Date   

Re: Meaning of the name FRIEDMAN #general

Jeffma2525@...
 

[Elmer Friedman writes: Researching FRIEDMAN (FRYDMAN,FRIDMAN) of Korosten and
Zitomir in Ukraine. I have maintained that our family name of FRIEDMAN translates
to "man of peace". Others say it means "freed man " or "free man". I would
appreciate some elucidation in this matter. Thank you.]


Alexander Beider in "A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from the Russian Empire"
examines the name FRIDMAN. The name derives >from "frid" Yiddish for "Peace"
with the addition of the element man. It arose as a calque >from the given name
Shalom.

There were many European countries where it was forbidden to assume Hebrew names
as family names. By selecting names looking like the word friede which is a
German word and thus acceptable, the Jews could still preserve their own meaning
of the name Shalom or Salomon.

The word for "Free" would be spelled frei. Had the name been spelled FREIMAN,
rather than FRIEDMAN, then the name would indeed mean "Free Man".

Jeff Malet
jeffma2525@...

Searching:

MALATZKY, FRIEDLAND, KACHERGINSKY >from Vidzy; FREEDLAND >from London
SCHERESCHEWSKY, RUDAITZKY, TAUROG, MUSCHAT >from Taurage & Riga
MARGOLIN, RUBIN >from Dolginovo
KOPELOWITZ, KAPLAN, KOPPELON, KOPELOFF >from Krevo
WOLFSON >from Zeimelis; KARASIN >from Dvinsk; CARTER >from Halifax


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Meaning of the name FRIEDMAN #general

Jeffma2525@...
 

[Elmer Friedman writes: Researching FRIEDMAN (FRYDMAN,FRIDMAN) of Korosten and
Zitomir in Ukraine. I have maintained that our family name of FRIEDMAN translates
to "man of peace". Others say it means "freed man " or "free man". I would
appreciate some elucidation in this matter. Thank you.]


Alexander Beider in "A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from the Russian Empire"
examines the name FRIDMAN. The name derives >from "frid" Yiddish for "Peace"
with the addition of the element man. It arose as a calque >from the given name
Shalom.

There were many European countries where it was forbidden to assume Hebrew names
as family names. By selecting names looking like the word friede which is a
German word and thus acceptable, the Jews could still preserve their own meaning
of the name Shalom or Salomon.

The word for "Free" would be spelled frei. Had the name been spelled FREIMAN,
rather than FRIEDMAN, then the name would indeed mean "Free Man".

Jeff Malet
jeffma2525@...

Searching:

MALATZKY, FRIEDLAND, KACHERGINSKY >from Vidzy; FREEDLAND >from London
SCHERESCHEWSKY, RUDAITZKY, TAUROG, MUSCHAT >from Taurage & Riga
MARGOLIN, RUBIN >from Dolginovo
KOPELOWITZ, KAPLAN, KOPPELON, KOPELOFF >from Krevo
WOLFSON >from Zeimelis; KARASIN >from Dvinsk; CARTER >from Halifax


Success Story re: Argentina #general

Rochelle Gershenow
 

I would suggest searching Buenos Aires Jewish cemeteries which are online
http://www.amia.org.ar/difuntos.asp
Jacob Rosen>

This website is a great find! I found my relatives (the dead ones anyway).
I had searched before for online cemetery info with no success.

For the Spanish speaking genners, I have a question regarding a naming protocol
for women. If the name appears as as Salem de Purinzon Sarah which is maiden
name, mother's name, or married name; and, if name is Purinzon Ana Katzman which
is maiden name, mother's name, or married name.
Also, on the cemetery listing what is the translation of "Manzana?" When I tried
translating it, it translated as "Apple" which made no sense since it was over a
number.

Rochelle Gershenow
Potomac, MD
USA
***
MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you have been successful in your research, you may wish to
mark this success by making a financial contribution to the work of JewishGen. For
details of how you can support their work, please go to
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Success Story re: Argentina #general

Rochelle Gershenow
 

I would suggest searching Buenos Aires Jewish cemeteries which are online
http://www.amia.org.ar/difuntos.asp
Jacob Rosen>

This website is a great find! I found my relatives (the dead ones anyway).
I had searched before for online cemetery info with no success.

For the Spanish speaking genners, I have a question regarding a naming protocol
for women. If the name appears as as Salem de Purinzon Sarah which is maiden
name, mother's name, or married name; and, if name is Purinzon Ana Katzman which
is maiden name, mother's name, or married name.
Also, on the cemetery listing what is the translation of "Manzana?" When I tried
translating it, it translated as "Apple" which made no sense since it was over a
number.

Rochelle Gershenow
Potomac, MD
USA
***
MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you have been successful in your research, you may wish to
mark this success by making a financial contribution to the work of JewishGen. For
details of how you can support their work, please go to
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity


Re: "I wish you long life" #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 2/1/2005 11:40:14 PM Eastern Standard Time, jrw@...
writes:

< I have just been struck by a completely different possibility for the
source of the English greeting to mourners: "I wish you long life." . . . . a
rough translation of the expression "le-orekh yamim tovim" which is sometimes
placed as an abbreviation: lamed aleph yod tet) directly after the name of a
person in the salutation at the beginning of the letter. . . . The Hebrew
expression means literally "[I wish you] length of good days." So maybe
that's where "I wish you long life" comes from? >

==An apparent and common slip of the pen. Yamim is the word for seas (pl.)
The word for days (pl.) is Yomim {pronounced Yowmim in most of Germany, Yoemim in
England and the USA, and Yoymim or Yeymim in Eastern Europe)

==The phrase is common when writing to or referring to a rabbi, and is in full
"sheyichyeh [or shetikhyeh] leorekh yomim tovim, amen" may he/you live for the
duration of good days, Amen." usually abbreviated to the acronym ShLIT"A. It is
meant to distinguish living rabbinical authorities >from those who have passed on,
which usuall carry the acronym, or an ellaboration thereof, ZTz"L (The memory of
this Tzadik is/should be, a blessing). It is not used in a verbal greeting, to
mourners or others.

Dr. Wegner adds:

< Of course the use of L-'-Y-T in the salutation of letters is not something
one associates primarily with the Anglo-Jewish community as such. When I and
others began to use it, it was definitely an influence imported >from abroad when
the B'nei Akiva youth movement took root in England during WW2. >

==True, the Bnai Akiva, Bachad and Poalei Mizrachi movements developed in England
subsequent to the arrival of orthodox families >from Germany and Western and
Central Europe, starting a couple of years before the outbreak of war, there. But
there was little influence on British Jewish practices by these "Western
Ashkenazim." When we arrived in England in late 1938, the custom of wishing
mourners "Long life," or "Chayim Arukhim," had obviously been long established in
both those descended tom the pre-1880 community, and the Eastern European
community that developed later. Also, I never heard the use of "le-orekh yomim
tovim" or "shetichyeh le-orekh yomim tovim" as a personal greeting or blessing, or
of "may you have a long life" by British Jews toward anyone but a mourner

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: "I wish you long life" #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 2/1/2005 11:40:14 PM Eastern Standard Time, jrw@...
writes:

< I have just been struck by a completely different possibility for the
source of the English greeting to mourners: "I wish you long life." . . . . a
rough translation of the expression "le-orekh yamim tovim" which is sometimes
placed as an abbreviation: lamed aleph yod tet) directly after the name of a
person in the salutation at the beginning of the letter. . . . The Hebrew
expression means literally "[I wish you] length of good days." So maybe
that's where "I wish you long life" comes from? >

==An apparent and common slip of the pen. Yamim is the word for seas (pl.)
The word for days (pl.) is Yomim {pronounced Yowmim in most of Germany, Yoemim in
England and the USA, and Yoymim or Yeymim in Eastern Europe)

==The phrase is common when writing to or referring to a rabbi, and is in full
"sheyichyeh [or shetikhyeh] leorekh yomim tovim, amen" may he/you live for the
duration of good days, Amen." usually abbreviated to the acronym ShLIT"A. It is
meant to distinguish living rabbinical authorities >from those who have passed on,
which usuall carry the acronym, or an ellaboration thereof, ZTz"L (The memory of
this Tzadik is/should be, a blessing). It is not used in a verbal greeting, to
mourners or others.

Dr. Wegner adds:

< Of course the use of L-'-Y-T in the salutation of letters is not something
one associates primarily with the Anglo-Jewish community as such. When I and
others began to use it, it was definitely an influence imported >from abroad when
the B'nei Akiva youth movement took root in England during WW2. >

==True, the Bnai Akiva, Bachad and Poalei Mizrachi movements developed in England
subsequent to the arrival of orthodox families >from Germany and Western and
Central Europe, starting a couple of years before the outbreak of war, there. But
there was little influence on British Jewish practices by these "Western
Ashkenazim." When we arrived in England in late 1938, the custom of wishing
mourners "Long life," or "Chayim Arukhim," had obviously been long established in
both those descended tom the pre-1880 community, and the Eastern European
community that developed later. Also, I never heard the use of "le-orekh yomim
tovim" or "shetichyeh le-orekh yomim tovim" as a personal greeting or blessing, or
of "may you have a long life" by British Jews toward anyone but a mourner

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: Yenta #general

yenta <2000@...>
 

Yes-I am Paul Adler, grandson of Jacob Adler.

There is no doubt my grandfather popularized the name Yenta through 60 years of
writing. Yenta was a yiddish name but Jacob used it to describe his gossipy
character in his many plays, over 30,000 yiddish works published.

Paul Adler


"Shutayetz: near Lemberg (Lwow) #general

NFatouros@...
 

I have been reading Fred Goldberg's translation of the memories of the writer
Isaac Leib Peretz.

In a passage about a dairymab Peretz mentions "Shutayetz, the village bhind the
Lvov road-gate and heind the slaughter house."

It struck me that Shutayetz may be an unusual,even weird spelling of Szczerzec
(Shcherets, Shchirets, etc.). I know that Szczerzec was only about 14 miles away
from Lwow and that the Mennonites who lived around Szczerzec could have been
engaged in producing milk and dairy products on their farms. Using the Shtetl
Seeker and Lwow's coordinates and typing in Shutayetz choosing the Daitch-Mokotoff
system, the closest match I could see on the list that appeared was indeed
Szczerzec.

But has anyone else have better grasp of what village "Shutayetz" might have been?

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@...
BELKOWSKY,BIELKOWSKY, BILKOWSKI, Odessa,St. Petersburg,Berdichev, Kiev;
ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug;FRASCH,Kiev;LIBERMAN,Moscow;FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS/SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk, Radomysl?; BEHAM, Salok, Kharkov;
WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yenta #general

yenta <2000@...>
 

Yes-I am Paul Adler, grandson of Jacob Adler.

There is no doubt my grandfather popularized the name Yenta through 60 years of
writing. Yenta was a yiddish name but Jacob used it to describe his gossipy
character in his many plays, over 30,000 yiddish works published.

Paul Adler


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Shutayetz: near Lemberg (Lwow) #general

NFatouros@...
 

I have been reading Fred Goldberg's translation of the memories of the writer
Isaac Leib Peretz.

In a passage about a dairymab Peretz mentions "Shutayetz, the village bhind the
Lvov road-gate and heind the slaughter house."

It struck me that Shutayetz may be an unusual,even weird spelling of Szczerzec
(Shcherets, Shchirets, etc.). I know that Szczerzec was only about 14 miles away
from Lwow and that the Mennonites who lived around Szczerzec could have been
engaged in producing milk and dairy products on their farms. Using the Shtetl
Seeker and Lwow's coordinates and typing in Shutayetz choosing the Daitch-Mokotoff
system, the closest match I could see on the list that appeared was indeed
Szczerzec.

But has anyone else have better grasp of what village "Shutayetz" might have been?

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@...
BELKOWSKY,BIELKOWSKY, BILKOWSKI, Odessa,St. Petersburg,Berdichev, Kiev;
ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug;FRASCH,Kiev;LIBERMAN,Moscow;FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS/SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk, Radomysl?; BEHAM, Salok, Kharkov;
WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


Given Name Abba #general

Msinger23@...
 

Dear Jewishgenners:

My great-great grandfather was named Abba KLEINMAN(N). He was born, I believe, in
Latvia's Courland district ca. 1865, and emigrated to the United States ca. 1890.
from what little I remember >from Hebrew School, "Abba" means "father." However,
Abba seems to have had this name all of his life--long before he became a father.
I cannot find an entry for Abba on the Given Names of Russian Jews database on
Jewishgen. Along the way, I've come across other individual with the given name
Abba--most notably, the rabbi Abba Hillel Silver.

Is it possible that Abba is a kinnui for Abraham? I know that Abba went by the
name Abraham Abba Kleinman in the United States.

Any and all insights would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

Matt Singer
Philadelphia PA

Families: SINGER, GERBER, GARONZIK, FREEDMAN, TUCH, KLEINMAN, RINGER, BLAU


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Given Name Abba #general

Msinger23@...
 

Dear Jewishgenners:

My great-great grandfather was named Abba KLEINMAN(N). He was born, I believe, in
Latvia's Courland district ca. 1865, and emigrated to the United States ca. 1890.
from what little I remember >from Hebrew School, "Abba" means "father." However,
Abba seems to have had this name all of his life--long before he became a father.
I cannot find an entry for Abba on the Given Names of Russian Jews database on
Jewishgen. Along the way, I've come across other individual with the given name
Abba--most notably, the rabbi Abba Hillel Silver.

Is it possible that Abba is a kinnui for Abraham? I know that Abba went by the
name Abraham Abba Kleinman in the United States.

Any and all insights would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

Matt Singer
Philadelphia PA

Families: SINGER, GERBER, GARONZIK, FREEDMAN, TUCH, KLEINMAN, RINGER, BLAU


Rav Yehoshua Heschel of Apta (Ostrow) #general

ben-ari <yrcdi@...>
 

One of my ancestors is believed to have been a disciple of Reb Yehoshua of Apta. A
few questions:
Since this ancestor was known to have lived in Ostraw(H) what was the connection
between Apta and Ostrah as to Yehoshua Heschel?
Is there a list of disciplesof Yehoshua Heshcel anywhere?
Was Yehoshua Heschel an Admo"r or connected to any branch of chassidut or "just" a
unique rabbinical figure on his own?

Thank you,

Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel

p.s. I know my neighbor is a descendant of Heschel but he's not around now to ask.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rav Yehoshua Heschel of Apta (Ostrow) #general

ben-ari <yrcdi@...>
 

One of my ancestors is believed to have been a disciple of Reb Yehoshua of Apta. A
few questions:
Since this ancestor was known to have lived in Ostraw(H) what was the connection
between Apta and Ostrah as to Yehoshua Heschel?
Is there a list of disciplesof Yehoshua Heshcel anywhere?
Was Yehoshua Heschel an Admo"r or connected to any branch of chassidut or "just" a
unique rabbinical figure on his own?

Thank you,

Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel

p.s. I know my neighbor is a descendant of Heschel but he's not around now to ask.


Understanding Arranged Marriages #general

Terri <terrib@...>
 

My great grandparents met on the day of their wedding engagement party, sometime
in the 1870s, in Poland. Does anyone know if this practice was widespread in
Poland, during the 19th century? Or in the 19th century did most Polish couples
get to choose their future mates?

Were there Jewish dowries'?

Were Jewish spouses usually distant cousins? Or were they selected for financial
reason?

Were Jewish weddings arranged in contemporary Russia and in Galicia, too?

Understanding the process, might help all of us with our research.

Thanks,
Tom Erribe
CA, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Understanding Arranged Marriages #general

Terri <terrib@...>
 

My great grandparents met on the day of their wedding engagement party, sometime
in the 1870s, in Poland. Does anyone know if this practice was widespread in
Poland, during the 19th century? Or in the 19th century did most Polish couples
get to choose their future mates?

Were there Jewish dowries'?

Were Jewish spouses usually distant cousins? Or were they selected for financial
reason?

Were Jewish weddings arranged in contemporary Russia and in Galicia, too?

Understanding the process, might help all of us with our research.

Thanks,
Tom Erribe
CA, USA


Regional archives for Boskovice #austria-czech

Robert Hanscom <rodihan@...>
 

I am trying to place two sets of relatives who lived in Boskowitz
(Boskovice), Moravia, situated not too far north of Brno. Apparently,
Jewish records for Boskovice are limited and do not cover the time period
I need. Does anyone know which regional archives that would include this
town? I would like to write and see if I can get them to search their
census records for 1857 and 1869.

The families I am researching are KNOPFELMACHER and ZERKOWITZ. Moritz
KNOPFELMACHER (b. c.1828-1830) was married to Netti Beer, and resided in
Boskovice. He had four children: Julie, Samuel, Jacob, and Wilhelm
(later a well-known pediatrician in Vienna). I am attempting to discover
Moritz KNOPFELMACHER's birthplace and the names of his parents.

Leopold ZERKOWITZ (1851-1927) was born in Boskovice and was married there
in 1877 to Amalia ZUCHER (or ZWICKER) (1856-1933), also >from Boskovice.
They moved to Brno and had three known children: Sigmund, Fani, and
Wilhelm. I believe that Leopold's mother was one Amalia ZERKOWITZ who
died in Boskovice on 29 October 1897, but I have no leads on the identity
of his father.

Potentially, Boskovice census records >from the 1850s and 1860s would
include both of these families and resolve some (if not all) of my
questions. If anyone can give me some guidance as to where I might write
-- or any other advice about Boskovice --, it would be greatly
appreciated.

Best regards,

Robert Hanscom
Andover, Massachusetts USA

Researching in Moravia / Vienna: TAUBER, ZWILLINGER, KNOPFELMACHER,
ZERKOWITZ, LAZAR, BRULL, POPPER v. PODHRAGY, WILHELM


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Regional archives for Boskovice #austria-czech

Robert Hanscom <rodihan@...>
 

I am trying to place two sets of relatives who lived in Boskowitz
(Boskovice), Moravia, situated not too far north of Brno. Apparently,
Jewish records for Boskovice are limited and do not cover the time period
I need. Does anyone know which regional archives that would include this
town? I would like to write and see if I can get them to search their
census records for 1857 and 1869.

The families I am researching are KNOPFELMACHER and ZERKOWITZ. Moritz
KNOPFELMACHER (b. c.1828-1830) was married to Netti Beer, and resided in
Boskovice. He had four children: Julie, Samuel, Jacob, and Wilhelm
(later a well-known pediatrician in Vienna). I am attempting to discover
Moritz KNOPFELMACHER's birthplace and the names of his parents.

Leopold ZERKOWITZ (1851-1927) was born in Boskovice and was married there
in 1877 to Amalia ZUCHER (or ZWICKER) (1856-1933), also >from Boskovice.
They moved to Brno and had three known children: Sigmund, Fani, and
Wilhelm. I believe that Leopold's mother was one Amalia ZERKOWITZ who
died in Boskovice on 29 October 1897, but I have no leads on the identity
of his father.

Potentially, Boskovice census records >from the 1850s and 1860s would
include both of these families and resolve some (if not all) of my
questions. If anyone can give me some guidance as to where I might write
-- or any other advice about Boskovice --, it would be greatly
appreciated.

Best regards,

Robert Hanscom
Andover, Massachusetts USA

Researching in Moravia / Vienna: TAUBER, ZWILLINGER, KNOPFELMACHER,
ZERKOWITZ, LAZAR, BRULL, POPPER v. PODHRAGY, WILHELM


Re: Looking for the names FALIK and FALIKMAN #austria-czech

Vitdoc@...
 

Celia, what about the first names tells you they are Galician?
Thanks
Susan Boyer
Los Angeles, California

In a message dated 2/1/05 3:10:05 PM, celiamale@... writes:
Karl Chaim
Falikmann Netty
Falik Mendl
The first names of FALIKMANN & FALIK suggest that most, if not all, of them
are of Galician origin.


Jewish Genealogical Society of Oregon (JGSO): February 21st Monthly #general

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Oregon (JGSO) invites you, your family, and
friends to our February meeting.

Decoding Jewish Matzevot (Gravestones)
presented by
Dr. Ronald D. Doctor

Date:<> MONDAY, February 21, 2005
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Place: Neveh Shalom Congregation
2900 Peaceful Lane
Portland, Oregon
(Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway/North on Dosch Rd/Right on Peaceful Lane)

Jewish matzevot can provide valuable genealogical information and can help link
one generation to another. At this meeting, you will learn how to decode the
matzevot inscriptions even if you can't speak Hebrew. We'll talk about standard
elements on Jewish gravestones, including old stones >from past centuries. We'll
learn how to interpret Jewish calendar dates that appear on the stones and how to
recognize names and titles. And, we'll discuss ways that you can obtain images of
your ancestors gravestones.

Ron has been involved in Jewish family research since 1992. A past president of
JGSO, he currently serves on the Advisory Board of JewishGen’s Ukraine Special
Interest Group, and is Co-coordinator for three international projects: the
Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP (which is translating 15,000 vital records >from the 19th
century); the Kremenets Yizkor Book Translation Project (which is translating
2,500 pages of Yizkor Books and Booklets >from the Ukrainian shtetls of Kremenets
and Vishnevets), and the Kremenets Jewish Cemetery Restoration and Documentation
Project (for Kremenets and Vishnevets). Ron has made two trips to the Ukraine in
the past 3 years. He is the author of Getting Started in Jewish Genealogy: A
Handbook for Beginners, with Supplementary Information for Advanced Research. Ron
holds a Ph.D. in engineering, a MLS in library and information science, and has
been retired since 1997 >from the faculty of the University of Alabama.

This event is free to JGSO members. Contributions at the door of $2 door are
requested >from non-members to help us defray the meeting cost. Contribution can be
deducted >from new membership if you join that evening.

It is time to renew your annual membership in JGSO. If you have not already done
so, please send your membership dues renewal check to JGSO, PO Box 19736,
Portland, Oregon 97280. Annual dues are $30 for Family Membership, $23 for
Individual Membership, and $10 for Student Membership. If you are not yet a member
of JGSO, won't you consider joining us?

The 170 page third edition of "Getting Started in Jewish Genealogy: A Handbook for
Beginners with Supplementary Information for Advanced Research" will be for sale
at the meeting. It is free to new members with paid membership, $12 to members in
good standing, and $18 to non-members. Also available for sale are copies of "The
JGSO CD-Rom". It is packed with useful information to help you develop your family
history. Cost is $15 for JGSO members and $25 for non-members.

To be placed on JGS of Oregon's e-mail distribution list, send an e-mail message
to rondoctor@.... Once you are on the list, you will receive periodic
messages concerning Jewish genealogy. Your name and e-mail address will not be
distributed outside of JGS of Oregon.

For more information about JGSO and its activities, visit the JGSO web
site at: http://www.rootsweb.com/~orjgs <http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Eorjgs>, or
call Sandra Shapiro at 503-694-5646.

The JGSO is affiliated with the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies.
Ronald D. Doctor