Date   

Jewish "Austrian soldier" fighting for Germany in WWI #germany

Jeffrey Knisbacher
 

Can anyone relate to this? Today in the HIAS files of the Jewish Museum
of Maryland I came across a three-page handwritten document penned by my
father, the late Max KNISBACHER, on April 6, 1978 in support of his
claim for a pension >from the German government. In the last paragraph he
writes that his father was an "Austrian soldier in the first world war
who fought for Germany and gave his life when, on leave in September
1918 he died >from the consequences of the flu that he caught while in
the military." (My translation >from my father's original German.)

My father never spoke to me or any of my siblings as far as I know about
his father's service in the German army and I was very surprised when I
discovered it in a roundabout fashion a few years back--on the basis of
a picture postcard he had sent to his brother serving in the Austrian
army. (I had posted that postcard on Viewmate and the several responses
I received at the time helped clarify the situation. My grandfather was
sitting [apparently posed] on a chair in a Berlin military hospital.)

In any case, my father was never a German citizen. On the documents that
he retained >from his one year of medical school, his nationality was
listed as Polish. We know, of course, that Germany and Austria-Hungary
were allies in WWI, but was there some special arrangement for
"Ostjuden" in Germany to serve in the German army? Might they otherwise
have been sent back their parents' home in Austria to serve there? We
don't know exactly when my grandfather was drafted (hard to imagine that
he volunteered since by 1917, the year of the postcard, he already had a
wife and three or four children to support) which adds to the unknowns.
Any comments would be very much appreciated.

Jeff Knisbacher j2456@...


Viewmate - Handwriting on Prussian Marriage record - correction #germany

Jeff Lewy <airbair@...>
 

The other day I posted to ViewMate a 2-page record for a marriage in
Ostrowo/Ostrow Wielkepolski in 1877 for which I would very much
appreciate a transliteration of the portions in handwritten German. I
can read the printed portions, but I cannot decipher the handwriting.

I mistyped one of the file addresses; the correct address is:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM56804

Please respond using the form provided in the ViewMate application or to
me directly at airbair@....

Thank you! Jeff Lewy San Francisco, CA USA


German SIG #Germany Jewish "Austrian soldier" fighting for Germany in WWI #germany

Jeffrey Knisbacher
 

Can anyone relate to this? Today in the HIAS files of the Jewish Museum
of Maryland I came across a three-page handwritten document penned by my
father, the late Max KNISBACHER, on April 6, 1978 in support of his
claim for a pension >from the German government. In the last paragraph he
writes that his father was an "Austrian soldier in the first world war
who fought for Germany and gave his life when, on leave in September
1918 he died >from the consequences of the flu that he caught while in
the military." (My translation >from my father's original German.)

My father never spoke to me or any of my siblings as far as I know about
his father's service in the German army and I was very surprised when I
discovered it in a roundabout fashion a few years back--on the basis of
a picture postcard he had sent to his brother serving in the Austrian
army. (I had posted that postcard on Viewmate and the several responses
I received at the time helped clarify the situation. My grandfather was
sitting [apparently posed] on a chair in a Berlin military hospital.)

In any case, my father was never a German citizen. On the documents that
he retained >from his one year of medical school, his nationality was
listed as Polish. We know, of course, that Germany and Austria-Hungary
were allies in WWI, but was there some special arrangement for
"Ostjuden" in Germany to serve in the German army? Might they otherwise
have been sent back their parents' home in Austria to serve there? We
don't know exactly when my grandfather was drafted (hard to imagine that
he volunteered since by 1917, the year of the postcard, he already had a
wife and three or four children to support) which adds to the unknowns.
Any comments would be very much appreciated.

Jeff Knisbacher j2456@...


German SIG #Germany Viewmate - Handwriting on Prussian Marriage record - correction #germany

Jeff Lewy <airbair@...>
 

The other day I posted to ViewMate a 2-page record for a marriage in
Ostrowo/Ostrow Wielkepolski in 1877 for which I would very much
appreciate a transliteration of the portions in handwritten German. I
can read the printed portions, but I cannot decipher the handwriting.

I mistyped one of the file addresses; the correct address is:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM56804

Please respond using the form provided in the ViewMate application or to
me directly at airbair@....

