Date   

Re: Help needed with Philadelphia street name. #general

Susan&David
 

Thanks to Steve Morse, Joel Weintraub and David Kehs there is a good
way to see a list of all streets that existed in large cities for US
census years 1880 - 1940 (1890 excepted)

Go to the Stephen Morse One-Step web-site, large city ED finder.
http://stevemorse.org/census/index.html

You can enter 1900 for the year, then Pennsylvania then
Philadelphia. When it asks for a street you can scroll down and see all
the streets in the city. Camac street looks like the best fit for your
passenger list.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 9/15/2012 9:55 AM, Mark London wrote:
Hi - I'm trying to decipher the street name given in Philadelphia on a
passenger list. Maybe someone is familiar enough with Philadelphia,
that can figure it out >from this image?

http://web.mit.edu/london/www/phil.jpg


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Help needed with Philadelphia street name. #general

Susan&David
 

Thanks to Steve Morse, Joel Weintraub and David Kehs there is a good
way to see a list of all streets that existed in large cities for US
census years 1880 - 1940 (1890 excepted)

Go to the Stephen Morse One-Step web-site, large city ED finder.
http://stevemorse.org/census/index.html

You can enter 1900 for the year, then Pennsylvania then
Philadelphia. When it asks for a street you can scroll down and see all
the streets in the city. Camac street looks like the best fit for your
passenger list.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 9/15/2012 9:55 AM, Mark London wrote:
Hi - I'm trying to decipher the street name given in Philadelphia on a
passenger list. Maybe someone is familiar enough with Philadelphia,
that can figure it out >from this image?

http://web.mit.edu/london/www/phil.jpg


FF Chromosome Browser #dna

sbloom@...
 

I, similarly to many on JewishGen, have attempted to wrap my head
around the meaning of my Family Finder tests and the significance of
some of the results. Since almost none of us are aware of the nature
of or criteria involved in the algorithm being used to define our
cousinhood we can only guess at the basis of these conclusions.
We don't know the exact algorithm, but many of us are aware that
certain key factors are weighted highly: longest block, number of
shared blocks above a certain threshhold, and total cM of blocks shared.
You might even be able to reverse engineer the algorithm by looking at
these data for everyone you match. Its doubtful you'll get something
exact, but it might be close enough to see what goes into the
calculation.

This weekend I decided to use FtDNA's chromosome browser to compare
my 22 third cousin hits and found some, to me, intriguing results. I
found 3 people who share almost exactly with me an apparently
significant stretch of chromosome 2. All three of these show the
exact same similarity endpoint. Two of those same people appear to
share exactly the same 16.81 cM region with me. Now, I realize that
these kinds of results could be biased to a certain extent by such
things as recombination "hot spots" or perhaps in this case "cold
spots". I can see also how these biases could be caused by
unevenness of the distributions of the chosen SNPs thoughout the
genome, but I find it hard to see how two people could share such a
substantial region so exactly without being related. Any thoughts on
these observation? Thanks in advance.
I've seen many people lately looking into these shared blocks (that
is, seeing if everybody who shares the same block on Chromosome 5 is
related somehow, etc.). I know its becoming more common to do this
in some surname projects, especially when it seem they don't relate
by YDNA (so, then, the question becomes, do they relate at all?
Maybe FF and chromosome browser can add insight).

My gut feeling is that you are right to have serious concerns! I
think all sorts of bias, and, in addition, noise (for small blocks)
can be problematic. But...16.8 cM is a moderate sized block. You
probably really do have a relatively recent MRCA with these folks.
Unfortunately, "relatively recent" when it comes to DNA can still be
hundreds of years. I certainly think it would be well worth your while
(and the while of yoru matches) to explore this more via standard
genealogy. That is, push the time limit of records, or whatever you
might find for these families.

I've had a lot of doubts over this method, but probably when the
blocks are big, and the "matchees" have something that indicates a
connection (name, geography, whatever) , it might be worth exploring.

You might also try to get more of your close and far relatives to
test. That can help in determing whether these relatives are maternal
or paternal, etc..

Steven D. Bloom


DNA Research #DNA FF Chromosome Browser #dna

sbloom@...
 

I, similarly to many on JewishGen, have attempted to wrap my head
around the meaning of my Family Finder tests and the significance of
some of the results. Since almost none of us are aware of the nature
of or criteria involved in the algorithm being used to define our
cousinhood we can only guess at the basis of these conclusions.
We don't know the exact algorithm, but many of us are aware that
certain key factors are weighted highly: longest block, number of
shared blocks above a certain threshhold, and total cM of blocks shared.
You might even be able to reverse engineer the algorithm by looking at
these data for everyone you match. Its doubtful you'll get something
exact, but it might be close enough to see what goes into the
calculation.

This weekend I decided to use FtDNA's chromosome browser to compare
my 22 third cousin hits and found some, to me, intriguing results. I
found 3 people who share almost exactly with me an apparently
significant stretch of chromosome 2. All three of these show the
exact same similarity endpoint. Two of those same people appear to
share exactly the same 16.81 cM region with me. Now, I realize that
these kinds of results could be biased to a certain extent by such
things as recombination "hot spots" or perhaps in this case "cold
spots". I can see also how these biases could be caused by
unevenness of the distributions of the chosen SNPs thoughout the
genome, but I find it hard to see how two people could share such a
substantial region so exactly without being related. Any thoughts on
these observation? Thanks in advance.
I've seen many people lately looking into these shared blocks (that
is, seeing if everybody who shares the same block on Chromosome 5 is
related somehow, etc.). I know its becoming more common to do this
in some surname projects, especially when it seem they don't relate
by YDNA (so, then, the question becomes, do they relate at all?
Maybe FF and chromosome browser can add insight).

My gut feeling is that you are right to have serious concerns! I
think all sorts of bias, and, in addition, noise (for small blocks)
can be problematic. But...16.8 cM is a moderate sized block. You
probably really do have a relatively recent MRCA with these folks.
Unfortunately, "relatively recent" when it comes to DNA can still be
hundreds of years. I certainly think it would be well worth your while
(and the while of yoru matches) to explore this more via standard
genealogy. That is, push the time limit of records, or whatever you
might find for these families.

I've had a lot of doubts over this method, but probably when the
blocks are big, and the "matchees" have something that indicates a
connection (name, geography, whatever) , it might be worth exploring.

You might also try to get more of your close and far relatives to
test. That can help in determing whether these relatives are maternal
or paternal, etc..

Steven D. Bloom


The Central Zionist Archives in Jerusalem has a new website #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

The Central Zionist Archives in Jerusalem has released its new
website. I am sure you will find interesting information there. They
have a special section called "Family Research"
http://www.zionistarchives.org.il/en/about-us/Pages/Default.aspx

Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Central Zionist Archives in Jerusalem has a new website #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

The Central Zionist Archives in Jerusalem has released its new
website. I am sure you will find interesting information there. They
have a special section called "Family Research"
http://www.zionistarchives.org.il/en/about-us/Pages/Default.aspx

Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association


Jewish American WWI draft dodgers; FINE/PAVER Family #general

Jan Fine
 

Jewishgenners,

I am writing to ask if anyone has general or specific information
about WWI (world war one) American jewish draft dodgers who "fled" to
Canada. I am specifically interested in what it was like to cross the
borders in those days, likely routes to have done so, and other
families with similar experiences. I would also like to know what the
consequences were for having dodged the draft and how return to the
states was managed or handled. Further, I am curious to know if there
are other connections to my family of FINE and PAVER to whom this
story rings a genealogical bell.

My grandfather, Abraham Fine, was a first generation American, born to
Max and Freda Fine in New York City, April 12,1894. He married my
grandmother, Mina Paver, in Windsor, Ontario, Canada on September 23,
1917. We know that there were Pavers in Ontario (Pavers were also in
NYC and were known as PARVER in Atlanta, GA) and that they were
probably responsible for helping the family when they lived there
during the few years that they were living there. We also know that
the family returned to New York. My father, Leonard Fine, was born in
New York City on November 30, 1919. To round out the family
informational portion of this question I add that there is a family
connection to the name Oppenheim in the Detroit area (interesting also
because of the proximity to Windsor by bridge). Max Fine had a dry
goods store in NYC (Harlem area) and I also wondered if this connected
with the Oppenheim family in Detroit who were also in that business.

If anyone can shed some light on the Jewish American WWI draft dodgers
issue or the connections to the Fine/Paver family please respond
publically. If you prefer to respond privately please contact me at
janrandyfine@gmail.com.

Thank you all for your help and I wish you a happy, healthy, and safe new year.

Jan R. Fine
Editor of Mishpacha, JGSGW
researching FINE (Minsk, maybe Nezvizh), PAVER (Nesvizh), FORMAN
(Kozan Harodok), SIEGEL (maybe Volozhin), PERSKY (Volozhin), KAPLAN,
SCHWARTZ, OPPENHEIM


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish American WWI draft dodgers; FINE/PAVER Family #general

Jan Fine
 

Jewishgenners,

I am writing to ask if anyone has general or specific information
about WWI (world war one) American jewish draft dodgers who "fled" to
Canada. I am specifically interested in what it was like to cross the
borders in those days, likely routes to have done so, and other
families with similar experiences. I would also like to know what the
consequences were for having dodged the draft and how return to the
states was managed or handled. Further, I am curious to know if there
are other connections to my family of FINE and PAVER to whom this
story rings a genealogical bell.

My grandfather, Abraham Fine, was a first generation American, born to
Max and Freda Fine in New York City, April 12,1894. He married my
grandmother, Mina Paver, in Windsor, Ontario, Canada on September 23,
1917. We know that there were Pavers in Ontario (Pavers were also in
NYC and were known as PARVER in Atlanta, GA) and that they were
probably responsible for helping the family when they lived there
during the few years that they were living there. We also know that
the family returned to New York. My father, Leonard Fine, was born in
New York City on November 30, 1919. To round out the family
informational portion of this question I add that there is a family
connection to the name Oppenheim in the Detroit area (interesting also
because of the proximity to Windsor by bridge). Max Fine had a dry
goods store in NYC (Harlem area) and I also wondered if this connected
with the Oppenheim family in Detroit who were also in that business.

If anyone can shed some light on the Jewish American WWI draft dodgers
issue or the connections to the Fine/Paver family please respond
publically. If you prefer to respond privately please contact me at
janrandyfine@gmail.com.

Thank you all for your help and I wish you a happy, healthy, and safe new year.

Jan R. Fine
Editor of Mishpacha, JGSGW
researching FINE (Minsk, maybe Nezvizh), PAVER (Nesvizh), FORMAN
(Kozan Harodok), SIEGEL (maybe Volozhin), PERSKY (Volozhin), KAPLAN,
SCHWARTZ, OPPENHEIM


Searching for Faith RUM of Toronto, Canada #general

Deborah Dworski
 

I would like to be in touch with Faith RUM, so if anyone can put me in
contact with her, I would be grateful. We last communicated about 10
years ago. She was married to my cousin Ben RUM, and they lived in
Toronto, Canada. Ben subsequently died. Through some of the
well-known, online search engines, I recently acquired an address for
Faith in the 1000 block of Steeles Avenue West in North York, but the
envelope was returned to me as "addressee unknown."

Please contact me privately if you know anything about Faith RUM's
whereabouts. Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Deborah Dworski
State of Virginia, U.S.A.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for Faith RUM of Toronto, Canada #general

Deborah Dworski
 

I would like to be in touch with Faith RUM, so if anyone can put me in
contact with her, I would be grateful. We last communicated about 10
years ago. She was married to my cousin Ben RUM, and they lived in
Toronto, Canada. Ben subsequently died. Through some of the
well-known, online search engines, I recently acquired an address for
Faith in the 1000 block of Steeles Avenue West in North York, but the
envelope was returned to me as "addressee unknown."

Please contact me privately if you know anything about Faith RUM's
whereabouts. Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Deborah Dworski
State of Virginia, U.S.A.


Searching for Resnick from Odessa #bessarabia

Peter Weinstock <ceteris@...>
 

I am looking for the Russian relatives of my maternal grandparents.

I know there was a large family left behind in Odessa as my grandma showed me a postcard
photo of the extended family with a note wishing them well on their travels. This postcard
has not been seen for some time.

Jacob RESNICK born 1874 and his wife Sarah CSATSKIN born 1875, left Odessa in 1910 or
1911 with two small children born in Odessa. (Rachel and Julius). Sarah was pregnant with
my mother's mother.

The family arrived in Manchester where Bachanina was born. She was recorded as being Betsy
in the 1911 census. There are a number of Resnicks >from Russia recorded in the 1911 census,
but this is the only family recorded as >from Odessa, Russia.

In Jan 1913 Jacob arrived in Sydney and the family followed arriving in March 1914.
Jacob is listed as being English on his arrival in Australia. They remained in Australia.

thanks in advance
Peter Weinstock


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Searching for Resnick from Odessa #bessarabia

Peter Weinstock <ceteris@...>
 

I am looking for the Russian relatives of my maternal grandparents.

I know there was a large family left behind in Odessa as my grandma showed me a postcard
photo of the extended family with a note wishing them well on their travels. This postcard
has not been seen for some time.

Jacob RESNICK born 1874 and his wife Sarah CSATSKIN born 1875, left Odessa in 1910 or
1911 with two small children born in Odessa. (Rachel and Julius). Sarah was pregnant with
my mother's mother.

The family arrived in Manchester where Bachanina was born. She was recorded as being Betsy
in the 1911 census. There are a number of Resnicks >from Russia recorded in the 1911 census,
but this is the only family recorded as >from Odessa, Russia.

In Jan 1913 Jacob arrived in Sydney and the family followed arriving in March 1914.
Jacob is listed as being English on his arrival in Australia. They remained in Australia.

thanks in advance
Peter Weinstock


Re: Questions about possible Lithuanian descent #lithuania

Wendy Hoechstetter
 

Thank you all so very much for the informative answers; I really
appreciate it.

And yes, we are, and were, Jewish.

Can someone recommend a book for me so I can learn more about these matters?

Wendy Hoechstetter


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Questions about possible Lithuanian descent #lithuania

Wendy Hoechstetter
 

Thank you all so very much for the informative answers; I really
appreciate it.

And yes, we are, and were, Jewish.

Can someone recommend a book for me so I can learn more about these matters?

Wendy Hoechstetter


Re: Questions About Possible Lithuanian Descent #lithuania

Remick <ralph.remick@...>
 

Here are a couple of map links on JewishGen that you may find useful
regarding changing Lithuanian borders.

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/golynka/maps.htm

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/golynka/maps/LithuaniaRegions.gif


Ralph Remick
California


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Questions About Possible Lithuanian Descent #lithuania

Remick <ralph.remick@...>
 

Here are a couple of map links on JewishGen that you may find useful
regarding changing Lithuanian borders.

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/golynka/maps.htm

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/golynka/maps/LithuaniaRegions.gif


Ralph Remick
California


Questions about Possible Lithuanian Descent #lithuania

William Yoffee
 

This is in response to Wendy Hoechstetter's question In the Digest of 13
September about whether the nationality of her ancestors >from Suwalki in
the middle of the 18th Century, and later, justifies saying that she is
of Lithuanian descent.

In a word, "No".

The answer to Wendy's question involves the various partitions of Poland
which are much too complex to boil down into a simple explananation.
Suffice it to say that Lithuania as a political entitiy did not exist
before the end of World War I.

There was a Grand Duchy of Lithuania that was united in a Commonwealth
with the eastern portion of Poland until the first partition of Poland in
the late 18th Century. But by 1795 neither Poland nor the Grand Duchy of
Lithuania remained. Most of what was the eastern part of Poland and what
is today Lithuania became part of the Russian Empire and is now referred
to as the Pale of Settlement where the bulk of the Jewish population was
forced to live.

The nationality of the Jews was just that: Jew. Even today in Lithuania
"Jewish" is considered to be one of four nationalities, although
elsewhere Jews may be considered as Lithuanian. Ethnic Lithuanians
are unlikely to recognize Jews as Lithuanians, just as ethnic Poles never
considered Jews as Poles.

As a personal example, my great grandfather emigrated in 1885 >from what is
now the District of Panevezys in present day Lithuania. When he became a
citizen of the United States, his citizenship record stated that he
renounced his allegiance to the Czar of Russia. I doubt that he ever had
any. He always claimed that he was >from Kovna Gubernia (the Government of
Kaunas).

L'Shanah Tovah and Shabbat Shalom,

Bill Yoffee
kidsbks@verizon.net


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Questions about Possible Lithuanian Descent #lithuania

William Yoffee
 

This is in response to Wendy Hoechstetter's question In the Digest of 13
September about whether the nationality of her ancestors >from Suwalki in
the middle of the 18th Century, and later, justifies saying that she is
of Lithuanian descent.

In a word, "No".

The answer to Wendy's question involves the various partitions of Poland
which are much too complex to boil down into a simple explananation.
Suffice it to say that Lithuania as a political entitiy did not exist
before the end of World War I.

There was a Grand Duchy of Lithuania that was united in a Commonwealth
with the eastern portion of Poland until the first partition of Poland in
the late 18th Century. But by 1795 neither Poland nor the Grand Duchy of
Lithuania remained. Most of what was the eastern part of Poland and what
is today Lithuania became part of the Russian Empire and is now referred
to as the Pale of Settlement where the bulk of the Jewish population was
forced to live.

The nationality of the Jews was just that: Jew. Even today in Lithuania
"Jewish" is considered to be one of four nationalities, although
elsewhere Jews may be considered as Lithuanian. Ethnic Lithuanians
are unlikely to recognize Jews as Lithuanians, just as ethnic Poles never
considered Jews as Poles.

As a personal example, my great grandfather emigrated in 1885 >from what is
now the District of Panevezys in present day Lithuania. When he became a
citizen of the United States, his citizenship record stated that he
renounced his allegiance to the Czar of Russia. I doubt that he ever had
any. He always claimed that he was >from Kovna Gubernia (the Government of
Kaunas).

L'Shanah Tovah and Shabbat Shalom,

Bill Yoffee
kidsbks@verizon.net


L'Shanah Tovah! #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear Bessarabers,

Happy and Healthy New Year to all of you!

May you and your family be inscribed in the Book of Life!
Shanah Tovah Tikatevu!

Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia L'Shanah Tovah! #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear Bessarabers,

Happy and Healthy New Year to all of you!

May you and your family be inscribed in the Book of Life!
Shanah Tovah Tikatevu!

Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator

161561 - 161580 of 668785