
know are long gone.
Thanks for any suggestions.
Jerry Small
Richardson Texas


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for immigration records #general

Jerry Small
 

My grandmother Jennie immigrated as a single person >from Rypin Poland.
The year according to 1910 census was 1906, according to 1920 census
was 1903, according to 1930 census was 1905. Also according to a 1911
passport was 1903. She had brothers and sister who came later with
surname Wabik, so I assume she used the same. I have searched using
Ancestry.com and Family Search with no success. A record >from the
Maryland State Archives leads me to believe she married John Small in
1906, although the surname given on that record is Philips. Puzzling!
John Small did have a brother Philip Small, who immigrated with him in
1891, living in Baltimore and the 1906 city directory does list him
and a Jennie Small at the same address. Maybe the name Philips on the
marriage entry was short lived since she became Jennie Small
thereafter. Whether she arrived in Baltimore or somewhere else I do
not know. At some point in 1906 she and John moved to Clarksdale
Mississippi and my father was born in December of that year. So, am I
at the end of my search or where else can I look. All people who would
know are long gone.
Thanks for any suggestions.
Jerry Small
Richardson Texas


Re: ukraine digest: February 19, 2017 #ukraine

nursebeth211@...
 

Dear Stephen,

My name is Elizabeth (prefer Beth) and I am one of JewishGen's recent members.
Diligently researching my family history for about three years, I have
successfully used JewishGen to add names and statistics to my family tree
and have been reunited with cousins >from New York and Texas.

Why am I telling you this? Because I know how you feel - overwhelmed and
unsure of a good starting point. In addition, I want you to know that there
is a light at the end of the tunnel.

After I paid my $100 membership, I opened JewishGen's pages to begin my research.
I was pumped to find my roots. I was confident that I could do this; and like
most Americans, I am busy with a lot of "stuff" and have time constraints. So,
I wanted what every person wants - the possibility of a quick, successful research.
Isn't that what I am accustomed to? Isn't JewishGen like Google? When I enter
a surname (last name), shouldn't I expect hundreds of options to explore? I wish
it was that easy.

It was tougher than I expected. Trying to grasp JewishGen's methodologies
and research tips, I encountered tons of printed instructions in a hard-to-read
small font. This was brutal. I had to learn how to research before I could
research. How utterly frustrating !!! However, I took a big breath and dived
in.

Stephen,I have learned a few things over the years. The most important piece
of education was understanding our group's complexity and its impact on
ancestral research. I am sure there are a plethora of reasons for this c
omplexity and I am not smart enough to delineate nor explain all these reasons.
However, I do know that our group's nomadic traits and insatiable desire to
collect a boatload of first names means we have to dig deep and wide to find
our loved ones. We are never sure which name our relative chose or gave for
documentation purposes? Who knows which name they used for the birth record
or the marriage record? Who knows which name they gave to the census taker?
Each member of my family had a closet full of names. Did the person use
his/her Hebrew-given first name followed by his/her father's first name?
Perhaps the person's first name was followed by the mother's first name
because the baby's daddy was unknown. Did he/she use his/her Yiddish
first name- the one he/she wore for social occasions? Or perhaps the
person selected his/her legally enforced German first and last name for
his/her documents. Or maybe the person used the German first and last
name for his 1895 documents, but used his voluntarily selected first
and last name for assimilation purposes on his/her 1915 documents.
I know this sounds like goobledry, but that is the point. I am
emphasizing the complexity. To make our research more difficult,
our relatives changed their neighborhoods as quickly as they changed
their names (I think my family was always looking for new scenery).

Stephen, also, the villages or shtetls' (aka shtetlekh) names changed.
Due to the ongoing rivalry amongst the European and Asian countries, areas
of land and its accompanying villages were quickly changed ; and, thus,
changed names. If Belarus owned The village's selected name changed often,
just like our relatives' names. As the ruling country of the many areas
switched hands, so did the So, Stephen, our complexities

To sum it up, it takes time to figure things out. And we ARE listening.
I am like u, a paid member who is researching familial roots. But, there
are tons of knowledgeable people in this group who are dedicated JewishGen
volunteers who will guide you and help you. However, you have to speak up
and ask questions so they can help you.

What villages or shtetls are u researching?

Beth


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: ukraine digest: February 19, 2017 #ukraine

nursebeth211@...
 