Thank you! Jeff Lewy San Francisco, CA USA


Re: Records alert! Familysearch comes through -SITE CITE #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Update: I have created a Google spreadsheet that lists on-line and other
films >from Prussia and a few other places. I make no claims regarding
completeness or accuracy.

http://tinyurl.com/LDS-Prussia-Plus

If you live outside the US, please let me know if access to the films is
other than what I have noted.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 7/5/2017, Roger Lustig gersig.research@... wrote:
Some weeks ago I told you about films that familysearch.org had
digitized and put on line.

That was but a taste. In recent days, hundreds if not thousands of
films of interest to us have appeared on the site.

Find your town of interest, click on one of the collections that comes
up, then see if there's a camera icon next to the listing of
individual film items. If so, click on it and away you go!

Now all I have to do is rewrite my talk for Orlando, which is about
several sets of these films, among others.

Imagine: your own private Salt Lake City library in the comfort of
your home, coffee shop or wherever.


German SIG #Germany Re: Records alert! Familysearch comes through -SITE CITE #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Update: I have created a Google spreadsheet that lists on-line and other
films >from Prussia and a few other places. I make no claims regarding
completeness or accuracy.

http://tinyurl.com/LDS-Prussia-Plus

If you live outside the US, please let me know if access to the films is
other than what I have noted.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 7/5/2017, Roger Lustig gersig.research@... wrote:
Some weeks ago I told you about films that familysearch.org had
digitized and put on line.

That was but a taste. In recent days, hundreds if not thousands of
films of interest to us have appeared on the site.

Find your town of interest, click on one of the collections that comes
up, then see if there's a camera icon next to the listing of
individual film items. If so, click on it and away you go!

Now all I have to do is rewrite my talk for Orlando, which is about
several sets of these films, among others.

Imagine: your own private Salt Lake City library in the comfort of
your home, coffee shop or wherever.


Re: how to find documents when the town no longer has them #germany

Renate Rosenau <RenateRosenau@...>
 

Lin Herz, Palm Bay, Florida lin2@...
asks for help finding the birth certificate for her great great grandfather,
Benjamin REINHEIMER, after the local authority could not help.

You could address:
Hessisches Hauptstaatsarchiv,
Mosbacher Str. 55, D - 65187 Wiesbaden,
poststelle@...

You can find out more in English language under
https://landesarchiv.hessen.de/hessian-state-archives.

Good luck, Renate Rosenau, Alzey/Germany


German SIG #Germany Re: how to find documents when the town no longer has them #germany

Renate Rosenau <RenateRosenau@...>
 

Lin Herz, Palm Bay, Florida lin2@...
asks for help finding the birth certificate for her great great grandfather,
Benjamin REINHEIMER, after the local authority could not help.

You could address:
Hessisches Hauptstaatsarchiv,
Mosbacher Str. 55, D - 65187 Wiesbaden,
poststelle@...

You can find out more in English language under
https://landesarchiv.hessen.de/hessian-state-archives.

Good luck, Renate Rosenau, Alzey/Germany


Re: how to find documents [in Hessen-Darmstadt] when the town no longer has them #germany

Gerhard Buck <buckidstein@...>
 

[Another reply to Lin Herz]

Research in Hessen-Darmstadt has become very easy, because more and more
digitized Jewish vital registers appear on the internet, published by
the Staatsarchiv Darmstadt. The originals are in quite a number of
diverse archives. The images are on the site of all Hessian archives:
www.arcinsys.hessen.de <http://www.arcinsys.hessen.de>The direct link to
the index of places: http://tinyurl.com/yasbb7k8

The concrete answer for this case (on p. 12): on 21.01.1815 Benjamin was
born to Koppel Salomon and his wife Raache nee Simon, born in
Georgenhausen. The mother's given name was Rainche, when her daughter
Esther was born in 1813. Due to the dialect's influence this old Jewish
female name appears with many variations. Later it was changed to a
modern name starting with R, in this case Regine.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany - buckidstein@...

< ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >
Please thank those who help you and support ViewMate, JewishGen
and GerSIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Honors/
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp


German SIG #Germany Re: how to find documents [in Hessen-Darmstadt] when the town no longer has them #germany

Gerhard Buck <buckidstein@...>
 

[Another reply to Lin Herz]

Research in Hessen-Darmstadt has become very easy, because more and more
digitized Jewish vital registers appear on the internet, published by
the Staatsarchiv Darmstadt. The originals are in quite a number of
diverse archives. The images are on the site of all Hessian archives:
www.arcinsys.hessen.de <http://www.arcinsys.hessen.de>The direct link to
the index of places: http://tinyurl.com/yasbb7k8

The concrete answer for this case (on p. 12): on 21.01.1815 Benjamin was
born to Koppel Salomon and his wife Raache nee Simon, born in
Georgenhausen. The mother's given name was Rainche, when her daughter
Esther was born in 1813. Due to the dialect's influence this old Jewish
female name appears with many variations. Later it was changed to a
modern name starting with R, in this case Regine.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany - buckidstein@...

< ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >
Please thank those who help you and support ViewMate, JewishGen
and GerSIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Honors/
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp


Re: how to find documents when the town no longer has them #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Lin:

Beerfelden's Jewish records for 1810-1875 are on line! Here's the link
to the first book of birth records.

https://arcinsys.hessen.de/arcinsys/detailAction.action?detailid=v2634654

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 7/6/2017 Lin Herz lin2@... wrote:
Hi GerSIGers,
I need help finding the birth certificate for my great great
grandfather, Benjamin REINHEIMER.
I recently found my great-great grandfather, Benjamin REINHEIMER's
death certificate. He died in 1884 Beerfelden, Hesse, where my great
grandmother Rebecca REINHEIMER was born. Beerfelden was not able to help
me find records of his birth when I wrote 6 years ago. But, with the
death certificate, I now have the names of his parents: Koppel SALOMON
AND Regine SCHACK, so I thought that would help to find his birth
certificate. The death certificate also said he was 70.

Beerfelden just wrote me back and said they don't have documents
earlier than 1810. But since he was 70 in November 1884, he would have
been born in 1814. Does anyone have any suggestions of where I might
find those documents? Would they exist?

Previously when I was looking for more REINHEIMER documents I also
wrote Reinheim, due to the surname.
Just in case, I also wrote Reinheim with this information. Since he was
the first REINHEIMER in the family, I thought he might have been born
there. Now that I have his parents names, maybe the standesamt there can
help. I have not heard back.
But in case they don't have records back that far what can I do?


German SIG #Germany Re: how to find documents when the town no longer has them #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Lin:

Beerfelden's Jewish records for 1810-1875 are on line! Here's the link
to the first book of birth records.

https://arcinsys.hessen.de/arcinsys/detailAction.action?detailid=v2634654

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 7/6/2017 Lin Herz lin2@... wrote:
Hi GerSIGers,
I need help finding the birth certificate for my great great
grandfather, Benjamin REINHEIMER.
I recently found my great-great grandfather, Benjamin REINHEIMER's
death certificate. He died in 1884 Beerfelden, Hesse, where my great
grandmother Rebecca REINHEIMER was born. Beerfelden was not able to help
me find records of his birth when I wrote 6 years ago. But, with the
death certificate, I now have the names of his parents: Koppel SALOMON
AND Regine SCHACK, so I thought that would help to find his birth
certificate. The death certificate also said he was 70.

Beerfelden just wrote me back and said they don't have documents
earlier than 1810. But since he was 70 in November 1884, he would have
been born in 1814. Does anyone have any suggestions of where I might
find those documents? Would they exist?

Previously when I was looking for more REINHEIMER documents I also
wrote Reinheim, due to the surname.
Just in case, I also wrote Reinheim with this information. Since he was
the first REINHEIMER in the family, I thought he might have been born
there. Now that I have his parents names, maybe the standesamt there can
help. I have not heard back.
But in case they don't have records back that far what can I do?


Re: Ukrainian genealogy database pra.in.ua -- and other online sources #ukraine

Adam Goodheart
 

I'm catching up on past emails and read with interest the recent
exchange about a new Ukrainian genealogy database.

I used the pra.in.ua database last night and there are indeed plenty
of Jews included, including a few of my family members. However, the
frustrating thing is that the entries typically include little if any
context or sources. For instance, a typical entry might just read
"Gitarts, Itsko. Son of Yosef. Birthdate 1909. Place: Olgopol,
Vinnitsya."

Some entries indicate the source/context -- for instance, a roster of
WWII medal recipients -- but seem to be the minority. To the extent
that I could tell, sources appear to be mostly >from the early to mid
20th century.

There's a handy way to use this database and similar ones if you don't
know Ukrainian or Russian (I do not):

- Open pra.in.ua in the Chrome browser, which can automatically
translate the pages to English or another language.
- You can register and set up a pra.in.ua user name and password using English.
- If you know, or can get, your family surnames in Russian or
Ukrainian Cyrillic characters (for instance, >from family papers or
archival documents), use a point-and-click Russian keyboard online to
type out the names in Cyrillic. I use Google Translate, but there are
others as well if you just search "Russian keyboard." The Ukrainian
alphabet is basically interchangeable with Russian.
- Cut and paste those surnames in Cyrillic characters into the
pra.in.ua search field.
- A list of pra.in.ua results will appear and the Chrome browser
translates them immediately into English.

It's easy once you get the hang of it. The same cut-and-paste method
works if you just want to Google your surnames and/or towns in
Russian/Ukrainian -- I've found tons of cool stuff that doesn't appear
in English Google results. (For instance, a cousin who started the
first rock band in Soviet Belarus!) Also, check out the big Russian
website http://j-roots.info/ for Jewish genealogy (including Ukraine,
Belarus, Poland, etc.): lots of message boards and large troves of
documents not found elsewhere. Again, if you're a non-Russian speaker,
the basic method I described above works to use http://j-roots.info.
The site's helpful English-speaking moderators can lend a hand if you
have trouble registering/navigating.

Adam Goodheart
Washington, DC

FEIN [Bershad and Peschanka, Podolia Gubernia; Bender, Bessarabia];
GUTHARTZ, GITARTS, GITGARTS [Podolia]; KATZ [Dunaevtsy, Kalyus, and
Yarmolintsy, Podolia]; SELTZER [Bershad and Trostianets, Podolia];
SHMIDT [Bershad and Trostianets, Podolia]; SUDMAN [Podolia and
Bessarabia]; TENENBAUM [Savran, Balta, and Chechelnyk, Podolia]


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Ukrainian genealogy database pra.in.ua -- and other online sources #ukraine

Adam Goodheart
 

I'm catching up on past emails and read with interest the recent
exchange about a new Ukrainian genealogy database.

I used the pra.in.ua database last night and there are indeed plenty
of Jews included, including a few of my family members. However, the
frustrating thing is that the entries typically include little if any
context or sources. For instance, a typical entry might just read
"Gitarts, Itsko. Son of Yosef. Birthdate 1909. Place: Olgopol,
Vinnitsya."

Some entries indicate the source/context -- for instance, a roster of
WWII medal recipients -- but seem to be the minority. To the extent
that I could tell, sources appear to be mostly >from the early to mid
20th century.

There's a handy way to use this database and similar ones if you don't
know Ukrainian or Russian (I do not):

- Open pra.in.ua in the Chrome browser, which can automatically
translate the pages to English or another language.
- You can register and set up a pra.in.ua user name and password using English.
- If you know, or can get, your family surnames in Russian or
Ukrainian Cyrillic characters (for instance, >from family papers or
archival documents), use a point-and-click Russian keyboard online to
type out the names in Cyrillic. I use Google Translate, but there are
others as well if you just search "Russian keyboard." The Ukrainian
alphabet is basically interchangeable with Russian.
- Cut and paste those surnames in Cyrillic characters into the
pra.in.ua search field.
- A list of pra.in.ua results will appear and the Chrome browser
translates them immediately into English.

It's easy once you get the hang of it. The same cut-and-paste method
works if you just want to Google your surnames and/or towns in
Russian/Ukrainian -- I've found tons of cool stuff that doesn't appear
in English Google results. (For instance, a cousin who started the
first rock band in Soviet Belarus!) Also, check out the big Russian
website http://j-roots.info/ for Jewish genealogy (including Ukraine,
Belarus, Poland, etc.): lots of message boards and large troves of
documents not found elsewhere. Again, if you're a non-Russian speaker,
the basic method I described above works to use http://j-roots.info.
The site's helpful English-speaking moderators can lend a hand if you
have trouble registering/navigating.

Adam Goodheart
Washington, DC

FEIN [Bershad and Peschanka, Podolia Gubernia; Bender, Bessarabia];
GUTHARTZ, GITARTS, GITGARTS [Podolia]; KATZ [Dunaevtsy, Kalyus, and
Yarmolintsy, Podolia]; SELTZER [Bershad and Trostianets, Podolia];
SHMIDT [Bershad and Trostianets, Podolia]; SUDMAN [Podolia and
Bessarabia]; TENENBAUM [Savran, Balta, and Chechelnyk, Podolia]


Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Sunday, July 16, 2017, meeting: Chuck Weinstein on "Choosing the Right Family Tree Software" and "What's New at Ukraine SIG?" #general

Martin Fischer
 

Chuck Weinstein, towns director for Ukraine SIG and a moderator of its email
discussion group, will give two presentations at the Sunday, July 16, 2017,
meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois, at Temple Beth-El,
3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook, Ill. "What's New at Ukraine SIG," beginning at
1 p.m., and "Choosing the Right Family Tree Software," beginning at 2:30 p.m.,
are his topics at this special JGSI meeting.

