Date   

Re: Chevra Tillem Kesher Yissrael Synagogue, Brooklyn #general

backon@...
 

AllanDolgow@aol.com writes:

I am looking for information on the Chevra Tillem Kesher Yissrael Synagogue,
Brooklyn New York.
I believe it no longer exists. My grandfather may have been one of the
founders, I know he was president of the synagogue at one time, it may have been
in the 1930's or earlier.
Try the following website:
http://home.att.net/~landsmanshaft/ which lists literally
thousands of Jewish "landsmanshaft", synagogues and organizations.

Josh Backon
backon@vms.huji.ac.il


Suceava and Radauti, NE Romania, Jewish name lists #general

Felicia Varza <claudiadingermania@...>
 

Hello,

Thank you for your emails. I will check all your names
and then I’ll be back to respond to each.
The second list that I have contain all the jewish
names who were born (partialy with data for marriage
and death) in Suceava, Bucovina, NE Romania, between
1843 and 1904. The third list with all jewish names
who were born in Radauti between 1857 and 1884 is
ready too.

Claudia Friedlander
Hamburg, Germany


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Chevra Tillem Kesher Yissrael Synagogue, Brooklyn #general

backon@...
 

AllanDolgow@aol.com writes:

I am looking for information on the Chevra Tillem Kesher Yissrael Synagogue,
Brooklyn New York.
I believe it no longer exists. My grandfather may have been one of the
founders, I know he was president of the synagogue at one time, it may have been
in the 1930's or earlier.
Try the following website:
http://home.att.net/~landsmanshaft/ which lists literally
thousands of Jewish "landsmanshaft", synagogues and organizations.

Josh Backon
backon@vms.huji.ac.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Suceava and Radauti, NE Romania, Jewish name lists #general

Felicia Varza <claudiadingermania@...>
 

Hello,

Thank you for your emails. I will check all your names
and then I’ll be back to respond to each.
The second list that I have contain all the jewish
names who were born (partialy with data for marriage
and death) in Suceava, Bucovina, NE Romania, between
1843 and 1904. The third list with all jewish names
who were born in Radauti between 1857 and 1884 is
ready too.

Claudia Friedlander
Hamburg, Germany


"Swimming in Auschwitz" - Screening #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

If you live in the greater New York area you may want to attend a screening
of the excellent (2007) film:

"Swimming in Auschwitz: Survival Stories of Six Women"

New York premier on Wednesday, 16 May 2007 at 7:00 PM at:

The Museum of Jewish Heritage
36 Battery Place
New York, NY 10280

Out of the hundreds of thousands of women who were tortured and killed at
Auschwitz, the six women featured in this moving film (>from Poland,
Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Holland) managed to survive. Each woman tells
their life’s story -- >from before they were taken away, leading up the
liberation by Allied forces at the end of the war. They tell inspiring
stories: forming families for support, singing, sharing food, literally
carrying one another along to avoid selection, and even sneaking a quick
swim in the German soldiers’ pool. These extraordinary women talk about how
they were able to find humor wherever they could in order to survive, and
how they are still able to laugh today.

Post-screening discussion with director Jon Kean and Renee Firestone,
featured in film.

$10 adults, $7 students/seniors, $5 members.

Screened in conjunction with the Museum’s exhibition Daring to Resist:
Jewish Defiance in the Holocaust.

Note: This film will also be screened twice as part of the film festival at
this summer's IAJGS conference in Salt Lake City.

For more information on this film, or how to purchase a home video DVD go
to:
http://www.swimminginauschwitz.com/

Museum of Jewish Heritage Website: http://www.mjhnyc.org/

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Swimming in Auschwitz" - Screening #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

If you live in the greater New York area you may want to attend a screening
of the excellent (2007) film:

"Swimming in Auschwitz: Survival Stories of Six Women"

New York premier on Wednesday, 16 May 2007 at 7:00 PM at:

The Museum of Jewish Heritage
36 Battery Place
New York, NY 10280

Out of the hundreds of thousands of women who were tortured and killed at
Auschwitz, the six women featured in this moving film (>from Poland,
Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Holland) managed to survive. Each woman tells
their life’s story -- >from before they were taken away, leading up the
liberation by Allied forces at the end of the war. They tell inspiring
stories: forming families for support, singing, sharing food, literally
carrying one another along to avoid selection, and even sneaking a quick
swim in the German soldiers’ pool. These extraordinary women talk about how
they were able to find humor wherever they could in order to survive, and
how they are still able to laugh today.

Post-screening discussion with director Jon Kean and Renee Firestone,
featured in film.

$10 adults, $7 students/seniors, $5 members.

Screened in conjunction with the Museum’s exhibition Daring to Resist:
Jewish Defiance in the Holocaust.

Note: This film will also be screened twice as part of the film festival at
this summer's IAJGS conference in Salt Lake City.

For more information on this film, or how to purchase a home video DVD go
to:
http://www.swimminginauschwitz.com/

Museum of Jewish Heritage Website: http://www.mjhnyc.org/

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Recording Speakers at JGS Meetings #general

Sharon Singer <bathsheba@...>
 

When I read the postings of all the JGS groups about knowledgeable speakers
coming to their particular meetings, I often wish that I could attend these
meetings in the various cities. I am sure that I am not alone in this.

Is it possible to start recording some of these wonderful talks, and share
them among our JGS groups? We could build a library that would be of use to
future genealogists. Our generation is the last one that can bridge the
pre-Holocaust and post-Holocaust worlds. We have the memories, the
photographs, the languages, the knowledge. It is unlikely that future
generations will know the changes in the family name, the original towns
where our families came from, and so many other important details about our
family histories.

I am not suggesting to record every meeting, but when there is a speaker who
has unique knowledge -- let's preserve it for all of us and for the future.

Sharon Singer

MODERATOR NOTE: You may want to make this suggestion to the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) at www.iajgs.org. This
organization provides coordination and support for the activities of JGSs
around the world, as well as organizing the annual Conference. The IAJGS is
an independent organization not connected to JewishGen. Extended discussion
of projects of this sort would be offtopic in the JewishGen Discussion Group.
Please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Recording Speakers at JGS Meetings #general

Sharon Singer <bathsheba@...>
 

When I read the postings of all the JGS groups about knowledgeable speakers
coming to their particular meetings, I often wish that I could attend these
meetings in the various cities. I am sure that I am not alone in this.

Is it possible to start recording some of these wonderful talks, and share
them among our JGS groups? We could build a library that would be of use to
future genealogists. Our generation is the last one that can bridge the
pre-Holocaust and post-Holocaust worlds. We have the memories, the
photographs, the languages, the knowledge. It is unlikely that future
generations will know the changes in the family name, the original towns
where our families came from, and so many other important details about our
family histories.

I am not suggesting to record every meeting, but when there is a speaker who
has unique knowledge -- let's preserve it for all of us and for the future.

Sharon Singer

MODERATOR NOTE: You may want to make this suggestion to the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) at www.iajgs.org. This
organization provides coordination and support for the activities of JGSs
around the world, as well as organizing the annual Conference. The IAJGS is
an independent organization not connected to JewishGen. Extended discussion
of projects of this sort would be offtopic in the JewishGen Discussion Group.
Please reply privately.


"Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume II" now available #general

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
Are you researching family >from any of the following Lithuanian
towns? Alsedziai, Antaliepte, Balbieriskis, Darbenai, Gruzdziai,
Kelme, Kavarskas, Mazeikiai, Pajuris, Plunge, Raguva, Salakas,
Salociai, Sirvintos, Saukenai, Uzpaliai, Vyzuonos, Varniai, Zarasai,
Zagare, Ziezmariai

If so, read on!