Dear Stephen,

My name is Elizabeth (prefer Beth) and I am one of JewishGen's recent members.
Diligently researching my family history for about three years, I have
successfully used JewishGen to add names and statistics to my family tree
and have been reunited with cousins >from New York and Texas.

Why am I telling you this? Because I know how you feel - overwhelmed and
unsure of a good starting point. In addition, I want you to know that there
is a light at the end of the tunnel.

After I paid my $100 membership, I opened JewishGen's pages to begin my research.
I was pumped to find my roots. I was confident that I could do this; and like
most Americans, I am busy with a lot of "stuff" and have time constraints. So,
I wanted what every person wants - the possibility of a quick, successful research.
Isn't that what I am accustomed to? Isn't JewishGen like Google? When I enter
a surname (last name), shouldn't I expect hundreds of options to explore? I wish
it was that easy.

It was tougher than I expected. Trying to grasp JewishGen's methodologies
and research tips, I encountered tons of printed instructions in a hard-to-read
small font. This was brutal. I had to learn how to research before I could
research. How utterly frustrating !!! However, I took a big breath and dived
in.

Stephen,I have learned a few things over the years. The most important piece
of education was understanding our group's complexity and its impact on
ancestral research. I am sure there are a plethora of reasons for this c
omplexity and I am not smart enough to delineate nor explain all these reasons.
However, I do know that our group's nomadic traits and insatiable desire to
collect a boatload of first names means we have to dig deep and wide to find
our loved ones. We are never sure which name our relative chose or gave for
documentation purposes? Who knows which name they used for the birth record
or the marriage record? Who knows which name they gave to the census taker?
Each member of my family had a closet full of names. Did the person use
his/her Hebrew-given first name followed by his/her father's first name?
Perhaps the person's first name was followed by the mother's first name
because the baby's daddy was unknown. Did he/she use his/her Yiddish
first name- the one he/she wore for social occasions? Or perhaps the
person selected his/her legally enforced German first and last name for
his/her documents. Or maybe the person used the German first and last
name for his 1895 documents, but used his voluntarily selected first
and last name for assimilation purposes on his/her 1915 documents.
I know this sounds like goobledry, but that is the point. I am
emphasizing the complexity. To make our research more difficult,
our relatives changed their neighborhoods as quickly as they changed
their names (I think my family was always looking for new scenery).

Stephen, also, the villages or shtetls' (aka shtetlekh) names changed.
Due to the ongoing rivalry amongst the European and Asian countries, areas
of land and its accompanying villages were quickly changed ; and, thus,
changed names. If Belarus owned The village's selected name changed often,
just like our relatives' names. As the ruling country of the many areas
switched hands, so did the So, Stephen, our complexities

To sum it up, it takes time to figure things out. And we ARE listening.
I am like u, a paid member who is researching familial roots. But, there
are tons of knowledgeable people in this group who are dedicated JewishGen
volunteers who will guide you and help you. However, you have to speak up
and ask questions so they can help you.

What villages or shtetls are u researching?

Beth


Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery St. Louis Mo vandalism #ukraine

Marilyn Levinson
 

Hello
I just learned that the above cemetery was vandalized. This is where most
of my ancestors are buried. The count now is that at least 200 headstones
were toppled over or damaged. I spoke with a representative of the cemetery
and tomorrow or day after they will post on their website the names on the
headstones vandalized.

Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery St. Louis Mo vandalism #ukraine

Marilyn Levinson
 

Hello
I just learned that the above cemetery was vandalized. This is where most
of my ancestors are buried. The count now is that at least 200 headstones
were toppled over or damaged. I spoke with a representative of the cemetery
and tomorrow or day after they will post on their website the names on the
headstones vandalized.

Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC


Portnoi/Gordon from Konvelishki and Divienishok #lithuania

Scott Familant <familant@...>
 

Hello

I have some questions I was hoping folks in this community could help me
with.

First, I;ll be traveling to Konvelishki and Divienishok in April
and was wondering whether anyone had any leads on writings or
websites to consult for background info. My family emigrated
from/lived in these shtetls at the turn of the 19th C.

Second, I'm trying to find records in the old country for my
family and would appreciate any leads. My great grandfather was Joseph
Gordon. Based on the manifests I've finally found, the family
came over under the name Portnoi and presumably adopted the name Gordon
once here. Joseph had several siblings and his parents were Abraham
Yitzhak and Dora Katz Portnoi. Abraham also had several siblings,
including Golda Rivke Grodsinsky, Louis Aliezar Yehuda, Mirke Kherson
(who never emigrated and lived in Divienishok until her death during the
Holocaust) and Samuel. Their common father was Moses Israel and we
believe he was married at least twice, to Chaya Ida Levine and Ida
Kaplan. Joseph came over alone in 1899 with Meite and Louis Lewin's
family, whom I believe were related to Joseph via his paternal =
grandfather or grandmother.

I hired someone to look for records at the Lithuanian state archives
when all I had to go on at the time was the surname "Gordon"
and Snipishke, as the place Moses lived late in his life as a widower.
The researcher focused on looking for records for "Gordon"
in the Vilnius gubernia. Although he found lots of leads, the most
promising ones didn't seem to match my family's particulars.

When I wrote the Archives, I was told it had no records
documenting a Jewish community in Konvelishki in the 19th C. So I am
now wondering what I should be trying to look for and where. My
understanding is these two shtetls would have been part of the Oshmiany
district in the 19th C.

Any leads folks could offer would be much appreciated.

Best,

Scott Familant

MODERATOR'S NOTE: We have put the Oshmiany District Research Group
Coordinator in touch with Scott.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Portnoi/Gordon from Konvelishki and Divienishok #lithuania

Scott Familant <familant@...>
 

Hello

I have some questions I was hoping folks in this community could help me
with.

First, I;ll be traveling to Konvelishki and Divienishok in April
and was wondering whether anyone had any leads on writings or
websites to consult for background info. My family emigrated
from/lived in these shtetls at the turn of the 19th C.

Second, I'm trying to find records in the old country for my
family and would appreciate any leads. My great grandfather was Joseph
Gordon. Based on the manifests I've finally found, the family
came over under the name Portnoi and presumably adopted the name Gordon
once here. Joseph had several siblings and his parents were Abraham
Yitzhak and Dora Katz Portnoi. Abraham also had several siblings,
including Golda Rivke Grodsinsky, Louis Aliezar Yehuda, Mirke Kherson
(who never emigrated and lived in Divienishok until her death during the
Holocaust) and Samuel. Their common father was Moses Israel and we
believe he was married at least twice, to Chaya Ida Levine and Ida
Kaplan. Joseph came over alone in 1899 with Meite and Louis Lewin's
family, whom I believe were related to Joseph via his paternal =
grandfather or grandmother.

I hired someone to look for records at the Lithuanian state archives
when all I had to go on at the time was the surname "Gordon"
and Snipishke, as the place Moses lived late in his life as a widower.
The researcher focused on looking for records for "Gordon"
in the Vilnius gubernia. Although he found lots of leads, the most
promising ones didn't seem to match my family's particulars.

When I wrote the Archives, I was told it had no records
documenting a Jewish community in Konvelishki in the 19th C. So I am
now wondering what I should be trying to look for and where. My
understanding is these two shtetls would have been part of the Oshmiany
district in the 19th C.

Any leads folks could offer would be much appreciated.

Best,

Scott Familant

MODERATOR'S NOTE: We have put the Oshmiany District Research Group
Coordinator in touch with Scott.


Stanley Diamond article link #poland

p.loften@sky.com
 

Thank you for the link to the article on Stanley Diamond. It
was so interesting to read. He is a real life hero of JRI-Poland
and has done so much to help so many people with his research
into hereditary disease and detailed genealogical knowledge.

It should be noted that it is not only Jewish people that have
benefited >from his work but people of all races and religions.

Paul Loften


JRI Poland #Poland Stanley Diamond article link #poland

p.loften@sky.com
 

Thank you for the link to the article on Stanley Diamond. It
was so interesting to read. He is a real life hero of JRI-Poland
and has done so much to help so many people with his research
into hereditary disease and detailed genealogical knowledge.

It should be noted that it is not only Jewish people that have
benefited >from his work but people of all races and religions.