For more information, see https://jgsi.org/event-2537151 or phone 312-666-0100.

Now that Ukraine records are beginning to come online, "What's New at Ukraine
SIG?" will provide a preview of announcements to be made at the Orlando IAJGS
Conference later in July, along with information on how to get involved with
Ukraine SIG. Chuck will discuss ongoing efforts to find more Ukraine SIG town
leaders and build more KehilaLinks pages for Jewish communities of eastern
Ukraine. This talk, which starts at 1 p.m., should be of interest to anyone
with family roots in the Russian Empire portion of Ukraine.

In the second presentation, "Choosing the Right Family Tree Software," which
starts at 2:30 p.m., Chuck will describe the new versions of some of the more
popular family tree software programs and seek to clear up confusion over
combining your computer family tree with online family trees. He will also
help you sort out the options and review popular software for both PCs and
Macs. Features and benefits of each software will be described.

A past president of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island, Chuck
Weinstein was also a co-chair of last year's IAJGS Conference in Seattle. He
is currently writing a book on Holocaust research.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Sunday, July 16, 2017, meeting: Chuck Weinstein on "Choosing the Right Family Tree Software" and "What's New at Ukraine SIG?" #general

Martin Fischer
 

Chuck Weinstein, towns director for Ukraine SIG and a moderator of its email
discussion group, will give two presentations at the Sunday, July 16, 2017,
meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois, at Temple Beth-El,
3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook, Ill. "What's New at Ukraine SIG," beginning at
1 p.m., and "Choosing the Right Family Tree Software," beginning at 2:30 p.m.,
are his topics at this special JGSI meeting.

For more information, see https://jgsi.org/event-2537151 or phone 312-666-0100.

Now that Ukraine records are beginning to come online, "What's New at Ukraine
SIG?" will provide a preview of announcements to be made at the Orlando IAJGS
Conference later in July, along with information on how to get involved with
Ukraine SIG. Chuck will discuss ongoing efforts to find more Ukraine SIG town
leaders and build more KehilaLinks pages for Jewish communities of eastern
Ukraine. This talk, which starts at 1 p.m., should be of interest to anyone
with family roots in the Russian Empire portion of Ukraine.

In the second presentation, "Choosing the Right Family Tree Software," which
starts at 2:30 p.m., Chuck will describe the new versions of some of the more
popular family tree software programs and seek to clear up confusion over
combining your computer family tree with online family trees. He will also
help you sort out the options and review popular software for both PCs and
Macs. Features and benefits of each software will be described.

A past president of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island, Chuck
Weinstein was also a co-chair of last year's IAJGS Conference in Seattle. He
is currently writing a book on Holocaust research.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


Jagielnica and Pidvolochysk cemetery pictures #poland

Milton Koch
 

I have seen on JOWBR, that there have been some pictures posted , as
well as plans, but I wonder if ALL the grave sites in both of these
cemeteries?
Please respond.
Thanks,
Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD, USA
KOCH-JAGIELNICA
BARBASCH-PIDVOLOCHYSK


JRI Poland #Poland Jagielnica and Pidvolochysk cemetery pictures #poland

Milton Koch
 

I have seen on JOWBR, that there have been some pictures posted , as
well as plans, but I wonder if ALL the grave sites in both of these
cemeteries?
Please respond.
Thanks,
Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD, USA
KOCH-JAGIELNICA
BARBASCH-PIDVOLOCHYSK


Yizkor Book Project, June 2017 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

You will undoubtedly notice that, compared to previous hectic months,
June was somewhat slower in the Yizkor Book Project but then again,
numbers aren't everything... We have been kept very busy expanding
quite a few of our existing projects, some of which will be completed
in the very near future and this is certainly something to look
forward to.

We did also manage to complete yet another project this last month -
this time for Didyliv, Ukraine that was kindly presented to the YB
Project by William Leibner. His name is associated with a
considerable number of projects and we do salute him for his untiring
dedication to preparing this unique material.

Apart >from that, the Yizkor Books in Print Project presented its 56th
and 57th hard cover book in June and this continues to be a very
ongoing, expanding project, undoubtedly thanks to the devoted team
behind it. The books published were:

- "Yizkor Book of Ostrow Mazowiecka (Number 2)" - which joins the
previous published book we have on this community. The project was
ably coordinated by Michael Richman and expertly translated and edited
by Gary S. Schiff.
- "Zabrze (Hindenburg) Yizkor Book" - compiled by William Leibner -
yes, that familiar name appears again and, once again, we send out our
thanks to him.

Note that these books and all the books we publish in the YBIP Project
continue to be freely available for reading in the Yizkor Book site,
an a link to our Translations Index appears at the end of this report.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in June.

We have added in 3 new entries:

- Fagaras, Romania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom1_00331.html

- Starobin, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slu460.html

- Staryya Darohi, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slu468.html

And we have continued to update 16 of our existing projects:

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy, Ukraine (Akkerman and the towns of its
district; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Brody, Ukraine (An Eternal Light: Brody in Memoriam)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brody/brody.html

- Chmielnik, Poland (Memorial Book of Chmielnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Chmielnik/Chmielnik.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Didyliv, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Jewish communities of
Dziedzilow, Winniki, Barszczowice, Pidelisek, Pidbaritz, Kukizov, Old
Jarczow, Pekalowice, Kamenopole & Nowy Jarczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dziedzilow/Dziedzilow.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Sarny, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Sarny)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sarny/sarny.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed
Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tarnogrod/Tarnogrod.html

- Tykocin, Poland (Memorial book of Tiktin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tykocin/Tykocin.html

- Volodymyr Volynskyy, Ukraine (Wladimir Wolynsk; in memory of the
Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Volodymyr_Volynskyy/Volodymyr_Volynskyy.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to
find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations
go online.

All the best and a Happy Independence Day to all our American readers,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Belarus SIG #Belarus Yizkor Book Project, June 2017 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

You will undoubtedly notice that, compared to previous hectic months,
June was somewhat slower in the Yizkor Book Project but then again,
numbers aren't everything... We have been kept very busy expanding
quite a few of our existing projects, some of which will be completed
in the very near future and this is certainly something to look
forward to.

We did also manage to complete yet another project this last month -
this time for Didyliv, Ukraine that was kindly presented to the YB
Project by William Leibner. His name is associated with a
considerable number of projects and we do salute him for his untiring
dedication to preparing this unique material.

Apart >from that, the Yizkor Books in Print Project presented its 56th
and 57th hard cover book in June and this continues to be a very
ongoing, expanding project, undoubtedly thanks to the devoted team
behind it. The books published were:

- "Yizkor Book of Ostrow Mazowiecka (Number 2)" - which joins the
previous published book we have on this community. The project was
ably coordinated by Michael Richman and expertly translated and edited
by Gary S. Schiff.
- "Zabrze (Hindenburg) Yizkor Book" - compiled by William Leibner -
yes, that familiar name appears again and, once again, we send out our
thanks to him.

Note that these books and all the books we publish in the YBIP Project
continue to be freely available for reading in the Yizkor Book site,
an a link to our Translations Index appears at the end of this report.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in June.

We have added in 3 new entries:

- Fagaras, Romania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom1_00331.html

- Starobin, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slu460.html

- Staryya Darohi, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slu468.html

And we have continued to update 16 of our existing projects:

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy, Ukraine (Akkerman and the towns of its
district; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Brody, Ukraine (An Eternal Light: Brody in Memoriam)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brody/brody.html

- Chmielnik, Poland (Memorial Book of Chmielnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Chmielnik/Chmielnik.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Didyliv, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Jewish communities of
Dziedzilow, Winniki, Barszczowice, Pidelisek, Pidbaritz, Kukizov, Old
Jarczow, Pekalowice, Kamenopole & Nowy Jarczow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dziedzilow/Dziedzilow.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Sarny, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Sarny)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sarny/sarny.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed
Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tarnogrod/Tarnogrod.html

- Tykocin, Poland (Memorial book of Tiktin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tykocin/Tykocin.html

- Volodymyr Volynskyy, Ukraine (Wladimir Wolynsk; in memory of the
Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Volodymyr_Volynskyy/Volodymyr_Volynskyy.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to
find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations
go online.

All the best and a Happy Independence Day to all our American readers,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager