Date   

Polish Jews Who Settled In Florida - Jewish Museum Call For Materials #general

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

_Jewish Museum of Florida_ Issues Call for materials for exhibit on
Polish Jews who settled in Florida.
Deadline: August 31, 2010

Housed in two former Miami Beach adjacent synagogues, and on the
National Register of Historic Places, the Museum collects, preserves
and interprets material evidence of the Florida Jewish experience
since at least 1763.

The Museum has a new acquisition that is significant to the Jewish
history of Florida, as well as world Jewish history.

Peter Maurice, of England and Spain, donated to the Museum ten Polish
wooden synagogue models, which he built. They depict synagogues in
Poland >from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries >from the shtetls
of Przedborz, Gombin, Zabludow, Gwozdziec, Wysoke Mazowieckie,
Lutomiersk, Kornik, Narowla, Glinne and Pilic.

Creating a Florida Connection Exhibit:
To share these models with the public, the Museum is planning an exhibit
to tell an expanded story of Jews in Florida who came (or whose ancestors
came) >from Poland. If you (or someone you know) are one of them, contact
the Museum so that they can create a "Florida Connection" with your
family's photos and artifacts. Donors need to provide the dates, names,
and places for each photo, document and artifact and the story overview
of the family.

Please contact the Museum Registrar (305-672-5044, ext. 3167) or email
(registrar@jewishmuseum.com). Website: www.jewishmuseum.com

--
Bernard I. Kouchel
Researcher JMF
koosh@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polish Jews Who Settled In Florida - Jewish Museum Call For Materials #general

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

_Jewish Museum of Florida_ Issues Call for materials for exhibit on
Polish Jews who settled in Florida.
Deadline: August 31, 2010

Housed in two former Miami Beach adjacent synagogues, and on the
National Register of Historic Places, the Museum collects, preserves
and interprets material evidence of the Florida Jewish experience
since at least 1763.

The Museum has a new acquisition that is significant to the Jewish
history of Florida, as well as world Jewish history.

Peter Maurice, of England and Spain, donated to the Museum ten Polish
wooden synagogue models, which he built. They depict synagogues in
Poland >from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries >from the shtetls
of Przedborz, Gombin, Zabludow, Gwozdziec, Wysoke Mazowieckie,
Lutomiersk, Kornik, Narowla, Glinne and Pilic.

Creating a Florida Connection Exhibit:
To share these models with the public, the Museum is planning an exhibit
to tell an expanded story of Jews in Florida who came (or whose ancestors
came) >from Poland. If you (or someone you know) are one of them, contact
the Museum so that they can create a "Florida Connection" with your
family's photos and artifacts. Donors need to provide the dates, names,
and places for each photo, document and artifact and the story overview
of the family.

Please contact the Museum Registrar (305-672-5044, ext. 3167) or email
(registrar@jewishmuseum.com). Website: www.jewishmuseum.com

--
Bernard I. Kouchel
Researcher JMF
koosh@bellsouth.net


concentration camp victims #general

Hannah Berliner Fischthal
 

I have been searching unsuccessfully for many years for the places and
dates of murder of some of my relatives. The following are a few
helpful steps for Mr. Cassio:
1. If you have the place where your famiy was living, you can easily
find in the Jewish Encyclopedia the main camps to which the population
was deported.

2. Gross-Rosen has a list of victims, which is partially complete but
helpful

3. If you can get to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, that
would be great.

4. File a search with ITS and the American Red Cross.

Good luck with this.

Hannah Berliner Fischthal
BERLINER, Dabrowa Gornicza, Brzeznica


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen concentration camp victims #general

Hannah Berliner Fischthal
 

I have been searching unsuccessfully for many years for the places and
dates of murder of some of my relatives. The following are a few
helpful steps for Mr. Cassio:
1. If you have the place where your famiy was living, you can easily
find in the Jewish Encyclopedia the main camps to which the population
was deported.

2. Gross-Rosen has a list of victims, which is partially complete but
helpful

3. If you can get to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, that
would be great.

4. File a search with ITS and the American Red Cross.

Good luck with this.

Hannah Berliner Fischthal
BERLINER, Dabrowa Gornicza, Brzeznica


Re: List of psychiatrists in New York #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

John Shuman asked about online resources to look for psychiatrists
in the New York City area in the 1940s and 1950s.

For many professions that require a license, it's possible to find
somebody if you're working with an unusual name or know the exact name1.
For example, in New York you can look for physicians, pharmacists,
optometrists, dentists, public accountants, and many others, at
http://www.op.nysed.gov/opsearches.htm. However, in New York the
Department of Education or licensing boards routinely keep only a
minimal amount of information about license holders.

Another idea is to get phone books for a specific geographic area.
These can be obtained on microfilm at most libraries by interlibrary loan.

Ira
Ira Leviton, M.D.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: List of psychiatrists in New York #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

John Shuman asked about online resources to look for psychiatrists
in the New York City area in the 1940s and 1950s.

For many professions that require a license, it's possible to find
somebody if you're working with an unusual name or know the exact name1.
For example, in New York you can look for physicians, pharmacists,
optometrists, dentists, public accountants, and many others, at
http://www.op.nysed.gov/opsearches.htm. However, in New York the
Department of Education or licensing boards routinely keep only a
minimal amount of information about license holders.

Another idea is to get phone books for a specific geographic area.
These can be obtained on microfilm at most libraries by interlibrary loan.

Ira
Ira Leviton, M.D.


Re: Records of Aliens Held for Special Inquiry #general

Susan&David
 

Gary: He was deported. In the "Actions of the Board of Special
Inquiry" columns, under "Admitted" his entries are blank (as is the
person just above him on the list, Beruch Axelrad). Also- under
"Deported" is the name of the ship Breslau and the date 12/18 when the
ship left for Europe. Gersfeld's block has ditto marks.
Axelrad had trachoma. Gersfeld has faint ditto marks just below the "15"
where the time 12:15 is shown. He too had trachoma.
He is also shown on the ship's manifest itself, along with Axelrad. Both
are stamped Deported, both having been in hospital.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 7/18/2010 8:29 PM, Gary Gershfield wrote:
Good Evening to all,

I came across an ancestor listed on the Ellis Island Records of Aliens Held for
Special Inquiry. I read the JewishGen Info Files on the topic,which was helphul.

Based on the wording of the manifest, I am still confused as to the disposition
of this relative, and whether he remained in the US, and if there would be
additional information to be searched.

The name of the ancestor was Chaim Gersfeld,arriving on December 16,1907 on the
Breslau. All I could make out is, "Ret.12/18."


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Records of Aliens Held for Special Inquiry #general

Susan&David
 

Gary: He was deported. In the "Actions of the Board of Special
Inquiry" columns, under "Admitted" his entries are blank (as is the
person just above him on the list, Beruch Axelrad). Also- under
"Deported" is the name of the ship Breslau and the date 12/18 when the
ship left for Europe. Gersfeld's block has ditto marks.
Axelrad had trachoma. Gersfeld has faint ditto marks just below the "15"
where the time 12:15 is shown. He too had trachoma.
He is also shown on the ship's manifest itself, along with Axelrad. Both
are stamped Deported, both having been in hospital.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 7/18/2010 8:29 PM, Gary Gershfield wrote:
Good Evening to all,

I came across an ancestor listed on the Ellis Island Records of Aliens Held for
Special Inquiry. I read the JewishGen Info Files on the topic,which was helphul.

Based on the wording of the manifest, I am still confused as to the disposition
of this relative, and whether he remained in the US, and if there would be
additional information to be searched.

The name of the ancestor was Chaim Gersfeld,arriving on December 16,1907 on the
Breslau. All I could make out is, "Ret.12/18."


Re: Rochester NY Info Sought #general

Adam Stein <adam@...>
 

Here are a collection of Rochester genealogy related links I keep:

http://www.csh.rit.edu/~adam/bookmarks/Reference/Genealogy/Rochester___Monroe_County/
[or http://tinyurl.com/244h34w --Mod.]

On the 'GenWeb of Monroe County, NY' page are links to the mailing list
(MONROE-L). The Message Board is the same as the mailing list, just a
different interface (I believe). The thing to note about the mailing
list is that the libraries (at least some) of the Rochester library
system are subscribed and frequently answer questions. If you can't
find what you are looking for using my links, ask your question and I'm
sure somebody can give you more specific information (or I guess you can
just call the library directly).

On Sun, 2010-07-18 at 18:57 -0500, Peggy Morrow wrote:
When my great-grandmother Rachel Kornfeld Kramer died in Chicago on August 19,
1931 at age 76, her obituary listed a sister "Mrs. I. Davis of Rochester, N. Y."

Rachel was born in what is now Bardejov, Slovakia and what was Barfeld, Hungary.
Rachel lived in Rzeszow, Poland for awhile. Their father was either Leon
(Rachel's death certificate) or David Yehuda (Rachel's headstone) Kornfeld.

Does anyone know of this family or can provide Rochester NY resource suggestions
that my friend Google couldn't find?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Rochester NY Info Sought #general

Adam Stein <adam@...>
 

Here are a collection of Rochester genealogy related links I keep:

http://www.csh.rit.edu/~adam/bookmarks/Reference/Genealogy/Rochester___Monroe_County/
[or http://tinyurl.com/244h34w --Mod.]

On the 'GenWeb of Monroe County, NY' page are links to the mailing list
(MONROE-L). The Message Board is the same as the mailing list, just a
different interface (I believe). The thing to note about the mailing
list is that the libraries (at least some) of the Rochester library
system are subscribed and frequently answer questions. If you can't
find what you are looking for using my links, ask your question and I'm
sure somebody can give you more specific information (or I guess you can
just call the library directly).

On Sun, 2010-07-18 at 18:57 -0500, Peggy Morrow wrote:
When my great-grandmother Rachel Kornfeld Kramer died in Chicago on August 19,
1931 at age 76, her obituary listed a sister "Mrs. I. Davis of Rochester, N. Y."

Rachel was born in what is now Bardejov, Slovakia and what was Barfeld, Hungary.
Rachel lived in Rzeszow, Poland for awhile. Their father was either Leon
(Rachel's death certificate) or David Yehuda (Rachel's headstone) Kornfeld.

Does anyone know of this family or can provide Rochester NY resource suggestions
that my friend Google couldn't find?


LA Times Article: French Jews Want Their Old Names Back #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

An article in the July 18, 2010 Los Angeles Times related how many of post
holocaust-era Jews and Tunisian Jews that immigrated to France changed their
surnames to sound more French and today their descendants want to change
their names back to their original sur names to reflect family origins.
French Civil Code states family names can't be reverted once changed to
French sounding names. To read more about this see:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-france-jews-20100718,0,307074.story
[or http://tinyurl.com/2wfj79e --Mod.]

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Director-at-large and
Chairperson, Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen LA Times Article: French Jews Want Their Old Names Back #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

An article in the July 18, 2010 Los Angeles Times related how many of post
holocaust-era Jews and Tunisian Jews that immigrated to France changed their
surnames to sound more French and today their descendants want to change
their names back to their original sur names to reflect family origins.
French Civil Code states family names can't be reverted once changed to
French sounding names. To read more about this see:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-france-jews-20100718,0,307074.story
[or http://tinyurl.com/2wfj79e --Mod.]

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Director-at-large and
Chairperson, Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Lithuanian Translation help-Viewmate #latvia

ms nodrog
 

Dear Latvian Genners,
I am hoping that there is someone who can read and translate some
small Lithuanian items. These are small snipets >from my Aunt's 1949
Internal Passports. I have been able to translate a lot of the print
and script using a Lithuanian -> English on-line translator but the
script is a little more difficult to do.

I have posted the following items to Viewmate:

Family Situation:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16037

Passport Information:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16038

Nationality:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16039

Nationality:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16040

A response on Viewmate or directly to msnodrog@yahoo.com

Your help will be greatly appreciated.

Thank yo in advance,
Hope L. M. Gordon


Wife of Kalman Klonimus SHAPIRA #rabbinic

Debbie Lifshitz
 

Does anyone know where the wife of the Piaseczna Rov was buried? As
far as I know, she passed away in 1938 before the war.
Many thanks for your help,
Tzom Kal -- umetzapim li'yshu'a!
Debbie Lifschitz
Jerusalem


Latvia SIG #Latvia Lithuanian Translation help-Viewmate #latvia

ms nodrog
 

Dear Latvian Genners,
I am hoping that there is someone who can read and translate some
small Lithuanian items. These are small snipets >from my Aunt's 1949
Internal Passports. I have been able to translate a lot of the print
and script using a Lithuanian -> English on-line translator but the
script is a little more difficult to do.

I have posted the following items to Viewmate:

Family Situation:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16037

Passport Information:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16038

Nationality:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16039

Nationality:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=16040

A response on Viewmate or directly to msnodrog@yahoo.com

Your help will be greatly appreciated.

Thank yo in advance,
Hope L. M. Gordon


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Wife of Kalman Klonimus SHAPIRA #rabbinic

Debbie Lifshitz
 

Does anyone know where the wife of the Piaseczna Rov was buried? As
far as I know, she passed away in 1938 before the war.
Many thanks for your help,
Tzom Kal -- umetzapim li'yshu'a!
Debbie Lifschitz
Jerusalem


Digitized Latvian Newspapers #latvia

Marion Werle <werle@...>
 

To take Bruce's posting farther (I have used this website before), once you
display the article, there are tabs across the top (Download PDF, Print,
etc.). If you select "Text View", you can copy and paste it into Google
translator and get an approximation of what the article is about.

Marion Werle
North Hills, CA

From: Bruce Dumes <brucedumes@dumes.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2010 17:02:48 -0700

Sorry if this is old news, but it is new news to me. The national
digital library of Latvia has searchable digitized versions of a number
of historical Latvian newspapers online. Most are in Latvian, 1 or 2
are in Russian.

http://www.periodicals.lv

The search tool works pretty well, and wisely ignores grammatical
endings, so a search may be successful even if you haven't used the
exact spelling of the word. Of course, whenever you are searching
text which has a digital image as the source, you can expect plenty
of errors. But it's a start!


Latvia SIG #Latvia Digitized Latvian Newspapers #latvia

Marion Werle <werle@...>
 

To take Bruce's posting farther (I have used this website before), once you
display the article, there are tabs across the top (Download PDF, Print,
etc.). If you select "Text View", you can copy and paste it into Google
translator and get an approximation of what the article is about.

Marion Werle
North Hills, CA

From: Bruce Dumes <brucedumes@dumes.net>
Date: Thu, 15 Jul 2010 17:02:48 -0700

Sorry if this is old news, but it is new news to me. The national
digital library of Latvia has searchable digitized versions of a number
of historical Latvian newspapers online. Most are in Latvian, 1 or 2
are in Russian.

http://www.periodicals.lv

The search tool works pretty well, and wisely ignores grammatical
endings, so a search may be successful even if you haven't used the
exact spelling of the word. Of course, whenever you are searching
text which has a digital image as the source, you can expect plenty
of errors. But it's a start!


Family Finder - The Big Picture? #dna

Martin Davis (com)
 

I received below a helpful clarification >from Max Blankfeld at FTDNA which I
am sure others would wish to see.

Martin

Martin Davis - London (UK)

---
From: Max - Family Tree DNA [mailto:max@familytreedna.com]

Martin, this is what I sent to Steven Bloom, who had similar questions. You
are welcome to post it to the list:

Here are the main problems that Jews have in trying to identify common
ancestors - as you certainly know?
a) lack of a common surname prior to late 1700?s early 1800?s
b) inbreeding population
c) many unrelated lines adopting same surnames
d) many related lines adopting different surnames
e) many surnames being adapted to the land where descendants moved in

To put it in simple terms it makes the work for us, Jews, a little more
complicated as we cannot trace people as easily as the others would be able
to. Our trees in general are much shorter. It's harder for us to focus on a
certain path/line. To do that we need more people to be tested, and combine
more with Y, mtDNA and X to help identify lines given the combined results
from all tests.
So, in terms of a Family Finder result, a 3rd cousin match, given the
inbreeding, may show a total value of centimorgans composed >from the
combination of different lines due to that inbreeding, and thus, what the
algorithm guesses to be a 3rd cousin, may in fact be a more distant cousin.
Example: I had a case of a person that matched with my nephew (my brother?s
son) as a 2nd cousin, and with me as a 4th cousin. If we were talking about
matching with just one line, he should be 3rd, and I 4th. But because he may
be adding blocks of DNA >from his maternal line (unrelated to me) to the
relationship with that person, those blocks, adding up to the my main block
with him, elevates by one generation his matching to that person.
I hope this was not too confusing.
Therefore, the names that don't make sense to you are there as a match
because of inbreeding, which makes them look more closely related than they
really are, and therefore unknown to us.
Another example >from my own matches related to change of names: I have one
match predicted as 4th cousin with the last name Rubio - typical Hispanic
name (I also had the first and middle Hispanic names). My first reaction was,
what is this name doing there?? Well, I checked his record and there's a
note there: his ancestral name was Rubizewsky? well, I checked JewishGen and
I saw 2 records >from a very small town in Belarus with the name Pinsk. And
guess where my mother is from? Yes, you guessed it right: Pinsk!
So, this is a most probable case of inbreeding, combined with a change,
generations later, to a Hispanic name.
In short, while you should not dismiss those "make no sense matches", you
should certainly weight in all the factors I mentioned above.
As we gather more Jewish samples we will be able to adjust the algorithm to
reflect all those factors.
In the meantime, I can tell you that we've already had several success
stories coming out of the Family Finder test.

E-mail me anytime!

Max Blankfeld
Vice-President, Operations and Marketing
http://www.FamilyTreeDNA.com


DNA Research #DNA Family Finder - The Big Picture? #dna

Martin Davis (com)
 

I received below a helpful clarification >from Max Blankfeld at FTDNA which I
am sure others would wish to see.

Martin

Martin Davis - London (UK)

---
From: Max - Family Tree DNA [mailto:max@familytreedna.com]

Martin, this is what I sent to Steven Bloom, who had similar questions. You
are welcome to post it to the list:

Here are the main problems that Jews have in trying to identify common
ancestors - as you certainly know?
a) lack of a common surname prior to late 1700?s early 1800?s
b) inbreeding population
c) many unrelated lines adopting same surnames
d) many related lines adopting different surnames
e) many surnames being adapted to the land where descendants moved in

To put it in simple terms it makes the work for us, Jews, a little more
complicated as we cannot trace people as easily as the others would be able
to. Our trees in general are much shorter. It's harder for us to focus on a
certain path/line. To do that we need more people to be tested, and combine
more with Y, mtDNA and X to help identify lines given the combined results
from all tests.
So, in terms of a Family Finder result, a 3rd cousin match, given the
inbreeding, may show a total value of centimorgans composed >from the
combination of different lines due to that inbreeding, and thus, what the
algorithm guesses to be a 3rd cousin, may in fact be a more distant cousin.
Example: I had a case of a person that matched with my nephew (my brother?s
son) as a 2nd cousin, and with me as a 4th cousin. If we were talking about
matching with just one line, he should be 3rd, and I 4th. But because he may
be adding blocks of DNA >from his maternal line (unrelated to me) to the
relationship with that person, those blocks, adding up to the my main block
with him, elevates by one generation his matching to that person.
I hope this was not too confusing.
Therefore, the names that don't make sense to you are there as a match
because of inbreeding, which makes them look more closely related than they
really are, and therefore unknown to us.
Another example >from my own matches related to change of names: I have one
match predicted as 4th cousin with the last name Rubio - typical Hispanic
name (I also had the first and middle Hispanic names). My first reaction was,
what is this name doing there?? Well, I checked his record and there's a
note there: his ancestral name was Rubizewsky? well, I checked JewishGen and
I saw 2 records >from a very small town in Belarus with the name Pinsk. And
guess where my mother is from? Yes, you guessed it right: Pinsk!
So, this is a most probable case of inbreeding, combined with a change,
generations later, to a Hispanic name.
In short, while you should not dismiss those "make no sense matches", you
should certainly weight in all the factors I mentioned above.
As we gather more Jewish samples we will be able to adjust the algorithm to
reflect all those factors.
In the meantime, I can tell you that we've already had several success
stories coming out of the Family Finder test.

E-mail me anytime!

Max Blankfeld
Vice-President, Operations and Marketing
http://www.FamilyTreeDNA.com