Date   

Searching Herbie Lipschitz in Australia #general

Carol Baker
 

Does anyone have a current email address for Herbie (George Herbert)
Lipschitz? He was born in Johannesburg and moved to Australia in 1988. His
wife's name is Sonia. The address I have (lipp@...) is not
working.

Thank you.
Carol Coplin Baker
carolcbaker@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching Herbie Lipschitz in Australia #general

Carol Baker
 

Does anyone have a current email address for Herbie (George Herbert)
Lipschitz? He was born in Johannesburg and moved to Australia in 1988. His
wife's name is Sonia. The address I have (lipp@...) is not
working.

Thank you.
Carol Coplin Baker
carolcbaker@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


SCHECTER Of Grand Rapids Mich. #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

To Jewishgen:
Eleven years ago I tried to track down Arthur H. Schecter President of
Wolverine Hide Co. of Grand Rapids, Michigan. He was an important member of
the Stavishter Society in the US and one of the leading initiators of the
Stavisht yizker bukh. I wrote to the Grand Rapids Chamber of Commerce which
forwarded my letter to the City Historian. There was a record form Mr.
Schecter as of 1968 but that was all.
Now that we have Jewishgen, perhaps someone can track down any descendants
of Mr. Schechter. His wife's name was Ida.
Sincerely,
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SCHECTER Of Grand Rapids Mich. #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

To Jewishgen:
Eleven years ago I tried to track down Arthur H. Schecter President of
Wolverine Hide Co. of Grand Rapids, Michigan. He was an important member of
the Stavishter Society in the US and one of the leading initiators of the
Stavisht yizker bukh. I wrote to the Grand Rapids Chamber of Commerce which
forwarded my letter to the City Historian. There was a record form Mr.
Schecter as of 1968 but that was all.
Now that we have Jewishgen, perhaps someone can track down any descendants
of Mr. Schechter. His wife's name was Ida.
Sincerely,
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, israel


Re: REICHENBACH - where they came from? #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Sometimes surnames were taken because they sounded good, or they sounded
like something in Hebrew or they were given only certain options.

While the town name is a good possibility, the Bruckheimer's did not
come >from Bruckheim (there isn't any) or >from Bruck (there isn't any
anywherenear where they lived for 100 years before adopting the surname).
There were no bridges to live near either. My guess is that the family
name Baruch was turned into something 'German sounding'. So don't restrict
yourself to the likely towns without finding your family in a town near
Reichenbach (they would be called that after they left, Moses 'the guy
from Reichenbach', which then became the inherited surname).
Of course, they could also have lived in some town near the 'Rich Brook'
- a stream in the area but without a town named for it.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


BRITZMAN family from "?" and London #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Barry Britzman on 23 Feb asked about guidance re his
grandfather [born ca 1860] who arrived in London in
the late 19th C and died in 1914. Hermann Ernst
BRITZMAN Occupation Tailor in London (at various times
- Shoreditch, Hoxton Old Town, Marylebone and Soho.
Father Daniel Britzman (Manufacturer of Vinegar. From
Hermann's marriage Certificate). This is
all that is known of Daniel Britzman.

A preliminary screen shows the early BRITZMAN{N}
immigrants into the US [1851-1891] as having come from
Hamburg and England as ports of embarkation:

August Britzmann est.dob 1837
Carl Britzmann est. dob 1863
Julius Britzmann est. dob 1816
Rosa Britzman est. dob 1843

Ports of embarkation: Liverpool, England 1 Hamburg,
Germany 1 Bremen, Germany and Southampton, England 1

The censuses of England and Wales revealed in 1871:
[no husband apparent!] Catharine Britzman 27 born in
Liverpool, Lancashire.

In the 1901 census of England and Wales one BRIZMAN
family is listed:

Aaron {31}, wife Simmy {31} and children Mathilde and
Hyman aged 4 and 2 resp. The whole family was born in
Russia [a term which could include parts of Poland and
Ukraine and possibly Galicia]. They lived in Liverpool
and Aaron was a cabinet maker. So they must have
arrived in England in between 1899 and 1901.

But so far I have not found Barry's grandfather
Hermann in the census. I suggest that he arrived after
1901. There are also quite a few Jewish BRITZ from
Russia, Poland and Germany.

Tragically, a very good indication of the geographic
spread of the name and its various spellings can be
found on the Yad Vashem database where you will find
57 victims associated with that name coming from
Berlin, Russia, Poland, Bessarabia, Romania, Galicia
and France.

In the UK births register of 1904 I find a birth:

Britzman, Ernest Herman 1904 March Births St
Marylebone [1902-1977] Greater London London

Perhaps Barry's father?

With first names "Hermann Ernst" my bet is that
Barry's BRITZMAN family came >from Germany or possibly
Galicia which was part of the Hapsburg Empire.

Galicians however, did not usually have such Germanic
names till they emigrated to Vienna! So my choice is
Germany. And before that? Perhaps Silesia or Poland.


Celia Male [UK]


JRI Poland #Poland Re: REICHENBACH - where they came from? #poland

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Sometimes surnames were taken because they sounded good, or they sounded
like something in Hebrew or they were given only certain options.

While the town name is a good possibility, the Bruckheimer's did not
come >from Bruckheim (there isn't any) or >from Bruck (there isn't any
anywherenear where they lived for 100 years before adopting the surname).
There were no bridges to live near either. My guess is that the family
name Baruch was turned into something 'German sounding'. So don't restrict
yourself to the likely towns without finding your family in a town near
Reichenbach (they would be called that after they left, Moses 'the guy
from Reichenbach', which then became the inherited surname).
Of course, they could also have lived in some town near the 'Rich Brook'
- a stream in the area but without a town named for it.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


JRI Poland #Poland BRITZMAN family from "?" and London #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Barry Britzman on 23 Feb asked about guidance re his
grandfather [born ca 1860] who arrived in London in
the late 19th C and died in 1914. Hermann Ernst
BRITZMAN Occupation Tailor in London (at various times
- Shoreditch, Hoxton Old Town, Marylebone and Soho.
Father Daniel Britzman (Manufacturer of Vinegar. From
Hermann's marriage Certificate). This is
all that is known of Daniel Britzman.

A preliminary screen shows the early BRITZMAN{N}
immigrants into the US [1851-1891] as having come from
Hamburg and England as ports of embarkation:

August Britzmann est.dob 1837
Carl Britzmann est. dob 1863
Julius Britzmann est. dob 1816
Rosa Britzman est. dob 1843

Ports of embarkation: Liverpool, England 1 Hamburg,
Germany 1 Bremen, Germany and Southampton, England 1

The censuses of England and Wales revealed in 1871:
[no husband apparent!] Catharine Britzman 27 born in
Liverpool, Lancashire.

In the 1901 census of England and Wales one BRIZMAN
family is listed:

Aaron {31}, wife Simmy {31} and children Mathilde and
Hyman aged 4 and 2 resp. The whole family was born in
Russia [a term which could include parts of Poland and
Ukraine and possibly Galicia]. They lived in Liverpool
and Aaron was a cabinet maker. So they must have
arrived in England in between 1899 and 1901.

But so far I have not found Barry's grandfather
Hermann in the census. I suggest that he arrived after
1901. There are also quite a few Jewish BRITZ from
Russia, Poland and Germany.

Tragically, a very good indication of the geographic
spread of the name and its various spellings can be
found on the Yad Vashem database where you will find
57 victims associated with that name coming from
Berlin, Russia, Poland, Bessarabia, Romania, Galicia
and France.

In the UK births register of 1904 I find a birth:

Britzman, Ernest Herman 1904 March Births St
Marylebone [1902-1977] Greater London London

Perhaps Barry's father?

With first names "Hermann Ernst" my bet is that
Barry's BRITZMAN family came >from Germany or possibly
Galicia which was part of the Hapsburg Empire.

Galicians however, did not usually have such Germanic
names till they emigrated to Vienna! So my choice is
Germany. And before that? Perhaps Silesia or Poland.


Celia Male [UK]


Sisters, ITA, ETTA, ITTA? #poland

Rita Margolis <ritamargolis@...>
 

Przasnysz, Poland

1862 Grandmother, ETTA FISZER, dies

1864 Granddaughter, ITA KRUK , born to Gitla FISZER and Gedalia KRUK

1866 Granddaughter, ITA KRUK , dies, same parents as above

1871 Granddaughter, ETTA KRUK, born 22 Dec 1871 to same parents,
recorded 6 Feb 1874, Akt #34

1874 Granddaughter, ITTA KRUK, born 21 Oct 1873 to same parents,
recorded 6 Feb 1874, Akt #33

1874 ITTA KRUK dies - I've sent away to PSA for this document to see if
it's the same ITTA that was born in 1874 to Gitla FISZER and Gedalia
KRUK????????

Why were three girls in the same immediate family named, ITA ETTA,
and ITTA?

All explanations welcomed.

Rita Krakower Margolis

ritamargolis@...


JRI Poland #Poland Sisters, ITA, ETTA, ITTA? #poland

Rita Margolis <ritamargolis@...>
 

Przasnysz, Poland

1862 Grandmother, ETTA FISZER, dies

1864 Granddaughter, ITA KRUK , born to Gitla FISZER and Gedalia KRUK

1866 Granddaughter, ITA KRUK , dies, same parents as above

1871 Granddaughter, ETTA KRUK, born 22 Dec 1871 to same parents,
recorded 6 Feb 1874, Akt #34

1874 Granddaughter, ITTA KRUK, born 21 Oct 1873 to same parents,
recorded 6 Feb 1874, Akt #33

1874 ITTA KRUK dies - I've sent away to PSA for this document to see if
it's the same ITTA that was born in 1874 to Gitla FISZER and Gedalia
KRUK????????

Why were three girls in the same immediate family named, ITA ETTA,
and ITTA?

All explanations welcomed.

Rita Krakower Margolis

ritamargolis@...


Re: Family recollections from Bialystok #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

I had a private response to my posting re 1906 Bialystok pogrom >from Peter
Levene of the UK. I thought I would share my answer to him with the
list, since the information may be of general interest.

He had been told that his great aunt Pearl Lewin/Levine died in a pogrom,
but no date. He could not see her name on the list on my site. He had a
great uncle Movshe Lewin who would have been 35 at that date. Do I think,
Peter asked, he could have been the Mordechaj Lewin 38 listed?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I don't know about your uncle Mordechaj? Lewin is a name that you
frequently see in Bialystok, and I think it's likely that there was more
than one Lewin family. . . that they weren't all related.

My impression is that pogroms were not a common feature of Jewish life
in the Bialystok region. I've been told by people who were there that
in the Shetels Jews and Poles lived very closely together. Even though
they were socially and certainly religiously quite separate Jews had for
hundreds of years been very well integrated into a larger socio economic
system. Jews and Poles mostly got along and were able to cooperate for
the common good of their towns. I'm told that in Bialystok (the big
city) things were not as good. All over Eastern Poland the situation
worsened in the period between the two world wars, particularly in the
1930's. And it's with this particularly horrible period that we tend to
be most familiar. Also you have to put this in some context and realize
that even in America at that time anti semitism was very widespread. You
can't evaluate it by 21st century standards of human rights and
political correctness, or people who do need to know what they are doing.

While Polish anti semites participated in the 1906 pogrom, I think it
was organized and instigated by Czarist authorities and carried out with
a sizable number of Czarist troops. Don't get me wrong, there was
widespread "Christian" anti-Semitism among the Poles. There were pretty
frequent fights, often between Polish and Jewish tuffs. But Poles
running wild in the streets inflicting violence and mayhem on Jews was
not something that took place often at all. Also my experience is that
some Jews wrongly attribute some events to the Poles that actually had
at least as much if not more to do with Russian Czarist authorities or
troops. As I previously mentioned particularly in the early 1930's
things between Poles and Jews started getting worse and went down hill
quickly >from there. But that is another story.

If anyone has another take on this subject, or information on the
subject of Polish-Jewish relations in the Bialystok area I'd be
interested to hear it.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Yizkor Book Project Report for February 2005 #hungary

Joyce Field
 

We are delighted to report another successful month for the JewishGen
Yizkor Book Project. Two new entries, one new book, and 17 updates
went online in February. All translations can be accessed >from the
index page at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
where all new translations for the month are flagged.

New book:

-Maramures Region

New entries:

-Klimontow,Poland; Pinkas HaKehillot, Poland, volume 7
-Mlawa, Poland; Pinkas HaKehillot, poland, volume 4

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belzec: Prototype of the Final Solution
-Brest, Belarus
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dereczyn, Poland
-Gorodets, Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kletsk, Belarus
-Lita, Lithuania
-Minsk,Poland
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Radomsko,Poland
-Ryki,Poland (including a necrology)

In addition to the translations, the Yizkor Book Project contains
numerous other resources for researchers: the Database, Infofiles,
Necrology Index, Links, and FAQ. All can be accessed >from the top
of the translations index page. Also, please consider making a
donation to the projects at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html and to
JewishGen,which provides the resources for the Yizkor Book Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition
jfield@...


Translation of a job #hungary

georges <georges.graner@...>
 

Hello Siggers,
In a wedding document of 1896, the bridegroom has the following job :
"fogyaszta'si hivatali felu:gyelo: ".
A rough translation gives "inspector of the consumption administration" but
what does it mean ?
The Hungarian colleague who sent me this document confesses that he has no
idea of what kind of job it is.
Could it be somthing related to a fiscal administration ?
Thank you for your help.

Georges GRANER (Paris-France)
georges.graner@...


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Family recollections from Bialystok #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

I had a private response to my posting re 1906 Bialystok pogrom >from Peter
Levene of the UK. I thought I would share my answer to him with the
list, since the information may be of general interest.

He had been told that his great aunt Pearl Lewin/Levine died in a pogrom,
but no date. He could not see her name on the list on my site. He had a
great uncle Movshe Lewin who would have been 35 at that date. Do I think,
Peter asked, he could have been the Mordechaj Lewin 38 listed?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I don't know about your uncle Mordechaj? Lewin is a name that you
frequently see in Bialystok, and I think it's likely that there was more
than one Lewin family. . . that they weren't all related.

My impression is that pogroms were not a common feature of Jewish life
in the Bialystok region. I've been told by people who were there that
in the Shetels Jews and Poles lived very closely together. Even though
they were socially and certainly religiously quite separate Jews had for
hundreds of years been very well integrated into a larger socio economic
system. Jews and Poles mostly got along and were able to cooperate for
the common good of their towns. I'm told that in Bialystok (the big
city) things were not as good. All over Eastern Poland the situation
worsened in the period between the two world wars, particularly in the
1930's. And it's with this particularly horrible period that we tend to
be most familiar. Also you have to put this in some context and realize
that even in America at that time anti semitism was very widespread. You
can't evaluate it by 21st century standards of human rights and
political correctness, or people who do need to know what they are doing.

While Polish anti semites participated in the 1906 pogrom, I think it
was organized and instigated by Czarist authorities and carried out with
a sizable number of Czarist troops. Don't get me wrong, there was
widespread "Christian" anti-Semitism among the Poles. There were pretty
frequent fights, often between Polish and Jewish tuffs. But Poles
running wild in the streets inflicting violence and mayhem on Jews was
not something that took place often at all. Also my experience is that
some Jews wrongly attribute some events to the Poles that actually had
at least as much if not more to do with Russian Czarist authorities or
troops. As I previously mentioned particularly in the early 1930's
things between Poles and Jews started getting worse and went down hill
quickly >from there. But that is another story.

If anyone has another take on this subject, or information on the
subject of Polish-Jewish relations in the Bialystok area I'd be
interested to hear it.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Translation of a job #hungary

georges <georges.graner@...>
 

Hello Siggers,
In a wedding document of 1896, the bridegroom has the following job :
"fogyaszta'si hivatali felu:gyelo: ".
A rough translation gives "inspector of the consumption administration" but
what does it mean ?
The Hungarian colleague who sent me this document confesses that he has no
idea of what kind of job it is.
Could it be somthing related to a fiscal administration ?
Thank you for your help.

Georges GRANER (Paris-France)
georges.graner@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary Yizkor Book Project Report for February 2005 #hungary

Joyce Field
 

We are delighted to report another successful month for the JewishGen
Yizkor Book Project. Two new entries, one new book, and 17 updates
went online in February. All translations can be accessed >from the
index page at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
where all new translations for the month are flagged.

New book:

-Maramures Region

New entries:

-Klimontow,Poland; Pinkas HaKehillot, Poland, volume 7
-Mlawa, Poland; Pinkas HaKehillot, poland, volume 4

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belzec: Prototype of the Final Solution
-Brest, Belarus
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dereczyn, Poland
-Gorodets, Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kletsk, Belarus
-Lita, Lithuania
-Minsk,Poland
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Radomsko,Poland
-Ryki,Poland (including a necrology)

In addition to the translations, the Yizkor Book Project contains
numerous other resources for researchers: the Database, Infofiles,
Necrology Index, Links, and FAQ. All can be accessed >from the top
of the translations index page. Also, please consider making a
donation to the projects at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html and to
JewishGen,which provides the resources for the Yizkor Book Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition
jfield@...


Re: 1793 Census #austria-czech

Ruth Coman <ruth.coman@...>
 

Belated thanks to all those, especially Celia Male, who explained the
meaning of Schnittwarenhandel; Kurzenwarenhandel; Bandehandel
Fleklhandel and Buenkelgehen.

The 1793 Census is an exceptionally useful and interesting publication -
and will be even more so when the work is finally completed, hopefully
later this year. The census is being published by the Czech National
Archive and the status is currently that of work in progress; 4 vols
already published and 2 or 3 more scheduled. Each volume deals with
three or four administrative districts or "kraj". Each kraj has its
own index (sadly no centralised or comprehensive index).

For those who might like to acquire the work themselves, the details
are:

Soupis zidovskych rodin v Cechach z roku 1793

Vol.1. Loketsky kraj, Boleslavsky kraj, Budejovicky kraj
Statni ustredni archiv v Praze 2002
ISBN 80-85475-91-X

Vol.2 Kourimsky kraj, Bydzovsky kraj, Litomericky kraj
Statni ustredni archiv v Praze 2003
ISBN 80-85475-96-0

Vol.3 Prachensky kraj, Berounsky kraj, Taborsky kraj
Statni ustredni archiv v Praze 2003
ISBN 80-86712-93-6

Vol.4 Chrudimsky kraj, Plzensky kraj, Zatecky kraj, Hradecky kraj
Statni ustredni archiv v Praze 2004
ISBN 80-86712-12-5

A friend bought me my copies and posted them to me, but
I understand the publications are available >from the Research room of
the Czech National Archive, Str. Milady Horakove 133, 160 00
Praha 6. Tel.: +420 974 847 834
e-mail: sua1@... - for the attention of Ms Kynslova.
(The books are very inexpensive - about four ot five pounds sterling each)

The catalogue of the British Library indicates that it holds Vols 1-3
and I understand that later volumes are on order.

With best wishes

Ruth Coman
London, England
Researching: SALUS, Bohemia; SCHUESSLER,Bohemia,Wien; LOEWY,
Kolodeje nad Luznici,Kolin; FISCHER,Kolin; FRIED,Kolin,Praha; MELZER,Zatec;
MOC,MOTZ,Bohemia


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech RE: 1793 Census #austria-czech

Ruth Coman <ruth.coman@...>
 

Belated thanks to all those, especially Celia Male, who explained the
meaning of Schnittwarenhandel; Kurzenwarenhandel; Bandehandel
Fleklhandel and Buenkelgehen.

The 1793 Census is an exceptionally useful and interesting publication -
and will be even more so when the work is finally completed, hopefully
later this year. The census is being published by the Czech National
Archive and the status is currently that of work in progress; 4 vols
already published and 2 or 3 more scheduled. Each volume deals with
three or four administrative districts or "kraj". Each kraj has its
own index (sadly no centralised or comprehensive index).

For those who might like to acquire the work themselves, the details
are:

Soupis zidovskych rodin v Cechach z roku 1793

Vol.1. Loketsky kraj, Boleslavsky kraj, Budejovicky kraj
Statni ustredni archiv v Praze 2002
ISBN 80-85475-91-X

Vol.2 Kourimsky kraj, Bydzovsky kraj, Litomericky kraj
Statni ustredni archiv v Praze 2003
ISBN 80-85475-96-0

Vol.3 Prachensky kraj, Berounsky kraj, Taborsky kraj
Statni ustredni archiv v Praze 2003
ISBN 80-86712-93-6

Vol.4 Chrudimsky kraj, Plzensky kraj, Zatecky kraj, Hradecky kraj
Statni ustredni archiv v Praze 2004
ISBN 80-86712-12-5

A friend bought me my copies and posted them to me, but
I understand the publications are available >from the Research room of
the Czech National Archive, Str. Milady Horakove 133, 160 00
Praha 6. Tel.: +420 974 847 834
e-mail: sua1@... - for the attention of Ms Kynslova.
(The books are very inexpensive - about four ot five pounds sterling each)

The catalogue of the British Library indicates that it holds Vols 1-3
and I understand that later volumes are on order.

With best wishes

Ruth Coman
London, England
Researching: SALUS, Bohemia; SCHUESSLER,Bohemia,Wien; LOEWY,
Kolodeje nad Luznici,Kolin; FISCHER,Kolin; FRIED,Kolin,Praha; MELZER,Zatec;
MOC,MOTZ,Bohemia


my "faceless" grandfather #belarus

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

Not to refute the ramblings of our fearless leader, but, some time ago, I
documented the Wolpa plot in Mt Zion Centemtery in Queens. In that plot,
there were four ARKIN graves (Not the ones that Jeff was looking for), but I
did send that information on to Jeff privately.

I also mentioned to him that I have about 40-50 photos of tombstones in that
plot. (I have plans to donate them to the cemetery project). I am writing
this here because in that cemetery and in that burial society, there was a
custom of putting a photo on the tombstone. This aspect of this cemetery is
documented in a book that is sold at the Mt. Zion office.

My computer is on the fritz, but once I am fully back on line, I will check
the photos that I have >from the Wolpa plot and I will notify the readers of
this digest which photos of stones include photographs of the deceased. This
is one of the more unusual places to locate a photograph of a deceased
ancestor.

Regards >from Dave's fan,
Marlene Bishow
Rockville, MD

Perhaps someone else can add to what I have written, although this really
does not have anything to do with Belarus.

Dave
--
David Fox
Mail to: davefox73@...
Belarus SIG Coordinator
Arnold, MD USA
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus

On 3/1/05 1:00 AM, "Belarus SIG digest" ( Jeff Arkin ) wrote:
I have never met my paternal grandfather, Jacob ARKIN, because he
died at
an early age.
I have never seen a photo of him, either.
---snip
Would there be any other documents, here or in the "old country",
that might have his picture on them? If so, how could I go about
obtaining
copies?





---

END OF DIGEST

---
To post to the Belarus SIG discussion group, send your message to:
<belarus@...>
Remember to send your message in PLAIN TEXT and sign
with your full name and location

Belarus SIG Webpage: <http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus>
Belarus Online Newsletter:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm>

Join the Research Trip to Belarus
<http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/>

This SIG (belarus@...) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org
****************************************************
Sign up for the JGFFAlert!
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html#q3.7
****************************************************
You are currently subscribed to belarus as: [mlbishow@...]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://lyris.jewishgen.org/ListManager


Belarus SIG #Belarus my "faceless" grandfather #belarus

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

Not to refute the ramblings of our fearless leader, but, some time ago, I
documented the Wolpa plot in Mt Zion Centemtery in Queens. In that plot,
there were four ARKIN graves (Not the ones that Jeff was looking for), but I
did send that information on to Jeff privately.

I also mentioned to him that I have about 40-50 photos of tombstones in that
plot. (I have plans to donate them to the cemetery project). I am writing
this here because in that cemetery and in that burial society, there was a
custom of putting a photo on the tombstone. This aspect of this cemetery is
documented in a book that is sold at the Mt. Zion office.

My computer is on the fritz, but once I am fully back on line, I will check
the photos that I have >from the Wolpa plot and I will notify the readers of
this digest which photos of stones include photographs of the deceased. This
is one of the more unusual places to locate a photograph of a deceased
ancestor.

Regards >from Dave's fan,
Marlene Bishow
Rockville, MD

Perhaps someone else can add to what I have written, although this really
does not have anything to do with Belarus.

Dave
--
David Fox
Mail to: davefox73@...
Belarus SIG Coordinator
Arnold, MD USA
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus

On 3/1/05 1:00 AM, "Belarus SIG digest" ( Jeff Arkin ) wrote:
I have never met my paternal grandfather, Jacob ARKIN, because he
died at
an early age.
I have never seen a photo of him, either.
---snip
Would there be any other documents, here or in the "old country",
that might have his picture on them? If so, how could I go about
obtaining
copies?





---

END OF DIGEST

---
To post to the Belarus SIG discussion group, send your message to:
<belarus@...>
Remember to send your message in PLAIN TEXT and sign
with your full name and location

Belarus SIG Webpage: <http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus>
Belarus Online Newsletter:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm>

Join the Research Trip to Belarus
<http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/>

This SIG (belarus@...) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org
****************************************************
Sign up for the JGFFAlert!
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html#q3.7
****************************************************
You are currently subscribed to belarus as: [mlbishow@...]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://lyris.jewishgen.org/ListManager