Date   

U.S. Holocaust Museum Calls for Immediate Access to ITS records #general

bik <kooshb9341@...>
 

March 7
U.S. Holocaust Museum Calls for Immediate Access to Closed Archive

Because of the continued refusal of the International Tracing Service
(ITS) to permit Holocaust survivors and scholars to access the world's
largest closed Holocaust-era archive, the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum called on the International Committee of the Red Cross
(ICRC), which supervises the ITS, to open the archive and permit the
ITS's 11 International Commission board member states to copy its
records. Read more:
http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stories.pl?ACCT=104&STORY=/www/story/03-07-2006/0004315257&EDATE=
or
http://tinyurl.com/q95bl
--
Bernard Kouchel
kooshb9341@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen U.S. Holocaust Museum Calls for Immediate Access to ITS records #general

bik <kooshb9341@...>
 

March 7
U.S. Holocaust Museum Calls for Immediate Access to Closed Archive

Because of the continued refusal of the International Tracing Service
(ITS) to permit Holocaust survivors and scholars to access the world's
largest closed Holocaust-era archive, the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum called on the International Committee of the Red Cross
(ICRC), which supervises the ITS, to open the archive and permit the
ITS's 11 International Commission board member states to copy its
records. Read more:
http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stories.pl?ACCT=104&STORY=/www/story/03-07-2006/0004315257&EDATE=
or
http://tinyurl.com/q95bl
--
Bernard Kouchel
kooshb9341@bellsouth.net


Re: Krotochin and Monasch #germany

Ron James <rejames@...>
 

Baer Lobel Monasch was a famous publisher of religious books in Prussia's
Poland Province, now part of Poland.

The son of B. L. Monasch, came to Australia in 1854 and changed the name to
Monash. John Monash , was born in Australia in 1865 and became one of Australia's
greatest military commanders. Sir John Monash is buried in Brighton Cemetery
Melbourne, Australia.

Krotoschin; I would be very interested to know if you have any information
of any graves of Leib JOACHIM, his wife Susan? or any other JOACHIM names
that you have any information on. They were >from Krotoschin, Prussia

Liz James Melbourne, Australia <rejames@iinet.net.au>
Searching JOACHIM; OTTOLANGUI; OTTOLENGHI


German SIG #Germany Re: Krotochin and Monasch #germany

Ron James <rejames@...>
 

Baer Lobel Monasch was a famous publisher of religious books in Prussia's
Poland Province, now part of Poland.

The son of B. L. Monasch, came to Australia in 1854 and changed the name to
Monash. John Monash , was born in Australia in 1865 and became one of Australia's
greatest military commanders. Sir John Monash is buried in Brighton Cemetery
Melbourne, Australia.

Krotoschin; I would be very interested to know if you have any information
of any graves of Leib JOACHIM, his wife Susan? or any other JOACHIM names
that you have any information on. They were >from Krotoschin, Prussia

Liz James Melbourne, Australia <rejames@iinet.net.au>
Searching JOACHIM; OTTOLANGUI; OTTOLENGHI


Portland and Maine Jewish records #usa

Joyce Field
 

I hope that Harris Gleckman, who wrote the other day about Portland
Jewish records, knows about JOWBR, JewishGen's Obnline Worldwide
Burial Registry, and would consider donating Portland's and Maine's
burial records to this searchable database. Unfortunately, the
Moderator for Earlyamerican SIG did not call attention to this
important JewishGen site with Mr. Gleckman's posting.

For the information of all Earlyamerican SIG Digest subscribers,
JOWBR can be searched at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/

To submit burial records of a town or a landsmanschaft, see

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm

A quarterly update of new records will be online soon. We have
recently received burial records of:

Anshel Sphard Congregation, Memphis, TN. The group submitting these burial
records, Mid-South Memphis Jewish Historical Society, will be indexing additional
burials >from Memphis as well as records >from other communities in
Tennessee, Arkansas, and rural Mississippi. Bravo to this group!!

We are eager to receive burial records >from other American
communities. To see those that are already online, click on:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/tree/CemList.htm

and scroll down to USA. Click on "country" and a menu of burials by
state will appear. Click on "Region" and you will get the breakdown
by cities in the state. Currently, there are about a quarter million
burials in the USA in this database. Obviously, we are just touching
the surface*. Help us grow this important genealogical resource by
donating your town's Jewish burial records.

Joyce Field, JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition jfield@jewishgen.org
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/

* did you mean subsurface ? This is a burial registry, after all. MOD


Early American SIG #USA Portland and Maine Jewish records #usa

Joyce Field
 

I hope that Harris Gleckman, who wrote the other day about Portland
Jewish records, knows about JOWBR, JewishGen's Obnline Worldwide
Burial Registry, and would consider donating Portland's and Maine's
burial records to this searchable database. Unfortunately, the
Moderator for Earlyamerican SIG did not call attention to this
important JewishGen site with Mr. Gleckman's posting.

For the information of all Earlyamerican SIG Digest subscribers,
JOWBR can be searched at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/

To submit burial records of a town or a landsmanschaft, see

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm

A quarterly update of new records will be online soon. We have
recently received burial records of:

Anshel Sphard Congregation, Memphis, TN. The group submitting these burial
records, Mid-South Memphis Jewish Historical Society, will be indexing additional
burials >from Memphis as well as records >from other communities in
Tennessee, Arkansas, and rural Mississippi. Bravo to this group!!

We are eager to receive burial records >from other American
communities. To see those that are already online, click on:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/tree/CemList.htm

and scroll down to USA. Click on "country" and a menu of burials by
state will appear. Click on "Region" and you will get the breakdown
by cities in the state. Currently, there are about a quarter million
burials in the USA in this database. Obviously, we are just touching
the surface*. Help us grow this important genealogical resource by
donating your town's Jewish burial records.

Joyce Field, JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition jfield@jewishgen.org
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/

* did you mean subsurface ? This is a burial registry, after all. MOD


Options Using Morses's Boston Listings #usa

Paul King <samorai@...>
 

I am seeking a clarification regarding the several Stephen Morse options for
tracing immigrants who may have arrived at the port of Boston in mid-19th c.
Given the following data:

1) first and last name of arrival (with alternative spellings and name
changes);
2) exact date and place of birth;
3) highest degree of certainty regarding year of departure;
4) educated guess of port of departure

Am I confined to tracing the individual through payment to the commercial
site for access to information or can I, given the above data, employ the
one-step process without using the services of the commercial site?

Moderator. Please advise whether responses should be sent privately.
MODERATOR REPLY - Replies can be sent to the GerSIG list but for better results
you should post this inquiry to the JGDG (JewishGen Discussion Group).

Paul King Jerusalem <samorai@012.net.il>


Early American SIG #USA Options Using Morses's Boston Listings #usa

Paul King <samorai@...>
 

I am seeking a clarification regarding the several Stephen Morse options for
tracing immigrants who may have arrived at the port of Boston in mid-19th c.
Given the following data:

1) first and last name of arrival (with alternative spellings and name
changes);
2) exact date and place of birth;
3) highest degree of certainty regarding year of departure;
4) educated guess of port of departure

Am I confined to tracing the individual through payment to the commercial
site for access to information or can I, given the above data, employ the
one-step process without using the services of the commercial site?

Moderator. Please advise whether responses should be sent privately.
MODERATOR REPLY - Replies can be sent to the GerSIG list but for better results
you should post this inquiry to the JGDG (JewishGen Discussion Group).

Paul King Jerusalem <samorai@012.net.il>


Vladimerets #ukraine

SCM <smunch1@...>
 

I am looking for anyone who might be related or might have information
of the family Kanonicz >from Vladimerets. My father, Aron Cannon
(Kanonicz) came to the U.S. >from Vladimerets through Argentina. He
arrived about 1923 and resided in Detroit , Michigan. I am looking for
any information regarding his family that may be in South America.

Shirley C. Munch
Los Angeles, CA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Vladimerets #ukraine

SCM <smunch1@...>
 

I am looking for anyone who might be related or might have information
of the family Kanonicz >from Vladimerets. My father, Aron Cannon
(Kanonicz) came to the U.S. >from Vladimerets through Argentina. He
arrived about 1923 and resided in Detroit , Michigan. I am looking for
any information regarding his family that may be in South America.

Shirley C. Munch
Los Angeles, CA


"Story of a Czech Water Polo Player/Officer/Jew" Mar. 16 in San Francisco #austria-czech

Jrbaston
 

Although Jewish athletes played a major role in competitive sports at
the start of the twentieth century, they do not always occupy a
significant place in Jewish memory or research.

On Thursday, March 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Jewish Community Library
in San Francisco, Helen Epstein, author of "Children of the Holocaust"
and "Where She Came From: A Daughter's Search for her Mother's
History," turns her focus on her father, Czech Olympic athlete Kurt Epstein.

Drawing on her research >from historical sources as well as interviews
with other Central European athletes, Epstein sketches the life of her
father and his generation of Jewish sportsmen and women in the period
between the two World Wars.

Born in Prague in 1947, Helen Epstein, the daughter of Holocaust
survivors, grew up in New York City and studied musicology at Hebrew
University in Jerusalem.

The Jewish Community Library is located at 1835 Ellis Street, San
Francisco. There is free parking in the building on Pierce Street between
Ellis and Eddy Streets. Helen Epstein's appearance is co-sponsored by
the Holocaust Center of Northern California and the Northern California
Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. The event -- like all programs at the Library
-- is free.

For more information, contact the Jewish Community Library at
< library@bjesf.org >

Judy Baston,
San Francisco, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech "Story of a Czech Water Polo Player/Officer/Jew" Mar. 16 in San Francisco #austria-czech

Jrbaston
 

Although Jewish athletes played a major role in competitive sports at
the start of the twentieth century, they do not always occupy a
significant place in Jewish memory or research.

On Thursday, March 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Jewish Community Library
in San Francisco, Helen Epstein, author of "Children of the Holocaust"
and "Where She Came From: A Daughter's Search for her Mother's
History," turns her focus on her father, Czech Olympic athlete Kurt Epstein.

Drawing on her research >from historical sources as well as interviews
with other Central European athletes, Epstein sketches the life of her
father and his generation of Jewish sportsmen and women in the period
between the two World Wars.

Born in Prague in 1947, Helen Epstein, the daughter of Holocaust
survivors, grew up in New York City and studied musicology at Hebrew
University in Jerusalem.

The Jewish Community Library is located at 1835 Ellis Street, San
Francisco. There is free parking in the building on Pierce Street between
Ellis and Eddy Streets. Helen Epstein's appearance is co-sponsored by
the Holocaust Center of Northern California and the Northern California
Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. The event -- like all programs at the Library
-- is free.

For more information, contact the Jewish Community Library at
< library@bjesf.org >

Judy Baston,
San Francisco, CA


Re: Sources in Vienna - 1826 #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Omri Arnon writes: <"My great grandfather Ignacz
(Ignatz) REINITZ, born and raised in Nagykanizsa,
Hungary, attended the University of Vienna in 1826-7.
He was enrolled in the first year of the Philosophy
Faculty in 1826 and probably stopped studying there in
1827/8 when he moved to Budapest to study medicine. I
checked with the University archive and it seems that
while they have Ignacz registered in the University,
they do not hold additional details of the students
from these years.
I know that Ignacz and his widow mother Regina lived
in Vienna these years. Regina probably continued
living in Vienna or possibly Kis Marton (Eisenstadt)
in the late 1820s. I wonder if anyone can help me with
sources that will provide details of their residence
and additional details about Regina REINITZ.">

Omri and I met in Nagykanizsa [Gross Kanitz, Hungary]
in May 2004 when we both attended the very moving
ceremony commemorating the 60th anniversary of the
deportation of the Jews of this town, so I know about
his long-standing quest re Vienna.

Jews were not generally allowed to reside in Vienna
before 1848 unless they were part of the long
established community, military personnel/doctors,
had a "toleriert" status, or were under the
suzerainity of the Turkish Sultan. There was also a
transient population [visitors, physicians, surgeons,
tourists?, academics, traders etc] but they were not
allowed to settle.

In the early 1800s there were under 150 toleriert
Jewish families in the city. {Faktor, Hoffaktor,
wholesalers {Grosshandler}; dealers in textiles,
leather, paper, wool/silk, jewels/gold, alcohol and
manufactured products as well as a predominance of
bankers and moneylenders. There were also servants -
and lesser tradesmen [kosher butchers, gravediggers,
and official dealing with the needs of the Jewish
community. By the early 1900s, the Viennese Jewish
community was one of the largest in W. Europe.

So the fact that Omri's gtgrandfather and gtgt
grandmother were living in Vienna in the 1820s may
just be because she, a widow, had accompanied her son
on his studies - [she had nowhere else to live]. My
gtgrandfather Albert {Abraham} KOHN also came to
Vienna >from Grossbock, Bohemia in the 1850s with his
widowed mother - as an only son, he obviously could
not leave her behind "in the sticks".

The other possibility is that there were already
"toleriert" relatives living in Vienna. There are
lists of "Tolerierte Juden" and also very early trade
directories of Vienna where the Jewish tradesmen are
listed. The available vital records start in the
1780s, but there are records of burials in the old
cemeteries of Vienna well before that. Similarly the
burial book of the Jewish cemetery of Wahring {Vienna}
often has details of origins of the deceased.
Searching for any early "Nagykanizsa deaths" in Vienna
may provide a clue.

I have found an early REINITZ birth in Vienna
Salomon REINITZ Birth: 15 April 1839 - father Hermann
REINITZ and mother Regina. One would have to check the
Jewish birth records to see whether there is an
annotation about Hermann's origins and occupation.
These records often say things like: Handelsmann aus
Eisenstadt, Gross Kanitz etc. The address and
witnesses also may provide valuable clues.

There were only 9 Jewish weddings in Vienna in 1837
and 10 in 1838 - so this REINITZ couple had emigrated
to Vienna from? Hermann REINITZ could be a cousin of
Ignatz - the family connection many have brought
Ignatz and Regina to Vienna in those early days.

The fact that Ignatz was studying at Vienna University
in the 1820s probably implies that his family was
already well-off and very well-established.

Sadly, the extremely valuable Vienna Meldezettel
[registration documents] pre-1900 have been thrown-out
when an over-zealous archivist/bureaucrat decided on a
spring clean - thus destroying much vital data. For an
excellent account of the Meldezettel of Vienna, please
read Peter Lowe's account:

http://www.jewishgen.org/bohmor/TOWNS/Austria/meldezettel.htm

Celia Male [U.K.]


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech re: Sources in Vienna - 1826 #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Omri Arnon writes: <"My great grandfather Ignacz
(Ignatz) REINITZ, born and raised in Nagykanizsa,
Hungary, attended the University of Vienna in 1826-7.
He was enrolled in the first year of the Philosophy
Faculty in 1826 and probably stopped studying there in
1827/8 when he moved to Budapest to study medicine. I
checked with the University archive and it seems that
while they have Ignacz registered in the University,
they do not hold additional details of the students
from these years.
I know that Ignacz and his widow mother Regina lived
in Vienna these years. Regina probably continued
living in Vienna or possibly Kis Marton (Eisenstadt)
in the late 1820s. I wonder if anyone can help me with
sources that will provide details of their residence
and additional details about Regina REINITZ.">

Omri and I met in Nagykanizsa [Gross Kanitz, Hungary]
in May 2004 when we both attended the very moving
ceremony commemorating the 60th anniversary of the
deportation of the Jews of this town, so I know about
his long-standing quest re Vienna.

Jews were not generally allowed to reside in Vienna
before 1848 unless they were part of the long
established community, military personnel/doctors,
had a "toleriert" status, or were under the
suzerainity of the Turkish Sultan. There was also a
transient population [visitors, physicians, surgeons,
tourists?, academics, traders etc] but they were not
allowed to settle.

In the early 1800s there were under 150 toleriert
Jewish families in the city. {Faktor, Hoffaktor,
wholesalers {Grosshandler}; dealers in textiles,
leather, paper, wool/silk, jewels/gold, alcohol and
manufactured products as well as a predominance of
bankers and moneylenders. There were also servants -
and lesser tradesmen [kosher butchers, gravediggers,
and official dealing with the needs of the Jewish
community. By the early 1900s, the Viennese Jewish
community was one of the largest in W. Europe.

So the fact that Omri's gtgrandfather and gtgt
grandmother were living in Vienna in the 1820s may
just be because she, a widow, had accompanied her son
on his studies - [she had nowhere else to live]. My
gtgrandfather Albert {Abraham} KOHN also came to
Vienna >from Grossbock, Bohemia in the 1850s with his
widowed mother - as an only son, he obviously could
not leave her behind "in the sticks".

The other possibility is that there were already
"toleriert" relatives living in Vienna. There are
lists of "Tolerierte Juden" and also very early trade
directories of Vienna where the Jewish tradesmen are
listed. The available vital records start in the
1780s, but there are records of burials in the old
cemeteries of Vienna well before that. Similarly the
burial book of the Jewish cemetery of Wahring {Vienna}
often has details of origins of the deceased.
Searching for any early "Nagykanizsa deaths" in Vienna
may provide a clue.

I have found an early REINITZ birth in Vienna
Salomon REINITZ Birth: 15 April 1839 - father Hermann
REINITZ and mother Regina. One would have to check the
Jewish birth records to see whether there is an
annotation about Hermann's origins and occupation.
These records often say things like: Handelsmann aus
Eisenstadt, Gross Kanitz etc. The address and
witnesses also may provide valuable clues.

There were only 9 Jewish weddings in Vienna in 1837
and 10 in 1838 - so this REINITZ couple had emigrated
to Vienna from? Hermann REINITZ could be a cousin of
Ignatz - the family connection many have brought
Ignatz and Regina to Vienna in those early days.

The fact that Ignatz was studying at Vienna University
in the 1820s probably implies that his family was
already well-off and very well-established.

Sadly, the extremely valuable Vienna Meldezettel
[registration documents] pre-1900 have been thrown-out
when an over-zealous archivist/bureaucrat decided on a
spring clean - thus destroying much vital data. For an
excellent account of the Meldezettel of Vienna, please
read Peter Lowe's account:

http://www.jewishgen.org/bohmor/TOWNS/Austria/meldezettel.htm

Celia Male [U.K.]


JC Microfilm at Libraries #unitedkingdom

Sharon Avraham <shouav@...>
 

For those of us in Israel, please note that there are Jewish Chronicle
Microfilm at Bar Ilan University Library. Call them to find out the times
and conditions etc.

Sharon, Netanya Israel
Researching: Spitalsky, Spitallen, Keminic, Kenwick, Segal, Segalovitch,
Flatter


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom JC Microfilm at Libraries #unitedkingdom

Sharon Avraham <shouav@...>
 

For those of us in Israel, please note that there are Jewish Chronicle
Microfilm at Bar Ilan University Library. Call them to find out the times
and conditions etc.

Sharon, Netanya Israel
Researching: Spitalsky, Spitallen, Keminic, Kenwick, Segal, Segalovitch,
Flatter


Seeking M. ROSENBERG re:WOLGROCH,GINCBERG,SLOMINSKI #latinamerica

Alison Jordan <aliyah5678@...>
 

Dear People,

Recently I discovered the names of family members from
Warsaw documented in the Yad Vashem database by M.
Rosenberg of Buenos Aires.

The entries made by M. Rosenberg in 1972 document the
birthdates and deaths of family members in Warsaw
1941.

The family is of my grandmother, Feige Kloc, nee
Gincberg. She and my father (Benjamin) and aunt
(Devorah) stayed with her sister Ester and brother in
law Mendl Wolgroch at 23 Dzielna before coming to the
U.S. in 1921.

(My grandfather, Chaim Kloc, parents Avraham and
Devorah of Lysobycki, Poland, came to the U.S. in
1920.)

I have been searching for information of my
grandmother's parents, Leib and Rachel Gincberg of
Pultusk, and any of the sisters and children left in
Warsaw.
Two sisters noted by M. Rosenberg are Sima Slominski
and Brajna Rosenberg, his mother.

I would be very grateful for help in making contact
with M. Rosenberg or any known relatives in Buenos
Aires.

Thank you very much.
Alison Jordan


Latin America #LatinAmerica Seeking M. ROSENBERG re:WOLGROCH,GINCBERG,SLOMINSKI #latinamerica

Alison Jordan <aliyah5678@...>
 

Dear People,

Recently I discovered the names of family members from
Warsaw documented in the Yad Vashem database by M.
Rosenberg of Buenos Aires.

The entries made by M. Rosenberg in 1972 document the
birthdates and deaths of family members in Warsaw
1941.

The family is of my grandmother, Feige Kloc, nee
Gincberg. She and my father (Benjamin) and aunt
(Devorah) stayed with her sister Ester and brother in
law Mendl Wolgroch at 23 Dzielna before coming to the
U.S. in 1921.

(My grandfather, Chaim Kloc, parents Avraham and
Devorah of Lysobycki, Poland, came to the U.S. in
1920.)

I have been searching for information of my
grandmother's parents, Leib and Rachel Gincberg of
Pultusk, and any of the sisters and children left in
Warsaw.
Two sisters noted by M. Rosenberg are Sima Slominski
and Brajna Rosenberg, his mother.

I would be very grateful for help in making contact
with M. Rosenberg or any known relatives in Buenos
Aires.

Thank you very much.
Alison Jordan


4xxx Hotel de Ville, Montreal 1950s #general

Shlomo Katz <SKatz@...>
 

I would like to make contact with anyone who lived near 4xxx Hotel de
Ville, Montreal in the 1950s. My father's first-cousin Edward Katz
lived at that address.

Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring Maryland


Searching for Jack Horbal #general

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP has lost e-mail contact with Jack Horbal.
Jack, if you read this will you please contact me so that I can update
your e-mail address? Or, if any of you know Jack and can forward this to
him, please do. Thanks,

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP