Date   

meaning of words on tombstone #poland

kay@...
 

I am posting this question for my cousin who has been doing research for
several decades. He has asked me for help in understanding this
contradictions.

His grandfather, Gerson Cohen, immigrated >from Poland/Russia. The
informant for Gerson's death certificate, his older son,
said he didn't know Gerson's parents' names or their birth places.
Yet the Hebrew on his tombstone says that he was "the son of Aryeh the
Cohen".

Gerson Cohen had a married sister, Minnie, and the informant for her
death certificate, her daughter, likewise said she didn't know Minnie's
parents' names or birth places. Yet the Hebrew on her tombstone says
"daughter of Aryeh."

Gerson and Minnie died within several months of each other in 1934 and
are buried in the same family plot in Dallas. So I assume that the
tombstone carvings may not reflect independent information.

Aryeh means lion.

I don't see how two death certificates could say the father's name is
unknown yet the tombstones carry a name. His question was "is
"Aryeh" a default name to carve in Hebrew on tombstones if you don't
know the father's name? This seems highly improbable to me, but is
there any other explanation for this?

Does anyone have suggestions about this problem?

Thank you
Please respond to me at kay@kaycgoldman.com

Kay Goldman


Polish Translation Request #poland

Nomi Waksberg <nwaksberg@...>
 

I've posted 5 vital records in Polish for which I need a translations:

They are on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72186
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72182
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72157
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72152
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72149


Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

As always, thank you very much for your time and assistance.
Nomi Fiszenfeld Waksberg

Researching also Braun, Frydman, Zyngier, Wolkowicz, Elwig,
Burman, Rambaum, Bijak, Gryzmek, Lewkowicz (relative by marriage)


JRI Poland #Poland meaning of words on tombstone #poland

kay@...
 

I am posting this question for my cousin who has been doing research for
several decades. He has asked me for help in understanding this
contradictions.

His grandfather, Gerson Cohen, immigrated >from Poland/Russia. The
informant for Gerson's death certificate, his older son,
said he didn't know Gerson's parents' names or their birth places.
Yet the Hebrew on his tombstone says that he was "the son of Aryeh the
Cohen".

Gerson Cohen had a married sister, Minnie, and the informant for her
death certificate, her daughter, likewise said she didn't know Minnie's
parents' names or birth places. Yet the Hebrew on her tombstone says
"daughter of Aryeh."

Gerson and Minnie died within several months of each other in 1934 and
are buried in the same family plot in Dallas. So I assume that the
tombstone carvings may not reflect independent information.

Aryeh means lion.

I don't see how two death certificates could say the father's name is
unknown yet the tombstones carry a name. His question was "is
"Aryeh" a default name to carve in Hebrew on tombstones if you don't
know the father's name? This seems highly improbable to me, but is
there any other explanation for this?

Does anyone have suggestions about this problem?

Thank you
Please respond to me at kay@kaycgoldman.com

Kay Goldman


JRI Poland #Poland Polish Translation Request #poland

Nomi Waksberg <nwaksberg@...>
 

I've posted 5 vital records in Polish for which I need a translations:

They are on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72186
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72182
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72157
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72152
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM72149


Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

As always, thank you very much for your time and assistance.
Nomi Fiszenfeld Waksberg

Researching also Braun, Frydman, Zyngier, Wolkowicz, Elwig,
Burman, Rambaum, Bijak, Gryzmek, Lewkowicz (relative by marriage)


need data on Sephardic ancestor from Livorno #sephardic

Paul Beek <paulbeek_1956@...>
 

Shalom,

Just read
"Genealo-J/, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 139, October 2019 has just been published."

For my search into my Sephardic ancestor >from Livorno,I would like
to know who can help me find my ancestor since no archive in Livorno
has replied to my messages.

It concerns my great great great great grandmother Esther Fionquino,born
in Livorno in 1740 (she died in 1828 in Amsterdam),would like to have
any data in her possible:date of birth,parents etc.
She married Jacob Rimini of Verona but do not know when and where.

Hope you can help me with this earch,thanks in advance,

with best regards

Paul Beek
the Hague


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim need data on Sephardic ancestor from Livorno #sephardic

Paul Beek <paulbeek_1956@...>
 

Shalom,

Just read
"Genealo-J/, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 139, October 2019 has just been published."

For my search into my Sephardic ancestor >from Livorno,I would like
to know who can help me find my ancestor since no archive in Livorno
has replied to my messages.

It concerns my great great great great grandmother Esther Fionquino,born
in Livorno in 1740 (she died in 1828 in Amsterdam),would like to have
any data in her possible:date of birth,parents etc.
She married Jacob Rimini of Verona but do not know when and where.

Hope you can help me with this earch,thanks in advance,

with best regards

Paul Beek
the Hague


Re: Healthcare in #Belarus :This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #belarus #yizkorbooks

N. Summers
 

Thanks so much for sharing this information on healthcare in Belarus. I’m just starting on my journey in exploring my family‘s history there and information like this makes the dry facts come alive.

Nancy Summers
Maryland, USA

areas of interest: #Radzillow, #Volyn; #Ostrog; #Rechitsa
names: #Finkelstein, #Bookstein, #Goldman, #Lusman, #Lifschitz, #Lyss


WOLFSTHAL - MESSINGER #hungary

Yaron Wolfsthal
 

Dear Group,
As I'm new to the group, allow me to take a minute and introduce myself.
For quite some time I'm researching the roots of my family - WOLFSTHAL
- >from Galicia. It was a large family, with special music talents.
Some of them became quite famous in this field. The Composer Chune
WOLFSTHAL was one of them.

At this stage in my research, to address many remaining gaps, I turned
to examine the branch of the family which, as I've concluded, moved to
Hungary for various reasons.

Among other primary and secondary sources, I've looked at MyHeritage
and found an entry >from 02.06.2016 where a researcher named "V.
Kovacs" was looking for information about Rozalia WOLFSTHAL, whose
father was Chune WOLFSTHAL, and husband was Bela MESSINGER.

I had good information about the marriage of Bela MESSIGNGER and
Rozalia WOLFSTHAL, but the specific connection to Chune WOLFSTHAL is a
great discovery, if it can be established. Unfortunately, I could not
establish a contact via MyHeritage to the researcher who placed that
query. Therefore, I'm reaching out here to our entire H-SIG group with
a kind request for any advice/contact to either the researcher "V
Kovacs" or about the above-mentioned marriage connection of the
WOLFSTHAL and MESSINGER families (and specifically to Rozalia and her
father).

Very thankfully,
Prof. Yaron Wolfsthal, Ben-Gurion University, Israel (yaron.wolfsthal@gmail.com)

Moderator: Please respond off-list unless you have info of general interest.


Jaffa 1903

Roberta Lipitz <rlipitz@...>
 

My Grandmother Fanny (maiden surname Shore) at age 18 left Jaffa with her father and 1 younger sister via the La Lorraine out of LaHavre,  France bound for Ellis Island. Have the ship's manifest but I am looking for any possible travel documents needed for the trip.  Any help is greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,
Roberta Lipitz


Re: Healthcare in Belarus: This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #yizkorbooks

Dorcey Rose
 

My great grandmother was a Slobodkin/Slabodkin from Minsk area. She married my great grandfather, Solomon/Samuel Josselowitz/Fine from Kapyl/Kopyl about 55 miles SSW of Minsk where they lived and raised 6 children before immigrating to NYC in 1904. Some of her relatives who immigrated later shortened their surname to Slobin. One older cousin of my mother became a pharmacist in NYC. I have a family tree on Ancestry I would be happy to share with you. Frankly, I have no idea how common a name Slobodkin was in that area. Have you done your dna? Mine is on all the major sites. We had a cab driver in Maryland this past summer, who was a Jewish emigre from the Minsk area in the 1980s. He said that Jews were not allowed to live in Minsk proper when my relatives left. They lived in small towns around it. A doctor in your case may have had special privileges. Thanks, Dorcey Rose
--
Dorcey Rose
727 772 1097
dorceyrose@...

--
Dorcey Rose
dorceyrose@...
410-703-3483
Florida US


Re: Jewish Hungarian baron? #hungary

גירון
 

Hello,
As for the specific question ( how and where titles were given) I don’t know .
But , I heard from my late father , there were Jews who  had titles in Hungary .
My father grew up in Ujpest ( now the 4th quarter of Budapest  ) which was a city with 20,000 Jewish inhabitants.
It was an affluent community , there was a family that had a title Baron , they had a large leather factory .
It was said 30,000 people worked there in one shift and that the railway branched into the factory and they had their own freight train station .
 
Nava Giron
 

בלי וירוסים. www.avast.com


Issue 139 of Genealo-J has just been published #sephardic

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

//Genealo-J/, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 139, October 2019 has just been published.

Leghorn (Livorno in Italian) has been for many centuries the hub of the
Jewish communities and trade in the western Mediterranean Sea since the
grand-duke of Tuscany decided in 1591 to welcome the Jews in this city.
Alain and Liliane Nedjar, with Gilles Boulu, have begun to digitalize
and analyze the very rich archives of Leghorn.To demonstrate what can be
obtained >from these archives as well as >from Tunisian and French
sources, these authors treat in details the Busnach family. The first
known Busnach, named Micael, was expelled >from Oran (Algeria) by the
Spanish in 1669 and settled in Leghorn. He had 4 sons: Said, Ilel, Abram
and Naphtali. Said had no child but his three brothers were the
ancestors of extended families which are described by the authors. Some
members settled in Tunis and came back to Leghorn. Others commuted >from
Algiers to Leghorn and Tunis. Some went to Malta and to Minorca. Several
detailed family trees are given.

Robert Romano's paper is divided in two distinct parts. He first tells
the history of his grandfather Reuben Romano, born in Salonika in 1862.
He was first a very wealthy businessman owning a large quarry. But two
events changed his life: first Salonika was conquered by the Greeks in
1912 and the Greek government seized Reuben's quarry since he could not
prove his ownership. Then, on August 18, 1917, a terrible fire destroyed
most of the Jewish neighborhood and Reuben was completely ruined. The
family lived in misery until they decided in 1931 to migrate to Paris.
Alas, on November 5, 1942, the French police arrested a great deal of
"Greek" Jews. Reuben, aged 80, his wife, two of their children and
several of their grandchildren were deported to Auschwitz and
assassinated.In the second part, the author tries to understand the
origin of the surname Romano which is found all over Europe but
especially in Spain and Italy: Sicily, northern Italy and even,
surprisingly, Rome itself. According to him, this surname derives not
from Rome but >from Romania, the name under which the Byzantine Empire
was known in its time.

Anne-Marie Faraggi-Rychner also deals with her ancestors >from Salonika.
They were "protected" by the French consulate, a privileged statute due
to their activity as "drogman" or interpreter. Simon Farach (ca. 1750 -
1838) is attested as drogman and protected in 1775. His offsprings are
given for three generations.

Nadia Hofnung, nee Darmon, describes the most noteworthy members of her
Algerian family. Rabbi Mordekhai Darmon (1730- Oran 1815) was the head
of the Jewish community of Mascara and well appreciated by the local
Ottoman authorities, the bey of Mascara and the dey of Alger. When Oran
was taken by the Turks >from the Spanish in 1792, he moved to this city
where he refounded the Jewish community. When France conquered Algeria,
two brothers, Amran (Oran 1815-Mascara 1878)and Mardochee (Oran
1826-Tlemcen 1898)Darmon became official interpreters in the French
army. Amran played an important role during the revolt of Abd-el-Kader
to protect the Jews stuck between the two armies. He was given the
"Legion d'Honneur" in 1852 and the French citizenship by an imperial
decree in 1865. Mardochee lived longer and had official roles as
judiciary interpreter and member of the city council. As his brother, he
was given the French citizenship in 1866, four years before the Cremieux
decree applied to all the Jews of Algeria. Diane Esther Darmon**(Tlemcen
1892 - Grenoble 1979), the grandmother of Nadia Hofnung, lost her mother
when she was 11 days old. When she was only 15 years old, she married
Sadia Darmon (Lamoriciere 1884 -Beni Saf 1943) who was a rabbi and an
erudite person. When WWI begun, he volunteered in the French Army and
became chaplain. He was gassed in 1916 and lived the rest of his life
with pulmonary problems.

Georges Graner


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Issue 139 of Genealo-J has just been published #sephardic

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

//Genealo-J/, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 139, October 2019 has just been published.

Leghorn (Livorno in Italian) has been for many centuries the hub of the
Jewish communities and trade in the western Mediterranean Sea since the
grand-duke of Tuscany decided in 1591 to welcome the Jews in this city.
Alain and Liliane Nedjar, with Gilles Boulu, have begun to digitalize
and analyze the very rich archives of Leghorn.To demonstrate what can be
obtained >from these archives as well as >from Tunisian and French
sources, these authors treat in details the Busnach family. The first
known Busnach, named Micael, was expelled >from Oran (Algeria) by the
Spanish in 1669 and settled in Leghorn. He had 4 sons: Said, Ilel, Abram
and Naphtali. Said had no child but his three brothers were the
ancestors of extended families which are described by the authors. Some
members settled in Tunis and came back to Leghorn. Others commuted >from
Algiers to Leghorn and Tunis. Some went to Malta and to Minorca. Several
detailed family trees are given.

Robert Romano's paper is divided in two distinct parts. He first tells
the history of his grandfather Reuben Romano, born in Salonika in 1862.
He was first a very wealthy businessman owning a large quarry. But two
events changed his life: first Salonika was conquered by the Greeks in
1912 and the Greek government seized Reuben's quarry since he could not
prove his ownership. Then, on August 18, 1917, a terrible fire destroyed
most of the Jewish neighborhood and Reuben was completely ruined. The
family lived in misery until they decided in 1931 to migrate to Paris.
Alas, on November 5, 1942, the French police arrested a great deal of
"Greek" Jews. Reuben, aged 80, his wife, two of their children and
several of their grandchildren were deported to Auschwitz and
assassinated.In the second part, the author tries to understand the
origin of the surname Romano which is found all over Europe but
especially in Spain and Italy: Sicily, northern Italy and even,
surprisingly, Rome itself. According to him, this surname derives not
from Rome but >from Romania, the name under which the Byzantine Empire
was known in its time.

Anne-Marie Faraggi-Rychner also deals with her ancestors >from Salonika.
They were "protected" by the French consulate, a privileged statute due
to their activity as "drogman" or interpreter. Simon Farach (ca. 1750 -
1838) is attested as drogman and protected in 1775. His offsprings are
given for three generations.

Nadia Hofnung, nee Darmon, describes the most noteworthy members of her
Algerian family. Rabbi Mordekhai Darmon (1730- Oran 1815) was the head
of the Jewish community of Mascara and well appreciated by the local
Ottoman authorities, the bey of Mascara and the dey of Alger. When Oran
was taken by the Turks >from the Spanish in 1792, he moved to this city
where he refounded the Jewish community. When France conquered Algeria,
two brothers, Amran (Oran 1815-Mascara 1878)and Mardochee (Oran
1826-Tlemcen 1898)Darmon became official interpreters in the French
army. Amran played an important role during the revolt of Abd-el-Kader
to protect the Jews stuck between the two armies. He was given the
"Legion d'Honneur" in 1852 and the French citizenship by an imperial
decree in 1865. Mardochee lived longer and had official roles as
judiciary interpreter and member of the city council. As his brother, he
was given the French citizenship in 1866, four years before the Cremieux
decree applied to all the Jews of Algeria. Diane Esther Darmon**(Tlemcen
1892 - Grenoble 1979), the grandmother of Nadia Hofnung, lost her mother
when she was 11 days old. When she was only 15 years old, she married
Sadia Darmon (Lamoriciere 1884 -Beni Saf 1943) who was a rabbi and an
erudite person. When WWI begun, he volunteered in the French Army and
became chaplain. He was gassed in 1916 and lived the rest of his life
with pulmonary problems.

Georges Graner


Klyetsk book #belarus

Carol
 

I was overwhelmed by the response to my post about the Klyetsk Yizkor book!
So many people wrote asking for the book and telling me about their own ties
to the town. But what was most touching, I think, were the number of people
who said: don't give it to a person, give it to an institution like YIVO or
the Yiddish Book Center where it can be shared. I found that very
compelling and have been investigating where it might be welcome. If the
owner decides he still wants to give it to an individual, the first person
who wrote knows who she is. If it goes to an institution, I will post
where, so that the many of you who wrote will be able to access a copy.

Carol Isenberg Clingan
Dedham MA


Belarus SIG #Belarus Klyetsk book #belarus

Carol
 

I was overwhelmed by the response to my post about the Klyetsk Yizkor book!
So many people wrote asking for the book and telling me about their own ties
to the town. But what was most touching, I think, were the number of people
who said: don't give it to a person, give it to an institution like YIVO or
the Yiddish Book Center where it can be shared. I found that very
compelling and have been investigating where it might be welcome. If the
owner decides he still wants to give it to an individual, the first person
who wrote knows who she is. If it goes to an institution, I will post
where, so that the many of you who wrote will be able to access a copy.

Carol Isenberg Clingan
Dedham MA


Require translation of Arolsen Archives documents

Rose
 

Dear Group

 

I recently received a number of documents from the Arolsen Archives in Germany for my maternal uncle Alexander HAZET which require translation. There are far too many to post on JewishGen but I would be grateful if anyone is able to assist with the translation.

 

Please contact me if you’re able to help in any way.

 

Best wishes

 

Rose Raymen

Perth, Western Australia


Jewish Genealogy Society of Maryland Oct 27 program

Susan Steeble
 

Speaker: Kira Dolcimascolo

Title: “The Heymann Family of Greifenberg”

Date and Time: Sunday, October 27, 2019, 1:30 p.m.

Location: Pikesville Library’s meeting room, 1301 Reisterstown Rd, Pikesville, MD

 

Please join us on Sunday, October 27, 2019, at 1:30 p.m. at the Pikesville Library’s meeting room, 1301 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville, when Kira Dolcimascolo presents our next program: “The Heymann Family of Greifenberg.

 

In this presentation, Kira Dolcimascolo tells the story of her great-grandmother Emma Heymann, and her 10 siblings from Greifenberg in Pomerania and Berlin. Members of this unusual family include not only circus strongwoman Katie Sandwina, but a boxer, a soap opera actor, a dancer, a “sausage man,” a “hobby-dentist,” Shanghai refugees, and descendants around the globe. As a result of her research and social media, she reunited with Heymann family members in Berlin in 2019. Kira will provide a short history of Jews in Pomerania and background on the Heymann family’s origins in Posen, West Prussia, and Pomerania, today all part of Poland. She shares her research techniques using Polish archives, web sites, and books specific to Pomeranian research, as well as research tips for small Jewish communities in the German Empire.

 

Kira Dolcimascolo has actively researched her Jewish-German and Sicilian roots for the past 6 years; her knowledge of her ancestors from Germany/Prussia now extends to the 17th and 18th centuries. When not obsessively researching her family’s genealogy, she works as a school-based occupational therapist and assists her husband with their painting and decorating business. She has lived in Baltimore for 30 years. 

 

The program is free for paid members and $5 for non-members (applied to membership fee when a visitor joins JGSMD) after their first meeting. Please check our web site at www.jgsmd.org for late updates and for the time, location, and program of future meetings.

Susan Steeble
Baltimore, MD
JGSMD Public Relations

 


Translation help with Hebrew inscription on grave #austria-czech

Michael Gordy
 

This is a collection of photos of an inscription on a single grave in Brno.  The name of the deceased in Aron Frisch.  I would be very grateful for a translation!
 
 
Thanks,
Michael Gordy
Takoma Park, MD, USA


Re: Lithuanian Yizkor Book

gordberger@sympatico.ca
 

Does anyone know if the last name Birger or Birgeras from Panevesyz
appears in the Lithuania Yizkor Book?


Re: Help translating town name on German manifest

Milton Goldsamt
 

By any chance could it be Lublin, in Poland (not Russia, as it might have then been under Russian rule)

Milton Goldsamt
Silver Spring, MD

31921 - 31940 of 668687