Paul Loften


WIZO in pre WWII Radom? #poland

ingrid rockberger
 

Plaques are being replaced and added to the Jewish Open Air Museum
in Radom. We have been approached by the creator, Rachel Lea Kesselman, who
asks if anyone knows the address of the pre-war WIZO (Women's International
Zionist Organization) branch in Radom. If we can find the address, a plaque
will be placed in the relevant street of the Open Air Museum.

There are references to a WIZO branch in Radom in the Radom Yizkor
Book and other publications - but no address. Before World War II, Poland
was WIZO's biggest federation with over 10,000 members.

All records of this federation were lost in the war.....does
anyone anywhere have information about WIZO in Radom?


Ingrid Rockberger,
Chair, Publicity & Communications Division, World WIZO, Tel
Aviv.
Chair, Sharon Branch Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA)
Researching: ROCHVERGER:Lowicz, Krakow and Lodz,Poland,
KONIARSKI:Zloczew, Poland, LAJZEROWICZ:Lutotow, Poland, SCZNAJDER,
Kozow Lacki, Poland, MONKA, Sokolow Podlaski, Poland


JRI Poland #Poland WIZO in pre WWII Radom? #poland

ingrid rockberger
 

Plaques are being replaced and added to the Jewish Open Air Museum
in Radom. We have been approached by the creator, Rachel Lea Kesselman, who
asks if anyone knows the address of the pre-war WIZO (Women's International
Zionist Organization) branch in Radom. If we can find the address, a plaque
will be placed in the relevant street of the Open Air Museum.

There are references to a WIZO branch in Radom in the Radom Yizkor
Book and other publications - but no address. Before World War II, Poland
was WIZO's biggest federation with over 10,000 members.

All records of this federation were lost in the war.....does
anyone anywhere have information about WIZO in Radom?


Ingrid Rockberger,
Chair, Publicity & Communications Division, World WIZO, Tel
Aviv.
Chair, Sharon Branch Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA)
Researching: ROCHVERGER:Lowicz, Krakow and Lodz,Poland,
KONIARSKI:Zloczew, Poland, LAJZEROWICZ:Lutotow, Poland, SCZNAJDER,
Kozow Lacki, Poland, MONKA, Sokolow Podlaski, Poland


Searching for Sugihara Visa Survivors Izaak and Maria GOLDBERG from Warsaw, Pruzany, and Antwerp #poland

Mark Halpern
 

I am searching for a married couple who immigrated to the US in April
1941 with the aid of a Japanese transit visa provided by Chiune
Sugihara.

The man was Izaak GOLDBERG, age 28, listed as a lawyer born in Warsaw.
There are indications >from the listing of his contact in the US that his
family was originally >from Pruzany, Poland, now Belarus. His cousin
living in the US was Bluma CHWATSKY whose maiden name was WAMTFUS or
WANTFUSS living in Oceanside, Long Island, New York. Izaak is listed as
being 6 foot 3 inches in height.

Isaak was traveling with his wife Szymona or Maria GOLDBERG, age 26,
listed as a housewife born in Antwerp, Belgium. The contact in the old
country is her father Gustav in Antwerp. The last name looks like KUMAR
or KUMAN.

I am looking for living relatives of either of these people or other
information about their lives after arriving in the US in 1941.

Thank you in advance for your help.

Mark Halpern
West Chester, PA, USA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland Searching for Sugihara Visa Survivors Izaak and Maria GOLDBERG from Warsaw, Pruzany, and Antwerp #poland

Mark Halpern
 

I am searching for a married couple who immigrated to the US in April
1941 with the aid of a Japanese transit visa provided by Chiune
Sugihara.

The man was Izaak GOLDBERG, age 28, listed as a lawyer born in Warsaw.
There are indications >from the listing of his contact in the US that his
family was originally >from Pruzany, Poland, now Belarus. His cousin
living in the US was Bluma CHWATSKY whose maiden name was WAMTFUS or
WANTFUSS living in Oceanside, Long Island, New York. Izaak is listed as
being 6 foot 3 inches in height.

Isaak was traveling with his wife Szymona or Maria GOLDBERG, age 26,
listed as a housewife born in Antwerp, Belgium. The contact in the old
country is her father Gustav in Antwerp. The last name looks like KUMAR
or KUMAN.

I am looking for living relatives of either of these people or other
information about their lives after arriving in the US in 1941.

Thank you in advance for your help.

Mark Halpern
West Chester, PA, USA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.