Date   

Re: FRANKFURTER #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Sorry, one more wrinkle. Johanna WERTHEIMER is the second wife of
Emanuel FRANKFURTER, married July 9, 1854. Since Felix's father Samuel
Leopold FRANKFURTER was born January 26, 1854, he was probably the child
of the first wife of Emanuel, who perhaps died in childbirth and was
then quickly replaced by the second wife Johanna. So I am now looking
again for the name of Emanuel's first wife, the grandmother of Felix.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: FRANKFURTER #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Sorry, one more wrinkle. Johanna WERTHEIMER is the second wife of
Emanuel FRANKFURTER, married July 9, 1854. Since Felix's father Samuel
Leopold FRANKFURTER was born January 26, 1854, he was probably the child
of the first wife of Emanuel, who perhaps died in childbirth and was
then quickly replaced by the second wife Johanna. So I am now looking
again for the name of Emanuel's first wife, the grandmother of Felix.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


FRANKFURTER #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Ok. Now it is more clear.

Justice Felix FRANKFURTER's father is Samuel Leopold FRANKFURTER of
Bratislava married to Emma WINTER of Ostroh, Moravia. Felix had an
uncle Israel Salomon FRANKFURTER, who published a death notice in the
NFP for his mother Johanna FRANKFURTER geb. WERTHEIMER. Johanna is
buried with her husband Emanuel FRANKFURTER, who is the son of Nathan
and Rose FRANKFURTER, according to their marriage records in the
All-Hungary database.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech FRANKFURTER #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Ok. Now it is more clear.

Justice Felix FRANKFURTER's father is Samuel Leopold FRANKFURTER of
Bratislava married to Emma WINTER of Ostroh, Moravia. Felix had an
uncle Israel Salomon FRANKFURTER, who published a death notice in the
NFP for his mother Johanna FRANKFURTER geb. WERTHEIMER. Johanna is
buried with her husband Emanuel FRANKFURTER, who is the son of Nathan
and Rose FRANKFURTER, according to their marriage records in the
All-Hungary database.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Re: Felix Frankfurter's grandparents #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

On second thought, I think I made a mistake on the FRANKFURTERs and
confused Leopold with a cousin of the same name. Now it looks like Felix's
grandmother was Johanna FRANKFURTER geb. WERTHEIMER. Still working on
the name of his grandfather

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Felix Frankfurter's grandparents #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

On second thought, I think I made a mistake on the FRANKFURTERs and
confused Leopold with a cousin of the same name. Now it looks like Felix's
grandmother was Johanna FRANKFURTER geb. WERTHEIMER. Still working on
the name of his grandfather

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Re: admixture analysis shows Ashkenazim and Sephardim as Middle Eastern and European populations. #dna

Sean Silver <sean_silver@...>
 

Hello Beth,

Besides Vincent Vizachero's and my own work, there are now several
projects which have shown a correlation between this Eastern R1b
(colloquially called ht35), which is found in high frequencies and
broad genetic variance among the Southern Anatolia, the Caucasuses,
South Eastern Asia and the Levant. Conversely, this Eastern R1b
presents with a very low frequency and genetic variance within
Europe, particularly Western Europe. Peter Hrechdakian, the admin
of the Armenian and Assyrian DNA Projects, also offers data that
further confirms an established R1b presence within the geographic
area that was once Assyria. The Jewish clusters do indeed fit
within his clusters of Middle Eastern R1b, most of whom are tightly-
clustered -- none more than the Jewish clusters, which themselves
are tightly clustered and distinct >from the others.

At last year's FTDNA International Conference of Genetic Genealogy,
Vince and I had a long discussion with Dr. Michael Hammer, who has
since revised his theory of R1b migration to include the presence
of this R1b which never migrated into Europe. At last week's
conference, I spoke with Dr. Michael Hammer and Dr. Doron Behar
about the findings of my project, and both confirmed that it indeed
indicated such a presence of Jewish R1b with origins in the Middle
East. I have also worked at length with Bennett Greenspan of FTDNA
over the past three years on the project and he has devoted quite a
bit of time and support.

Roughly 120 project members (41% of the total project) all fit
within this Eastern R1b modal. These 120 individuals are sorted
into only a handful of clusters and all are SNP-confirmed only to
m269+ or L23+, negative the rest of the way downstream. All have an
indicative DYS 393=12 and a portion further have DYS 426=11, both of
which have a low mutation rate.

None of these project members have a non-Jewish match beyond Y-12
and all have a confirmed Jewish paternal history without knowledge
of conversion. 31 members are further confirmed to only have matches
with an oral tradition of being Cohanim, and are themselves tightly
clustered into 2 groups, none of whom have a non-Cohane, yet alone
non-Jewish match beyond Y-12. GATA-H4 = 12 is also an indicative
marker among these two clusters, which itself has a slow mutation
rate and is 1 allele apart >from the modal.

Sorry for the lengthy reply, I just wanted to clarify this
misconception. Is there indeed admixture within R1b? Yes, but it is
far smaller than we may have first conceived. There is a very small
instance of WAMH among the entire 300 person project.

