Date   

Re: Photographic Stick Pins #galicia

Frank Schulaner
 

After years of moving about, I lost them, but at one time I had photo stick pins both of my mother (born 1907) and her mother, my grandmother (born c.1870). Both photos were taken when they were one or two years old, in apparently the same photo studio in Rymanow, Galicia. I say apparently, because the style of both photos--the shading, the black-white balance, etc.--seems the same despite the years between them.


Re: JewishGen.org Discussion Group - Digest #1

Jon Seligman
 

Abraham,

 

The hashtag has the potential to be useful but needs to be visually presented better. The white in small letters on a light green background (#Sephardic #Galicia) makes it almost invisible to the eye. Larger letters and a black background would work (#Sephardic #Galicia).

 

חג שמח

)it was always outrageous that the JewishGen forum would not accept Hebrew characters – so תודה רבה)

 

Jon Seligman

Zur Hadassa, Israel


Re: Panevezys - Lithuania #lithuania

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Please email me and I will try to help.

Also check out the KehilaLink at https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/panevezys/

Regards

Eli


Messages. How to delete them?

babycat3@...
 

How do I delete messages after read but have no need.
Thanks


Re: Cherkassy-Smela #ukraine

Bella Tseytlin
 

Hi, and apologies for bothering you. 

What do you mean by list for Smela?  asking as I, myself, am interested in Uman, Cherkassy Region (and surrounds).


Thank you.

Regards,
Bella Tseytlin.



Panevezys - Lithuania #lithuania

gordberger@sympatico.ca
 

I am endeavouring to try to ascertain what happened to my family who lived in Panevezys, Lithuania at the start of World War ll.
My grandfather’s name was Itsyk Leyb Birger and my grandmother’s maiden name was Gold Elka Gofman.
They had 4 children Muscia (married name Kliackiene),Nathan Birger, Sara Birger and Israel Birger (my father) who emigrated to
South Africa in the 1920’s.
Despite making extensive enquiries through Yad Vashem and the International Red Cross, I have been unable to find any information.
If anyone can assist me with any information. It would be greatly appreciated.

Gordon Berger

Moderator note: please reply privately


Photographic Stick Pins #galicia

Barbara Krasner
 


I've come across a photo stick pin that was found in my grandfather's knotted sock. I suspect the photo might be my grandmother's mother, Pesia Seife Zuckerkandel, of Kozlow, Galicia. Has anyone come across stick pin photos of family members? If so, from what region and timeframe?
Barbara Krasner
Somerset, NJ


SS5 Question for Immigrants #usa #poland

Marjorie Geiser
 

Hi all,

I've been trying to find ANY living ancestor on my grandfather's side, Levine, hitting brick walls at each turn, and just hit another.

My g-grandfather was Isaac Levine (in the US - Lewin in Poland, born in Grodno), and my g-grandmother was Sarah Silver (Silbernagel/ Zylbernagel - born in Warsaw). Isaac came to the US in 1903. Sarah came in 1906 with my grandfather, Jacob, and his two older sisters, Elizabeth and Helen.

They were in Philadelphia for the 1910 census and I found them in the 1915 NY census. By the 1920 census, Isaac had died. I still haven't found exactly when and why he died.

I was able to find all of my grandfather's siblings, his youngest three all born in Philadelphia. And I could find who they all married, and even found some children from a couple of them. I think I found ONE living ancestor, whose grandmother was Helen. But I can't get any response from her, and when I look at the family tree she has, I suspect she knows less about her grandmother than I know about my grandfather. There HAS to be someone, though, and I'd love to find photos.

That gives a bit of a background. I still can't find any birth info for ANY of the family born in Poland/Belarus. On all my grandfather's  records, he said he was born in Warsaw, and the birth locations of my great-grandparents came from their marriage record that Stanley from JRI-Poland kindly found for me. I was even in Poland in May, and met with one of the genealogists at the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw. She was able to track my grandfather's family back to the late 1700s, thanks to revisionist lists, but no birth certificates for anyone.

I have a 1952 ship manifest when Helen and her husband, Murray, went to Burmuda, which listed where she was born (which I believe is incorrect - it's the exact same location as her husband which is MILES from even where her father was born), as well as when and where she was naturalized, along with a number. None of that has helped and I still can't find her naturalization papers. So, I still don't know where she was born.

Since my grandfather's SS5 had been so helpful when I didn't even know the names of my great-grandparents, I decided that I'd request one for my g-aunt, Helen, whose married name was Denison.

However, when I received it last week, it had that she was born in Philadelphia. So this is where my question of genealogists comes in: Everything else on the form matches the info I have; parents' names, where she lived, her married name. the same date of birth that I have, which is 1900. She requested her SS# in 1977 (she was 77 years old). She had to have been naturalized in order to get a SS#. But my question is, if she wasn't born in the US, how could she get a SS# without a birth certificate or naturalization papers? She was NOT born in Philadelphia.

Thanks,

Margie Geiser
Arizona, USA

Family names: LEVINE/LEWIN, SILBERNAGEL/ZYLBERNAGEL, EPSZTEJN, MOCZYDLOWER, MENDELSOHN, WILK, GRUNPELTZ, ERLICH, JOSKOWICZ, ABRAHAMOWICZ, ZYLBERSZTEJN

Known locations: Plawno, Warsaw, Grodno, Lodz, Rodomsko, Mozydlow


Re: Seeking help finding birth records or other records in Czernovitz #ukraine

Daniel Horowitz
 

Hello Miranda,

I would like to point you to the Czernowitz BMD database available at
https://czernowitz.geneasearch.net
It is based on the microfilms from FamilySearch but has also some
extra documents.

There is also The Czernowitz-L Website and mailing list
http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/

Best regards
Daniel Horowitz
Daniel@...


Phoenix (Arizona) Jewish Genealogy Group, October 20, 2019 meeting

Emily Garber
 

The Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Group will welcome Risa Daitzman Heywood of Denver, Colorado, as its guest speaker on Sunday, October 20, 2019 from 1:00 P.M. to 3:00 P.M. at the Cutler-Plotkin Jewish Heritage Center, home of the Arizona Jewish Historical Society, at 122 E. Culver Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004. The meeting will be held in the bungalow. Heywood will speak on “The Power of Catalog – Unindexed Records and How to Find Them.”

 

Did you know that over 75% of the records available on FamilySearch.org cannot be accessed by a simple records search? Did you know that Ancestry has record collections that are available to browse but that cannot be searched because they are not yet indexed? While digitizing records is relatively fast and inexpensive, indexing those records is much more costly. Many online repositories have made these records available for browsing but working with them can be a challenge. This presentation will show you how to find and use these unindexed records to greatly enhance your research.

 

Risa Daitzman Heywood, a professional genealogist, began researching her family more than 25 years ago. She has earned a Certificate of Genealogical Research from Boston University and is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists. She, has served as the co-chair of JewishGen’s Belarus Special Interest Group (SIG) and is past-president of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado. Her company, Research by Risa, specializes in Ashkenazi Jewish research and heritage travel. Risa loves breaking down brick walls and helping clients get to know their immigrant ancestors.

 

The Phoenix Genealogy Group is a committee of the Arizona Jewish Historical Society. Meetings are held once each month from October through May and are free and open to all. Donations are accepted. For further information see https://azjhs.org/Genealogy.html or contact emilyhgarber@....

Emily Garber
Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Group


Re: Seeking help finding birth records or other records in Czernovitz #ukraine

Juan Fernández Delgado
 

Address: Nebesnoi Sotni, 20-А (Bldg 1), Chernivtsi, 58029;
Tel: +380(372) 57-36-77, 57-37-46, 57-86-55, 53-13-58, 52-30-29
Phone/Fax: +380 (372) 57-86-54.
How to get: trolleybus № 5 (stop "Мicroraion"), bus № 5, 29 (stop "Nebesnoi Sotni str.").
1 Tekstyl`nykiv Str., Chernivtsi, 58029 (Building 2)
Tel: +380 (372) 54-50-01, 54-74-90, 54-49-99, 54-49-98.
How to get: Trolleybus № 1 (stop "Kovalchuka str."), bus № 9, 20, 26, 30, 31, 42 (stop "Myrhorodska str.").
E-mail: archive_cv@...
Web: cv.archives.gov.ua


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #yizkorbooks

Bruce Drake
 

As a young girl, Esther Brand was “Saved by Righteous Gentiles” — the
title of her account from the Yizkor book of Turka, a town that sat by
the Stryj River in western Ukraine. At times, she walked the streets
not wearing the yellow Star of David patch as ordered by the Germans
on pain of death, but one day she was overtaken by fear and put it on
her arm. She approached a farmer to ask if he would like to purchase
kitchen utensils from her house in exchange for food, but once there,
he said to her: “I saw announcements that you must be prepared to go
to the Sambor Ghetto. We have no children at home, and we want to
perform a good deed in this world and save a young soul from
extermination.”

And for two years, he did just that, hiding her in a crate, and then a
haystack and then his attic. She witnessed the fate she had avoided
befalling other Jews of Turka, watching from a window for hours as the
Jews were being marched to the Sambor ghetto, “walking with suitcases,
packages and sacks. Some wept, and others were just sad. From time to
time, they peered backward, as if to cast a final glance at their
houses in which they and their ancestors had lived - and who knew if
they would see them again.”

Esther did get to see Turka again after the Soviets drove out the
Germans. But all that was left “was a heap of ruins, without any
Jewish remnant.”

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/2551878231500983?__tn__=K-R

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


more than one surname in familiant record #austria-czech

esther.bloch@...
 

Hello Philip

The word is "unbekannt", meaning, unknown. It refers to the parents and
the wife.

Esther Bloch, Dundas Ontario, Canada


two surnames on familiant record - follow up #austria-czech

morav@...
 

Thank you to the individuals who responded to my earlier question
about the two different surnames appearing on the familiant record for
my ancestors Gabriel Fidra and Jonas Federer. It seems to be the
consensus that one of these men changed his name >from Fidra to
Federer.

My question now is why would someone do that? And, do records exist
somewhere recording such name changes?

The familiant record also indicates a "Landes" number, which I take to
be a land parcel that this family either lived on or had rights to
use. Isn't there a record of such land tenure somewhere at
Badatelna.cz?

Thanks again.

Philip Moravcik


Austrian Citizenship #austria-czech

Robert Fraser
 

The main purpose, so far as I'm concerned, of Austrian
citizenship, is to make the point that our parents and
relatives who were forcibly deprived of Austrian
citizenship, can now claim it back by proxy, courtesy of
their descendants.

My Parents were forced out of their native country on pain
of death. Now there is some small, if very belated,
recompense.

Robert Fraser
Perth, Western Australia

****

Tony Hausner asked what if any benefits there are for
descendants of
Holocaust survivors to obtain Austrian citizenship under the
new law.
Snip>>>


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech more than one surname in familiant record #austria-czech

esther.bloch@...
 

Hello Philip

The word is "unbekannt", meaning, unknown. It refers to the parents and
the wife.

Esther Bloch, Dundas Ontario, Canada


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech two surnames on familiant record - follow up #austria-czech

morav@...
 

Thank you to the individuals who responded to my earlier question
about the two different surnames appearing on the familiant record for
my ancestors Gabriel Fidra and Jonas Federer. It seems to be the
consensus that one of these men changed his name >from Fidra to
Federer.

My question now is why would someone do that? And, do records exist
somewhere recording such name changes?

The familiant record also indicates a "Landes" number, which I take to
be a land parcel that this family either lived on or had rights to
use. Isn't there a record of such land tenure somewhere at
Badatelna.cz?

Thanks again.

Philip Moravcik


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Austrian Citizenship #austria-czech

Robert Fraser
 

The main purpose, so far as I'm concerned, of Austrian
citizenship, is to make the point that our parents and
relatives who were forcibly deprived of Austrian
citizenship, can now claim it back by proxy, courtesy of
their descendants.

My Parents were forced out of their native country on pain
of death. Now there is some small, if very belated,
recompense.

Robert Fraser
Perth, Western Australia

****

Tony Hausner asked what if any benefits there are for
descendants of
Holocaust survivors to obtain Austrian citizenship under the
new law.
Snip>>>


Re: more than one surname in familiant record #austria-czech

hpgrab@...
 

Not "unbelaut" but "unbekannt = unknown". Parents of Gabriel Fidra were
unknown. Jonas Federer is unambiguous the first born son of Gabriel Fidra.

Best
Hanus Grab


(Austria) The Formal Announcement Form Austrian Embassy on Austria Extending Citizenship of Descendants to Victims of Nazi Persecution #austria-czech

Jan Meisels Allen
 

I previously posted about the Austrian Parliament enacting an amendment to
the Austrian Nationality Act Extending citizenship to descendants of victims
of the Nazis. The Austrian Embassy in Washington DC has posted the official
statement which may be read at:
https://www.austria.org/the-latest/2019/10/7/austrian-citizenship-descendant
s-victims-nazi-persecution

Note the law does not become effective until September 1, 2020.

Thank you to Frank Eisinger for sharing with us.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee