Date   

Looking for Russian Relatives -- KRASNER Family #general

Richard Krasner
 

Dear JewishGen,

My father's side of the family was separated by the events of the 1917
Russian Revolution. My grandfather, Yankel (Jack) KRASNER and his older
brother, Meilech (Morris), arrived in November 1911 and January 1911,
respectively.

However, they left behind their mother and father, two younger brothers,
and five younger sisters, two of whom they never knew because they were
supposedly born after 1911.

My father's older brother had made contact with the family in the years
before he died, but none of the American relatives have kept in touch with them.

Some are in NY, I believe, and the rest could be in Israel, or still in
what is now Moldova. They cam originally >from Tiraspol. My
great-grandfather's name was Moishe, and his wife's name was Freda.

I would like to get in touch with at least the ones who are here in the US,
and since my Russian is over thirty years old (took it in college), I am
unable to find them.

I know one relative shares the same first name as my father's brother, Alex.
This seems to be a trait in our family, because there are two Francine's
in the family, one is my uncle's daughter, the other is the granddaughter
of my grandfather's older brother.

Let me know if there is any information you may need. I do know that the
Russian Alexander KRASNER lived in Sheepshead Bay in 1993, which is the
last time we saw them, before my folks and I moved to Florida. His wife's
name is Tanya.

I would really like to get to know their children and the other children
of my grandfather's nieces and nephews.

Thanks!

Richard Krasner

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Richard privately with specific contact
information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for Russian Relatives -- KRASNER Family #general

Richard Krasner
 

Dear JewishGen,

My father's side of the family was separated by the events of the 1917
Russian Revolution. My grandfather, Yankel (Jack) KRASNER and his older
brother, Meilech (Morris), arrived in November 1911 and January 1911,
respectively.

However, they left behind their mother and father, two younger brothers,
and five younger sisters, two of whom they never knew because they were
supposedly born after 1911.

My father's older brother had made contact with the family in the years
before he died, but none of the American relatives have kept in touch with them.

Some are in NY, I believe, and the rest could be in Israel, or still in
what is now Moldova. They cam originally >from Tiraspol. My
great-grandfather's name was Moishe, and his wife's name was Freda.

I would like to get in touch with at least the ones who are here in the US,
and since my Russian is over thirty years old (took it in college), I am
unable to find them.

I know one relative shares the same first name as my father's brother, Alex.
This seems to be a trait in our family, because there are two Francine's
in the family, one is my uncle's daughter, the other is the granddaughter
of my grandfather's older brother.

Let me know if there is any information you may need. I do know that the
Russian Alexander KRASNER lived in Sheepshead Bay in 1993, which is the
last time we saw them, before my folks and I moved to Florida. His wife's
name is Tanya.

I would really like to get to know their children and the other children
of my grandfather's nieces and nephews.

Thanks!

Richard Krasner

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Richard privately with specific contact
information.


[USA] Launch of New Jewish Cemetery Database in New Haven CT #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Greater New Haven Connecticut's 49 Jewish cemeteries are the foundation of
a new database put together by Rabbi Eliezer Greer. The 49 cemeteries hold
the remains of approximately 26,000 deceased Jewish persons. The cemeteries
cover south central Connecticut >from Madison to Moodus, >from Deep River to
the Havens. There is a free online database which may be accessed at The
database is free and can be accessed through the Jewish Cemetery
Association of Greater New Haven [JCAGNH] website, www.jewishnewhaven.org
or directly at: http://www.yeshivanewhavensynagogue.org/cemetery.asp . The
database also includes information on which synagogues took over
responsibilities for now defunct congregations. To read the article go to:
http://tinyurl.com/kez3733
Original url:
http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/jewish_cemetery_databased_launched/

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen [USA] Launch of New Jewish Cemetery Database in New Haven CT #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Greater New Haven Connecticut's 49 Jewish cemeteries are the foundation of
a new database put together by Rabbi Eliezer Greer. The 49 cemeteries hold
the remains of approximately 26,000 deceased Jewish persons. The cemeteries
cover south central Connecticut >from Madison to Moodus, >from Deep River to
the Havens. There is a free online database which may be accessed at The
database is free and can be accessed through the Jewish Cemetery
Association of Greater New Haven [JCAGNH] website, www.jewishnewhaven.org
or directly at: http://www.yeshivanewhavensynagogue.org/cemetery.asp . The
database also includes information on which synagogues took over
responsibilities for now defunct congregations. To read the article go to:
http://tinyurl.com/kez3733
Original url:
http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/jewish_cemetery_databased_launched/

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Last Walk in Naryshkin Park #latvia

Jo Ann Goldwater
 

I'm writing in response to Paul Silbert's e-mail about Last Walk in
Naryshkin Park by Rose Zvi. I read the book recently and I would
recommend it to everyone. She tells her story in a way that makes
you want to read on as if you're reading a mystery, and want to find
out what happens at the end. She describes how she found her
relatives (some living and some deceased) that she had heard about
but never met. At the same time, it's told in a way that makes it
interesting to everyone. It's an invaluable resource for life in
Zagare before the war, what happened there during the Holocaust, and
what her immediate family experienced in Mexico, South Africa, and
Australia. If you would like to order it, it's available on
Amazon.com for $12.22.

Jo Ann Goldwater Montreal

Researching GOLDWASSER, KAGAN, SARON, ABRAHAMS >from Akmene, Zagare,
and Riga.


Latvia SIG #Latvia Last Walk in Naryshkin Park #latvia

Jo Ann Goldwater
 

I'm writing in response to Paul Silbert's e-mail about Last Walk in
Naryshkin Park by Rose Zvi. I read the book recently and I would
recommend it to everyone. She tells her story in a way that makes
you want to read on as if you're reading a mystery, and want to find
out what happens at the end. She describes how she found her
relatives (some living and some deceased) that she had heard about
but never met. At the same time, it's told in a way that makes it
interesting to everyone. It's an invaluable resource for life in
Zagare before the war, what happened there during the Holocaust, and
what her immediate family experienced in Mexico, South Africa, and
Australia. If you would like to order it, it's available on
Amazon.com for $12.22.

Jo Ann Goldwater Montreal

Researching GOLDWASSER, KAGAN, SARON, ABRAHAMS >from Akmene, Zagare,
and Riga.


Re: If Results are Not Beneficial to Research, Why Test? #dna

Marsha Epstein <marsha.epstein@...>
 

I helped a man find his birth family via autosomal DNA. It found a 2nd
cousin. I asked the 2nd cousin if she had any relatives who had ever
lived in St. Louis (where the man had been born) and yes, her 2nd
cousin's father had lived in St. Louis. Turned out the 2nd cousin's
father was the man's birth father and the man found his birth family,
proven by YDNA testing, similarity in features, and facts matching the
stories he'd been told about his birth father.

Marsha Epstein


DNA Research #DNA Re: If Results are Not Beneficial to Research, Why Test? #dna

Marsha Epstein <marsha.epstein@...>
 

I helped a man find his birth family via autosomal DNA. It found a 2nd
cousin. I asked the 2nd cousin if she had any relatives who had ever
lived in St. Louis (where the man had been born) and yes, her 2nd
cousin's father had lived in St. Louis. Turned out the 2nd cousin's
father was the man's birth father and the man found his birth family,
proven by YDNA testing, similarity in features, and facts matching the
stories he'd been told about his birth father.

Marsha Epstein


Re: If Results are Not Beneficial to Research, Why Test? #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

I could not tell rather Carolyn Lea (nee Schwarzbaum) had her father
tested or rather it was her Population Finder results that said your
father was an Ashkenazi. If it was >from his results and he was tested on
the Y, there is no reason to have you brother tested unless you do not
trust your mother. :-) If your father was not tested, getting your
brother Y tested could be useful for following your direct paternal line.
The "Advanced Matches" listing does show the male haplogroups and you
could drop anyone that is not in his haplogroup. If you do get your
brother FF tested, his list should have a few different names then your
and where the common DNA with others could be totally different.

About using the mtDNA testing for you maternal gg grandmother, the person
tested could be a male also since a mother pass the mtDNA down to all of
her children. One thing about mtDNA, it does not mutation very fast and
your may be share with millions of others.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA
J2b2e Y-DNA haplogroup


DNA Research #DNA Re: If Results are Not Beneficial to Research, Why Test? #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

I could not tell rather Carolyn Lea (nee Schwarzbaum) had her father
tested or rather it was her Population Finder results that said your
father was an Ashkenazi. If it was >from his results and he was tested on
the Y, there is no reason to have you brother tested unless you do not
trust your mother. :-) If your father was not tested, getting your
brother Y tested could be useful for following your direct paternal line.
The "Advanced Matches" listing does show the male haplogroups and you
could drop anyone that is not in his haplogroup. If you do get your
brother FF tested, his list should have a few different names then your
and where the common DNA with others could be totally different.

About using the mtDNA testing for you maternal gg grandmother, the person
tested could be a male also since a mother pass the mtDNA down to all of
her children. One thing about mtDNA, it does not mutation very fast and
your may be share with millions of others.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA
J2b2e Y-DNA haplogroup


Cemetery lookup, Adas Israel, Washington, DC: Katherine BORNET #general

Michael Meshenberg
 

I am looking for cemetery (headstone) information for Katherine BORNET who
died in Washington, DC, probably between 1930 and 1934 (she is enumerated
with her husband, Bernard, in the 1930 Census and, at his death in 1934, the
obituary describes her as "the late Katherine"). He is buried in Adas Israel
Cemetery so I assume she is, too. I am particularly interested in her maiden
name - probably HELLMAN or ELLMAN -- and, if possible, the names of her
parents, plus any other headstone information or, of course, a photo.

I checked JOWBR; no listing.

Thanks for any help.

Mike Meshenberg
Chicago

MODERATOR NOTE: To avoid duplication of effort, please contact Mike before
heading to the cemetery.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cemetery lookup, Adas Israel, Washington, DC: Katherine BORNET #general

Michael Meshenberg
 

I am looking for cemetery (headstone) information for Katherine BORNET who
died in Washington, DC, probably between 1930 and 1934 (she is enumerated
with her husband, Bernard, in the 1930 Census and, at his death in 1934, the
obituary describes her as "the late Katherine"). He is buried in Adas Israel
Cemetery so I assume she is, too. I am particularly interested in her maiden
name - probably HELLMAN or ELLMAN -- and, if possible, the names of her
parents, plus any other headstone information or, of course, a photo.

I checked JOWBR; no listing.

Thanks for any help.

Mike Meshenberg
Chicago

MODERATOR NOTE: To avoid duplication of effort, please contact Mike before
heading to the cemetery.


Re: Naming in the Netherlands (changing names when going from Germany to Holland) #general

Roger Lustig
 

Fraadgen would be the Dutch equivalent of the German Fradchen. German
spelling wasn't completely standardized, and people recording vital
records often went by the sound of the name. D/T, P/B, B/W, G/K, etc.
could substitute for one another depending on dialect. My LOEWENSTEIN
ancestors often appeared as LOEBENSTEIN, for instance.

There are many examples of the same name being spelled two ways in the
same record! Spelling just didn't matter to the degree it does today.

As to the reversal of the names, note that that's not so different >from
the German way of writing a married woman's name: Fradchen GANS geb.
SCHWARZ.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 10/25/2013 11:37 AM, Lin wrote:
My great-grandmother's sister was Fratchen SCHWARZ, born in Raesfeld,
Germany. She married David GANS who was >from Holland. I was told that
the Dutch records list her as Fraadgen and on her headstone it says
Fradchen GANS-SCHWARZ instead of (Fratchen) SCHWARZ GANS.

Does anyone know why the names would be reversed. And is it common for
a first name's spelling to be changed?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming in the Netherlands (changing names when going from Germany to Holland) #general

Roger Lustig
 

Fraadgen would be the Dutch equivalent of the German Fradchen. German
spelling wasn't completely standardized, and people recording vital
records often went by the sound of the name. D/T, P/B, B/W, G/K, etc.
could substitute for one another depending on dialect. My LOEWENSTEIN
ancestors often appeared as LOEBENSTEIN, for instance.

There are many examples of the same name being spelled two ways in the
same record! Spelling just didn't matter to the degree it does today.

As to the reversal of the names, note that that's not so different >from
the German way of writing a married woman's name: Fradchen GANS geb.
SCHWARZ.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 10/25/2013 11:37 AM, Lin wrote:
My great-grandmother's sister was Fratchen SCHWARZ, born in Raesfeld,
Germany. She married David GANS who was >from Holland. I was told that
the Dutch records list her as Fraadgen and on her headstone it says
Fradchen GANS-SCHWARZ instead of (Fratchen) SCHWARZ GANS.

Does anyone know why the names would be reversed. And is it common for
a first name's spelling to be changed?


Contacting Lithuanian State Archives #general

hughharvey@...
 

I am trying to obtain copies of records >from the Lithuanian State Archives
and am wondering if this is feasible without having a local person as
intermediary. I am sure many members have had experience in this area and
would like to hear if anyone has any tips as to the best way to go about this.

Hope someone out there can steer me in the right direction.
Many thanks in advance for any advise you may be able to give.

Hugh Harvey,
Forest Hills, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Contacting Lithuanian State Archives #general

hughharvey@...
 

I am trying to obtain copies of records >from the Lithuanian State Archives
and am wondering if this is feasible without having a local person as
intermediary. I am sure many members have had experience in this area and
would like to hear if anyone has any tips as to the best way to go about this.

Hope someone out there can steer me in the right direction.
Many thanks in advance for any advise you may be able to give.

Hugh Harvey,
Forest Hills, New York


1875 Montefiore Census of Eretz Israel now available for searching #warsaw #poland

rosef@...
 

With the uploading of the 1875 census of the Jewish population of
Eretz Israel, the 6 year project of digitizing and translating the 5
censuses of the Eretz Israel and the one-time census of the Jews of
Alexandria (Egypt), has come to completion.

The Censuses are owned and have been preserved, conserved and scanned
by the Montefiore Endowment, a registered charity. The Montefiore
Endowment commissioned the Israel Genealogy Society, and the team
headed by Mathilde A. Tagger, Rose A. Feldman and Billie Stein, and
assisted by 31 dedicated volunteers, to transcribe and translate in
full these records of the Jewish population of the Holyland during the
period 1839-1875.

The census charts were compiled by the community or Kolel heads, and
is divided accordingly. The data requested (but not always provided)
includes name, age and place of birth of the head of household, his
financial status and occupation, his wife's name, names and ages of
his children, and various comments.

The population came >from all four corners of the Jewish Diaspora, and
included many well known Rabbinic families. Searches of the censuses
and results are possible in both English and Hebrew. Using the
advanced search option, searches can be done by a single or multiple
fields, including Surname, Given name, Place of Residence, Kolel,
Country of Birth, Occupation, and Economic Status

While there are some surnames for Ashkenazim, most are listed only by
given names. It is helpful to know several family given names as
results show family groupings. Spelling, too, can present a
challenge, as names, which often were transliterated >from the original
language into Hebrew were then transliterated 150 years later into
English. In addition, there is little or no consistency of spelling in
the original Hebrew. There is no soundex system (to date) that serves
both Sephardic and Ashkenzic names, so it is recommended to use a wild
card search, using % as the wild card. The key is to be creative in
searching.

The censuses can be searched on the Montefiore Endowment website at no
charge, and with no need to register, at
http://www.montefioreendowment.org.uk/. Please take a moment to read
the FAQ page and also the "About" page in order to acknowledge the
volunteers who made this project possible.

Rose Feldman
Montefiore Census Project Steering Committee

Israel Genealogy Research Association
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy

Keep up to date on archives, databases and genealogy in general and
Jewish and Israeli roots in particular with
http://twitter.com/JewDataGenGirl


ViewMate translation request - Russian #warsaw #poland

avraham997@...
 

I've posted vital record in Russian I would appreciate a translation of all
names, ages, dates, times, locations and occupations. It is on ViewMate at
the following address:
...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM29481
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM29482

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.


AVRAHAM LAPA
972-0548436963
ISRAEL


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland 1875 Montefiore Census of Eretz Israel now available for searching #poland #warsaw

rosef@...
 

With the uploading of the 1875 census of the Jewish population of
Eretz Israel, the 6 year project of digitizing and translating the 5
censuses of the Eretz Israel and the one-time census of the Jews of
Alexandria (Egypt), has come to completion.

The Censuses are owned and have been preserved, conserved and scanned
by the Montefiore Endowment, a registered charity. The Montefiore
Endowment commissioned the Israel Genealogy Society, and the team
headed by Mathilde A. Tagger, Rose A. Feldman and Billie Stein, and
assisted by 31 dedicated volunteers, to transcribe and translate in
full these records of the Jewish population of the Holyland during the
period 1839-1875.

The census charts were compiled by the community or Kolel heads, and
is divided accordingly. The data requested (but not always provided)
includes name, age and place of birth of the head of household, his
financial status and occupation, his wife's name, names and ages of
his children, and various comments.

The population came >from all four corners of the Jewish Diaspora, and
included many well known Rabbinic families. Searches of the censuses
and results are possible in both English and Hebrew. Using the
advanced search option, searches can be done by a single or multiple
fields, including Surname, Given name, Place of Residence, Kolel,
Country of Birth, Occupation, and Economic Status

While there are some surnames for Ashkenazim, most are listed only by
given names. It is helpful to know several family given names as
results show family groupings. Spelling, too, can present a
challenge, as names, which often were transliterated >from the original
language into Hebrew were then transliterated 150 years later into
English. In addition, there is little or no consistency of spelling in
the original Hebrew. There is no soundex system (to date) that serves
both Sephardic and Ashkenzic names, so it is recommended to use a wild
card search, using % as the wild card. The key is to be creative in
searching.

The censuses can be searched on the Montefiore Endowment website at no
charge, and with no need to register, at
http://www.montefioreendowment.org.uk/. Please take a moment to read
the FAQ page and also the "About" page in order to acknowledge the
volunteers who made this project possible.

Rose Feldman
Montefiore Census Project Steering Committee

Israel Genealogy Research Association
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy

Keep up to date on archives, databases and genealogy in general and
Jewish and Israeli roots in particular with
http://twitter.com/JewDataGenGirl


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland ViewMate translation request - Russian #warsaw #poland

avraham997@...
 

I've posted vital record in Russian I would appreciate a translation of all
names, ages, dates, times, locations and occupations. It is on ViewMate at
the following address:
...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM29481
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM29482

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.


AVRAHAM LAPA
972-0548436963
ISRAEL

137561 - 137580 of 670639