Date   

How to obtain a court decision ? #lodz #poland

Dominique Merlet <dom.merlet@...>
 

Hello,

I would like to know how obtain a copy of a court decision in Lodz.

This document concerns my grandfather Mojzesz Izak GERSZONOWICZ,
but we don't know where to go to get it.

Mojzesz's birth was declared twice: once by his mother Chaja Mariem
in 1914 when she named her son Moshe and said he was born on
14-10-1910 and a second time by his father Jankiel in 1922 when
he named his son Mojzesz Isak and said he was born on 01-05-1911.
Jankiel was not present when her son was born (probably in the army...)

In 1932, the Court of Justice of Lodz issued a decision annulling the
1st birth certificate in favour of the 2nd. I would like to recover
this court decision and know the motivation that gave priority to
the father's statement.

A few weeks ago, I submitted an online request on the website of
The States Archive in Lodz but I don't have an answer. Is this the
organization to be solicited?

Do you know how to obtain this document? Who should we contact?
Who can obtain it and what proof of identity do we need to produce?

Thank you for your help.

Best regards.


Mme Dominique MERLET


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland How to obtain a court decision ? #lodz #poland

Dominique Merlet <dom.merlet@...>
 

Hello,

I would like to know how obtain a copy of a court decision in Lodz.

This document concerns my grandfather Mojzesz Izak GERSZONOWICZ,
but we don't know where to go to get it.

Mojzesz's birth was declared twice: once by his mother Chaja Mariem
in 1914 when she named her son Moshe and said he was born on
14-10-1910 and a second time by his father Jankiel in 1922 when
he named his son Mojzesz Isak and said he was born on 01-05-1911.
Jankiel was not present when her son was born (probably in the army...)

In 1932, the Court of Justice of Lodz issued a decision annulling the
1st birth certificate in favour of the 2nd. I would like to recover
this court decision and know the motivation that gave priority to
the father's statement.

A few weeks ago, I submitted an online request on the website of
The States Archive in Lodz but I don't have an answer. Is this the
organization to be solicited?

Do you know how to obtain this document? Who should we contact?
Who can obtain it and what proof of identity do we need to produce?

Thank you for your help.

Best regards.


Mme Dominique MERLET


Theresian Cadaster Revisited #austria-czech

Paul King
 

Theresian Cadaster (Tereziansky katastr)

In a private correspondence replying to my SIG posting of November 27,
"Randy Schoenberg's Prague Visit", Randy corrects my chronological
boundaries for the Theresian Cadastre by giving a time span of
1748-1754, I had given the time span as c 1714 - c 1748. Randy cites
an article by a Dr. Kosir accompanied by a URL.
http://www2.arnes.si/~krsrd1/conference/Speeches/Kosir_Land_Records.htm

I believe that the Kosir dates refer to the PUBLISHING of the Cadastre
and not the contents which began more than two decades earlier. I wish
to elaborate because I think the following information is very
important for SIG Austria-Czech family researchers seeking to identify
Bohemian ancestors during the reigns of Charles VI and Maria Theresia

1. "The enumerations in the Theresian cadastre were begun in 1715 and
completed during the period 1727-1729. The majority of the
enumerations were collected in 1723; the district of Bechni and
Konigratz after 1723." Ruth Kestenberg-Gladstein, The Non-Metropolitan
1724 Census of the Jewish Population in Bohemia, Zion 9 (1)1943, fn.
11. [Hebrew]

2. According to an entry in an abbreviated version of the 1748
Theresian cadastre published in 1964, a Jewish resident registered on
the Zduchovice estate (no name given) was a wine distiller, butcher,
and merchant in corn, cattle and cloth. Two servants were living with
him. In the original edition of the Theresian cadastre, a Jakob Lobl
is named as the referent of the 1964 citing and the cadastre entry is
dated 1718. It reads that he is collecting the taxes, has 2 horses, 2
cows, 3 sheep, and that he has been resident on the estate for 40
years. His taxes amount to 50 kreuzers and another 100 kr. schutzgeld.
This information was supplied to me by Prague genealogist, Julius
Muller. Jakob Lobl also appears in the 1724 census, resident in
Zduchovice.

3. "The convoluted collection of Bohemia's second cadastral survey is
traditionally referred to as the "Theresian Cadastre", although the
preparatory work commences in 1710-1711, the first processing phase in
1713-1714, and the revision in the year 1722, that is, largely in the
reign of Charles VI. The final elaboration of the collected data comes
from the years 1748 and 1756, the actual reign of Maria Theresia,"
Michaela Kral, Auswirkungen des Familiantengesetzes auf eine judische
Familie in der sudbohmischen Stadt Patzau zwischen 1726 und 1849. Eine
Fallstudie, [Effects of the Family Decree on a Jewish Family in the
South Bohemian Town of Patzau (Pacov)] between 1726 and 1849. A Case
Study], Zeitschrift f=C3=BCr Ostmitteleuropa-Forschung 53/1 (2004), S. 83 -
98, fn. 25. The text notes that "In the Theresian cadastre (data from
1734) eight Jewish families are listed in Patzau."

4. For a recent applied use of the Cadastre with a description of what
its content entailed, see "Was Domar Right? Serfdom and Factor
Endowments in Bohemia," Alexander Klein and Sheilagh Ogilvie, October
2017. https://www.kent.ac.uk/economics/documents/research/papers/2017/1717.pdf
Neither this article nor other micro socio-economic studies of Ogilvie
touch on Jewish residents of Bohemia but are splendid investigations
of what could and should be done regarding the role of Jews in
commerce and communication in the Bohemian Crown Lands.

5. In a publication of the Jewish Museum on the Radobyl Cemetery near
Kamyk nad Vltavou in Beroun District, one finds the following remark:
"In 1719, first written evidence on Jews, in cadastre Terezianskeho."
Dated 31 May 1719. About Jews in nearby Drazkov.

Theresian Cadastre is a generic term for material gathered >from the
beginning of the second decade of the 18th c. in the reign of Charles
VI. Its material was collected until at least the 1740s under the
regime of Maria Theresa. It appears to embrace both census and
cadastre material, that is, enumeration of the population (census) and
enumeration of the mobile and immobile property (cadastre) of
household heads in specific municipal locations.

I welcome comments and corrections but I hope I have briefly
demonstrated that stuff relevant to Jewish genealogy can be turned up
in this Habsburg mania for documenting and re-documenting.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Theresian Cadaster Revisited #austria-czech

Paul King
 

Theresian Cadaster (Tereziansky katastr)

In a private correspondence replying to my SIG posting of November 27,
"Randy Schoenberg's Prague Visit", Randy corrects my chronological
boundaries for the Theresian Cadastre by giving a time span of
1748-1754, I had given the time span as c 1714 - c 1748. Randy cites
an article by a Dr. Kosir accompanied by a URL.
http://www2.arnes.si/~krsrd1/conference/Speeches/Kosir_Land_Records.htm

I believe that the Kosir dates refer to the PUBLISHING of the Cadastre
and not the contents which began more than two decades earlier. I wish
to elaborate because I think the following information is very
important for SIG Austria-Czech family researchers seeking to identify
Bohemian ancestors during the reigns of Charles VI and Maria Theresia

1. "The enumerations in the Theresian cadastre were begun in 1715 and
completed during the period 1727-1729. The majority of the
enumerations were collected in 1723; the district of Bechni and
Konigratz after 1723." Ruth Kestenberg-Gladstein, The Non-Metropolitan
1724 Census of the Jewish Population in Bohemia, Zion 9 (1)1943, fn.
11. [Hebrew]

2. According to an entry in an abbreviated version of the 1748
Theresian cadastre published in 1964, a Jewish resident registered on
the Zduchovice estate (no name given) was a wine distiller, butcher,
and merchant in corn, cattle and cloth. Two servants were living with
him. In the original edition of the Theresian cadastre, a Jakob Lobl
is named as the referent of the 1964 citing and the cadastre entry is
dated 1718. It reads that he is collecting the taxes, has 2 horses, 2
cows, 3 sheep, and that he has been resident on the estate for 40
years. His taxes amount to 50 kreuzers and another 100 kr. schutzgeld.
This information was supplied to me by Prague genealogist, Julius
Muller. Jakob Lobl also appears in the 1724 census, resident in
Zduchovice.

3. "The convoluted collection of Bohemia's second cadastral survey is
traditionally referred to as the "Theresian Cadastre", although the
preparatory work commences in 1710-1711, the first processing phase in
1713-1714, and the revision in the year 1722, that is, largely in the
reign of Charles VI. The final elaboration of the collected data comes
from the years 1748 and 1756, the actual reign of Maria Theresia,"
Michaela Kral, Auswirkungen des Familiantengesetzes auf eine judische
Familie in der sudbohmischen Stadt Patzau zwischen 1726 und 1849. Eine
Fallstudie, [Effects of the Family Decree on a Jewish Family in the
South Bohemian Town of Patzau (Pacov)] between 1726 and 1849. A Case
Study], Zeitschrift f=C3=BCr Ostmitteleuropa-Forschung 53/1 (2004), S. 83 -
98, fn. 25. The text notes that "In the Theresian cadastre (data from
1734) eight Jewish families are listed in Patzau."

4. For a recent applied use of the Cadastre with a description of what
its content entailed, see "Was Domar Right? Serfdom and Factor
Endowments in Bohemia," Alexander Klein and Sheilagh Ogilvie, October
2017. https://www.kent.ac.uk/economics/documents/research/papers/2017/1717.pdf
Neither this article nor other micro socio-economic studies of Ogilvie
touch on Jewish residents of Bohemia but are splendid investigations
of what could and should be done regarding the role of Jews in
commerce and communication in the Bohemian Crown Lands.

5. In a publication of the Jewish Museum on the Radobyl Cemetery near
Kamyk nad Vltavou in Beroun District, one finds the following remark:
"In 1719, first written evidence on Jews, in cadastre Terezianskeho."
Dated 31 May 1719. About Jews in nearby Drazkov.

Theresian Cadastre is a generic term for material gathered >from the
beginning of the second decade of the 18th c. in the reign of Charles
VI. Its material was collected until at least the 1740s under the
regime of Maria Theresa. It appears to embrace both census and
cadastre material, that is, enumeration of the population (census) and
enumeration of the mobile and immobile property (cadastre) of
household heads in specific municipal locations.

I welcome comments and corrections but I hope I have briefly
demonstrated that stuff relevant to Jewish genealogy can be turned up
in this Habsburg mania for documenting and re-documenting.

Paul King
Jerusalem


The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler #southafrica

geraldine.auerbach@...
 

Smouse is a term that was often used to describe an itinerant Jewish peddler in
South Africa. It seemed to me to be used almost as a badge of pride for some
early settlers who started their livelihood in South Africa providing goods for
the farmers and shopkeepers in the country areas.

The Jewish digital archive for Graaff Reinet says:
The Mosenthals set up trading stores, promoted the mohair industry and supported
the Jewish peddlers ("smouse"). A monument to these "smouse" was erected in
Graaff-Reinet in 1989.

South African Jewish Museum Cape Town, website says: 'Known as smouse (or
peddlers) they fanned out across the country into the small rural communities.
They travelled in wagons with goods for sale and many settled in these tiny towns
and villages that once had thriving Jewish communities (although this is no
longer the case).

I also have included a paragraph below >from THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF NAMAQUALAND
mentioning smouse and how they were welcomed by the Dutch farmers.

However, I was concerned to hear >from one of our Kimberley ex-pats, that being
called a 'smouse' was not a complementary word - and that many Jewish traders did
not appreciate this term. He said: People use the word smuk or smow in Yiddish
but these are derogatory words. There was nothing complimentary by calling a
Jewish trader a smouse. He said, 'The Afrikaners used this term because they
also believed that the Jews exploited them by over charging for their goods. My
parents who spoke only Yiddish at home told me never to use this word as it was
insulting. The Afrikaners many of whom were anti-Semitic during the war years
enjoyed using this derogatory word to label many of the Jewish businesses.'

I just wonder if anyone has any views on the term 'Smouse' and how it was used,
and whether it was mainly a derogatory or neutral term.

I look forward to hearing >from you.
Best wishes
Geraldine


Geraldine Auerbach MBE
T: 020 8907 1905 M: 07971 818 262
geraldine.auerbach@...

.........................................
THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF NAMAQUALAND
Peddlers appeared in South Africa in the late nineteenth century, and
the name smous or bondeldraers (men carrying bundles) were given to
them by the Dutch. These itinerant travellers arrived on foot >from the
Cape carrying items for trading on their backs. They made their way
from farm to farm selling jewellery, sewing necessities such as
needles, buttons, thread, thimbles, pins and an assortment of
material, as well as herbs, medicines and beauty products. They were
welcomed on the farms, given food and accommodation and sometimes had
their washing done for them. Travelling over the rough terrain of
Namaqualand was dangerous, especially while descending the steep Kammiesberg.
This community of Jewish traders in Namaqualand came >from the shtetls
of Eastern Europe and at its peak in the 1930s there were about 200
peddlers, and the numbers subsequently declined until the peddlers
became a part of the formal economy of the region. Fleeing repression,
the peddlers started off supplying necessities -- and later luxuries --
to isolated farmers. Many years later they became proprietors of
country hotels, spotting the need to provide hospitality to travellers
in these inhospitable parts. Having been attracted to the region by
the development of copper mining in the 1850s and the discovery of
diamonds in the 1920s, these Jews became the area's middlemen --
traders, shopkeepers and hoteliers -- rather than being involved in the mining
itself.
.......................................................

In the city of Graaf-Reinet, there was a plaque on the main street
honoring the "smouse," the itinerant merchant who peddled wares >from town to town.
The smouse would travel with a cart filled with supplies that often
served as a lifeline for these tiny outposts in the wilderness. Yet
every city I stop in now, a whole litany of places like Grahamstown,
Ladybrand, Kroonstad, Colesburg, Ficksburg and Bethlehem (yes, same
name), there are communities that have dried up, and synagogues that
are now closed. Some synagogues have been bought out by private
business like the one in Colesburg that is now an ABSA bank office.
............................................
Some crossed the countryside as smouse (itinerant peddlers), where
devout Boer farmers who regarded them as the "people of the book"
received them warmly. These entrepreneurs were significant agents of
the commercial revolution that transformed the South African
countryside in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They acted
as intermediates between the dorps and the producers, both black and
white. Jewish storekeepers and smouse bought wool, maize and skins
from Boer landowners and black sharecroppers and then sent them to
urban markets and wholesalers. In turn the Jewish country stores met
the growing needs of these emergent rural consumers.


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler #southafrica

geraldine.auerbach@...
 

Smouse is a term that was often used to describe an itinerant Jewish peddler in
South Africa. It seemed to me to be used almost as a badge of pride for some
early settlers who started their livelihood in South Africa providing goods for
the farmers and shopkeepers in the country areas.

The Jewish digital archive for Graaff Reinet says:
The Mosenthals set up trading stores, promoted the mohair industry and supported
the Jewish peddlers ("smouse"). A monument to these "smouse" was erected in
Graaff-Reinet in 1989.

South African Jewish Museum Cape Town, website says: 'Known as smouse (or
peddlers) they fanned out across the country into the small rural communities.
They travelled in wagons with goods for sale and many settled in these tiny towns
and villages that once had thriving Jewish communities (although this is no
longer the case).

I also have included a paragraph below >from THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF NAMAQUALAND
mentioning smouse and how they were welcomed by the Dutch farmers.

However, I was concerned to hear >from one of our Kimberley ex-pats, that being
called a 'smouse' was not a complementary word - and that many Jewish traders did
not appreciate this term. He said: People use the word smuk or smow in Yiddish
but these are derogatory words. There was nothing complimentary by calling a
Jewish trader a smouse. He said, 'The Afrikaners used this term because they
also believed that the Jews exploited them by over charging for their goods. My
parents who spoke only Yiddish at home told me never to use this word as it was
insulting. The Afrikaners many of whom were anti-Semitic during the war years
enjoyed using this derogatory word to label many of the Jewish businesses.'

I just wonder if anyone has any views on the term 'Smouse' and how it was used,
and whether it was mainly a derogatory or neutral term.

I look forward to hearing >from you.
Best wishes
Geraldine


Geraldine Auerbach MBE
T: 020 8907 1905 M: 07971 818 262
geraldine.auerbach@...

.........................................
THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF NAMAQUALAND
Peddlers appeared in South Africa in the late nineteenth century, and
the name smous or bondeldraers (men carrying bundles) were given to
them by the Dutch. These itinerant travellers arrived on foot >from the
Cape carrying items for trading on their backs. They made their way
from farm to farm selling jewellery, sewing necessities such as
needles, buttons, thread, thimbles, pins and an assortment of
material, as well as herbs, medicines and beauty products. They were
welcomed on the farms, given food and accommodation and sometimes had
their washing done for them. Travelling over the rough terrain of
Namaqualand was dangerous, especially while descending the steep Kammiesberg.
This community of Jewish traders in Namaqualand came >from the shtetls
of Eastern Europe and at its peak in the 1930s there were about 200
peddlers, and the numbers subsequently declined until the peddlers
became a part of the formal economy of the region. Fleeing repression,
the peddlers started off supplying necessities -- and later luxuries --
to isolated farmers. Many years later they became proprietors of
country hotels, spotting the need to provide hospitality to travellers
in these inhospitable parts. Having been attracted to the region by
the development of copper mining in the 1850s and the discovery of
diamonds in the 1920s, these Jews became the area's middlemen --
traders, shopkeepers and hoteliers -- rather than being involved in the mining
itself.
.......................................................

In the city of Graaf-Reinet, there was a plaque on the main street
honoring the "smouse," the itinerant merchant who peddled wares >from town to town.
The smouse would travel with a cart filled with supplies that often
served as a lifeline for these tiny outposts in the wilderness. Yet
every city I stop in now, a whole litany of places like Grahamstown,
Ladybrand, Kroonstad, Colesburg, Ficksburg and Bethlehem (yes, same
name), there are communities that have dried up, and synagogues that
are now closed. Some synagogues have been bought out by private
business like the one in Colesburg that is now an ABSA bank office.
............................................
Some crossed the countryside as smouse (itinerant peddlers), where
devout Boer farmers who regarded them as the "people of the book"
received them warmly. These entrepreneurs were significant agents of
the commercial revolution that transformed the South African
countryside in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They acted
as intermediates between the dorps and the producers, both black and
white. Jewish storekeepers and smouse bought wool, maize and skins
from Boer landowners and black sharecroppers and then sent them to
urban markets and wholesalers. In turn the Jewish country stores met
the growing needs of these emergent rural consumers.


Re: Khashchevate - Chashivater Aid Society

yael polat
 

Hi!
we are aware of the plot and the Izkor book.
We are looking for information about the society itself, who was in it, which activities did they organize. I found the book recommended, but it is about landmanshaften in general.


View Mate: Krugersdorp, South Africa Yiddish Drama Society 1923 #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

I have posted on View Mate a photo of the Krugersdorp, South Africa
Yiddish Drama Society 1923. This is for possible identification of
participants. Request is >from Elona Steinfeld of the Country
Communities Project, SA Friends of Beth Hatfusoth.

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76020

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

If anyone has a clearer copy of the photo please send .jpeg file to
museum@... . Thank you very much

Saul Issroff
London


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica View Mate: Krugersdorp, South Africa Yiddish Drama Society 1923 #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

I have posted on View Mate a photo of the Krugersdorp, South Africa
Yiddish Drama Society 1923. This is for possible identification of
participants. Request is >from Elona Steinfeld of the Country
Communities Project, SA Friends of Beth Hatfusoth.

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76020

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

If anyone has a clearer copy of the photo please send .jpeg file to
museum@... . Thank you very much

Saul Issroff
London


Re: German letter translation

Helene Bergman
 


I've posted what I believe is a letter written in German from my grandmother's brother in Prague to her in New York for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76010
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.
Lanie Bergman


JewishGen Education 2020 #warsaw #poland

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education has updated its classes and its formats 2020

We are delighted to offer a new range of courses in 2020.

1. 3 week Mentored Classes with personal instruction based on helping a
student progress with research projects.
2. Home Study classes which are delivered electronically
3. Workbook courses which are Free. Tuition is waived for Value Added
members of JewishGen who have donated $100 to the General Fund in the
last 12 months.

The three week classes are taught in a unique FORUM, a personal
mentoring experience, where students have the opportunity to share their
story and work one step at a time with the instructor. Students are
encouraged to post one branch, set goals for their research and work
interactively. Instructors are familiar with a wide range of resources
and offer text lessons to accompany the research process.

Home Study consists of PDF lessons. Consider the beginning course for
organization and basic research skills (census, vital records, manifests)
then move on to the Complex U.S. course which covers naturalization,
military, governmental records, and local archival research.

Workbook Basic Courses are self-paced text based PDFs with exercises
covering genealogical tools to enhance research skills. Tuition is waived
for Value Added members of JewishGen who have donated $100 to the General
Fund in the last 12 months.

We strongly encourage researchers to look at the course details,
instructor's credentials and student requirements (time, fee,
prerequisites) on the updated education web page:
www.jewishgen.org/education . Course Registration opens two weeks before
the course start date. If, after reviewing the education page, you have
some questions, please email
JewishGen-Education@...
and happy sleuthing!

Nancy Holden, Director of Education
www.JewishGen.org/education


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland JewishGen Education 2020 #warsaw #poland

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education has updated its classes and its formats 2020

We are delighted to offer a new range of courses in 2020.

1. 3 week Mentored Classes with personal instruction based on helping a
student progress with research projects.
2. Home Study classes which are delivered electronically
3. Workbook courses which are Free. Tuition is waived for Value Added
members of JewishGen who have donated $100 to the General Fund in the
last 12 months.

The three week classes are taught in a unique FORUM, a personal
mentoring experience, where students have the opportunity to share their
story and work one step at a time with the instructor. Students are
encouraged to post one branch, set goals for their research and work
interactively. Instructors are familiar with a wide range of resources
and offer text lessons to accompany the research process.

Home Study consists of PDF lessons. Consider the beginning course for
organization and basic research skills (census, vital records, manifests)
then move on to the Complex U.S. course which covers naturalization,
military, governmental records, and local archival research.

Workbook Basic Courses are self-paced text based PDFs with exercises
covering genealogical tools to enhance research skills. Tuition is waived
for Value Added members of JewishGen who have donated $100 to the General
Fund in the last 12 months.

We strongly encourage researchers to look at the course details,
instructor's credentials and student requirements (time, fee,
prerequisites) on the updated education web page:
www.jewishgen.org/education . Course Registration opens two weeks before
the course start date. If, after reviewing the education page, you have
some questions, please email
JewishGen-Education@...
and happy sleuthing!

Nancy Holden, Director of Education
www.JewishGen.org/education


Translation request--Russian--MURAKHOVSKIY family of Boguslav

Joseph Walder
 

I have posted two vital records in Russian for which I need a translation. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM75988


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM75989

Both records are from an 1875 census of Boguslav, Kanev uyezd, Kiev gubernia. I am able to make out a few of the names but I cannot actually read Russian so I would love as complete a translation as possible.

I’m reasonably confident that the Yankel MURAKHOVSKIY in the first record is my great grandfather. I’m not certain how the people named in the second record relate to him.

The original records are here:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:%D0%94%D0%90%D0%9A%D0%9E_12-3-641._1875_%D1%80%D1%96%D0%BA._%D0%9F%D0%B5%D1%80%D0%B5%D0%BF%D0%B8%D1%81_%D1%94%D0%B2%D1%80%D0%B5%D1%97%D0%B2_%D0%BC%D1%96%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B0_%D0%91%D0%BE%D0%B3%D1%83%D1%81%D0%BB%D0%B0%D0%B2%D0%B0_%D0%9A%D0%B0%D0%BD%D1%96%D0%B2%D1%81%D1%8C%D0%BA%D0%BE%D0%B3%D0%BE_%D0%BF%D0%BE%D0%B2%D1%96%D1%82%D1%83.pdf

The first is at the bottom of page 11 and top of page 12; the second is on page 55.

 

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.


Joseph Walder


More on USCIS Fee Increase #Archives #Records Access

Jan Meisels Allen
 

I was asked if I could enumerate types of records that one may find from USCIS.  These are a list of some of the types of records you may find:

 

Naturalization Certificate Files (C-Files), September 27, 1906 to March 31, 1956

 

·         Alien Registration Forms (Form AR-2), August 1940 to March 1944

 

·         Visa Files, July 1, 1924 to March 31, 1944

 

·               Registry Files, March 1929 to March 31, 1944

 

·               A-Files, April 1, 1944 to May 1, 1951

 

If you had  relatives who immigrated to the United States in the 20th century this the place to order the above records.

 

Per USCIS the A-File is:

What Are A-Files?

 

Alien Files, or "A-Files," are individual files identified by subject's Alien Registration Number ("A-number"). An A-number is a unique personal identifier assigned to a non-citizen. A-Files became the official file for all immigration and naturalization records created or consolidated since April 1, 1944.

See: https://www.uscis.gov/history-and-genealogy/genealogy/files-numbered-below-8-million#WhatAreAFiles

 

 

Per USCIS the C-File is:

What are C-Files?        

 

Certificate Files, or "C-Files,"  document naturalizations - the acquisition of United States citizenship after birth. C-Files contain copies of records evidencing the:

 

    Granting of naturalized U.S. citizenship by courts between from 1906 to 1956; and

    Issuance of Certificates of Citizenship to those who derived or resumed U.S. citizenship.

 

C-Files are a product of the Basic Naturalization Act of 1906. That law created the Federal Naturalization Service and required the new agency to collect and maintain copies of all naturalization records nationwide. The C-File series later expanded to include records of U.S. citizenship acquired by derivation (naturalization by virtue of qualifying relation to another who is a birthright or naturalized citizen) and resumption or repatriation by former citizens that expatriated themselves (lost their U.S. citizenship).

 

Between September 27, 1906 until March 31, 1956, the Federal Naturalization Service stored its citizenship records in C-Files. Certain C-File documents are duplicated in the records of naturalization courts across the nation. Other C-File documents are unique.

See: https://www.uscis.gov/history-and-genealogy/genealogy/certificate-files-september-27-1906-march-31-1956#C-Files

 

Per USCIS Registry file are:

What are Registry Files?

 

Registry Files document the creation of official immigrant arrival records under the Registry Act of March 2, 1929 (45 Stat 1512). The Registry Act applied to persons who entered the United States prior to July 1, 1924, and for whom no arrival record could later be found. Because the Registry Program required applicants to document their arrival and subsequent residence in the country, Registry Files often contain significant biographical information about the subject immigrant.

See: https://www.uscis.gov/history-and-genealogy/genealogy/registry-files-march-2-1929-march-31-1944#WhatAreRegistryFiles

 

The most important thing is to oppose the obscene fee increases. Go to: https://www.recordsnotrevenue.com/ for more information and

send your comments to:

Written comments must be submitted on or before December 16, 2019.  Comments must be identified by DHS Docket No. USCIS– 2019–0010 by one of the following methods:

•Federal eRulemaking Portal: http:// www.regulations.gov

•By Mail: Samantha Deshommes, Chief, Regulatory Coordination Division, Office of Policy and Strategy, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security, 20 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Mailstop  #2140, Washington, DC 20529–2140.

No hand delivered or couriered comments will be accepted. Nor will they accept anything on digital medial storage devices such as CDs/DVDs or USB drives.

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 


Book - The Tattooist of Auschwitz

edoberst@...
 

I recommend this book, even though I did not want read  to another book about The Holocaust. This book is a novel, based on the real life story of a Jewish man and his girlfriend, who later became his wife. The story is riveting. I read it in 2 days !


(US) Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz Introduces Bill Restoring Rights of Holocaust Era Insurance Benefits

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) introduced a bi-partisan bill, The Holocaust Insurance Accountability Act of 2019, that would restore the rights of Holocaust-era insurance beneficiaries to recover billions in unclaimed payments left behind after World War ll. Co-sponsors currently include: Rep. Lee Zeldin, R-New York.   Senator Marco Rubio R-FL introduced the companion bill , S 2621 in October. ( See: https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/senate-bill/2621/text?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B%22Holocaust+Insurance+Accountability+Act%22%5D%7D&r=1&s=8).  The House version is not yet printed nor does it have a bill number.

 

Due to federal court rulings and a failure by insurance companies to adequately publish the names of recipients and pay these claims, 97 percent of the approximately 800,000 policies held in 1938 have yet to be honored. The insurers’ unreasonable demands that death certificates and original policy paperwork be produced is all but impossible for survivors who, at the time, had just survived death camps, forced relocations, torture and death marches.

 

The legislation would: validate state laws requiring insurers to publish policy holder information; establish a federal cause of action in U.S. courts to ensure Holocaust survivors and heirs have access to U.S. courts; and provide a 10-year period of time for cases to be brought after the date of enactment.

 

To read Rep. Wasserman-Shultz’s press release see”: https://wassermanschultz.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=2430

 

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

 

 


ViewMate translation request - Polish

shaul berger
 

I've posted two letters in Polish for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following addresses.

.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76002

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page. You can also contact me directly at dspmaster@....

The first letter was written in 1940 by my father in law from Hungary after he escaped from the Nazis in Poland. We would like to get translation of the letter that we think describes his situation  as well as other family members. The second letter was written by my wife's aunt. She and her family fled the Nazis from Poland to Russia. The Russians exiled them to Siberia. We do not know the nature of this letter but it was written by Jadwiga Neuman (nee Mandelbaum) and sent to Ruth Lekowicz that lived in 45 Popham rd in Scarsdale NY. The letter was written in June 18, 1945.

If you have any questions, you are welcome to contact me by email. Thank you very much.

Shaul Berger
California
 
BRUMER, RETTIG, WATTENBERG (Zolkiew, Rawa Russka);
HUTTER, KIFLIG, HERZIG, WATTENBERG (Jaroslaw, Przemysl,
Dobromil, Stanislawow);
BERGER & SPITZER (Szecseny, Shirkovce, Prague);
POSNER, LICHTSZAJN (Warsaw); EHRENREICH (Warsaw/Miechow);
SCHELL & RIEGER (Gorlice); NEUMANN, FADENHECHT & NACHT (Krakow, Buczacz)


Scholarship offered to attend the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh in summer 2020

Emily Garber
 

Jewish Genners:

 

Next Summer, from July 19-24, 2020, the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP) will for the first time be offering Introduction to Jewish Genealogy (see attached flyer). This course, team-taught by Emily Garber, Janette Silverman, Lara Diamond and Marian L. Smith, will concentrate on Eastern European Ashkenazi Jewish research in the Old World and the United States in 21 lessons.

 

We will provide additional information at a later date, but for now we want to make sure that those who are thinking of attending are aware of a scholarship opportunity: the Donn Devine Scholarship. GRIP will sponsor a full scholarship for a first time GRIP attendee. It will include full tuition and on-campus housing in a shared room (total value $825). The application deadline is January 1, 2020. For more information see: https://www.gripitt.org/grip-announces-the-donn-devine-scholarship/ .

 

To read more about the concept of a genealogical institute, see https://www.gripitt.org/gripitt-home/what-is-an-institute/ .

 

To see all the sessions and courses offered in 2020, see https://www.gripitt.org/courses/ .

 

Registration for GRIP 2020 will open on February 5, 2020. In the meantime, one may find more information at https://www.gripitt.org/ and https://www.gripitt.org/registration/ .

 

Emily Garber

Phoenix, AZ


Dr. Henry Weksler, Social Psychologist from Harvard

Neil Rosenstein
 

Trying to make contact with the children of Dr. Weksler author of
"Dying to Drink."
The family resided in Boston and descended from the Horowitz
rabbinical family of Piotrkow.


Re: Mount Zion Cemetery seeks old photos and documents

Leah Cook
 

I have all of the photos from the Mathilda Banner Plot at Mt. Zion.  Photos are digital. Plus I have a description of the Mathilda Banner Benevolent Society (which I can photocopy).  Any interest?
Leah Cook
leahcook@...

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