As a valuable resource benefitting your interests, Josef Rosin's
newest book "Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume II" will be
a treasure. Using a wide range of material in Lithuanian,
Hebrew and Yiddish, including newspapers and Yad Vashem archives,
Rosin has painstakingly investigated every available detail of life
in these towns. Every possible name, photograph and date has been
included He has produced a scholarly work which is an excellent
addition to the literature of Lithuania and of the
Holocaust. "Preserving our Litvak Heritage - Volume II"
complements Volume I (an historical record of 31 Lithuanian
Jewish towns) in every way possible.

Because of its richness of detail, Volume II is a priceless record
of an additional 21 Jewish communities that were totally obliterated
by their hostile neighbors in the space of a few weeks in 1941. Works
such as these ensure that the communities and their populace will
never be forgotten.

The book is available only >from JewishGen and we encourage you to
visit the mall soon where it is pictured on the mall home
page. Click on it to order. Look also at Volume I "JGI101" and
take some time to explore all the other offerings in the
JewishGenMall. As a special offer you can purchase Volumes I and II
at a combined discounted price. See product code JGI104, or click
on Sale Items at the bottom of the page when you visit the
JewishGenMall. Either of these books will be a valuable asset to your
research and familiarity with what used to exist in your ancestral
towns. Take a look, < http://www.jewishgenmall.org >
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume II" now available #general

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
Are you researching family >from any of the following Lithuanian
towns? Alsedziai, Antaliepte, Balbieriskis, Darbenai, Gruzdziai,
Kelme, Kavarskas, Mazeikiai, Pajuris, Plunge, Raguva, Salakas,
Salociai, Sirvintos, Saukenai, Uzpaliai, Vyzuonos, Varniai, Zarasai,
Zagare, Ziezmariai

If so, read on!

As a valuable resource benefitting your interests, Josef Rosin's
newest book "Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume II" will be
a treasure. Using a wide range of material in Lithuanian,
Hebrew and Yiddish, including newspapers and Yad Vashem archives,
Rosin has painstakingly investigated every available detail of life
in these towns. Every possible name, photograph and date has been
included He has produced a scholarly work which is an excellent
addition to the literature of Lithuania and of the
Holocaust. "Preserving our Litvak Heritage - Volume II"
complements Volume I (an historical record of 31 Lithuanian
Jewish towns) in every way possible.

Because of its richness of detail, Volume II is a priceless record
of an additional 21 Jewish communities that were totally obliterated
by their hostile neighbors in the space of a few weeks in 1941. Works
such as these ensure that the communities and their populace will
never be forgotten.

The book is available only >from JewishGen and we encourage you to
visit the mall soon where it is pictured on the mall home
page. Click on it to order. Look also at Volume I "JGI101" and
take some time to explore all the other offerings in the
JewishGenMall. As a special offer you can purchase Volumes I and II
at a combined discounted price. See product code JGI104, or click
on Sale Items at the bottom of the page when you visit the
JewishGenMall. Either of these books will be a valuable asset to your
research and familiarity with what used to exist in your ancestral
towns. Take a look, < http://www.jewishgenmall.org >
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


Re: Translation of Russian Document Needed - Suwalki Birth #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Barry Eisenberg wrote

I would greatly appreciate a translation of viewmate document VM9904. It
is a birth document >from Suwalki that is written in Russian. I apologize
for sending this request out a second time, but I only received one
response the first time (and that person asked for a fee!).
Barry,

Please do not be surprised that someone had a "hutzpa" to ask you for a fee
for the translation services.

Translations of the old records require first of all, old script handwritten
text deciphering. When ordering records >from Polish Archives, you have been
also offering translation documents for an additional fee. Why it should be
done free of charge when requesting translation services through JG?

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab

MODERATOR NOTE: The JewishGen home page states that JewishGen is
"based on the concept of free sharing of information". Professional
researchers who use JewishGen to solicit business are in violation of
JewishGen policies and may have their access restricted. On the other
hand, it is normal to offer to cover the expenses of someone who
helps you, or to offer to pay a nominal amount to compensate them
for their time. Common sense should be your guide.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Translation of Russian Document Needed - Suwalki Birth #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Barry Eisenberg wrote

I would greatly appreciate a translation of viewmate document VM9904. It
is a birth document >from Suwalki that is written in Russian. I apologize
for sending this request out a second time, but I only received one
response the first time (and that person asked for a fee!).
Barry,

Please do not be surprised that someone had a "hutzpa" to ask you for a fee
for the translation services.

