Date   

Re: pogroms #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Caryl Simon-Katler wrote:

Apparently, the Russian Duma prepared a lengthy report on the June
1906 pogrom in Bialystok. Does anyone know whether it has been
translated into English and where to obtain it? That would certainly
provide some more answers.

Regarding relations between Jews and Poles, I can't speak for
Bialystok per se, but in the shtetls there seems to have been a rather
ambivalent set of interactions. In the book, Life is With People: The
Culture of the Shtetl, the authors say that contact on matters of
business or government was generally peaceful, even friendly, but
subject to explosions of violence. Neighbors would suddenly become
pillagers and murderers, then when the pogrom ended would revert to the
old benign routine. Jan Gross's recent book, Neighbors, which documents
the deliberate and vicious murder of the Jews of Jedwabne (a town not
far >from Bialystok) during the holocaust by their Polish neighbors --
an act which was not instigated by the Nazis -- certainly confirms
this.

Yes, ambivalent is probably not a bad way to describe it. I think Jews
feared that their Polish neighbors (even the good ones) were potentially
subject to manipulation and instigation by anti semites in part because
they felt that pretty much all Poles had a certain basis for anti
semitism "breed" into them. This I think is how most Jews rightly or
wrongly looked at Poles. You may remember Menachem Begin's remark about
Poles which reveals this.

I think the reality is that thru much of the lifespan of many Shtetls
relations were generally pretty good, and Jewish life was able to
prosper and develop within a certain place and larger socio economic
system. I think >from the 1500's until at least the early 1800's most of
the shtetls were not poor places where Jews were downtrodden. They were
places of relative prosperity where Jews reached a high level of
organization and cultural achievement. I think things got worse after
the 2nd partition of Poland in 1793, and gradually worse yet during the
1800's when modernization and certain macro trends for a variety of
reasons started to have a bad effect. The 20th century is another story.

Jedwabne is not an isolated phenomena within the Bialystok region. There
was a wave of attacks and brutalities inflicted on Jews by Poles in the
Bialystok region mostly between the end of June and August of 1941.
Jedwabne was I think by far the worst, and probably involved the Poles
acting more independently without as much German instigation than any of
the others. A guesstimate is that 2,000 - 2,500 Jews were killed.

Incidents occurred in many of the Shtetls. In my family's Zabludow the
Germans ordered that the Jews tear down the Statue of Lenin that the
Russians had built in the town square. They forced a group of Jewish men
to take the pieces to the Jewish cemetery and give lenin a "Jewish
funeral". On the way to and >from the cemetery groups of Poles collected
and came at the Jews with farm impliments. The Jews were told to pray to
their god to save them. I think a few were actually killed and others
injured. A relative of mine by marriage was one of these men. He
survived the war and ended up in Melborne Australia.

This kind of thing was very common. A lot of Polish people would
tell you that while this was very unfortunate and that they don't
condone such a thing, they will explain that for several years Poles
had seen their Jewish neighbors collaborate with the Soviets, that
their families were sent to Siberia with the help of Jewish commissars,
Jewish NKVD, Jewish Milita, and that a certain element within Polish
society could not control their impulse for revenge against Jews who
they felt had sold out Poland and persecuted them. That is how it
is explained by many otherwise very nice, educated, cultured, people
in Poland.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: pogroms #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Caryl Simon-Katler wrote:

Apparently, the Russian Duma prepared a lengthy report on the June
1906 pogrom in Bialystok. Does anyone know whether it has been
translated into English and where to obtain it? That would certainly
provide some more answers.

Regarding relations between Jews and Poles, I can't speak for
Bialystok per se, but in the shtetls there seems to have been a rather
ambivalent set of interactions. In the book, Life is With People: The
Culture of the Shtetl, the authors say that contact on matters of
business or government was generally peaceful, even friendly, but
subject to explosions of violence. Neighbors would suddenly become
pillagers and murderers, then when the pogrom ended would revert to the
old benign routine. Jan Gross's recent book, Neighbors, which documents
the deliberate and vicious murder of the Jews of Jedwabne (a town not
far >from Bialystok) during the holocaust by their Polish neighbors --
an act which was not instigated by the Nazis -- certainly confirms
this.

Yes, ambivalent is probably not a bad way to describe it. I think Jews
feared that their Polish neighbors (even the good ones) were potentially
subject to manipulation and instigation by anti semites in part because
they felt that pretty much all Poles had a certain basis for anti
semitism "breed" into them. This I think is how most Jews rightly or
wrongly looked at Poles. You may remember Menachem Begin's remark about
Poles which reveals this.

I think the reality is that thru much of the lifespan of many Shtetls
relations were generally pretty good, and Jewish life was able to
prosper and develop within a certain place and larger socio economic
system. I think >from the 1500's until at least the early 1800's most of
the shtetls were not poor places where Jews were downtrodden. They were
places of relative prosperity where Jews reached a high level of
organization and cultural achievement. I think things got worse after
the 2nd partition of Poland in 1793, and gradually worse yet during the
1800's when modernization and certain macro trends for a variety of
reasons started to have a bad effect. The 20th century is another story.

Jedwabne is not an isolated phenomena within the Bialystok region. There
was a wave of attacks and brutalities inflicted on Jews by Poles in the
Bialystok region mostly between the end of June and August of 1941.
Jedwabne was I think by far the worst, and probably involved the Poles
acting more independently without as much German instigation than any of
the others. A guesstimate is that 2,000 - 2,500 Jews were killed.

Incidents occurred in many of the Shtetls. In my family's Zabludow the
Germans ordered that the Jews tear down the Statue of Lenin that the
Russians had built in the town square. They forced a group of Jewish men
to take the pieces to the Jewish cemetery and give lenin a "Jewish
funeral". On the way to and >from the cemetery groups of Poles collected
and came at the Jews with farm impliments. The Jews were told to pray to
their god to save them. I think a few were actually killed and others
injured. A relative of mine by marriage was one of these men. He
survived the war and ended up in Melborne Australia.

This kind of thing was very common. A lot of Polish people would
tell you that while this was very unfortunate and that they don't
condone such a thing, they will explain that for several years Poles
had seen their Jewish neighbors collaborate with the Soviets, that
their families were sent to Siberia with the help of Jewish commissars,
Jewish NKVD, Jewish Milita, and that a certain element within Polish
society could not control their impulse for revenge against Jews who
they felt had sold out Poland and persecuted them. That is how it
is explained by many otherwise very nice, educated, cultured, people
in Poland.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Re: Russian Occupation of Janow Sokolski #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Allen Saxe wrote:

The Russian occupation of Janow Sokolski >from
1939 until
the shoah was a most difficult time for at least some Jews
in Janow Sokolski (not far >from Bialystok). My grandparents
and uncle wrote letters to my father in the US detailing
interrogations and severe shortages of food and clothing.


Yes, this is typical. The standard of living and availability of goods
in the shops sharply declined. Jews who owned shops or businesses not
infrequently lost them. Some were also arrested and sent to Siberia,
some where left to the charity of relatives. Some were forced out of
their relatively nice homes into much more modest accommodations. People
who had been active in the Zionist cause were also suspect and at risk.

The religious tradition retreated >from the wooden synagogues (most were
closed and many became warehouses) to the neighborhood prayer houses and
became the province primarily of the elderly. Schools actually became an
important focus and it is there that the Soviets targeted much of their
propaganda, and many of the Jewish young people were strongly
influenced. Some Jews joined the Soviet militia, became functionaries of
the new regime, and even served as NKVD agents. Poles suffered even
more. Poles who were intellectual, nationalist, strongly catholic in a
certain way, or in a certain socio economic class were in waves of
deportations sent into the gulag and had a very horrible time. Thousands
of Jews also went. I don't think anyone knows just how many. Out of
well over a million Poles I'm not sure much more than three or four
hundred thousand survived. The Poles almost uniformly hated the Russians
and many avoided collaboration at all costs. They looked at the Jews and
felt that they had betrayed Poland, and saw that quite a few of the
Commissars, NKVD agents etc had Jewish names. This was very bad for
Polish/Jewish relations, which had already grown steadily worse during
most of the 1930's.

When the Germans invaded Russia, Stalin amnestied the Polish captives in
Siberia. Many made a horrible "death march" to Iran. There those that
survived joined a Polish Army called the Anders Army. It was transferred
to British control in N. Africa, and became the Polish Second Corps. It
is most famous for it's hard fighting at Moni Casino. Quite a few Jews
were in the Anders Army including the husband of one of my cousins >from
Zabludow.

Most of the Jews deserted the Anders Army when it was stationed in
Palestine before the invasion of Italy. These Jews entered Palestine
illegally and many took new Hebrew names. My cousin's husband
Moshe Abramitski ended up in the Palmach fighting in Israel's war of
independence. His son fought in the 67, 73, and Lebanon war, and is a
retired Lt. Colonel in the IDF Artillery Corp. I visited him and his
mother who is still alive in Israel for the first time a few years ago.
Some Jews stayed in the Anders Army, and at the Polish cemetery at Moni
Casino I'm told you can see some stars of David.

Anyway this whole "Soviet" period in the Shtetls of Eastern Poland is
quite interesting and controversial, and there is quite a bit written
about it. It's a very depressing chapter. In the Zabludow Yizkor book
they said, "The first part of the socialist internationale was realized,
the old world was destroyed. But the second part about building a new
world never happened".

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Russian Occupation of Janow Sokolski #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Allen Saxe wrote:

The Russian occupation of Janow Sokolski >from
1939 until
the shoah was a most difficult time for at least some Jews
in Janow Sokolski (not far >from Bialystok). My grandparents
and uncle wrote letters to my father in the US detailing
interrogations and severe shortages of food and clothing.


Yes, this is typical. The standard of living and availability of goods
in the shops sharply declined. Jews who owned shops or businesses not
infrequently lost them. Some were also arrested and sent to Siberia,
some where left to the charity of relatives. Some were forced out of
their relatively nice homes into much more modest accommodations. People
who had been active in the Zionist cause were also suspect and at risk.

The religious tradition retreated >from the wooden synagogues (most were
closed and many became warehouses) to the neighborhood prayer houses and
became the province primarily of the elderly. Schools actually became an
important focus and it is there that the Soviets targeted much of their
propaganda, and many of the Jewish young people were strongly
influenced. Some Jews joined the Soviet militia, became functionaries of
the new regime, and even served as NKVD agents. Poles suffered even
more. Poles who were intellectual, nationalist, strongly catholic in a
certain way, or in a certain socio economic class were in waves of
deportations sent into the gulag and had a very horrible time. Thousands
of Jews also went. I don't think anyone knows just how many. Out of
well over a million Poles I'm not sure much more than three or four
hundred thousand survived. The Poles almost uniformly hated the Russians
and many avoided collaboration at all costs. They looked at the Jews and
felt that they had betrayed Poland, and saw that quite a few of the
Commissars, NKVD agents etc had Jewish names. This was very bad for
Polish/Jewish relations, which had already grown steadily worse during
most of the 1930's.

When the Germans invaded Russia, Stalin amnestied the Polish captives in
Siberia. Many made a horrible "death march" to Iran. There those that
survived joined a Polish Army called the Anders Army. It was transferred
to British control in N. Africa, and became the Polish Second Corps. It
is most famous for it's hard fighting at Moni Casino. Quite a few Jews
were in the Anders Army including the husband of one of my cousins >from
Zabludow.

Most of the Jews deserted the Anders Army when it was stationed in
Palestine before the invasion of Italy. These Jews entered Palestine
illegally and many took new Hebrew names. My cousin's husband
Moshe Abramitski ended up in the Palmach fighting in Israel's war of
independence. His son fought in the 67, 73, and Lebanon war, and is a
retired Lt. Colonel in the IDF Artillery Corp. I visited him and his
mother who is still alive in Israel for the first time a few years ago.
Some Jews stayed in the Anders Army, and at the Polish cemetery at Moni
Casino I'm told you can see some stars of David.

Anyway this whole "Soviet" period in the Shtetls of Eastern Poland is
quite interesting and controversial, and there is quite a bit written
about it. It's a very depressing chapter. In the Zabludow Yizkor book
they said, "The first part of the socialist internationale was realized,
the old world was destroyed. But the second part about building a new
world never happened".

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Re: Pogroms #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

JACK219@aol.com wrote:

I read with interest about the pogroms in Bialystok. My grandmother, born
Sora Bella Schuster, spoke of them when I was very little..terrible stories.
Besides the pogroms of 1905 and 1906, were there earlier ones that are known
that happened between 1885 and 1903? Thank you for any information.

Jack Fackerell

I've read descriptions of the 1905 and 1906 pogroms and they were indeed
very gruesome

No wonder they sparked a wave of immigration. The first one of my
Bartnowski family (great uncle David Bartnowski) in Zabludow came to
Detroit in 1912. I also think there were earlier pogroms in Bialystok
but I know nothing about them. In Zabludow there was a blood libel in
the 1700's. It was called the Gruvella Libel for the name of the Polish
child who it was thought was killed for his blood to be used in Jewish
ritual.

Also in the Russian-Polish war that took place in about 1560 I know
that the Russians killed many Zabludow Jews, and also took captives
that had to be ransomed for 600 goldens. Other than the pogroms of 1905
and 1906 I'm not aware of any pogroms in Bialystok in the 20th century.
The pogroms around 1905 and 1906 had to do with the climate after the
Russian loss in the Russo-Japanese war, and the threats to the monarchy.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Pogroms #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

JACK219@aol.com wrote:

I read with interest about the pogroms in Bialystok. My grandmother, born
Sora Bella Schuster, spoke of them when I was very little..terrible stories.
Besides the pogroms of 1905 and 1906, were there earlier ones that are known
that happened between 1885 and 1903? Thank you for any information.

Jack Fackerell

I've read descriptions of the 1905 and 1906 pogroms and they were indeed
very gruesome

No wonder they sparked a wave of immigration. The first one of my
Bartnowski family (great uncle David Bartnowski) in Zabludow came to
Detroit in 1912. I also think there were earlier pogroms in Bialystok
but I know nothing about them. In Zabludow there was a blood libel in
the 1700's. It was called the Gruvella Libel for the name of the Polish
child who it was thought was killed for his blood to be used in Jewish
ritual.

Also in the Russian-Polish war that took place in about 1560 I know
that the Russians killed many Zabludow Jews, and also took captives
that had to be ransomed for 600 goldens. Other than the pogroms of 1905
and 1906 I'm not aware of any pogroms in Bialystok in the 20th century.
The pogroms around 1905 and 1906 had to do with the climate after the
Russian loss in the Russo-Japanese war, and the threats to the monarchy.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Relatives of Myer Myers (Meyers) #southafrica

armeyers@...
 

I am trying to locate relatives of Myer Myers (Meyers).
He was born in Lithuania probably in the mid 1800's. He was married to a
Leah (Lillian) Kerbal (?).
He had five children: Nathan, Samuel, George, Ada and Anna. Samuel and
George went to the US in the early 1900's after being in South Africa for a
few years. The other children went and lived in South Africa. Nathan married
a Fanny Berman. Ada married a Solomon Wade. Anna married a George Maisnick.
I have been told that other relatives of Myers relatives of Myer went to
South Africa. Does anyone have any information on these other relatives.

Andrew Meyers


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Relatives of Myer Myers (Meyers) #southafrica

armeyers@...
 

I am trying to locate relatives of Myer Myers (Meyers).
He was born in Lithuania probably in the mid 1800's. He was married to a
Leah (Lillian) Kerbal (?).
He had five children: Nathan, Samuel, George, Ada and Anna. Samuel and
George went to the US in the early 1900's after being in South Africa for a
few years. The other children went and lived in South Africa. Nathan married
a Fanny Berman. Ada married a Solomon Wade. Anna married a George Maisnick.
I have been told that other relatives of Myers relatives of Myer went to
South Africa. Does anyone have any information on these other relatives.

Andrew Meyers


Rubin family #galicia

JenniferSchu@...
 

My family is Catholic but my great-grandmother's name was Marianna Rubin. She
was >from Galicia. She married a Polish Christian man after she came to the U.S.
I am researching what I have come to believe may be our family's Jewish roots.

Marianna Rubin's parents are listed on her death certificate as Anthony Rubin
and Sophia Danak. Would anyone have information on these families in Galicia?
Were Jewish children given Christian-sounding surnames like Marianna and Anthony?
Is Danak a Jewish surname?

I have no other information other than my own deceased grandmother's words to me
when I was a child that her mother came >from "Ga-LEET-zia in Poland."

Many thanks,
Jennifer


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Rubin family #galicia

JenniferSchu@...
 

My family is Catholic but my great-grandmother's name was Marianna Rubin. She
was >from Galicia. She married a Polish Christian man after she came to the U.S.
I am researching what I have come to believe may be our family's Jewish roots.

Marianna Rubin's parents are listed on her death certificate as Anthony Rubin
and Sophia Danak. Would anyone have information on these families in Galicia?
Were Jewish children given Christian-sounding surnames like Marianna and Anthony?
Is Danak a Jewish surname?

I have no other information other than my own deceased grandmother's words to me
when I was a child that her mother came >from "Ga-LEET-zia in Poland."

Many thanks,
Jennifer


Correction to JewishGen Upgrades message #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field
 

While we all support projects to translate our precious Yizkor Books
, we must not forget that it is the JewishGen General Fund that is
the sole support of our mailing lists, programs and projects. So
please consider acknowledging this effort by a financial contribution
to the General fund at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.html.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project Manager
Vice President, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Correction to JewishGen Upgrades message #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field
 

While we all support projects to translate our precious Yizkor Books
, we must not forget that it is the JewishGen General Fund that is
the sole support of our mailing lists, programs and projects. So
please consider acknowledging this effort by a financial contribution
to the General fund at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.html.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project Manager
Vice President, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Re: My Faceless Grandfather/How to get grandmother's picture #belarus

Roberta Sheps
 

Lynne Shapiro asks if anyone has any idea of how to find a picture of her
grandmother who emigrated to the US in 1905.

Although the kind of snapshots we now take as routine were not common until
the end of WWII, I have come across several group pictures taken at more
important family functions. Also, people occasionally had formal pictures
taken by photographers.

If you have not nagged every single one of your living family members, do
so. If you have done so once, do it again. My late aunt swore she had no
documents of any kind relating to her parents' immigration to Canada or any
photos, but when she died, her son found her parents' wedding license, which
gave her grandmother's maiden name, and several photos, including one of her
grandfather (taken in Lithuania, as he did not emigrate), the first anyone
in my generation had ever seen.

Good luck,

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England=20
(born in Winnipeg, Canada)




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Belarus SIG #Belarus RE: Re: My Faceless Grandfather/How to get grandmother's picture #belarus

Roberta Sheps
 

Lynne Shapiro asks if anyone has any idea of how to find a picture of her
grandmother who emigrated to the US in 1905.

Although the kind of snapshots we now take as routine were not common until
the end of WWII, I have come across several group pictures taken at more
important family functions. Also, people occasionally had formal pictures
taken by photographers.

If you have not nagged every single one of your living family members, do
so. If you have done so once, do it again. My late aunt swore she had no
documents of any kind relating to her parents' immigration to Canada or any
photos, but when she died, her son found her parents' wedding license, which
gave her grandmother's maiden name, and several photos, including one of her
grandfather (taken in Lithuania, as he did not emigrate), the first anyone
in my generation had ever seen.

Good luck,

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England=20
(born in Winnipeg, Canada)




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Re: The Society For The History of Czechoslovak Jews - Memorial #austria-czech

Amira Kohn-Trattner <amira.kt@...>
 

Hello everyone,

There will be a memorial service this forthcoming Sunday, March 6th at
3:00P.M. at Congregation Habonim in Manhattan (66th Street between
Columbus and Central Park West). Anyone who might be able to attend
is welcome. It is an annual get together for Czechoslovak Jews.
Services and various presentations are lead by Rabbi Patz. I happen to
be on the Board of the Society and hope to present a short film, or
rather a trailer (if it arrives >from Prague today) on a group of
extraordinary, life-long friends, originally >from Prague, who live in
Caracas under the threat of a third dictatorship in their lives.
I interviewed them on video and Martin Smok, a young talented film
maker >from Prague put a trailer (short film presentation) together.
Their stories and personalities are compelling.

As to the Reviews Charlie and Susan mentioned, there are extra
ones for sale in Rabbi Patz's office. If anyone knows where
Oscar Rabiniwitz article may be found I would appreciate the
information very much. Oscar Rabinowitcz was a teacher in the Jewish
Day School in Prague when it first opened in the early 1920's.
Apparently, my grandfather, Viktor Kohn, a founder and supporter of
the school hired Dr. Rabinowitcz for the school (I believe I have a
picture of him with a the first grade of the school with my mother
Ruth Kohn as a little girl) and later he hired Dr. Rabinowitcz
as a writer for a Zionist (Revisionist) newspaper owned and published
by my grandfather, in Prague, in 1934 and 1935 DER JUDENSTADT.
I have a vague recollection of meeting someone, who I think may have
been Oscar Rabinowitz, shortly after my parents and I arrived in
New York (1958). He invited us to a lovely club on Madison Avenue.
Unfortunately, I don't know much more than that and whether it was
indeed Oscar Rabinowitz. If so, he may have children who live in the
States - does anyone know?

Oscar RABINOWITCZ and my grandfather Viktor KOHN and others of the Zionist
Revisionist group urged Czech Jews to leave Czechoslovakia in the
mid-1930's. I remember one particular small article I read in DER
JUDENSTADT ( some copies available at Leo Beack Institute and
the Prague Jewish Museum) urging the youth to leave and reminding
everyone of what is happening to our Jewish "brothers" in Germany.
There are also notices of meetings and presentations to various
communities where Dr. RABINOWITCZ and my grandfather spoke about Zionism,
and Aliya to Palestina.

Amira Kohn-Trattner
New York, N.Y.

My last name, KOHN, is my mother's maiden name (Prague and Wossek) and my
father's last name (Lucenec, Slovakia) - unrelated (as far as we know..).

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Books by Society for the History of CZ Jews
From: Vitdoc@aol.com
Date: Thu, 3 Mar 2005 13:37:03 EST
Several people have written to me privately with questions
about the books written many years ago by the Society for the
History of CZ Jews, so I am sending this to the entire group as
it might be of interest. The first volume was published in 1968.
The third in 1984. The last review was published in 1993.
There were six in all and I don't have copies of all of them.
Rabbi Patz and his assistant Lesly Cohen can be reached at their
synagogue in New Jersey. The phone number at one time was: 973 239-2333.
They may have some books left but these books are also often
available >from libraries. I am not sure about the Reviews which are
more like journals. Online book selling websites may have used
copies. On my website <www.czechtorah.org >is one story from
Volume 3 written by Joseph Pick, The Story of the CZ Srolls.
I was given permission to reproduce it on my web site. It will give
you an idea of what type of stories the books have in them. The articles
in the books were written after the war and many who wrote were survivors.
They covered a variety of subjects like holocaust, history, art,
music and the economy as they related to the CZ Jews. These
articles were written by some of the following: Hana Volavkova,
Guido Kisch, Hugo Stransky, Gertrude Hirschler, Avigdor Dagan,
Theodore Rabb, Oskar Rabinowicz, Kurt Wehle, Wilma Iggers, and
Erich Kulka to name a few. I am sure there are others on the SIG
who have these books or have read them.

Susan Boyer LA CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: The Society For The History of Czechoslovak Jews - Memorial #austria-czech

Amira Kohn-Trattner <amira.kt@...>
 

Hello everyone,

There will be a memorial service this forthcoming Sunday, March 6th at
3:00P.M. at Congregation Habonim in Manhattan (66th Street between
Columbus and Central Park West). Anyone who might be able to attend
is welcome. It is an annual get together for Czechoslovak Jews.
Services and various presentations are lead by Rabbi Patz. I happen to
be on the Board of the Society and hope to present a short film, or
rather a trailer (if it arrives >from Prague today) on a group of
extraordinary, life-long friends, originally >from Prague, who live in
Caracas under the threat of a third dictatorship in their lives.
I interviewed them on video and Martin Smok, a young talented film
maker >from Prague put a trailer (short film presentation) together.
Their stories and personalities are compelling.

As to the Reviews Charlie and Susan mentioned, there are extra
ones for sale in Rabbi Patz's office. If anyone knows where
Oscar Rabiniwitz article may be found I would appreciate the
information very much. Oscar Rabinowitcz was a teacher in the Jewish
Day School in Prague when it first opened in the early 1920's.
Apparently, my grandfather, Viktor Kohn, a founder and supporter of
the school hired Dr. Rabinowitcz for the school (I believe I have a
picture of him with a the first grade of the school with my mother
Ruth Kohn as a little girl) and later he hired Dr. Rabinowitcz
as a writer for a Zionist (Revisionist) newspaper owned and published
by my grandfather, in Prague, in 1934 and 1935 DER JUDENSTADT.
I have a vague recollection of meeting someone, who I think may have
been Oscar Rabinowitz, shortly after my parents and I arrived in
New York (1958). He invited us to a lovely club on Madison Avenue.
Unfortunately, I don't know much more than that and whether it was
indeed Oscar Rabinowitz. If so, he may have children who live in the
States - does anyone know?

Oscar RABINOWITCZ and my grandfather Viktor KOHN and others of the Zionist
Revisionist group urged Czech Jews to leave Czechoslovakia in the
mid-1930's. I remember one particular small article I read in DER
JUDENSTADT ( some copies available at Leo Beack Institute and
the Prague Jewish Museum) urging the youth to leave and reminding
everyone of what is happening to our Jewish "brothers" in Germany.
There are also notices of meetings and presentations to various
communities where Dr. RABINOWITCZ and my grandfather spoke about Zionism,
and Aliya to Palestina.

Amira Kohn-Trattner
New York, N.Y.

My last name, KOHN, is my mother's maiden name (Prague and Wossek) and my
father's last name (Lucenec, Slovakia) - unrelated (as far as we know..).

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Books by Society for the History of CZ Jews
From: Vitdoc@aol.com
Date: Thu, 3 Mar 2005 13:37:03 EST
Several people have written to me privately with questions
about the books written many years ago by the Society for the
History of CZ Jews, so I am sending this to the entire group as
it might be of interest. The first volume was published in 1968.
The third in 1984. The last review was published in 1993.
There were six in all and I don't have copies of all of them.
Rabbi Patz and his assistant Lesly Cohen can be reached at their
synagogue in New Jersey. The phone number at one time was: 973 239-2333.
They may have some books left but these books are also often
available >from libraries. I am not sure about the Reviews which are
more like journals. Online book selling websites may have used
copies. On my website <www.czechtorah.org >is one story from
Volume 3 written by Joseph Pick, The Story of the CZ Srolls.
I was given permission to reproduce it on my web site. It will give
you an idea of what type of stories the books have in them. The articles
in the books were written after the war and many who wrote were survivors.
They covered a variety of subjects like holocaust, history, art,
music and the economy as they related to the CZ Jews. These
articles were written by some of the following: Hana Volavkova,
Guido Kisch, Hugo Stransky, Gertrude Hirschler, Avigdor Dagan,
Theodore Rabb, Oskar Rabinowicz, Kurt Wehle, Wilma Iggers, and
Erich Kulka to name a few. I am sure there are others on the SIG
who have these books or have read them.

Susan Boyer LA CA


MAMBER - RUBEL family #galicia

Susana Englander Mamber <sem005@...>
 

Maybe someone knows the family of Rubel Nathan Wolf >from Montreal, Canada.
In one of the testimony pages I saw in the Internet, it is one written by Mr
RUBEL.

He wrote in the memory of his mother, Gitel MAMBER.
I dont really know the connection between Gitel and my MAMBER family, her
husband Isak RUBEL was a witness in my grandfather's sister birth
certificate. Her name was Elka MANBER, and Gitel MAMBER's mother was also an
"Elka"
(Elka KNOLLER).

Gitla RUBEL nee MAMBER was born in Przemysl 1871
Nathan Wolf RUBEL was born in Przemysl 1894
he has brothers: Dawid b. 1892
Abraham Salomon 1890
Israel 1893
Yosef 1897

Susana Mamber Englender
sem005@netvision.net.il
Raanana
Israel


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia MAMBER - RUBEL family #galicia

Susana Englander Mamber <sem005@...>
 

Maybe someone knows the family of Rubel Nathan Wolf >from Montreal, Canada.
In one of the testimony pages I saw in the Internet, it is one written by Mr
RUBEL.

He wrote in the memory of his mother, Gitel MAMBER.
I dont really know the connection between Gitel and my MAMBER family, her
husband Isak RUBEL was a witness in my grandfather's sister birth
certificate. Her name was Elka MANBER, and Gitel MAMBER's mother was also an
"Elka"
(Elka KNOLLER).

Gitla RUBEL nee MAMBER was born in Przemysl 1871
Nathan Wolf RUBEL was born in Przemysl 1894
he has brothers: Dawid b. 1892
Abraham Salomon 1890
Israel 1893
Yosef 1897

Susana Mamber Englender
sem005@netvision.net.il
Raanana
Israel


Tlumacz / Smarkow or Smarzow #galicia

Sherry Kisos <smwwk770@...>
 

Dear All,

I would like to know if anyone has any information on
these towns in Galicia (landsmanschaft, Yizkor books,
any other information, etc.)

Sherry Kisos
Petach Tikvah, Israel





__________________________________
Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday!
Yahoo! Netrospective: 100 Moments of the Web
http://birthday.yahoo.com/netrospective/


Jewish Landowners - Stanislawow Province #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Dear Galitzyaners,

Below is the list (in the alphabetical order) of the identified Jewish
landowners in Stanislawow (currently known as Ivano-Frankivsk) Wojewodstwo
(Province). Names are subtracted >from 1929 Poland Business Directory.

List covers 78 surnames but in the spreadsheet there are 91 entries since
some of the people listed were the owners of the several land properties in
a different locations.

If some of the names listed below are subject of your genealogical research,
please drop me a note and I would forward complete spreadsheet which also
includes land property location (village an district) and its size (where
given).

Alexander Sharon,

Calgary, Ab.

-----
ABRAHAMOWICZ Dawid
ABRAHAMOWICZ Wiktoria
ASCHEIM Leon

BARAN Hilel and Samuel
BERGMAN Chaim
BERGMANN Mojzesz
BIRNBAUM Henryk
BLAU
BODNAR Mojzesz
BRODMAN Szymon
BURSTIN Samuel

DIAMANDTSTEIN Izak
DIAMANTSTEIN Mozes
DIENSTAG J.

EIFERMAN Izrael
EISENSTEIN Markus
EPSTEIN

FEIGERT Dawid
FEIGERT Karol
FEILER Nachman
FEILER Salomon
FEINTUCH Samuel
FEUERSTEIN Jakob

GARTENBERG M and L
GARTENBERG M and D
GELLER Izaak
GLANZBERG Berl
GLEICHER Abraham
GOLD L
GOLDENBERG F.
GOLDREICH Wilhelm
GOLDSZLAG Helena
GOTZ Leopold
GROSS Adam
GRUNFELD Salomon

HALPERN Adolf
HALPERN Karol
HIRT Moses

JEWISH COLONISATION ASSOCIATION

KANAREK Eljasz
KASS Lejzer
KOHN Jozef
KONIG Majer
KORN Chaim
KORN Mordka
KORNBLUCH Bernard

LANDAU Henryk
LIEBLICH Schulim

MANCHAIM Chaim
MARGULIES Mendel
MARMOROSCH Salomon
MONHEIM Maurycy

NEUTUCH B

PINTER Markus
PISTYNER Isaak
PISTYNER S.
POTOK Izak

RAND H
REITER Henryk
REITER Jozef
REITER Tobiasz
RISENBERG Mechl
ROZEN Salomon
RUBEL Jakob
RUBINSTEIN Brothers
RUBINSTEIN Rafal

SCHIEBER Lejzor
SEEMAN Lejb
STADLER E and M
STERNHALL Gerschon
SZLEIFER Hersch
SZPIERER Berl

TENENBLATT F
TISCH T

UNGER Blima

WEINFELD Fejga

ZIMAND Eljasz