Date   

Re: Checking accuracy of translations #general

Alan Shuchat
 

Cathy Miller raises an interesting question about how to read the LDS
microfilms accessed >from the Litvak SIG records.

From: Cathy Miller <cathymillernz@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 May 2019 07:49:10 +1200
VITEN, Girsh Eliyash ben Izrael son of Yosel 2270864 / 2

LVIA/1226/1/1309/649 1887 Panevezys Record #M71
When I look at the microfilm, Volume 1226/1/1309 starts at image
number # 314 but I cant find a reference to the last 3 digits (649) or
M71
M71 means the 71st male record for that year and that town. The problem
is how to find the right page. 2270864 / 2 means item 2 in film #2270864.
(The digitized films have different film numbers, but clicking on 2270864
automatically brings you to the digitized version, which has number
#004221332.) As Cathy found, image #314 is the start of item 2. It takes
some work, but the Panevezys 1887 births start at image #628. There is an
index in Lithuanian (Latin script) for that year, and VITEN Girsh Eliyash
appears on image #631. The index says his actual birth record is #51 on
p. 274. The page numbers are written in the upper right corner of the
record book pages, and page 274 is on image #644. GIrsh is M51, not M71
(M71 is on #650 and is for a boy named Daniel Brezniker). The records are
in Russian and Hebrew.

The handwriting in the record is a little hard to read, but it says the
father, Izrael Yosefovich Viten is a soldier in the reserves and the
mother is Elka-Miraka[?] Gershkovna-Elyashovna. Her birth name was Blokh.
So the boy was named after his mother's father.

The second entry pertains to the marriage of a putative great great
uncle (brother of the above mentioned Tsalel/Calel/Izrael)
VITEN, Kashriel ben Yosel 2205137 / 2

LVIA/1226/1/1029/197/187 Marriage Record #2 1877 Birzai
When I look at the microfilm, Volume 1226/1/1029 seems to be in the
section that starts with 1226/1/1026 - 1226/1/1041 on image number 109
and 1877 seems to start at image number 160
Here #2205137 corresponds to the digital number #004221323. The marriage
book for 1877 in Birzai does start at #160. Record #2 is on image #161.
It is indeed for Kashriel' Ioselovich VITEN and Rivka Ioslovichova Kagan.
He is >from Vabalninkas (Vabol'niki in Russian, Vabolnik in Yiddish).
Their ages are listed as 22 and 18, respectively. This is echoed in the
Hebrew, where he is Kasriel ben Yosef and she is Sarah Rivka bat Yosef.

If the date of the marriage and the age of Kashriel (22) and his wife
(18) at the time of marriage are correct, then this conflicts with
other evidence that suggests they may have been about 10 years older
at the time. I have been wondering whether I am dealing with one
Kashriel or two. Since Kashriel ben Yosel is a rare name and Viten far
from common, it would help to check this transcription in case there
is a simple error that could explain this discrepancy.
Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUKHAT (Talnoe, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoe), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
ZILBERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Checking accuracy of translations #general

Alan Shuchat
 

Cathy Miller raises an interesting question about how to read the LDS
microfilms accessed >from the Litvak SIG records.

From: Cathy Miller <cathymillernz@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 May 2019 07:49:10 +1200
VITEN, Girsh Eliyash ben Izrael son of Yosel 2270864 / 2

LVIA/1226/1/1309/649 1887 Panevezys Record #M71
When I look at the microfilm, Volume 1226/1/1309 starts at image
number # 314 but I cant find a reference to the last 3 digits (649) or
M71
M71 means the 71st male record for that year and that town. The problem
is how to find the right page. 2270864 / 2 means item 2 in film #2270864.
(The digitized films have different film numbers, but clicking on 2270864
automatically brings you to the digitized version, which has number
#004221332.) As Cathy found, image #314 is the start of item 2. It takes
some work, but the Panevezys 1887 births start at image #628. There is an
index in Lithuanian (Latin script) for that year, and VITEN Girsh Eliyash
appears on image #631. The index says his actual birth record is #51 on
p. 274. The page numbers are written in the upper right corner of the
record book pages, and page 274 is on image #644. GIrsh is M51, not M71
(M71 is on #650 and is for a boy named Daniel Brezniker). The records are
in Russian and Hebrew.

The handwriting in the record is a little hard to read, but it says the
father, Izrael Yosefovich Viten is a soldier in the reserves and the
mother is Elka-Miraka[?] Gershkovna-Elyashovna. Her birth name was Blokh.
So the boy was named after his mother's father.

The second entry pertains to the marriage of a putative great great
uncle (brother of the above mentioned Tsalel/Calel/Izrael)
VITEN, Kashriel ben Yosel 2205137 / 2

LVIA/1226/1/1029/197/187 Marriage Record #2 1877 Birzai
When I look at the microfilm, Volume 1226/1/1029 seems to be in the
section that starts with 1226/1/1026 - 1226/1/1041 on image number 109
and 1877 seems to start at image number 160
Here #2205137 corresponds to the digital number #004221323. The marriage
book for 1877 in Birzai does start at #160. Record #2 is on image #161.
It is indeed for Kashriel' Ioselovich VITEN and Rivka Ioslovichova Kagan.
He is >from Vabalninkas (Vabol'niki in Russian, Vabolnik in Yiddish).
Their ages are listed as 22 and 18, respectively. This is echoed in the
Hebrew, where he is Kasriel ben Yosef and she is Sarah Rivka bat Yosef.

If the date of the marriage and the age of Kashriel (22) and his wife
(18) at the time of marriage are correct, then this conflicts with
other evidence that suggests they may have been about 10 years older
at the time. I have been wondering whether I am dealing with one
Kashriel or two. Since Kashriel ben Yosel is a rare name and Viten far
from common, it would help to check this transcription in case there
is a simple error that could explain this discrepancy.
Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUKHAT (Talnoe, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoe), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
ZILBERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #romania

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Romania SIG #Romania JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #romania

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Final reminder about Sunday's DNA conference in Chicago area #dna

Martin Fischer
 

For those who want to learn more about using genetic genealogy testing
and will be in the Chicago area this Sunday, there is still time to
register for the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois' one-day DNA
conference.

"DNA: Tests, Tools and Tales" is the theme of the JGS of Illinois
conference on Sunday, June 2, 2019, at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road,
Northbrook, Ill. Genetic genealogy experts Lara Diamond and Gil Bardige
will be the featured speakers for a two-track schedule -- one for
beginners and one for more experienced users of genealogical genetic
testing. For more information and to register, go to
https://www.jgsi.org/event-3360053

The event runs >from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., with sign-in, genealogy experts
help desk and research library >from 8:30 to 10 a.m., and presentations
starting at 10 a.m. Lunch will be provided.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


DNA Research #DNA Final reminder about Sunday's DNA conference in Chicago area #dna

Martin Fischer
 

For those who want to learn more about using genetic genealogy testing
and will be in the Chicago area this Sunday, there is still time to
register for the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois' one-day DNA
conference.

"DNA: Tests, Tools and Tales" is the theme of the JGS of Illinois
conference on Sunday, June 2, 2019, at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road,
Northbrook, Ill. Genetic genealogy experts Lara Diamond and Gil Bardige
will be the featured speakers for a two-track schedule -- one for
beginners and one for more experienced users of genealogical genetic
testing. For more information and to register, go to
https://www.jgsi.org/event-3360053

The event runs >from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., with sign-in, genealogy experts
help desk and research library >from 8:30 to 10 a.m., and presentations
starting at 10 a.m. Lunch will be provided.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #lodz #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #lodz #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #galicia

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records >from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents our
ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census
and vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #lithuania

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #galicia

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records >from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents our
ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census
and vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #lithuania

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JRI Poland #Poland JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #poland

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #unitedkingdom

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom JewishGen's NY Genealogy Course starts June 14 #unitedkingdom

Nancy Siegel
 

So many of our immigrant ancestors lived in New York City -- they
started on the Lower East Side and upgraded to the Bronx and Brooklyn;
their children moved to Queens, Westchester, Long Island and New
Jersey.

We have census reports >from Ancestry and vital records from
ItalianGen, but this class will focus on the more esoteric documents
our ancestors generated, including probate, landsmanshaften, voter
registration, newspapers, and court case records.

This is an intermediate level genealogy course with eight text lessons
you can download; there are no specific times for the course as
students are international. Students will select a branch to research
and receive daily advice and suggestions >from the instructor through a
24/7 Forum, in a query and answer format. Students must feel
comfortable browsing the web and downloading files, have 8-10 hours
available each week, and should select one NYC family where census and
vital records are already documented.

Tuition is $150; registration is open at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40135

For questions, please email the instructor: Phyllis Kramer,
JewishGen's VP of Education, born and bred in NYC; she will lead you
through it.
phylliskramer1@gmail.com

Nancy Siegel (San Francisco, CA, USA)
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


Yom HaShoah 2019/5779 #ciechanow #poland

Avraham Groll
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

For generations, Jewish tradition has associated the ritual of memory
with the lighting of candles. A candle represents the past, for a
flame is only as strong as its fuel source. Yet the light emanating
from the candle also represents a focus on the future. We look to the
candle and remember those who came before us, but do so within the
context of learning >from their experiences, and permitting the values
our ancestors held most dear to illuminate and influence our lives
today.

As we observe Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Memorial Day, JewishGen's mission
of remembrance and preservation becomes more pronounced and urgent.
JewishGen's work is designed to change us. It is supposed to transform
us. And it should inspire us.

Our goal is for people to understand not only who their relatives
were, but how they lived. What was important in their lives? What
challenges did they face? How can their experiences influence and
illuminate our life choices today?

Among JewishGen's most important projects is the translation of Yizkor
Books (memorial books), which offer an insight into communal life
before and during the Shoah.

Take some time to explore these treasure troves of information which,
among other things, provide first-hand accounts of a Jewish communal
life and culture that in many cases no longer exists.

These accounts help us to visualize what life was like in a very
personal way, while providing us the ability to transmit a more
profound legacy for the future.

We also encourage you to explore our Holocaust Collection, which
contains more than 2.75 million records about Holocaust victims and
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Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Yizkor Book Project, April 2019 #ciechanow #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Last week, we marked Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Day, in memory of our 6
million family members murdered in the Holocaust. For the many of us
in the Yizkor Book Project, the task of remembering our people, our
annihilated communities is something that we deal with every day of
the year. Making sure that the events and the memories are not lost
in time, is our everyday endeavor.

And as part of our endeavor, I am pleased to let you know that in
April, a further project has been completed. This time it is the
remarkable "Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields" book which provides a
detailed insight on the Jewish agricultural settlements which were
founded in the Kherson region of Ukraine at the beginning of the 19th
century. This unique book was translated entirely by Moshe Kutten, to
whom we are truly indebted. He was greatly assisted by Yocheved
Klausner and Rafael Manory and in their editing of his translations
and we do send out our grateful thanks to them, as well.

Last month, I was contacted by Meir Gover who has provided us with a
link to his book "Jewish Malta Yok" on the almost unknown Jewish
community of Malta. We have added in a link to his book which depicts
the Jewish history of the 3 Maltese Islands together with photographs
of 122 Jewish headstones >from Malta. We do appreciate his sharing this
unique material with us.

Just a word about the projects we run. I am frequently contacted by
people interested in seeing the translation of a book on a particular
community become available. My usual reply to them is that the option
of finding a willing volunteer with sufficient knowledge and skills to
translate a whole book, ranging in size form 300 -1000 pages or more,
is very low. The alternative is to engage a professional translator,
which does mean that the financial burden on financing the translation
of these large volumes is usually too much for an individual person. As
such, I then suggest setting up a dedicated translations fund which can
receive the financial support of other people with interest in the same
community.

In this vein, a number of translation funds have recently been setup for
the communities of:

- Khotyn, Ukraine
- Novohrad-Volyns'kyy (Zvhil), Ukraine
- Sokal, Ukraine

Now, if any of these communities are dear to your heart, or to any of
the other 80 plus translation fund projects (link below) we have
running, please assist us in achieving the goal of making these books
available to a wide audience.

Before letting you know about the updates and additions, I would like
to wish those of us in Israel, a memorable, enjoyable and particularly
happy Independence Day.

Last month we added in 5 new entries:

- Kamyanyets, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00312.html

- Kolodne, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar347.html

- Rubel, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315.html

- Ruzhany, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland -
Volume V) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol5_00315b.html

- Rus'ke Pole, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar314.html

One new book:

- The Mass Migration
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/MassMigration/MassMigration.html


And we have continued to update 19 of our existing projects:

- Braslaw, Belarus (Darkness and desolation)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Braslaw/Braslaw.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Drogobych, Ukraine (Memorial to the Jews of Drohobycz, Boryslaw,
and surroundings) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Drohobycz/Drogobych.html

- Iwye, Belarus (In Memory of the Jewish Community of Iwie)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ivye/ivye.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Khotyn, Ukraine (The book of the community of Khotin (Bessarabia))
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Khotyn/Khotyn.html

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and
Pochayiv) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Miskolc, Hungary (The martyrs of Miskolc and vicinity)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miskolc/Miskolc.html

- Przemysl, Poland (Przemysl memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/przemysl/przemysl.html

- Slutsk, Belarus (Slutsk and vicinity memorial book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slutsk/Slutsk.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszow.html

- Svencionys, Lithuania (Svintzian region: memorial book of 23
communities) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/svencionys/svencionys.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Voronovo)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

Yom Ha'atzmaut Sameach/Happy Israel's Independence Day,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager

23261 - 23280 of 655030