Date   

looking for information on Josef TARLER #galicia

Marina Fuchs <marina.fuchs@...>
 

I have found articles which mention that Peter (ne Josef) Tarler (born
on January 3, 1794 in Holohory, Zolochivskyi district, Lviv Oblast,
Ukraine) came to Wielkie Oczy (now eastern Poland) before 1813 and
married the daughter of the local rabbi. The chief rabbi of Lemberg
(Lviv), Jacob Orenstein excommunicated the "maskil" Tarler in 1816,
and the rabbi of Wielkie Oczy ordered his son in law to leave town
and divorce his wife, which she did not want. He left town with his
sons, and lived in Lviv, where he died January 23, 1854. There he
worked first as collector of tax on ritual slaughter, and then as the
official censor of Hebrew and Yiddish books.

I am looking for sources to substaniate this, and also wish to know
in particular :

1. who would have been the rabbi of Wielkie Oczy at the time? Was
there more than one rabbi? Could it have been Mordechai Hertz
Teomim listed as the rabbi of Wielkie Oczy in 1821? What is known
about him?

2. Is it known who were all the children of Peter (ne Josef ) Tarler? I
have the names of three daughters (Klara Anna, Josephine and
Klotilde) but not the names of the sons.

Josef Tarler is on the list of Galicician Celebrities Page 105,
(Translation of Medina va-chachameha : Toledot kol ha-hachamim
ve-has-soferim Written by: Gershom Bader Published in Austria &
New York, 1934 ) but there is no library in the country in which I live
that has it.

Marina Fuchs
La Tronche
France

please reply to marina.fuchs@gmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia looking for information on Josef TARLER #galicia

Marina Fuchs <marina.fuchs@...>
 

I have found articles which mention that Peter (ne Josef) Tarler (born
on January 3, 1794 in Holohory, Zolochivskyi district, Lviv Oblast,
Ukraine) came to Wielkie Oczy (now eastern Poland) before 1813 and
married the daughter of the local rabbi. The chief rabbi of Lemberg
(Lviv), Jacob Orenstein excommunicated the "maskil" Tarler in 1816,
and the rabbi of Wielkie Oczy ordered his son in law to leave town
and divorce his wife, which she did not want. He left town with his
sons, and lived in Lviv, where he died January 23, 1854. There he
worked first as collector of tax on ritual slaughter, and then as the
official censor of Hebrew and Yiddish books.

I am looking for sources to substaniate this, and also wish to know
in particular :

1. who would have been the rabbi of Wielkie Oczy at the time? Was
there more than one rabbi? Could it have been Mordechai Hertz
Teomim listed as the rabbi of Wielkie Oczy in 1821? What is known
about him?

2. Is it known who were all the children of Peter (ne Josef ) Tarler? I
have the names of three daughters (Klara Anna, Josephine and
Klotilde) but not the names of the sons.

Josef Tarler is on the list of Galicician Celebrities Page 105,
(Translation of Medina va-chachameha : Toledot kol ha-hachamim
ve-has-soferim Written by: Gershom Bader Published in Austria &
New York, 1934 ) but there is no library in the country in which I live
that has it.

Marina Fuchs
La Tronche
France

please reply to marina.fuchs@gmail.com


Seeking assistance with obtaining a book from Minsk #belarus

Bernice Goll
 

Hello,

I am trying to obtain a copy of the book of Jewish Partisans in Belarus >from
the Museum of Jewish History and Culture in Minsk. I was told by the director
of the museum that it would be easiest to transport the book via a person
traveling >from Minsk to the USA.

So, I am writing to find out if there is anyone in this group who is planning
a trip to Minsk, who would be interested in helping. I live in Philadelphia, PA.
But, I guess of course, the book could be shipped to me >from where ever in the USA.


Thanks in advance.

Bernice Goll
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Belarus SIG #Belarus Seeking assistance with obtaining a book from Minsk #belarus

Bernice Goll
 

Hello,

I am trying to obtain a copy of the book of Jewish Partisans in Belarus >from
the Museum of Jewish History and Culture in Minsk. I was told by the director
of the museum that it would be easiest to transport the book via a person
traveling >from Minsk to the USA.

So, I am writing to find out if there is anyone in this group who is planning
a trip to Minsk, who would be interested in helping. I live in Philadelphia, PA.
But, I guess of course, the book could be shipped to me >from where ever in the USA.


Thanks in advance.

Bernice Goll
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Annual records in France #france

bernerfolk
 

I've posted on ViewMate a page of an annual record kept by the city of Nancy in the late 19th century.
Here's a link:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=39093

I have several of these pages, all appear to be annotated in pencil with alternate information and
often there's a line through the entire entry. I can translate the basic information but I'd like to learn
more about this type of record, such as:

What is it called, in French and in English?

Were they kept across the country?

What time period were they kept?

How and when was the information collected?

How and when was information updated?

What was the purpose of these records?

What does the slash through the family indicate?

Other common notations?

Thank you,
Sherri Venditti
The Berkshires, USA


French SIG #France Annual records in France #france

bernerfolk
 

I've posted on ViewMate a page of an annual record kept by the city of Nancy in the late 19th century.
Here's a link:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=39093

I have several of these pages, all appear to be annotated in pencil with alternate information and
often there's a line through the entire entry. I can translate the basic information but I'd like to learn
more about this type of record, such as:

What is it called, in French and in English?

Were they kept across the country?

What time period were they kept?

How and when was the information collected?

How and when was information updated?

What was the purpose of these records?

What does the slash through the family indicate?

Other common notations?

Thank you,
Sherri Venditti
The Berkshires, USA


correction: Map for Lachowce 1848 (today, Pidhira) near Bohorodczany on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

The URL in the previous post about this map was incorrect. Below is
the right link:

Gesher Galicia has just added a new map to the Gesher Galicia
Cadastral Map Room:

Lachowce Cadastral Map 1848:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/lachowce-pidhiria-1848/

An incomplete, full-color paneled cadastral map of the village of
Lachowce (now Pidhiria), surveyed and printed in 1848. Heavily
annotated by a succession of Austrian and later Polish administrators,
the sheets of this copy were quartered and hard-backed for travel or
a field update. Buildings and land parcels are each numbered, and
many parcels also have landowner names written in. Although worn
and with missing panels, the map shows mixed-use lands bordering
Hlebowka and concentrated Ruthenian residential/farming lands at
center and bordering Bohorodczany; the Greek Catholic church of St.
Nicholas is located among those fields. Also at the northeast are huge
linked properties belonging to Rudolph Stadion, brother of the Galician
governor Franz Stadion, who freed Galician peasants >from serfdom
just before this map was made.

Lachowce was a village (in German Gemeinde) and Bohorodczany was
a town (in German Ort). In the pre-Austrian times, Lachowce was a
farming village that belonged to the magnate families of Potockis and
Kossakowskis. In 1787, the ownership of Lachowce and the
neighboring town of Bohorodczany transitioned to the Austrian land
administration in a huge land swap. To learn more about the history
of Bohorodczany, the surrounding villages, and the neighboring
Stanislawow, I can recommend Gesher Galicia board member, Andrew
Zalewski's book, "Galician Trails: The Forgotten Story of One Family."

The full map room is here: http://maps.geshergalicia.org

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia correction: Map for Lachowce 1848 (today, Pidhira) near Bohorodczany on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

The URL in the previous post about this map was incorrect. Below is
the right link:

Gesher Galicia has just added a new map to the Gesher Galicia
Cadastral Map Room:

Lachowce Cadastral Map 1848:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/lachowce-pidhiria-1848/

An incomplete, full-color paneled cadastral map of the village of
Lachowce (now Pidhiria), surveyed and printed in 1848. Heavily
annotated by a succession of Austrian and later Polish administrators,
the sheets of this copy were quartered and hard-backed for travel or
a field update. Buildings and land parcels are each numbered, and
many parcels also have landowner names written in. Although worn
and with missing panels, the map shows mixed-use lands bordering
Hlebowka and concentrated Ruthenian residential/farming lands at
center and bordering Bohorodczany; the Greek Catholic church of St.
Nicholas is located among those fields. Also at the northeast are huge
linked properties belonging to Rudolph Stadion, brother of the Galician
governor Franz Stadion, who freed Galician peasants >from serfdom
just before this map was made.

Lachowce was a village (in German Gemeinde) and Bohorodczany was
a town (in German Ort). In the pre-Austrian times, Lachowce was a
farming village that belonged to the magnate families of Potockis and
Kossakowskis. In 1787, the ownership of Lachowce and the
neighboring town of Bohorodczany transitioned to the Austrian land
administration in a huge land swap. To learn more about the history
of Bohorodczany, the surrounding villages, and the neighboring
Stanislawow, I can recommend Gesher Galicia board member, Andrew
Zalewski's book, "Galician Trails: The Forgotten Story of One Family."

The full map room is here: http://maps.geshergalicia.org

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org


New education course - The Jewish in Jewish Genealogy #belarus

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education will offer a new online forum - The Jewish in
Jewish Genealogy
May 1 - May 29

Genealogy is more than statistics and facts. This class will give
you a chance to understand the Jewish immigration experience and
we'll discover tricks and tips to successfully search for Jewish
ancestry.

With each passing generation, the torch passes to children whose
lifestyle is further >from the immigrant experience. Now we have to
dig deep in order to bring up images and voices >from the past, to
understand and recreate their lives.

This class will cover Jewish institutions in the old country and
in the U.S. It will help a researcher discover patterns and
prejudices that affected the way life was lived in the new country.
Jewish life cycles, customs and culture, origin of family names and
naming practices, assimilation and acculturation, migrations
patterns and surname mapping will be part of this study.

For this class a student will work on one immigrant family and the
town (or city) where they first settled -- New York, Chicago, St.
Louis or points west. The course includes general research tasks
and assignments to give insight into the Jewish search.

Class is taught in a *forum* setting, private to this class. The
site is open at all times for students to post. The instructor
answers posts daily. Cost is $120 for 4 weeks. The full class
description is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40022.
To enroll go to www.jewishgen.org/education and click on enroll.

For questions, please contact me
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org


Belarus SIG #Belarus New education course - The Jewish in Jewish Genealogy #belarus

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education will offer a new online forum - The Jewish in
Jewish Genealogy
May 1 - May 29

Genealogy is more than statistics and facts. This class will give
you a chance to understand the Jewish immigration experience and
we'll discover tricks and tips to successfully search for Jewish
ancestry.

With each passing generation, the torch passes to children whose
lifestyle is further >from the immigrant experience. Now we have to
dig deep in order to bring up images and voices >from the past, to
understand and recreate their lives.

This class will cover Jewish institutions in the old country and
in the U.S. It will help a researcher discover patterns and
prejudices that affected the way life was lived in the new country.
Jewish life cycles, customs and culture, origin of family names and
naming practices, assimilation and acculturation, migrations
patterns and surname mapping will be part of this study.

For this class a student will work on one immigrant family and the
town (or city) where they first settled -- New York, Chicago, St.
Louis or points west. The course includes general research tasks
and assignments to give insight into the Jewish search.

Class is taught in a *forum* setting, private to this class. The
site is open at all times for students to post. The instructor
answers posts daily. Cost is $120 for 4 weeks. The full class
description is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40022.
To enroll go to www.jewishgen.org/education and click on enroll.

For questions, please contact me
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org


Unrelated members of a household ? #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

I have a number of revision list records that show households in which
there are5 to 15 unrelated children, all with different surnames. The
children usually are identified in the census records as "nephews" or
"nieces". Their ages range >from infants (age about 1 year) to early20s.
These revision list records are >from the early to mid-1800s in the
Kremenets district of Ukraine.

Does anyone know why this would be? Did these households serve as foster
homes, or perhaps as orphanages for the community? Did the households
receive a stipend >from the community to care for these children? Is it
likely that the children truly are related to the head of household?

Ron

--
Ron Doctor (rddpdx@gmail.com)
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets
Portland, Oregon USA
and
Board Member and Past Coordinator
JewishGen Ukraine Special Interest Group (Ukraine SIG)

Researching DOCTOR (DIOKHTER), VARER, AVERBAKH, KORENFELD ... all >from Kremenets, Oleksinets, Yampol, Vishnevets
and KAZDOY (KOSODOY), DUBINSKI, DUBOWSKY ... all >from Kiev, Uman, Odessa


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Unrelated members of a household ? #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

I have a number of revision list records that show households in which
there are5 to 15 unrelated children, all with different surnames. The
children usually are identified in the census records as "nephews" or
"nieces". Their ages range >from infants (age about 1 year) to early20s.
These revision list records are >from the early to mid-1800s in the
Kremenets district of Ukraine.

Does anyone know why this would be? Did these households serve as foster
homes, or perhaps as orphanages for the community? Did the households
receive a stipend >from the community to care for these children? Is it
likely that the children truly are related to the head of household?

Ron

--
Ron Doctor (rddpdx@gmail.com)
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets
Portland, Oregon USA
and
Board Member and Past Coordinator
JewishGen Ukraine Special Interest Group (Ukraine SIG)

Researching DOCTOR (DIOKHTER), VARER, AVERBAKH, KORENFELD ... all >from Kremenets, Oleksinets, Yampol, Vishnevets
and KAZDOY (KOSODOY), DUBINSKI, DUBOWSKY ... all >from Kiev, Uman, Odessa


JewishGen 5 minute videos #ciechanow #poland

Phyllis Kramer
 

About four years ago i created a series of 5 minute videos to
introduce folks to various aspects of JewishGen and Genealogy
research. I just reviewed them and with a few exceptions, they are
valid today.

Go to www.jewishgen.org/education
to view any of these

Prepare For Your Search (for USA researchers)
Navigate JewishGen
Find Your Ancestral Town (for USA researchers)
Communicate with Other Researchers via:
JGFF: The JewishGen Family Finder -- for Surnames/Towns
FTJP: Family Tree of the Jewish People -- for over 5 million people
JewishGen Discussion Groups
Special Interest Groups and Hosted Organizations
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Jewish Genealogy Websites & Organizations
Jewish Genealogy Websites - Part I (JewishGen and IAJGS/JGS)
Jewish Genealogy Websites - Part II
We also have links to the JGSLI videos
8 Ways To Find Your Ancestral Town
Passenger Manifests
Guide to Post 1906 Naturalization...

Just trying to help!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education


New education course - The Jewish in Jewish Genealogy #ciechanow #poland

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education will offer a new online forum - The Jewish in
Jewish Genealogy
May 1 - May 29

Genealogy is more than statistics and facts. This class will give
you a chance to understand the Jewish immigration experience and
we'll discover tricks and tips to successfully search for Jewish
ancestry.

With each passing generation, the torch passes to children whose
lifestyle is further >from the immigrant experience. Now we have to
dig deep in order to bring up images and voices >from the past, to
understand and recreate their lives.

This class will cover Jewish institutions in the old country and
in the U.S. It will help a researcher discover patterns and
prejudices that affected the way life was lived in the new country.
Jewish life cycles, customs and culture, origin of family names and
naming practices, assimilation and acculturation, migrations
patterns and surname mapping will be part of this study.

For this class a student will work on one immigrant family and the
town (or city) where they first settled -- New York, Chicago, St.
Louis or points west. The course includes general research tasks
and assignments to give insight into the Jewish search.

Class is taught in a *forum* setting, private to this class. The
site is open at all times for students to post. The instructor
answers posts daily. Cost is $120 for 4 weeks. The full class
description is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40022.
To enroll go to www.jewishgen.org/education and click on enroll.

For questions, please contact me
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org


#Ciechanow #Poland JewishGen 5 minute videos #ciechanow #poland

Phyllis Kramer
 

About four years ago i created a series of 5 minute videos to
introduce folks to various aspects of JewishGen and Genealogy
research. I just reviewed them and with a few exceptions, they are
valid today.

Go to www.jewishgen.org/education
to view any of these

Prepare For Your Search (for USA researchers)
Navigate JewishGen
Find Your Ancestral Town (for USA researchers)
Communicate with Other Researchers via:
JGFF: The JewishGen Family Finder -- for Surnames/Towns
FTJP: Family Tree of the Jewish People -- for over 5 million people
JewishGen Discussion Groups
Special Interest Groups and Hosted Organizations
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Jewish Genealogy Websites & Organizations
Jewish Genealogy Websites - Part I (JewishGen and IAJGS/JGS)
Jewish Genealogy Websites - Part II
We also have links to the JGSLI videos
8 Ways To Find Your Ancestral Town
Passenger Manifests
Guide to Post 1906 Naturalization...

Just trying to help!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education


#Ciechanow #Poland New education course - The Jewish in Jewish Genealogy #ciechanow #poland

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education will offer a new online forum - The Jewish in
Jewish Genealogy
May 1 - May 29

Genealogy is more than statistics and facts. This class will give
you a chance to understand the Jewish immigration experience and
we'll discover tricks and tips to successfully search for Jewish
ancestry.

With each passing generation, the torch passes to children whose
lifestyle is further >from the immigrant experience. Now we have to
dig deep in order to bring up images and voices >from the past, to
understand and recreate their lives.

This class will cover Jewish institutions in the old country and
in the U.S. It will help a researcher discover patterns and
prejudices that affected the way life was lived in the new country.
Jewish life cycles, customs and culture, origin of family names and
naming practices, assimilation and acculturation, migrations
patterns and surname mapping will be part of this study.

For this class a student will work on one immigrant family and the
town (or city) where they first settled -- New York, Chicago, St.
Louis or points west. The course includes general research tasks
and assignments to give insight into the Jewish search.

Class is taught in a *forum* setting, private to this class. The
site is open at all times for students to post. The instructor
answers posts daily. Cost is $120 for 4 weeks. The full class
description is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40022.
To enroll go to www.jewishgen.org/education and click on enroll.

For questions, please contact me
Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
JewishGen-Education@lyris.JewishGen.org


Viewmate photo identification-Luxembourg? #general

Milton Koch
 

I've posted a picture of the inside of a synagogue. Could it be the old synagogue in
Luxembourg. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM39115
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Milton Koch


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate photo identification-Luxembourg? #general

Milton Koch
 

I've posted a picture of the inside of a synagogue. Could it be the old synagogue in
Luxembourg. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM39115
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Milton Koch


JGS of Colorado "Jews on the Move" - Sunday April 26 #general

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

Jews on the Move: A History of Modern Migration Presented by David Shneer

Jewish Community Center, 350 South Dahlia Street, Denver
April 26, 2015 - 10:00 am until 1:00 pm (note the longer time)
This session is open to the public


In 2014, for the first time in history, more than 50% of global Jews live in one
state. This happened as a result of modernity and industrialization as the modern
era saw hundreds of millions of people move >from the places of their parents' birth
to those of their grandchildren's births. In this talk, we will explore the trends
in Jewish migration, both internal and transcontinental, as we ask about the
contemporary Jewish map and where Jews are "moving" to in the future.

David Shneer is the Louis P. Singer Chair in Jewish History, Professor of History
and Religious Studies and Director of the Program in Jewish Studies at the
University of Colorado, Boulder, and is a Distinguished Lecturer for the
Association for Jewish Studies. Called a "path breaking" scholar, Shneer's
research focuses on 20th century European, Russian, and Jewish history and culture.
His newest book is Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust
(Rutgers University Press, 2011), which looks at the lives and works of two dozen
Soviet Jewish World War II military photographers to examine what kinds of
photographs they took when they encountered evidence of Nazi genocide on the
Eastern Front.

If you have any questions, please take a look at the JGSCO website at www.jgsco.org

Terry Lasky
Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Colorado "Jews on the Move" - Sunday April 26 #general

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

Jews on the Move: A History of Modern Migration Presented by David Shneer

Jewish Community Center, 350 South Dahlia Street, Denver
April 26, 2015 - 10:00 am until 1:00 pm (note the longer time)
This session is open to the public


In 2014, for the first time in history, more than 50% of global Jews live in one
state. This happened as a result of modernity and industrialization as the modern
era saw hundreds of millions of people move >from the places of their parents' birth
to those of their grandchildren's births. In this talk, we will explore the trends
in Jewish migration, both internal and transcontinental, as we ask about the
contemporary Jewish map and where Jews are "moving" to in the future.

David Shneer is the Louis P. Singer Chair in Jewish History, Professor of History
and Religious Studies and Director of the Program in Jewish Studies at the
University of Colorado, Boulder, and is a Distinguished Lecturer for the
Association for Jewish Studies. Called a "path breaking" scholar, Shneer's
research focuses on 20th century European, Russian, and Jewish history and culture.
His newest book is Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust
(Rutgers University Press, 2011), which looks at the lives and works of two dozen
Soviet Jewish World War II military photographers to examine what kinds of
photographs they took when they encountered evidence of Nazi genocide on the
Eastern Front.

If you have any questions, please take a look at the JGSCO website at www.jgsco.org

Terry Lasky
Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado

92201 - 92220 of 658890