Date   

Re: Germany Easing of Restoration of German Citizenship for Descendants of Nazi Persecution #germany

David Cherson
 

Hi,
Personally I am glad to see Germany move further in reconciliation, etc., and I have always maintained that they are far ahead of Austria in this regard.  However I find it absurd and a little bit insulting to see Jews trying to claim German citizenship.  I can't help but think that there are two things that influence this "movement" and have very little to do with German reconciliation. One is how people view the current (US) administration (yes, "him") and their fears of the US going extreme right-wing (won't happen, we are still and will remain a democracy), and two not giving a thought to aliyah to Israel because of their dislike of Netanyahu, et.al.  Well they still engage in free and democratic elections in Israel (perhaps too many lol) and once you become a citizen you can vote.  I did and I have voted in past elections.  But if you really do want to acquire German citizenship then I would require that you do the following: for men, put on a kippah and walk the streets of German cities, say Berlin for example.  Or for both men and women wear some identifying clothing that makes gentiles think that you are Jewish, whether you are or not.  If you come out of that experience with no problems, etc. then fine become a German citizen if that is what you want.  As my father would say "Gain und zay gezint". 


ViewMate translation request - Yiddish on back of photo #ukraine

ssroth@...
 

Dear friends,
I'm hoping somebody can help me translate a Yiddish note on the back of a
photo. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM75859

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you so much.
Sheree Roth
Palo Alto, CA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine ViewMate translation request - Yiddish on back of photo #ukraine

ssroth@...
 

Dear friends,
I'm hoping somebody can help me translate a Yiddish note on the back of a
photo. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM75859

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you so much.
Sheree Roth
Palo Alto, CA


Question about obtaining Death Records from St. Petersburg

stephen cohen
 

I was able to obtain a photograph of the headstone of my great great
grandmother, Rebecca Pinchuk, from the Jewish Cemetery in St.
Petersburg. Per the headstone, she died in 1933. I was wondering if
anyone knew if there are surviving death records for this time in St.
Petersburg. If so, would anyone know how to go about obtaining a
copy. Is there a Russian archive in St. Petersburg to contact?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Stephen Cohen


Re: Naming of first-born after grandfather's death #galicia

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

On Wed, 13 Nov 2019 David Scriven <davidwriter@yahoo.com> asked the
Gesher Galicia SIG:

<<I've noted a pattern in the records of my family: if the husband's father dies,
the first-born male after this event will be given the same name as the
(deceased) grandfather. I'm guessing that this was a tradition - but was it
among all Jews in Galicia, or among a specific group? Was it seen outside
Galicia?

<<Apart >from the difficulties for genealogists of having people with the same
name every 2nd generation, was it enough of a rule/tradition that the reverse
inference can be made?

<<My g-g-grandparents had a child named Abraham Isac Pomeranz 3 months
after the death of an Abraham Isak Pomeranz (at age 52) >from my
g-g-grandfather's home town (Stryy). How likely is it that Abraham Isak
Pomeranz is actually my g-g-g-grandfather?>>


Yes this was a tradition pretty much throughout the Ashkenazi population, not
only in Galicia. Like all traditions it was widely followed but not universally.

The core tradition was to name a child after a deceased relative and applied
to both males and females. To name a child after a living relative was,
therefore, to wish the relative dead.

This tradition can be used in reverse for research purposes but with some
care. If grandpa Abraham Isaac had four children and he died while they were
still building their families, there could be four grandchildren named Abraham
Isaac. In addition, if he died while his wife was pregnant with a male child, the
child might also be named Abraham Isaac. Each of those grandchildren could
eventually have multiple grandchildren named Abraham Isaac. While Jews
tended to move around more than the gentile peasants, many did live in the
same town so first and second cousins, etc., could be found living near each
other. As a result it is possible that an older Abraham Isaac could be, not a
grandfather, but a great uncle or even a cousin twice removed. Care and
additional confirmatory research is always advisable.


Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

PZAVON@Rochester.rr.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: Naming of first-born after grandfather's death #galicia

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

On Wed, 13 Nov 2019 David Scriven <davidwriter@yahoo.com> asked the
Gesher Galicia SIG:

<<I've noted a pattern in the records of my family: if the husband's father dies,
the first-born male after this event will be given the same name as the
(deceased) grandfather. I'm guessing that this was a tradition - but was it
among all Jews in Galicia, or among a specific group? Was it seen outside
Galicia?

<<Apart >from the difficulties for genealogists of having people with the same
name every 2nd generation, was it enough of a rule/tradition that the reverse
inference can be made?

<<My g-g-grandparents had a child named Abraham Isac Pomeranz 3 months
after the death of an Abraham Isak Pomeranz (at age 52) >from my
g-g-grandfather's home town (Stryy). How likely is it that Abraham Isak
Pomeranz is actually my g-g-g-grandfather?>>


Yes this was a tradition pretty much throughout the Ashkenazi population, not
only in Galicia. Like all traditions it was widely followed but not universally.

The core tradition was to name a child after a deceased relative and applied
to both males and females. To name a child after a living relative was,
therefore, to wish the relative dead.

This tradition can be used in reverse for research purposes but with some
care. If grandpa Abraham Isaac had four children and he died while they were
still building their families, there could be four grandchildren named Abraham
Isaac. In addition, if he died while his wife was pregnant with a male child, the
child might also be named Abraham Isaac. Each of those grandchildren could
eventually have multiple grandchildren named Abraham Isaac. While Jews
tended to move around more than the gentile peasants, many did live in the
same town so first and second cousins, etc., could be found living near each
other. As a result it is possible that an older Abraham Isaac could be, not a
grandfather, but a great uncle or even a cousin twice removed. Care and
additional confirmatory research is always advisable.


Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

PZAVON@Rochester.rr.com


Re: name translation help

Barbara Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 

I think David Rosen may have it!   Faigele/Feigele could easily have been written by a non-Jewish clerk as Fikela… 
    (Yiddish/German words ending in an e are usually pronounced ah  — think Porsche….  

On Nov 12, 2019, at 2:52 PM, Susan&David <rosens@...> wrote:

Maybe the clerk was told Faigela and  heard it as  Fikela

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 11/12/2019 10:38 AM, sarahlmeyer@... wrote:
Have you checked the given names database on Jewishgen.org for suggestions?  Also remember that when you look in the US censuses there were times when Poland did not exist, it was either Russia (eastern and central) or Germany/Prussia (western).  Many people Americanized their names by using the first letter.  I have seen many instances of the name Sam when the Hebrew/Yiddish name was not Shmuel.  No idea of Filda - could the name have been Tilda?


Re: Rzeszow mescellanious records 1790 - 1840 #galicia #poland

Ruben Weiser
 

No tenzer or héller sorry

 

De: יצחק הלר <iheller7@...>
Enviado el: miércoles, 13 de noviembre de 2019 10:33
Para: main@...; rubweiser@...
Asunto: Re: Rzeszow mescellanious records 1790 - 1840

 

Hi Ruben

Please look up for TENZER and HELLER for me.

part of family lived in Tyczyn

best regards

Itzchak Heller

Tel Aviv

Israel


Re: Rzeszow mescellanious records 1790 - 1840 #galicia #poland

יצחק הלר
 

Hi Ruben
Please look up for TENZER and HELLER for me.
part of family lived in Tyczyn
best regards
Itzchak Heller
Tel Aviv
Israel


Re: Rzeszow mescellanious records 1790 - 1840 #galicia #poland

warrenkarpf@...
 

Hi Ruben,
I have just returned from Rzeszow where I spent time at the records office as I am looking for information on my paternal family...KARPF.
I have plenty of information on my maternal side which was Nieder/Koretz....a complete family tree and addresses etc. but very little on my Father's side.
Any help would be appreciated.
I have photos and information from this visit if anyone requires.
Regards
Warren Karpf (Scotland)


Call for Papers for the Galitzianer #austria-czech

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia's journal, the Galitzianer, invites members and
non-members of Gesher Galicia to submit articles with a clear
connection to Jewish life in Austrian Galicia (1772-1918). Submissions
can also relate to Jewish life in the territory of former Galicia
during the interwar period and the Holocaust.

Although the subject area is broad, here are some suggestions for
possible article submissions:

** Family stories, including ones that involve archival records from
Galicia and other sources that have reshaped your understanding of
your own family history

** Profiles of Jewish writers, musicians, artists, political figures,
or others who were active in Galicia

** The intergenerational tensions over education and professional
careers for women in Galicia

Prior to submitting an article, please contact me at
submissions@geshergalicia.org with a brief description of your
proposal. Once accepted, all submitted articles undergo editorial
review and revisions to make sure they conform to the style and
standards of the journal.

For more information about the "Galitzianer," including instructions
for authors, please consult our website at
https://www.geshergalicia.org/the-galitzianer/.

Thank you,

Jodi G. Benjamin
Editor, The Galitzianer
Gesher Galicia


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Call for Papers for the Galitzianer #austria-czech

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia's journal, the Galitzianer, invites members and
non-members of Gesher Galicia to submit articles with a clear
connection to Jewish life in Austrian Galicia (1772-1918). Submissions
can also relate to Jewish life in the territory of former Galicia
during the interwar period and the Holocaust.

Although the subject area is broad, here are some suggestions for
possible article submissions:

** Family stories, including ones that involve archival records from
Galicia and other sources that have reshaped your understanding of
your own family history

** Profiles of Jewish writers, musicians, artists, political figures,
or others who were active in Galicia

** The intergenerational tensions over education and professional
careers for women in Galicia

Prior to submitting an article, please contact me at
submissions@geshergalicia.org with a brief description of your
proposal. Once accepted, all submitted articles undergo editorial
review and revisions to make sure they conform to the style and
standards of the journal.

For more information about the "Galitzianer," including instructions
for authors, please consult our website at
https://www.geshergalicia.org/the-galitzianer/.

Thank you,

Jodi G. Benjamin
Editor, The Galitzianer
Gesher Galicia


Families from TACHOV/TACHAU #austria-czech

mehadrin@...
 

While looking at information regarding the grave of the saintly Rabbi
Nachum the scribe of Tachov, I spent some time reading the book
Geschichte der Juden in Tachau by Josef Schoen (1927) which is
available online. I saw that there is a familienregister, a register of
local families in which the author painstakingly copies the names and
dates of birth of the Jewish families of Tachau. This is an invaluable
resource for anyone with origins in that historic community.
A. Marmorstein


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Families from TACHOV/TACHAU #austria-czech

mehadrin@...
 

While looking at information regarding the grave of the saintly Rabbi
Nachum the scribe of Tachov, I spent some time reading the book
Geschichte der Juden in Tachau by Josef Schoen (1927) which is
available online. I saw that there is a familienregister, a register of
local families in which the author painstakingly copies the names and
dates of birth of the Jewish families of Tachau. This is an invaluable
resource for anyone with origins in that historic community.
A. Marmorstein


Old maps site

Avraham Y. Kahana
 

Not sure if this will be useful for you, but I thought sharing the following site I just discovered:

https://www.oldmapsonline.org/

It has a collection of old maps.

Avraham

israel


Re: Statistics on Conversos #sephardic

Ralph Baer
 

I want to thank everyone who replied to my question, both on line and
privately. While, as expected, there is not universal agreement as to the
percentage of Spanish Jews who converted, there was agreement that
significant numbers converted and significant numbers left the country.

The reason that I had so few Converso matches is probably what my contact
suggested, a relatively small amount of non-Americans take DNA tests from
American companies.

I wanted to correct one thing which I wrote in replies to a couple of
people. I do not have one 4th-great-grandmother who is known to be
Sephardic. That 4th-great-grandmother Barbara (Brendel) ASTRUK who was born
about 1735 in Worms and died on 20 February 1793 in Heidelberg-Rohrbach was
herself actually only quarter Sephardic through her paternal grandfather
Calmon ASTRUK (born about 1660 Mannheim, died 26 February 1721 Mannheim).

His parents were Moses Abraham ASTRUK (born about 1630 Avignon, died 1668
Mannheim) and Gentille CARCASSONE (born Avignon, died 16 January 1705 Wien).
Abraham's wife. Moses Abraham ASTRUK's father was Gad ASTROUQUE (ASTRUK)
(born about 1600 Avignon). His mother is unknown. Gentille CARCASSONE's
parents were Emanuel (Manoach) CARCASSONE (born Avignon, died 8 April 1667
Mannheim) and Rosa de MONTE (MONTEUX) (born Avignon, died Mannheim).

One 6th-great-grandparent would account for 1/256 on my DNA or about 0.4%
which would explain why autosomal DNA tests don't show it.

If anyone knows how the people whom I mentioned are connected to those
families in Avignon, I am certainly interested.

Ralph N. Baer Washington, DC RalphNBaer@aol.com


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Re: Statistics on Conversos #sephardic

Ralph Baer
 

I want to thank everyone who replied to my question, both on line and
privately. While, as expected, there is not universal agreement as to the
percentage of Spanish Jews who converted, there was agreement that
significant numbers converted and significant numbers left the country.

The reason that I had so few Converso matches is probably what my contact
suggested, a relatively small amount of non-Americans take DNA tests from
American companies.

I wanted to correct one thing which I wrote in replies to a couple of
people. I do not have one 4th-great-grandmother who is known to be
Sephardic. That 4th-great-grandmother Barbara (Brendel) ASTRUK who was born
about 1735 in Worms and died on 20 February 1793 in Heidelberg-Rohrbach was
herself actually only quarter Sephardic through her paternal grandfather
Calmon ASTRUK (born about 1660 Mannheim, died 26 February 1721 Mannheim).

His parents were Moses Abraham ASTRUK (born about 1630 Avignon, died 1668
Mannheim) and Gentille CARCASSONE (born Avignon, died 16 January 1705 Wien).
Abraham's wife. Moses Abraham ASTRUK's father was Gad ASTROUQUE (ASTRUK)
(born about 1600 Avignon). His mother is unknown. Gentille CARCASSONE's
parents were Emanuel (Manoach) CARCASSONE (born Avignon, died 8 April 1667
Mannheim) and Rosa de MONTE (MONTEUX) (born Avignon, died Mannheim).

One 6th-great-grandparent would account for 1/256 on my DNA or about 0.4%
which would explain why autosomal DNA tests don't show it.

If anyone knows how the people whom I mentioned are connected to those
families in Avignon, I am certainly interested.

Ralph N. Baer Washington, DC RalphNBaer@aol.com


Constantinople 1890's-Egypt

nardir4@...
 

My Grandmother Louise (bernhardson,bernardson,bernhardt,berman??) was born in then
Constantinople into a family of merchants.The family apparently also had interests in a water bottling plant in Egypt.or so we were told.

Her mother Susan Sarah (Barris,Beinich??) died in 1894 giving birth to her 3rd child Isadore.

Her father Abraham came from Roumania as a 1 month old baby in 1858.

his (Abraham’s) parents were Moses Ber and Nahame.

My grandmother went to the once prestigious German School in Constantinople.

She had a cousin also named Louise about the same age who later married a

Moritz Kremer,a jeweler in Cairo.There was a common uncle of the Louises named Ignatz also in Cairo.Louise Kremer had 6 children,the eldest named Emmanuel.

After my grandmothers mothers death the family moved to Thessalonika,and then to London about 1896

My grandmothers mtdna Haplogroup is N1b1b1.

If there is anyone out there that can recognise even the smallest detail in this sketchy outline(which is all we know) I would be ever so grateful to hear from you.

Robin S

nardir4@...


Hamaui in Argentina ?

Barbara Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 

HI Ruben, 

Wonder if you can direct me to a source other than CEMLA, for locating info on an uncle. 


BTW, my maternal Weiser line is from Buczacz and Tarnopol.  

Barbara Mannlein
Tucson, AZ



Immigration Records found for surname HAMAUI 

Surname: HAMAUI -
Name
Age
Marital
Status
Occupation
Religion
Nationality
Ship
Procedence
Arrival Info
Born in
day/month/year - Port
HAMAUI, LOULOU MALIQUE HARARI52CCASERACATOLICASIRIAOCEANIATRIESTE24/07/1939 - BUENOS AIRESALEPPO


HAMAUI, VICTOR31SCOMERCIOPROTESTANTEINGLESAAVELONALONDRES26/03/1931 - BUENOS AIRESMANCHESTER


SOLIMAN, HAMAUI16SBRACCIANTEMUSULMANASIRIASARDEGNAGENOVA01/09/1911 - BUENOS AIRES


On Nov 12, 2019, at 12:55 PM, rubweiser@... wrote:
anybody with ancestors in rzeszow poland from 1790 to 1840
and want to try to learn more about them
please send to me names and dates so i can make a fast look up

thanks
ruben weiser
buenos aires
argentina
_._,_._,


Apotheker family in USA

Neil Rosenstein
 

Trying to make contact with descendants of this family which traces
back to Landau rabbinical family of Sanz. One - Rabbi Aryey Leib
Aoptheker lived in New York (1846-1942). On Kevarim.com there for him
was a posting by David Apotheker of Stoughton, MA. Any contact
information would be appreciated.

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