Thanks,
Sean Silver
Jewish R1b Project
Cohane R1b Project
Jewish Moravian Project

Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2010 11:47:55 -0700
From: bethlong3@yahoo.com

The admixture analysis may show that the average European Jew is
(for example) 63/64 Middle Eastern. Though I doubt that's the case.

However,
a Y-DNA analysis shows many Jews to have Q, R1a, and R1b direct male
ancestors. These are not Middle Eastern haplogroups.

Beth Long
Heimlich surname project administrator


DNA Research #DNA RE: admixture analysis shows Ashkenazim and Sephardim as Middle Eastern and European populations. #dna

Sean Silver <sean_silver@...>
 

Hello Beth,

Besides Vincent Vizachero's and my own work, there are now several
projects which have shown a correlation between this Eastern R1b
(colloquially called ht35), which is found in high frequencies and
broad genetic variance among the Southern Anatolia, the Caucasuses,
South Eastern Asia and the Levant. Conversely, this Eastern R1b
presents with a very low frequency and genetic variance within
Europe, particularly Western Europe. Peter Hrechdakian, the admin
of the Armenian and Assyrian DNA Projects, also offers data that
further confirms an established R1b presence within the geographic
area that was once Assyria. The Jewish clusters do indeed fit
within his clusters of Middle Eastern R1b, most of whom are tightly-
clustered -- none more than the Jewish clusters, which themselves
are tightly clustered and distinct >from the others.

At last year's FTDNA International Conference of Genetic Genealogy,
Vince and I had a long discussion with Dr. Michael Hammer, who has
since revised his theory of R1b migration to include the presence
of this R1b which never migrated into Europe. At last week's
conference, I spoke with Dr. Michael Hammer and Dr. Doron Behar
about the findings of my project, and both confirmed that it indeed
indicated such a presence of Jewish R1b with origins in the Middle
East. I have also worked at length with Bennett Greenspan of FTDNA
over the past three years on the project and he has devoted quite a
bit of time and support.

Roughly 120 project members (41% of the total project) all fit
within this Eastern R1b modal. These 120 individuals are sorted
into only a handful of clusters and all are SNP-confirmed only to
m269+ or L23+, negative the rest of the way downstream. All have an
indicative DYS 393=12 and a portion further have DYS 426=11, both of
which have a low mutation rate.

None of these project members have a non-Jewish match beyond Y-12
and all have a confirmed Jewish paternal history without knowledge
of conversion. 31 members are further confirmed to only have matches
with an oral tradition of being Cohanim, and are themselves tightly
clustered into 2 groups, none of whom have a non-Cohane, yet alone
non-Jewish match beyond Y-12. GATA-H4 = 12 is also an indicative
marker among these two clusters, which itself has a slow mutation
rate and is 1 allele apart >from the modal.

Sorry for the lengthy reply, I just wanted to clarify this
misconception. Is there indeed admixture within R1b? Yes, but it is
far smaller than we may have first conceived. There is a very small
instance of WAMH among the entire 300 person project.

Thanks,
Sean Silver
Jewish R1b Project
Cohane R1b Project
Jewish Moravian Project

Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2010 11:47:55 -0700
From: bethlong3@yahoo.com

The admixture analysis may show that the average European Jew is
(for example) 63/64 Middle Eastern. Though I doubt that's the case.

However,
a Y-DNA analysis shows many Jews to have Q, R1a, and R1b direct male
ancestors. These are not Middle Eastern haplogroups.

Beth Long
Heimlich surname project administrator


Re: Ashkenazic vs. Sephardic SNPs #dna

Justin Loe <justinloe@...>
 

" Can someone explain to me why, in light of these findings,
we continue to refer to these two groups as distinct genetically? In
fact there is a subgroup on jewishgen.org devoted to the idea that
people will be able to identify their deep Sephardic ancestry using
the services of Family Tree DNA. What am I missing here?

Joan Hartman"

Yes, two groups can have similar structure results and not have
common ancestors within the past 1000 years. We clearly see this,
when we see Cypriots overlapping part of the Sephardic cluster and
when we see the very different count of Sephardic matches on
Relative Finder at 23andme.

Also, Dienekes' latest plot shows distinctions between Sephardic
and Ashkenazi: http://tinyurl.com/2ddlhzh
[full URL: http://dodecad.blogspot.com/2010/11/analysis-of-greeks-italians-cypriots.html --Mod.]

Key:
Greeks: blue; Italians: green; Cypriots: magenta; Sephardic Jews:
grey; Ashkenazi Jews: red.

Justin Loe


Yizkor Book Project, October 2010 #ciechanow #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I hope you are sitting down when you read this, because it is rather long
being that there were a number of projects updated during October to the
Yizkor Book Project. I am particularly pleased note that this month saw the
completion of the Debica, Poland Project which has been slowly progressing
over quite a few years - kudos to all involved.

I often receive queries >from people asking why a particular Yizkor Book they
are interested in doesn't appear in our list or is only partially
translated. My reply to this is that the translation of the books is
coordinated by volunteers who take care of finding translators and/or
raising funds for a particular book and to plagiarize a JFK quote: "Don't
ask what the Yizkor Book Project can do for me, rather what can I do for the
Yizkor Book Project"! So if a particular Yizkor Book is important to you,
please contact me because I'm here to help you get a translation project for
it moving and can lead you step by step through the process.

And on volunteers, I feel that I don't get a real chance to thank all of
volunteers who give of their free time to advance the Yizkor Book Project
and so, each month, I will mention a few of the people who help so much. If
you are a volunteer and aren't mentioned this time, I will certainly note
you sometime in the a future report.

Barbara Beaton, Shaul Berger, Ann Harris, Matt Friedman, Alexander
Grodensky, Gilberto Jugend, Yocheved Klausner, Shmuel Laufer, Gladys Paulin,
Thia Persoff, Lorraine Rosengarten, Noam Silberberg, Al Silberman, Vivian
Singer, Esther Snyder, David Sosnovitch, Moshe Steinberg & Kathryn Wallach
- who are the team behind the many necrologies that have been added over the
last year or so. The work is certainly difficult emotionally and requires
skill and patience and I would like to thank these people for helping us in
maintaining the memories of our loved ones and, at the same time, to
presenting us invaluable information on these same people.

Now to figures. During this last month we have added these 4 new projects:

- Kossovo, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kosow Poleski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kossovo/Kossovo.html

- Pogost-Zagorodskiy, Belarus (Testimony and memorial to the community of
Pohost Zahorodzki and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pogost-Zagorodskiy/Pogost-Zagorodskiy.html

- Sandomierz, Poland (Whenever I remember: Memorial book of the Jewish
Community in Tzoyzmir (Sandomierz))
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sandomierz/Sandomierz.html

- Transnistra, Ukraine (Five short stories)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Transnistra1/Transnistra1.html

Added 5 new entries:

- Adelsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00197.html

- Kaunas, Lithuania (Pinkas Lita)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_lita/lit_00512.html

- Lisberg, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241.html

- Mulhausen, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241b.html

- Riechannsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00255.html

We have continued to update 32 of our existing projects:

- Berestechko, Ukraine (There was a town.memorial book of Beresteczko,
Boremel and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berestechko/Berestechko.html

- Bol'shoy Zhelutsk, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Zoludzk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bolshoy_zhelutsk/bolshoy_zhelutsk.html

- Chelm, Poland (Govorowo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Debica, Poland (The Book of Dembitz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/debica/dembitz.html

- Fehergyarmat, Hungary (Our Former City Fehergyarmat)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Fehergyarmat/Fehergyarmat.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd Book; A Memorial to the Jewish Community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Garwolin, Poland (Garwolin Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish]

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grajewo/grajewo.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Jewish community in Chust and its surrounding
villages) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/khust/khust.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial book of Kolomey and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Kolomyya/Kolomyya.html

- Kovel', Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.1) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.2) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita2/lita2.html

- Lowicz, Poland (Lowicz; a Town in Mazovia, Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lowicz/Lowicz.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/miskolc/miskolc.html

- Ostrow-Mazowiecka, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of
Ostrow-Mazowiecka) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrow/ostrow.html

- Pruszkow, Poland (Memorial Book of Pruszkow, Nadzin and Vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pruszkow/Pruszkow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rafalovka/Rafalovka.html

- Rivne, Ukraine (Rowno; a memorial to the Jewish community of Rowno, Wolyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rovno/rovno.html

- Rokiskis, Lithuania (Yizkor book of Rakishok and environs)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rokiskis/rokiskis.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Rozana; a memorial book to the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ruzhany/Ruzhany.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin
and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svinzian region; memorial book of 23 Jewish
communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tykocin, Poland (Memorial book of Tiktin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tykocin/tykocin.html

- Wislica, Poland (Memorial book of Wislica; the Wislich yizkor book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wislica/Wislica.html

- Zelechow, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Zelechow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/zelechow/zelp000.html [Polish]

- Zyrardow, Poland (Memorial Book of Zyrardow, Amshinov and Viskit)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zyrardow/Zyrardow.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it
easy to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


DNA Research #DNA Re: Ashkenazic vs. Sephardic SNPs #dna

Justin Loe <justinloe@...>
 

" Can someone explain to me why, in light of these findings,
we continue to refer to these two groups as distinct genetically? In
fact there is a subgroup on jewishgen.org devoted to the idea that
people will be able to identify their deep Sephardic ancestry using
the services of Family Tree DNA. What am I missing here?

Joan Hartman"

Yes, two groups can have similar structure results and not have
common ancestors within the past 1000 years. We clearly see this,
when we see Cypriots overlapping part of the Sephardic cluster and
when we see the very different count of Sephardic matches on
Relative Finder at 23andme.

Also, Dienekes' latest plot shows distinctions between Sephardic
and Ashkenazi: http://tinyurl.com/2ddlhzh
[full URL: http://dodecad.blogspot.com/2010/11/analysis-of-greeks-italians-cypriots.html --Mod.]

Key:
Greeks: blue; Italians: green; Cypriots: magenta; Sephardic Jews:
grey; Ashkenazi Jews: red.

Justin Loe


#Ciechanow #Poland Yizkor Book Project, October 2010 #ciechanow #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I hope you are sitting down when you read this, because it is rather long
being that there were a number of projects updated during October to the
Yizkor Book Project. I am particularly pleased note that this month saw the
completion of the Debica, Poland Project which has been slowly progressing
over quite a few years - kudos to all involved.

I often receive queries >from people asking why a particular Yizkor Book they
are interested in doesn't appear in our list or is only partially
translated. My reply to this is that the translation of the books is
coordinated by volunteers who take care of finding translators and/or
raising funds for a particular book and to plagiarize a JFK quote: "Don't
ask what the Yizkor Book Project can do for me, rather what can I do for the
Yizkor Book Project"! So if a particular Yizkor Book is important to you,
please contact me because I'm here to help you get a translation project for
it moving and can lead you step by step through the process.

And on volunteers, I feel that I don't get a real chance to thank all of
volunteers who give of their free time to advance the Yizkor Book Project
and so, each month, I will mention a few of the people who help so much. If
you are a volunteer and aren't mentioned this time, I will certainly note
you sometime in the a future report.

Barbara Beaton, Shaul Berger, Ann Harris, Matt Friedman, Alexander
Grodensky, Gilberto Jugend, Yocheved Klausner, Shmuel Laufer, Gladys Paulin,
Thia Persoff, Lorraine Rosengarten, Noam Silberberg, Al Silberman, Vivian
Singer, Esther Snyder, David Sosnovitch, Moshe Steinberg & Kathryn Wallach
- who are the team behind the many necrologies that have been added over the
last year or so. The work is certainly difficult emotionally and requires
skill and patience and I would like to thank these people for helping us in
maintaining the memories of our loved ones and, at the same time, to
presenting us invaluable information on these same people.

Now to figures. During this last month we have added these 4 new projects:

- Kossovo, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kosow Poleski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kossovo/Kossovo.html

- Pogost-Zagorodskiy, Belarus (Testimony and memorial to the community of
Pohost Zahorodzki and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pogost-Zagorodskiy/Pogost-Zagorodskiy.html

- Sandomierz, Poland (Whenever I remember: Memorial book of the Jewish
Community in Tzoyzmir (Sandomierz))
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sandomierz/Sandomierz.html

- Transnistra, Ukraine (Five short stories)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Transnistra1/Transnistra1.html

Added 5 new entries:

- Adelsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00197.html

- Kaunas, Lithuania (Pinkas Lita)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_lita/lit_00512.html

- Lisberg, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241.html

- Mulhausen, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241b.html

- Riechannsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00255.html

We have continued to update 32 of our existing projects:

- Berestechko, Ukraine (There was a town.memorial book of Beresteczko,
Boremel and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berestechko/Berestechko.html

- Bol'shoy Zhelutsk, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Zoludzk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bolshoy_zhelutsk/bolshoy_zhelutsk.html

- Chelm, Poland (Govorowo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Debica, Poland (The Book of Dembitz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/debica/dembitz.html

- Fehergyarmat, Hungary (Our Former City Fehergyarmat)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Fehergyarmat/Fehergyarmat.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd Book; A Memorial to the Jewish Community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Garwolin, Poland (Garwolin Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish]

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grajewo/grajewo.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Jewish community in Chust and its surrounding
villages) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/khust/khust.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial book of Kolomey and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Kolomyya/Kolomyya.html

- Kovel', Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.1) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.2) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita2/lita2.html

- Lowicz, Poland (Lowicz; a Town in Mazovia, Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lowicz/Lowicz.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/miskolc/miskolc.html

- Ostrow-Mazowiecka, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of
Ostrow-Mazowiecka) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrow/ostrow.html

- Pruszkow, Poland (Memorial Book of Pruszkow, Nadzin and Vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pruszkow/Pruszkow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rafalovka/Rafalovka.html

- Rivne, Ukraine (Rowno; a memorial to the Jewish community of Rowno, Wolyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rovno/rovno.html

- Rokiskis, Lithuania (Yizkor book of Rakishok and environs)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rokiskis/rokiskis.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Rozana; a memorial book to the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ruzhany/Ruzhany.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin
and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svinzian region; memorial book of 23 Jewish
communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tykocin, Poland (Memorial book of Tiktin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tykocin/tykocin.html

- Wislica, Poland (Memorial book of Wislica; the Wislich yizkor book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wislica/Wislica.html

- Zelechow, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Zelechow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/zelechow/zelp000.html [Polish]

- Zyrardow, Poland (Memorial Book of Zyrardow, Amshinov and Viskit)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zyrardow/Zyrardow.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it
easy to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Re: admixture analysis shows Ashkenazim and Sephardim as Middle Eastern and European populations. #dna

Beth Long
 

The admixture analysis may show that the average European Jew is
(for example) 63/64 Middle Eastern. Though I doubt that's the case.

However,
a Y-DNA analysis shows many Jews to have Q, R1a, and R1b direct male
ancestors. These are not Middle Eastern haplogroups.

Beth Long
Heimlich surname project administrator


DNA Research #DNA Re: admixture analysis shows Ashkenazim and Sephardim as Middle Eastern and European populations. #dna

Beth Long
 

The admixture analysis may show that the average European Jew is
(for example) 63/64 Middle Eastern. Though I doubt that's the case.

However,
a Y-DNA analysis shows many Jews to have Q, R1a, and R1b direct male
ancestors. These are not Middle Eastern haplogroups.

Beth Long
Heimlich surname project administrator


Yizkor Book Project, October 2010 #courland #latvia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I hope you are sitting down when you read this, because it is rather long
being that there were a number of projects updated during October to the
Yizkor Book Project. I am particularly pleased note that this month saw the
completion of the Debica, Poland Project which has been slowly progressing
over quite a few years - kudos to all involved.

I often receive queries >from people asking why a particular Yizkor Book they
are interested in doesn't appear in our list or is only partially
translated. My reply to this is that the translation of the books is
coordinated by volunteers who take care of finding translators and/or
raising funds for a particular book and to plagiarize a JFK quote: "Don't
ask what the Yizkor Book Project can do for me, rather what can I do for the
Yizkor Book Project"! So if a particular Yizkor Book is important to you,
please contact me because I'm here to help you get a translation project for
it moving and can lead you step by step through the process.

And on volunteers, I feel that I don't get a real chance to thank all of
volunteers who give of their free time to advance the Yizkor Book Project
and so, each month, I will mention a few of the people who help so much. If
you are a volunteer and aren't mentioned this time, I will certainly note
you sometime in the a future report.

Barbara Beaton, Shaul Berger, Ann Harris, Matt Friedman, Alexander
Grodensky, Gilberto Jugend, Yocheved Klausner, Shmuel Laufer, Gladys Paulin,
Thia Persoff, Lorraine Rosengarten, Noam Silberberg, Al Silberman, Vivian
Singer, Esther Snyder, David Sosnovitch, Moshe Steinberg & Kathryn Wallach
- who are the team behind the many necrologies that have been added over the
last year or so. The work is certainly difficult emotionally and requires
skill and patience and I would like to thank these people for helping us in
maintaining the memories of our loved ones and, at the same time, to
presenting us invaluable information on these same people.

Now to figures. During this last month we have added these 4 new projects:

- Kossovo, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kosow Poleski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kossovo/Kossovo.html

- Pogost-Zagorodskiy, Belarus (Testimony and memorial to the community of
Pohost Zahorodzki and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pogost-Zagorodskiy/Pogost-Zagorodskiy.html

- Sandomierz, Poland (Whenever I remember: Memorial book of the Jewish
Community in Tzoyzmir (Sandomierz))
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sandomierz/Sandomierz.html

- Transnistra, Ukraine (Five short stories)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Transnistra1/Transnistra1.html

Added 5 new entries:

- Adelsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00197.html

- Kaunas, Lithuania (Pinkas Lita)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_lita/lit_00512.html

- Lisberg, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241.html

- Mulhausen, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241b.html

- Riechannsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00255.html

We have continued to update 32 of our existing projects:

- Berestechko, Ukraine (There was a town.memorial book of Beresteczko,
Boremel and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berestechko/Berestechko.html

- Bol'shoy Zhelutsk, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Zoludzk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bolshoy_zhelutsk/bolshoy_zhelutsk.html

- Chelm, Poland (Govorowo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Debica, Poland (The Book of Dembitz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/debica/dembitz.html

- Fehergyarmat, Hungary (Our Former City Fehergyarmat)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Fehergyarmat/Fehergyarmat.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd Book; A Memorial to the Jewish Community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Garwolin, Poland (Garwolin Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish]

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grajewo/grajewo.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Jewish community in Chust and its surrounding
villages) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/khust/khust.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial book of Kolomey and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Kolomyya/Kolomyya.html

- Kovel', Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.1) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.2) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita2/lita2.html

- Lowicz, Poland (Lowicz; a Town in Mazovia, Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lowicz/Lowicz.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/miskolc/miskolc.html

- Ostrow-Mazowiecka, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of
Ostrow-Mazowiecka) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrow/ostrow.html

- Pruszkow, Poland (Memorial Book of Pruszkow, Nadzin and Vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pruszkow/Pruszkow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rafalovka/Rafalovka.html

- Rivne, Ukraine (Rowno; a memorial to the Jewish community of Rowno, Wolyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rovno/rovno.html

- Rokiskis, Lithuania (Yizkor book of Rakishok and environs)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rokiskis/rokiskis.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Rozana; a memorial book to the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ruzhany/Ruzhany.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin
and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svinzian region; memorial book of 23 Jewish
communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tykocin, Poland (Memorial book of Tiktin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tykocin/tykocin.html

- Wislica, Poland (Memorial book of Wislica; the Wislich yizkor book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wislica/Wislica.html

- Zelechow, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Zelechow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/zelechow/zelp000.html [Polish]

- Zyrardow, Poland (Memorial Book of Zyrardow, Amshinov and Viskit)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zyrardow/Zyrardow.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it
easy to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Yizkor Book Project, October 2010 #courland #latvia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I hope you are sitting down when you read this, because it is rather long
being that there were a number of projects updated during October to the
Yizkor Book Project. I am particularly pleased note that this month saw the
completion of the Debica, Poland Project which has been slowly progressing
over quite a few years - kudos to all involved.

I often receive queries >from people asking why a particular Yizkor Book they
are interested in doesn't appear in our list or is only partially
translated. My reply to this is that the translation of the books is
coordinated by volunteers who take care of finding translators and/or
raising funds for a particular book and to plagiarize a JFK quote: "Don't
ask what the Yizkor Book Project can do for me, rather what can I do for the
Yizkor Book Project"! So if a particular Yizkor Book is important to you,
please contact me because I'm here to help you get a translation project for
it moving and can lead you step by step through the process.

And on volunteers, I feel that I don't get a real chance to thank all of
volunteers who give of their free time to advance the Yizkor Book Project
and so, each month, I will mention a few of the people who help so much. If
you are a volunteer and aren't mentioned this time, I will certainly note
you sometime in the a future report.

Barbara Beaton, Shaul Berger, Ann Harris, Matt Friedman, Alexander
Grodensky, Gilberto Jugend, Yocheved Klausner, Shmuel Laufer, Gladys Paulin,
Thia Persoff, Lorraine Rosengarten, Noam Silberberg, Al Silberman, Vivian
Singer, Esther Snyder, David Sosnovitch, Moshe Steinberg & Kathryn Wallach
- who are the team behind the many necrologies that have been added over the
last year or so. The work is certainly difficult emotionally and requires
skill and patience and I would like to thank these people for helping us in
maintaining the memories of our loved ones and, at the same time, to
presenting us invaluable information on these same people.

Now to figures. During this last month we have added these 4 new projects:

- Kossovo, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kosow Poleski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kossovo/Kossovo.html

- Pogost-Zagorodskiy, Belarus (Testimony and memorial to the community of
Pohost Zahorodzki and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pogost-Zagorodskiy/Pogost-Zagorodskiy.html

- Sandomierz, Poland (Whenever I remember: Memorial book of the Jewish
Community in Tzoyzmir (Sandomierz))
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sandomierz/Sandomierz.html

- Transnistra, Ukraine (Five short stories)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Transnistra1/Transnistra1.html

Added 5 new entries:

- Adelsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00197.html

- Kaunas, Lithuania (Pinkas Lita)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_lita/lit_00512.html

- Lisberg, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241.html

- Mulhausen, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241b.html

- Riechannsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00255.html

We have continued to update 32 of our existing projects:

- Berestechko, Ukraine (There was a town.memorial book of Beresteczko,
Boremel and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berestechko/Berestechko.html

- Bol'shoy Zhelutsk, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Zoludzk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bolshoy_zhelutsk/bolshoy_zhelutsk.html

- Chelm, Poland (Govorowo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Debica, Poland (The Book of Dembitz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/debica/dembitz.html

- Fehergyarmat, Hungary (Our Former City Fehergyarmat)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Fehergyarmat/Fehergyarmat.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd Book; A Memorial to the Jewish Community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Garwolin, Poland (Garwolin Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish]

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grajewo/grajewo.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Jewish community in Chust and its surrounding
villages) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/khust/khust.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial book of Kolomey and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Kolomyya/Kolomyya.html

- Kovel', Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.1) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.2) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita2/lita2.html

- Lowicz, Poland (Lowicz; a Town in Mazovia, Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lowicz/Lowicz.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/miskolc/miskolc.html

- Ostrow-Mazowiecka, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of
Ostrow-Mazowiecka) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrow/ostrow.html

- Pruszkow, Poland (Memorial Book of Pruszkow, Nadzin and Vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pruszkow/Pruszkow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rafalovka/Rafalovka.html

- Rivne, Ukraine (Rowno; a memorial to the Jewish community of Rowno, Wolyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rovno/rovno.html

- Rokiskis, Lithuania (Yizkor book of Rakishok and environs)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rokiskis/rokiskis.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Rozana; a memorial book to the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ruzhany/Ruzhany.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin
and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svinzian region; memorial book of 23 Jewish
communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tykocin, Poland (Memorial book of Tiktin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tykocin/tykocin.html

- Wislica, Poland (Memorial book of Wislica; the Wislich yizkor book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wislica/Wislica.html

- Zelechow, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Zelechow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/zelechow/zelp000.html [Polish]

- Zyrardow, Poland (Memorial Book of Zyrardow, Amshinov and Viskit)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zyrardow/Zyrardow.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it
easy to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


Yizkor Book Project, October 2010 #southafrica

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I hope you are sitting down when you read this, because it is rather long
being that there were a number of projects updated during October to the
Yizkor Book Project. I am particularly pleased note that this month saw the
completion of the Debica, Poland Project which has been slowly progressing
over quite a few years - kudos to all involved.

I often receive queries >from people asking why a particular Yizkor Book they
are interested in doesn't appear in our list or is only partially
translated. My reply to this is that the translation of the books is
coordinated by volunteers who take care of finding translators and/or
raising funds for a particular book and to plagiarize a JFK quote: "Don't
ask what the Yizkor Book Project can do for me, rather what can I do for the
Yizkor Book Project"! So if a particular Yizkor Book is important to you,
please contact me because I'm here to help you get a translation project for
it moving and can lead you step by step through the process.

And on volunteers, I feel that I don't get a real chance to thank all of
volunteers who give of their free time to advance the Yizkor Book Project
and so, each month, I will mention a few of the people who help so much. If
you are a volunteer and aren't mentioned this time, I will certainly note
you sometime in the a future report.

Barbara Beaton, Shaul Berger, Ann Harris, Matt Friedman, Alexander
Grodensky, Gilberto Jugend, Yocheved Klausner, Shmuel Laufer, Gladys Paulin,
Thia Persoff, Lorraine Rosengarten, Noam Silberberg, Al Silberman, Vivian
Singer, Esther Snyder, David Sosnovitch, Moshe Steinberg & Kathryn Wallach
- who are the team behind the many necrologies that have been added over the
last year or so. The work is certainly difficult emotionally and requires
skill and patience and I would like to thank these people for helping us in
maintaining the memories of our loved ones and, at the same time, to
presenting us invaluable information on these same people.

Now to figures. During this last month we have added these 4 new projects:

- Kossovo, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kosow Poleski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kossovo/Kossovo.html

- Pogost-Zagorodskiy, Belarus (Testimony and memorial to the community of
Pohost Zahorodzki and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pogost-Zagorodskiy/Pogost-Zagorodskiy.html

- Sandomierz, Poland (Whenever I remember: Memorial book of the Jewish
Community in Tzoyzmir (Sandomierz))
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sandomierz/Sandomierz.html

- Transnistra, Ukraine (Five short stories)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Transnistra1/Transnistra1.html

Added 5 new entries:

- Adelsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00197.html

- Kaunas, Lithuania (Pinkas Lita)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_lita/lit_00512.html

- Lisberg, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241.html

- Mulhausen, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241b.html

- Riechannsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00255.html

We have continued to update 32 of our existing projects:

- Berestechko, Ukraine (There was a town.memorial book of Beresteczko,
Boremel and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berestechko/Berestechko.html

- Bol'shoy Zhelutsk, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Zoludzk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bolshoy_zhelutsk/bolshoy_zhelutsk.html

- Chelm, Poland (Govorowo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Debica, Poland (The Book of Dembitz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/debica/dembitz.html

- Fehergyarmat, Hungary (Our Former City Fehergyarmat)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Fehergyarmat/Fehergyarmat.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd Book; A Memorial to the Jewish Community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Garwolin, Poland (Garwolin Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish]

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grajewo/grajewo.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Jewish community in Chust and its surrounding
villages) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/khust/khust.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial book of Kolomey and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Kolomyya/Kolomyya.html

- Kovel', Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.1) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.2) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita2/lita2.html

- Lowicz, Poland (Lowicz; a Town in Mazovia, Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lowicz/Lowicz.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/miskolc/miskolc.html

- Ostrow-Mazowiecka, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of
Ostrow-Mazowiecka) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrow/ostrow.html

- Pruszkow, Poland (Memorial Book of Pruszkow, Nadzin and Vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pruszkow/Pruszkow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rafalovka/Rafalovka.html

- Rivne, Ukraine (Rowno; a memorial to the Jewish community of Rowno, Wolyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rovno/rovno.html

- Rokiskis, Lithuania (Yizkor book of Rakishok and environs)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rokiskis/rokiskis.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Rozana; a memorial book to the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ruzhany/Ruzhany.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin
and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svinzian region; memorial book of 23 Jewish
communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tykocin, Poland (Memorial book of Tiktin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tykocin/tykocin.html

- Wislica, Poland (Memorial book of Wislica; the Wislich yizkor book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wislica/Wislica.html

- Zelechow, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Zelechow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/zelechow/zelp000.html [Polish]

- Zyrardow, Poland (Memorial Book of Zyrardow, Amshinov and Viskit)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zyrardow/Zyrardow.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it
easy to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Yizkor Book Project, October 2010 #southafrica

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I hope you are sitting down when you read this, because it is rather long
being that there were a number of projects updated during October to the
Yizkor Book Project. I am particularly pleased note that this month saw the
completion of the Debica, Poland Project which has been slowly progressing
over quite a few years - kudos to all involved.

I often receive queries >from people asking why a particular Yizkor Book they
are interested in doesn't appear in our list or is only partially
translated. My reply to this is that the translation of the books is
coordinated by volunteers who take care of finding translators and/or
raising funds for a particular book and to plagiarize a JFK quote: "Don't
ask what the Yizkor Book Project can do for me, rather what can I do for the
Yizkor Book Project"! So if a particular Yizkor Book is important to you,
please contact me because I'm here to help you get a translation project for
it moving and can lead you step by step through the process.

And on volunteers, I feel that I don't get a real chance to thank all of
volunteers who give of their free time to advance the Yizkor Book Project
and so, each month, I will mention a few of the people who help so much. If
you are a volunteer and aren't mentioned this time, I will certainly note
you sometime in the a future report.

Barbara Beaton, Shaul Berger, Ann Harris, Matt Friedman, Alexander
Grodensky, Gilberto Jugend, Yocheved Klausner, Shmuel Laufer, Gladys Paulin,
Thia Persoff, Lorraine Rosengarten, Noam Silberberg, Al Silberman, Vivian
Singer, Esther Snyder, David Sosnovitch, Moshe Steinberg & Kathryn Wallach
- who are the team behind the many necrologies that have been added over the
last year or so. The work is certainly difficult emotionally and requires
skill and patience and I would like to thank these people for helping us in
maintaining the memories of our loved ones and, at the same time, to
presenting us invaluable information on these same people.

Now to figures. During this last month we have added these 4 new projects:

- Kossovo, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kosow Poleski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kossovo/Kossovo.html

- Pogost-Zagorodskiy, Belarus (Testimony and memorial to the community of
Pohost Zahorodzki and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pogost-Zagorodskiy/Pogost-Zagorodskiy.html

- Sandomierz, Poland (Whenever I remember: Memorial book of the Jewish
Community in Tzoyzmir (Sandomierz))
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sandomierz/Sandomierz.html

- Transnistra, Ukraine (Five short stories)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Transnistra1/Transnistra1.html

Added 5 new entries:

- Adelsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00197.html

- Kaunas, Lithuania (Pinkas Lita)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_lita/lit_00512.html

- Lisberg, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241.html

- Mulhausen, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00241b.html

- Riechannsdorf, Germany (Pinkas Germany)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_germany/ger1_00255.html

We have continued to update 32 of our existing projects:

- Berestechko, Ukraine (There was a town.memorial book of Beresteczko,
Boremel and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berestechko/Berestechko.html

- Bol'shoy Zhelutsk, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Zoludzk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bolshoy_zhelutsk/bolshoy_zhelutsk.html

- Chelm, Poland (Govorowo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Debica, Poland (The Book of Dembitz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/debica/dembitz.html

- Fehergyarmat, Hungary (Our Former City Fehergyarmat)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Fehergyarmat/Fehergyarmat.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd Book; A Memorial to the Jewish Community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Garwolin, Poland (Garwolin Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish]

- Gorodets, Belarus (Horodetz; history of a town, 1142-1942)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorodets/gorodets.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grajewo/grajewo.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kaluszyn, Poland (The Memorial Book of Kaluszyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kaluszyn/kaluszyn.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Jewish community in Chust and its surrounding
villages) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/khust/khust.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial book of Kolomey and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Kolomyya/Kolomyya.html

- Kovel', Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.1) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Lithuania (Lite, vol.2) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lita2/lita2.html

- Lowicz, Poland (Lowicz; a Town in Mazovia, Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lowicz/Lowicz.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/miskolc/miskolc.html

- Ostrow-Mazowiecka, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of
Ostrow-Mazowiecka) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrow/ostrow.html

- Pruszkow, Poland (Memorial Book of Pruszkow, Nadzin and Vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pruszkow/Pruszkow.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rafalovka/Rafalovka.html

- Rivne, Ukraine (Rowno; a memorial to the Jewish community of Rowno, Wolyn)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rovno/rovno.html

- Rokiskis, Lithuania (Yizkor book of Rakishok and environs)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rokiskis/rokiskis.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Rozana; a memorial book to the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ruzhany/Ruzhany.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/slutsk/slutsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of Stolin
and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stolin/stolin.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svinzian region; memorial book of 23 Jewish
communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tykocin, Poland (Memorial book of Tiktin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tykocin/tykocin.html

- Wislica, Poland (Memorial book of Wislica; the Wislich yizkor book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wislica/Wislica.html

- Zelechow, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Zelechow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/zelechow/zelp000.html [Polish]

- Zyrardow, Poland (Memorial Book of Zyrardow, Amshinov and Viskit)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zyrardow/Zyrardow.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it
easy to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager
lance.ackerfeld@gmail.com


ocs vezprem county #hungary

r.mannheimer@...
 

I am trying to find informations about Lajos Mannheimer born in Ocs Vezprem=
County in 1833. It seems that they can be found in
Nagyvazsony Jewish Community
Do you think that the 1848 Jewish census could help? How can I access it?
Thanks for your help.
Renato Mannheimer
Italy


Re: Location of 1869/1857/1848 Census for Szepes, Abauj-Torna? #hungary

samara99@...
 

I have photo images of several pages >from the 1857 census for Abauj-Torna
that were sent to me in 2004 by Michael Sura, a professional researcher, who
was commissioned by me to do some research. I would therefore conclude that
the 1857 census exists for this megye and that researchers in Hungary know
of it and can gain access.

Sam Schleman

----- Original Message -----
From: "Vivian Kahn" <viviankahn@comcast.net>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Cc: "Peter Kuhn" <peterlkuhn@gmail.com>
Sent: Friday, October 29, 2010 2:07 PM
Subject: Re:[h-sig] Location of 1869/1857/1848 Census for Szepes,
Abauj-Torna?


Have you checked the JewishGen Hungary Database? It includes more than
1,000 1869 Census Records >from Abauj-Torna.

According to sources at the Family History Library's Family Search project,
1857 records they have only located records for parts of the following
counties: Csanåd, Esztergom, Sopron, Tolna, Vas, Zala, ZemplÊn and for a few
cities BÊkÊscsaba (BÊkÊs), Gy?r (Gy?r), SzÊkesfehÊrvår (FejÊr)

H-SIG has been able to find some 1848 census records that were not filmed by
the FHL in archives outside of Budapest. These have been transcribed and
are now included in the Hungary Database. Unfortunately, no additional
records for Szepes have yet turned up.

Vivian Kahn, Hungarian SIG Coordinator

195901 - 195920 of 658151