Translations of the old records require first of all, old script handwritten
text deciphering. When ordering records >from Polish Archives, you have been
also offering translation documents for an additional fee. Why it should be
done free of charge when requesting translation services through JG?

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab

MODERATOR NOTE: The JewishGen home page states that JewishGen is
"based on the concept of free sharing of information". Professional
researchers who use JewishGen to solicit business are in violation of
JewishGen policies and may have their access restricted. On the other
hand, it is normal to offer to cover the expenses of someone who
helps you, or to offer to pay a nominal amount to compensate them
for their time. Common sense should be your guide.


Re: The meaning of "private person" #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/6/2007 3:03:54 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
a.sharon@shaw.ca writes:

<< Janette Levey Frisch wrote
Yesterday I was looking at the death record of my great great grandmother
Rywke Milmud Eisenberg >from Jezierzany (now Ozeryany) on October 11, 1888.
With the help of some online programs and indices I was able to see that her
parents were named in the record and that her father's occupation translated
as "private person".
<<< Perhaps you can share the original description ( I presume it was
in Polish) of this unique profession. I am just curious since I have never
seen before such profession.

Alexander Sharon >>>

==In German (and perhaps in French) there is a vaguely similar 19th century
expression that denotes a pensioner. My German dictionary defines Privatier
as a person with an independent income.

==The British had an expression "gentleman," still in use in 1952 to denote
the occupations of the (deceased) fathers of bride and groom at my wedding in
London. Her father had been a trader in Mandalay; mine had been a
manufacturer in Germany and England.

==My dictionary offers nine definitions of the label "gentleman." They
include:
* a man of good family, breeding, or social position.
* a man of good social standing, as a noble, or a commoner bearing or
entitled to use a coat of arms.
* a man with an independent income who does not work for a living.

==In general, the "occupation" label in 19th century records was intended to
suggest social standing at a time when people were classified as churchmen,
officers, soldiers, landowners, farmers, peasants, laborers, or independently
wealthy."Gentleman" was a catchall for those who didn't fit any of the other
categories, and was neither an aristocrat nor a pauper.

==Russia, after Czar Alexander I, sought modernization by importing
social patterns, technology and experts >from Germany France and England.
The terminology for these was imported at the same time.

Michael Bernet


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The meaning of "private person" #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/6/2007 3:03:54 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
a.sharon@shaw.ca writes:

<< Janette Levey Frisch wrote
Yesterday I was looking at the death record of my great great grandmother
Rywke Milmud Eisenberg >from Jezierzany (now Ozeryany) on October 11, 1888.
With the help of some online programs and indices I was able to see that her
parents were named in the record and that her father's occupation translated
as "private person".
<<< Perhaps you can share the original description ( I presume it was
in Polish) of this unique profession. I am just curious since I have never
seen before such profession.

Alexander Sharon >>>

==In German (and perhaps in French) there is a vaguely similar 19th century
expression that denotes a pensioner. My German dictionary defines Privatier
as a person with an independent income.

==The British had an expression "gentleman," still in use in 1952 to denote
the occupations of the (deceased) fathers of bride and groom at my wedding in
London. Her father had been a trader in Mandalay; mine had been a
manufacturer in Germany and England.

==My dictionary offers nine definitions of the label "gentleman." They
include:
* a man of good family, breeding, or social position.
* a man of good social standing, as a noble, or a commoner bearing or
entitled to use a coat of arms.
* a man with an independent income who does not work for a living.

==In general, the "occupation" label in 19th century records was intended to
suggest social standing at a time when people were classified as churchmen,
officers, soldiers, landowners, farmers, peasants, laborers, or independently
wealthy."Gentleman" was a catchall for those who didn't fit any of the other
categories, and was neither an aristocrat nor a pauper.

==Russia, after Czar Alexander I, sought modernization by importing
social patterns, technology and experts >from Germany France and England.
The terminology for these was imported at the same time.

Michael Bernet


Re: first names origins #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

christineusd@wanadoo.fr (Christine Usdin) writes:

Can you tell me please what are the origins of the first names "Girm" and
"Gerten". They are so named in the russian archives.
What are the other hebrew,yiddish or russian names for them?
As a wild guess: perhaps the letter "m" in "Girm" should really be a "sh"
(I think it's easy to confuse the two in Russian script, especially if
the writer is sloppy or the reader is inexperienced), so that name
should be "Girsh"; because of the H -> G shift which others have mentioned,
this is the Russian transliteration of the Yiddish/German Hirsch, meaning
"deer". That name is often linked to the Hebrew Tzvi and/or Naftali (as has
been discussed a number of times here, see e.g.
<http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~archview~160853~Naftali+and+Tzvi~634;7>
--
Robert Israel
israel@math.MyUniversitysInitials.ca
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: first names origins #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

christineusd@wanadoo.fr (Christine Usdin) writes:

Can you tell me please what are the origins of the first names "Girm" and
"Gerten". They are so named in the russian archives.
What are the other hebrew,yiddish or russian names for them?
As a wild guess: perhaps the letter "m" in "Girm" should really be a "sh"
(I think it's easy to confuse the two in Russian script, especially if
the writer is sloppy or the reader is inexperienced), so that name
should be "Girsh"; because of the H -> G shift which others have mentioned,
this is the Russian transliteration of the Yiddish/German Hirsch, meaning
"deer". That name is often linked to the Hebrew Tzvi and/or Naftali (as has
been discussed a number of times here, see e.g.
<http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~archview~160853~Naftali+and+Tzvi~634;7>
--
Robert Israel
israel@math.MyUniversitysInitials.ca
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


The Elusive KOSTOWATSKY Family #general

Linda Shefler <linsilv@...>
 

I have an assortment of KOSTOWETSKY KOSTOVETSKY COSTOWATSKY individuals
(including other variations of spelling) all >from the area of Pavoloch or
Fastov. Each one is somehow related to various branches of my SCHNAPARSKI
and/or NULMAN families that settled in Fall River, MA; Philadelphia and
Montreal. The following are the tidbits of information I have on the
various individuals:

Shmiel KOSTOWESKY >from Fastov, Ukraine arrived in NY August 1902, and listed
his destination as his brother-in-law Natan SOFORENKO in Fall River. Shmiel
and Natan's wives were GURALNIKs.

In 1909 Jossel WINOKUR (>from Pavoloch) listed his destination as his cousin
Joseph Kossiwezki which could easily be a variation of KOSTOWETSKY. Jossel
WINOKUR is related to my SCHNAPARSKI family.

In 1907 my great grandfather listed his brother-in-law S. COSTOWATSKY on
McGill St. in Montreal as his destination. I found a Sam COSTOWATSKY at
that address on McGill in the 1908 Montreal City Directory. He was there
until 1910 and then disappeared. I then found the name spelled KOSTOWATSKY;
I spoke with Sam KOSTOWATSKY's grandson who doesn't believe (or know) that
there is a family connection.

Lastly I found the following unrelated bit of information: In 1913
Mordechai Guthart of Kiev arrived in Galveston, TX on the SS Wittekind and
listed his destination (or, his friend) as P. KOSTOWETSKY. Unfortunately,
the second page of the manifest is missing, so I don't know where P.
KOSTOWETSKY was living in 1913. Mordechai Guthart was traveling with
individuals >from Pavoloch, so I assume P. KOSTOWETSKY was >from that area.

I haven't had any luck contacting people through JGFF; either there isn't a
connection or I haven't received responses. It seems pretty evident that
there is a major connection with the KOSTOWATSKY family as they turn up
everywhere in some relationship to family members.

I would greatly appreciate hearing >from anyone who is aware of this family,
even if your knowledge is limited. I'm very happy to work to unravel the
connections! Please respond privately.

Linda Silverman Shefler
Cary, NC
linsilv@nc.rr.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Elusive KOSTOWATSKY Family #general

Linda Shefler <linsilv@...>
 

I have an assortment of KOSTOWETSKY KOSTOVETSKY COSTOWATSKY individuals
(including other variations of spelling) all >from the area of Pavoloch or
Fastov. Each one is somehow related to various branches of my SCHNAPARSKI
and/or NULMAN families that settled in Fall River, MA; Philadelphia and
Montreal. The following are the tidbits of information I have on the
various individuals:

Shmiel KOSTOWESKY >from Fastov, Ukraine arrived in NY August 1902, and listed
his destination as his brother-in-law Natan SOFORENKO in Fall River. Shmiel
and Natan's wives were GURALNIKs.

In 1909 Jossel WINOKUR (>from Pavoloch) listed his destination as his cousin
Joseph Kossiwezki which could easily be a variation of KOSTOWETSKY. Jossel
WINOKUR is related to my SCHNAPARSKI family.

In 1907 my great grandfather listed his brother-in-law S. COSTOWATSKY on
McGill St. in Montreal as his destination. I found a Sam COSTOWATSKY at
that address on McGill in the 1908 Montreal City Directory. He was there
until 1910 and then disappeared. I then found the name spelled KOSTOWATSKY;
I spoke with Sam KOSTOWATSKY's grandson who doesn't believe (or know) that
there is a family connection.

Lastly I found the following unrelated bit of information: In 1913
Mordechai Guthart of Kiev arrived in Galveston, TX on the SS Wittekind and
listed his destination (or, his friend) as P. KOSTOWETSKY. Unfortunately,
the second page of the manifest is missing, so I don't know where P.
KOSTOWETSKY was living in 1913. Mordechai Guthart was traveling with
individuals >from Pavoloch, so I assume P. KOSTOWETSKY was >from that area.

I haven't had any luck contacting people through JGFF; either there isn't a
connection or I haven't received responses. It seems pretty evident that
there is a major connection with the KOSTOWATSKY family as they turn up
everywhere in some relationship to family members.

I would greatly appreciate hearing >from anyone who is aware of this family,
even if your knowledge is limited. I'm very happy to work to unravel the
connections! Please respond privately.

Linda Silverman Shefler
Cary, NC
linsilv@nc.rr.com


Re: first names origins--Russian uses "G" in place of "H" #general

Gary Goldberg <xgaryg@...>
 

MBernet@aol.com wrote:

In a message dated 5/5/2007 3:20:00 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
christineusd@wanadoo.fr writes:

<< Can you tell me please what are the origins of the first names "Girm"
and "Gerten". They are so named in the russian archives.

==The Russian alphabet does not have the letter "H" and uses instead
the letter "G." The names used by these two people would probably
have been Hirm and Herten.
Although sometimes the Russian letter "KH" is used. Thus, Hubert
Humphrey was written Gubert Khemfrey.

MODERATOR NOTE: Remove first "x" >from e-mail address to reply.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: first names origins--Russian uses "G" in place of "H" #general

Gary Goldberg <xgaryg@...>
 

MBernet@aol.com wrote:

In a message dated 5/5/2007 3:20:00 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
christineusd@wanadoo.fr writes:

<< Can you tell me please what are the origins of the first names "Girm"
and "Gerten". They are so named in the russian archives.

==The Russian alphabet does not have the letter "H" and uses instead
the letter "G." The names used by these two people would probably
have been Hirm and Herten.
Although sometimes the Russian letter "KH" is used. Thus, Hubert
Humphrey was written Gubert Khemfrey.

MODERATOR NOTE: Remove first "x" >from e-mail address to reply.