Date   

Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 is dedicated to Susan King,
JewishGen Founder, who was a fervent supporter of the Yizkor Book
Translation Project, and without whose dedication this project
would not have prospered.

For the month of March 2008, 16 updates went online.
All translations are accessed at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html >.
Additions for the month are flagged.

Updates:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belchatow, Poland
-Belzec, Stepping Stone to Genocide
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Derechin, Belarus
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Goniadz, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Krasnik, Poland
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zambrow, Poland
-Zuromin, Poland

Other Yizkor resources should be consulted:

Database: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html
Necrology: http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/
Infofiles: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/infofiles.html

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 is dedicated to Susan King,
JewishGen Founder, who was a fervent supporter of the Yizkor Book
Translation Project, and without whose dedication this project
would not have prospered.

For the month of March 2008, 16 updates went online.
All translations are accessed at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html >.
Additions for the month are flagged.

Updates:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belchatow, Poland
-Belzec, Stepping Stone to Genocide
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Derechin, Belarus
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Goniadz, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Krasnik, Poland
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zambrow, Poland
-Zuromin, Poland

Other Yizkor resources should be consulted:

Database: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html
Necrology: http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/
Infofiles: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/infofiles.html

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Re: mtDNA Plus results #dna

Judy Simon
 

On 2008.03.31 Annette Stolberg <annettes@frontiernet.net> wrote:

I am in deep quandary over the meaning of "low resolution" that
provided 50 names of people that match my dna. The high resolution
results of my test will be unavailable until mid April.
As often happens with Family Tree DNA, your high resolution results
are in early. If you check your personal FTDNA webpage or the
Jewish Ukraine West website you will see that both your HVR1 and
HVR2 results are there now, as well as your low resolution and high
resolution matches

The quandary is if a dna match means a relationship between myself
and 50 people on the low resolution list, can I assume that they are
relatives of mine?
You can assume that you have a common ancestor with all of them, but
that common ancestor could have lived many generations ago, in an
anthropological rather than a genealogical time frame.

These are names >from the Jewish Ukraine project, where my roots
are. One of the people has already contacted me and my reply gave
the towns where my family were born; I have yet to hear back from
this person, and am feeling reluctant to contact any of the others
on the list.
If you click on the MyMaps feature of your FTDNA personal webpage,
you will see which of your low resolution matches have maternal
ancestors >from the same area as yours are from. There is a "bubble"
to click on under the map if you want to see the ancestral villages
of your high resolution matches. The matches are shown as teardrops
on the map. If you click on any of those teardrops, you will see
the name of the match whose ancestors came >from the location where
the teardrop is pointing.

I would recommend you start by contacting the matches whose
ancestors are geographically closest to yours. You appear as the
"little blue man" on the map.

So - if I do make an effort to contact the other 49 names, what does
anyone suggest that I reveal about myself? Because the female line
wouldn't have a surname base that would be constant, as with the male
line, I thought I wouldn't give family names. Should I give the names
anyway?
It helps to give the shtetl name and the surnames of your maternal
ancestors as far back as you know as well as the dates (roughly)
when they lived. Depending on how comfortable you feel discussing
more that this based on your matches' responses to your information,
some other things that can be helpful in finding out if your
families are related in a genealogical time frame are oral histories
about famous relatives, recipes that are particular to your mother
and her mother, and unusual physical or medical characteristics on
your maternal line. I'm sure SIG members can think of additional
clues they have used to help discover if their matches are related
in the last couple of hundred years.

I hope this helps.
Judy Simon
co-administrator, Jewish Ukraine West


DNA Research #DNA Re: mtDNA Plus results #dna

Judy Simon
 

On 2008.03.31 Annette Stolberg <annettes@frontiernet.net> wrote:

I am in deep quandary over the meaning of "low resolution" that
provided 50 names of people that match my dna. The high resolution
results of my test will be unavailable until mid April.
As often happens with Family Tree DNA, your high resolution results
are in early. If you check your personal FTDNA webpage or the
Jewish Ukraine West website you will see that both your HVR1 and
HVR2 results are there now, as well as your low resolution and high
resolution matches

The quandary is if a dna match means a relationship between myself
and 50 people on the low resolution list, can I assume that they are
relatives of mine?
You can assume that you have a common ancestor with all of them, but
that common ancestor could have lived many generations ago, in an
anthropological rather than a genealogical time frame.

These are names >from the Jewish Ukraine project, where my roots
are. One of the people has already contacted me and my reply gave
the towns where my family were born; I have yet to hear back from
this person, and am feeling reluctant to contact any of the others
on the list.
If you click on the MyMaps feature of your FTDNA personal webpage,
you will see which of your low resolution matches have maternal
ancestors >from the same area as yours are from. There is a "bubble"
to click on under the map if you want to see the ancestral villages
of your high resolution matches. The matches are shown as teardrops
on the map. If you click on any of those teardrops, you will see
the name of the match whose ancestors came >from the location where
the teardrop is pointing.

I would recommend you start by contacting the matches whose
ancestors are geographically closest to yours. You appear as the
"little blue man" on the map.

So - if I do make an effort to contact the other 49 names, what does
anyone suggest that I reveal about myself? Because the female line
wouldn't have a surname base that would be constant, as with the male
line, I thought I wouldn't give family names. Should I give the names
anyway?
It helps to give the shtetl name and the surnames of your maternal
ancestors as far back as you know as well as the dates (roughly)
when they lived. Depending on how comfortable you feel discussing
more that this based on your matches' responses to your information,
some other things that can be helpful in finding out if your
families are related in a genealogical time frame are oral histories
about famous relatives, recipes that are particular to your mother
and her mother, and unusual physical or medical characteristics on
your maternal line. I'm sure SIG members can think of additional
clues they have used to help discover if their matches are related
in the last couple of hundred years.

I hope this helps.
Judy Simon
co-administrator, Jewish Ukraine West


FW: Szeklender Chaja,Brest ghetto,Belarus #belarus

Mari-Tuulia Siklander <oceanwindssky@...>
 

From: oceanwindssky@hotmail.com
To: belarus@lyris.jewishgen.org
Subject: Szeklender Chaja,Brest ghetto,Belarus
Date: Wed, 2 Apr 2008 16:06:29 +0000

Shalom,
I am gentile finnish woman who would very much like to have Jewish ancestry
and I made Jewish genealogy search >from link: http://www.jewishgen.org/
I searched also >from Holocaust archives with my surname:
Siklander
and computer found woman:
Szeklender,Chaja b.1889.
She was >from Brest ghetto and her parents were:Chaim and Tamara.
Her passport was issued:24.11.1941( I do not know what this means?Issued?)
and digitized archive is:7613.
So I would like you to help to find out if my family Siklander is related to
her and if we originally come >from Brest,Belarus.
Did Chaja Szeklender survive?
And does she have living relatives somewhere in world?
Is name Szeklender an Yiddishes name and what does it mean?
If I am related to Szeklenders,I would very much like to unite with them.
Thank you very much for your kind help,lehitraot:

Mari-Tuulia Siklander
Vantaa
Finland
MODERATORS NOTE: You may want to look at: http://www.jewishgen.org/DNA/
as part of your research also.


Belarus SIG #Belarus FW: Szeklender Chaja,Brest ghetto,Belarus #belarus

Mari-Tuulia Siklander <oceanwindssky@...>
 

From: oceanwindssky@hotmail.com
To: belarus@lyris.jewishgen.org
Subject: Szeklender Chaja,Brest ghetto,Belarus
Date: Wed, 2 Apr 2008 16:06:29 +0000

Shalom,
I am gentile finnish woman who would very much like to have Jewish ancestry
and I made Jewish genealogy search >from link: http://www.jewishgen.org/
I searched also >from Holocaust archives with my surname:
Siklander
and computer found woman:
Szeklender,Chaja b.1889.
She was >from Brest ghetto and her parents were:Chaim and Tamara.
Her passport was issued:24.11.1941( I do not know what this means?Issued?)
and digitized archive is:7613.
So I would like you to help to find out if my family Siklander is related to
her and if we originally come >from Brest,Belarus.
Did Chaja Szeklender survive?
And does she have living relatives somewhere in world?
Is name Szeklender an Yiddishes name and what does it mean?
If I am related to Szeklenders,I would very much like to unite with them.
Thank you very much for your kind help,lehitraot:

Mari-Tuulia Siklander
Vantaa
Finland
MODERATORS NOTE: You may want to look at: http://www.jewishgen.org/DNA/
as part of your research also.


A Message from JewishGen's Founder #unitedkingdom

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

There are times when it's almost impossible to find the right words, and
perhaps this is one of those times.

Twenty-two years ago (seems like eons), I had an idea that grew up to be
JewishGen. Over the years you may have been one of those wonderful people
who offered help and together we nurtured that brainchild of mine. Together
we loved it and lived it.

It has been an extraordinary ride and looking back >from where we have come,
we can all take enormous pride in what we have established collectively. It
is a legacy that I know will follow me wherever I go for the rest of my
life. There is nothing better than knowing that you have fulfilled a dream
and to know you have made a difference in so many lives. I will cherish
these years forever.

I am ever so grateful for the true friendships I've developed along the way,
ever so grateful for the spirit of the volunteers who have worked with so
much dedication over these many years creating and building a real
grassroots effort that was at the core of my vision and so grateful that
JewishGen has been at the center of my life for so many years.

I can't thank everyone enough for lending their talents, their skills, their
hearts, their ideas and their time. Effective Monday, March 31st, I will no
longer be associated with JewishGen either as an employee or as a director.
Even though I may be moving forward and perhaps defining yet another life
purpose, please know that JewishGen and all of you who walked the walk with
me, nurturing my dream along with yours, will remain in my heart forever.

Susan

Susan E. King
JewishGen Founder
susan.king@cgsg.com


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom A Message from JewishGen's Founder #unitedkingdom

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

There are times when it's almost impossible to find the right words, and
perhaps this is one of those times.

Twenty-two years ago (seems like eons), I had an idea that grew up to be
JewishGen. Over the years you may have been one of those wonderful people
who offered help and together we nurtured that brainchild of mine. Together
we loved it and lived it.

It has been an extraordinary ride and looking back >from where we have come,
we can all take enormous pride in what we have established collectively. It
is a legacy that I know will follow me wherever I go for the rest of my
life. There is nothing better than knowing that you have fulfilled a dream
and to know you have made a difference in so many lives. I will cherish
these years forever.

I am ever so grateful for the true friendships I've developed along the way,
ever so grateful for the spirit of the volunteers who have worked with so
much dedication over these many years creating and building a real
grassroots effort that was at the core of my vision and so grateful that
JewishGen has been at the center of my life for so many years.

I can't thank everyone enough for lending their talents, their skills, their
hearts, their ideas and their time. Effective Monday, March 31st, I will no
longer be associated with JewishGen either as an employee or as a director.
Even though I may be moving forward and perhaps defining yet another life
purpose, please know that JewishGen and all of you who walked the walk with
me, nurturing my dream along with yours, will remain in my heart forever.

Susan

Susan E. King
JewishGen Founder
susan.king@cgsg.com


Custom & the New Bride #unitedkingdom

Maureen Rob <robbjm@...>
 

Hello Fellow Genners
I wonder if anyone is aware whether it is a Jewish custom for a father to
make a financial gift to a daughter on her wedding day.
The reason for this enquiry is that I have a will where two minor, dependent
children are provided for in the father's estate, but the two older
daughters, believed to be married at the time are not mentioned.
I seems unlikely that a father would leave out some of his children, unless
there is an understanding that they are now the responsibility of the
husband, or, that they have already received something of value >from the
father.
If preferred I may be contacted at robbjm@paradise.net.nz
Lots of happy hunting
Maureen Myers
New Zealand

Researching: MYERS, SIMMONS, HARRIS, LEVY, ISAACS in London.


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Custom & the New Bride #unitedkingdom

Maureen Rob <robbjm@...>
 

Hello Fellow Genners
I wonder if anyone is aware whether it is a Jewish custom for a father to
make a financial gift to a daughter on her wedding day.
The reason for this enquiry is that I have a will where two minor, dependent
children are provided for in the father's estate, but the two older
daughters, believed to be married at the time are not mentioned.
I seems unlikely that a father would leave out some of his children, unless
there is an understanding that they are now the responsibility of the
husband, or, that they have already received something of value >from the
father.
If preferred I may be contacted at robbjm@paradise.net.nz
Lots of happy hunting
Maureen Myers
New Zealand

Researching: MYERS, SIMMONS, HARRIS, LEVY, ISAACS in London.


Re: Custom & the New Bride #unitedkingdom

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/1/2008 1:51:15 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
_robbjm@paradise.net.nz_ (mailto:robbjm@paradise.net.nz) writes:

<< I wonder if anyone is aware whether it is a Jewish custom for a father to
make a financial gift to a daughter on her wedding day.
The reason for this enquiry is that I have a will where two minor, dependent
children are provided for in the father's estate, but the two older
daughters, believed to be married at the time are not mentioned.
I seems unlikely that a father would leave out some of his children, unless
there is an understanding that they are now the responsibility of the
husband, or, that they have already received something of value >from the
father. >>

Your question would have been more easy to resolve if you had given a
location, language, social class and time period.

Safed? San Francisco? Sao Paolo? Stratford-on-Avon? St. Petersburg?
Strasbourg?
1623? 1718? 1821? 1895? 1930? 2005?
Peasant, pastrycook, pantsmaker, poet, patent lawyer?
You see how they may have had different customs?

The Jewish tradition going back to biblical times and still enshrined in
the marriage
ritual and the ketuba is that the bride's parents pay a dowery for the
daughter, and the
groom undertakes to support her in life and even after his own demise,
literally "including
the shirt on my back." Until marriage then, she is the beneficiary of her
father's home and
support, after that, she is an obligation of the husband and his family.
Very often, in
marriage, she moved far >from her father's village.

The money left to a son would often be conditioned for endowring the son's
sisters, or
his own daughters.

My grandfather Maier BERNET, born in 1851 in Upper Franconia (Germany) was
the sixth
child. His mother died in 1858 following the birth of her tenth child. There
were another two
sons in the family, one of whom may have died in childhood, the other lived
well into adulthood
but probably did not marry.

My grandfather worked, hard, to raise enough money to marry off his seven
sisters. By
tradition, he did not seek to marry until after he'd helped set up his
sisters with a financially
able husband. He was 44 when he married, 53 when he died in 1904 leaving
three orphans.

I assume that in his will, my grandfather would have (in accordance with
Jewish law and
tradition) left the bulk of his estate to his widow, a larger portion to his
first-born son (who
would have been responsible for paying his sister's dowry), and a smaller
amount to his
daughter (toward her dowry) and to his younger son, my father.

++Does that answer your question?

Michael Bernet, New York
mbernet@aol.com

www.mem-Ber.net


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Re: Custom & the New Bride #unitedkingdom

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/1/2008 1:51:15 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
_robbjm@paradise.net.nz_ (mailto:robbjm@paradise.net.nz) writes:

<< I wonder if anyone is aware whether it is a Jewish custom for a father to
make a financial gift to a daughter on her wedding day.
The reason for this enquiry is that I have a will where two minor, dependent
children are provided for in the father's estate, but the two older
daughters, believed to be married at the time are not mentioned.
I seems unlikely that a father would leave out some of his children, unless
there is an understanding that they are now the responsibility of the
husband, or, that they have already received something of value >from the
father. >>

Your question would have been more easy to resolve if you had given a
location, language, social class and time period.

Safed? San Francisco? Sao Paolo? Stratford-on-Avon? St. Petersburg?
Strasbourg?
1623? 1718? 1821? 1895? 1930? 2005?
Peasant, pastrycook, pantsmaker, poet, patent lawyer?
You see how they may have had different customs?

The Jewish tradition going back to biblical times and still enshrined in
the marriage
ritual and the ketuba is that the bride's parents pay a dowery for the
daughter, and the
groom undertakes to support her in life and even after his own demise,
literally "including
the shirt on my back." Until marriage then, she is the beneficiary of her
father's home and
support, after that, she is an obligation of the husband and his family.
Very often, in
marriage, she moved far >from her father's village.

The money left to a son would often be conditioned for endowring the son's
sisters, or
his own daughters.

My grandfather Maier BERNET, born in 1851 in Upper Franconia (Germany) was
the sixth
child. His mother died in 1858 following the birth of her tenth child. There
were another two
sons in the family, one of whom may have died in childhood, the other lived
well into adulthood
but probably did not marry.

My grandfather worked, hard, to raise enough money to marry off his seven
sisters. By
tradition, he did not seek to marry until after he'd helped set up his
sisters with a financially
able husband. He was 44 when he married, 53 when he died in 1904 leaving
three orphans.

I assume that in his will, my grandfather would have (in accordance with
Jewish law and
tradition) left the bulk of his estate to his widow, a larger portion to his
first-born son (who
would have been responsible for paying his sister's dowry), and a smaller
amount to his
daughter (toward her dowry) and to his younger son, my father.

++Does that answer your question?

Michael Bernet, New York
mbernet@aol.com

www.mem-Ber.net


researching SZEPSENWOL #belarus

Stephanie Schamess <skschamess@...>
 

Dear Jewish Genners,
I am researching my paternal great-grandparents whose last name was
SZEPSENWOL. I don't know their first names. As far as anyone in the family
knows, they were >from Minsk. Their daughter, my grandmother, came to
Hartford, CT in 1907 on the ship Noordam, leaving >from Rotterdam. She is
listed on her passenger record as Sora Szepsenwol, although once in
America she used the name Sarah Wohl. The ship record gives her last place
of residence as Barischew. I am wondering if this is a misspelling of
Barisov.
Sarah married Harry Krasnow and lived in Hartford until her death in
1962.
The only other information I have about the family is that Sarah had
four sisters who also settled in the Hartford, CT area. One sister, Anna,
was married to Max Mindell before coming to Hartford in 1922 with her
9-year-old son, Abram. Her last place of residence is listed on the
ship's passenger record as Hartford (a bit puzzling) but her son's is
listed as Sombin, Russia. Her husband Max came later. Anna was called
Helen by the family: I don't know how to account for the change of name.
I would appreciate any information that would help me take further
steps in researching my great-grandparents.
Thank you,
Stephanie Schamess
Florence, MA 01062
skschamess@yahoo.com
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply privately with specific information.
General research may be posted to the list.


Belarus SIG #Belarus researching SZEPSENWOL #belarus

Stephanie Schamess <skschamess@...>
 

Dear Jewish Genners,
I am researching my paternal great-grandparents whose last name was
SZEPSENWOL. I don't know their first names. As far as anyone in the family
knows, they were >from Minsk. Their daughter, my grandmother, came to
Hartford, CT in 1907 on the ship Noordam, leaving >from Rotterdam. She is
listed on her passenger record as Sora Szepsenwol, although once in
America she used the name Sarah Wohl. The ship record gives her last place
of residence as Barischew. I am wondering if this is a misspelling of
Barisov.
Sarah married Harry Krasnow and lived in Hartford until her death in
1962.
The only other information I have about the family is that Sarah had
four sisters who also settled in the Hartford, CT area. One sister, Anna,
was married to Max Mindell before coming to Hartford in 1922 with her
9-year-old son, Abram. Her last place of residence is listed on the
ship's passenger record as Hartford (a bit puzzling) but her son's is
listed as Sombin, Russia. Her husband Max came later. Anna was called
Helen by the family: I don't know how to account for the change of name.
I would appreciate any information that would help me take further
steps in researching my great-grandparents.
Thank you,
Stephanie Schamess
Florence, MA 01062
skschamess@yahoo.com
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply privately with specific information.
General research may be posted to the list.


SIG meeting in Israel? #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

I will be coming to Israel with my family June 23-July 12. If there is
interest in another SIG meeting in Israel during that time, I would love to
attend.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech SIG meeting in Israel? #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

I will be coming to Israel with my family June 23-July 12. If there is
interest in another SIG meeting in Israel during that time, I would love to
attend.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 #austria-czech

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 is dedicated to Susan King,
JewishGen Founder, who was a fervent supporter of the Yizkor Book
Translation Project, and without whose dedication this project
would not have prospered.

For the month of March 2008, 16 updates went online.
All translations are accessed at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html >.
Additions for the month are flagged.

Updates:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belchatow, Poland
-Belzec, Stepping Stone to Genocide
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Derechin, Belarus
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Goniadz, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Krasnik, Poland
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zambrow, Poland
-Zuromin, Poland

Other Yizkor resources should be consulted:

Database: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html
Necrology: http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/
Infofiles: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/infofiles.html

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 #austria-czech

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 is dedicated to Susan King,
JewishGen Founder, who was a fervent supporter of the Yizkor Book
Translation Project, and without whose dedication this project
would not have prospered.

For the month of March 2008, 16 updates went online.
All translations are accessed at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html >.
Additions for the month are flagged.

Updates:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belchatow, Poland
-Belzec, Stepping Stone to Genocide
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Derechin, Belarus
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Goniadz, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Krasnik, Poland
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zambrow, Poland
-Zuromin, Poland

Other Yizkor resources should be consulted:

Database: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html
Necrology: http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/
Infofiles: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/infofiles.html

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 #galicia

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 is dedicated to Susan King,
JewishGen Founder, who was a fervent supporter of the Yizkor Book
Translation Project, and without whose dedication this project
would not have prospered.

For the month of March 2008, 16 updates went online.
All translations are accessed at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html >.
Additions for the month are flagged.

Updates:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belchatow, Poland
-Belzec, Stepping Stone to Genocide
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Derechin, Belarus
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Goniadz, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Krasnik, Poland
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zambrow, Poland
-Zuromin, Poland

Other Yizkor resources should be consulted:

Database: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html
Necrology: http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/
Infofiles: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/infofiles.html

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 #galicia

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Report for March 2008 is dedicated to Susan King,
JewishGen Founder, who was a fervent supporter of the Yizkor Book
Translation Project, and without whose dedication this project
would not have prospered.

For the month of March 2008, 16 updates went online.
All translations are accessed at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html >.
Additions for the month are flagged.

Updates:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belchatow, Poland
-Belzec, Stepping Stone to Genocide
-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Derechin, Belarus
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Goniadz, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Krasnik, Poland
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Svencionys, Lithuania
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zambrow, Poland
-Zuromin, Poland

Other Yizkor resources should be consulted:

Database: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html
Necrology: http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/
Infofiles: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/infofiles.html

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition