Date   

Moscow #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

There are a number of Address/Calendar books available for downloading
(free) covering Moscow at the following:

1. For "All Moscow":
http://book-old.ru/BookLibrary/24400-Vsya-Moskva.html


The books are in Russian. They typically have information for: names,
addresses, industries, etc. Examples are: "All of Moscow in 1917", "
1925: All of Moscow. Part 6. Addresses of the persons Mentioned in the
Handbook", & "1939: List of Subscribers of the Moscow City Telephone
Network"

2. Other lists of books regarding Moscow are at Moscow Province:
http://book-old.ru/BookLibrary/24000-Moskovskaya-gub.html. It covers
"Imperial Moscow University", "Schools in Moscow", "Listings and
Memorial Book of Moscow & the Province", "Maps & Plans of the Moscow
Province", "Merchant, Provincial Newspapers & Magazines Moscow", "1891.
Old Moscow", etc.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Moscow #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

There are a number of Address/Calendar books available for downloading
(free) covering Moscow at the following:

1. For "All Moscow":
http://book-old.ru/BookLibrary/24400-Vsya-Moskva.html


The books are in Russian. They typically have information for: names,
addresses, industries, etc. Examples are: "All of Moscow in 1917", "
1925: All of Moscow. Part 6. Addresses of the persons Mentioned in the
Handbook", & "1939: List of Subscribers of the Moscow City Telephone
Network"

2. Other lists of books regarding Moscow are at Moscow Province:
http://book-old.ru/BookLibrary/24000-Moskovskaya-gub.html. It covers
"Imperial Moscow University", "Schools in Moscow", "Listings and
Memorial Book of Moscow & the Province", "Maps & Plans of the Moscow
Province", "Merchant, Provincial Newspapers & Magazines Moscow", "1891.
Old Moscow", etc.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Variations on a misspelled surname #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

Jessica--I think this suggestion might help you as well as others who
are trying to find variations of Jewish names to search. You left out
one great source,which is the Avotaynu website. On the right hand side
of the home page, you will see that you have an option to "Search Jewish
Surnames". Try entering the surname you are looking for. It will give you
Soundex possibilities of your surname and you can try checking those
for possible spellings of your name. The URL is www.avotaynu.com

The Ellis Island database can also be useful for searching alternate
spellings of surnames. However, Avotaynu's website concentrates only on
Jewish names, so I would begin with that first.

Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA

snip..
I also have an alternate first name for the mother:
"Chana." Does anyone have any idea what her maiden surname might be?
I've tried spelling it various ways and have come up with nothing on
Ancestry and JewishGen.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Variations on a misspelled surname #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

Jessica--I think this suggestion might help you as well as others who
are trying to find variations of Jewish names to search. You left out
one great source,which is the Avotaynu website. On the right hand side
of the home page, you will see that you have an option to "Search Jewish
Surnames". Try entering the surname you are looking for. It will give you
Soundex possibilities of your surname and you can try checking those
for possible spellings of your name. The URL is www.avotaynu.com

The Ellis Island database can also be useful for searching alternate
spellings of surnames. However, Avotaynu's website concentrates only on
Jewish names, so I would begin with that first.

Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA

snip..
I also have an alternate first name for the mother:
"Chana." Does anyone have any idea what her maiden surname might be?
I've tried spelling it various ways and have come up with nothing on
Ancestry and JewishGen.


Re: 1940 Census and my family - more missing people #general

Diane Jacobs
 

I remember with the 1930 US Census the index had many problems and
Then they went back over the entire thing and made correction. I hope
They will do this for the 1940. So, it certainly would be advisable to
Wait six months and try again.

Diane Jacobs
Somerset, NJ


snip..
I have had a massive amount of trouble finding people by just using the
spelling of their last names. I have found simple typing errors like Jordan
becoming Ordan,
snip...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: 1940 Census and my family - more missing people #general

Diane Jacobs
 

I remember with the 1930 US Census the index had many problems and
Then they went back over the entire thing and made correction. I hope
They will do this for the 1940. So, it certainly would be advisable to
Wait six months and try again.

Diane Jacobs
Somerset, NJ


snip..
I have had a massive amount of trouble finding people by just using the
spelling of their last names. I have found simple typing errors like Jordan
becoming Ordan,
snip...


Information about date of death and location Hirsch Zvi Marinsky #general

Jonathan Schachter <jschachter@...>
 

I am looking for any information - particularly date and place of death -
about:

Mr Hirsch (Zvi) Morinsky, born in Bialystock about 1885-1890,
lived in Kobe Japan >from the late 1930's - late 1940's,
then moved to Panama,
then Canada to be near a relative
Died in the 1950's

Jonathan Schachter
Pittsburgh PA
jschachter18@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Information about date of death and location Hirsch Zvi Marinsky #general

Jonathan Schachter <jschachter@...>
 

I am looking for any information - particularly date and place of death -
about:

Mr Hirsch (Zvi) Morinsky, born in Bialystock about 1885-1890,
lived in Kobe Japan >from the late 1930's - late 1940's,
then moved to Panama,
then Canada to be near a relative
Died in the 1950's

Jonathan Schachter
Pittsburgh PA
jschachter18@gmail.com


Re: Czech registers A-Z (minus Prague) #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Oops. My mistake! Still waiting for the ones after Susice. Sorry about that.

Randy Schoenberg


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Czech registers A-Z (minus Prague) #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Oops. My mistake! Still waiting for the ones after Susice. Sorry about that.

Randy Schoenberg


Czech registers A-Z (minus Prague) #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

It looks like all of the towns are now uploaded to
http://www.badatelna.cz/fond/1073, except for Prague.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Czech registers A-Z (minus Prague) #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

It looks like all of the towns are now uploaded to
http://www.badatelna.cz/fond/1073, except for Prague.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Zdar (Saar) question #austria-czech

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIG,

Ellen Alexander of Jacksonville, FL asked about the records for Zdar. There are several Zdars in the Czech
Republic. The best known of them is Zdar nad Sazavou, which was called was called Saar in German. It lies
out in the highlands near the (now non-existent) border between Bohemia and Moravia. I found eight books
for a town named Zdar on the badatelna.cz listing for that city, although they seem to run only between
1796 and 1894. Here is the direct link: http://www.badatelna.cz/?wicket:interface=:2:15:::

It might be the diacritics that are confusing in this case. There's a "hacek" over the 'Z' (not to mention over
the 'd' and a "carka" over the 'a' as well. The Czech word is pronounced basically "Zhdyaar" in English). 'Z'
with hacek follows behind an unaccented 'Z' in order in the alphabet. That is generally true for all letters
with diacritics in Czech. They follow after their unadorned siblings.

One letter that requires special attention is 'ch', which the Czechs consider a single letter. It lists between
'h' and 'i' in the Czech alphabet.

Good luck and shalom >from Prague!

Rick Pinard


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Zdar (Saar) question #austria-czech

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIG,

Ellen Alexander of Jacksonville, FL asked about the records for Zdar. There are several Zdars in the Czech
Republic. The best known of them is Zdar nad Sazavou, which was called was called Saar in German. It lies
out in the highlands near the (now non-existent) border between Bohemia and Moravia. I found eight books
for a town named Zdar on the badatelna.cz listing for that city, although they seem to run only between
1796 and 1894. Here is the direct link: http://www.badatelna.cz/?wicket:interface=:2:15:::

It might be the diacritics that are confusing in this case. There's a "hacek" over the 'Z' (not to mention over
the 'd' and a "carka" over the 'a' as well. The Czech word is pronounced basically "Zhdyaar" in English). 'Z'
with hacek follows behind an unaccented 'Z' in order in the alphabet. That is generally true for all letters
with diacritics in Czech. They follow after their unadorned siblings.

One letter that requires special attention is 'ch', which the Czechs consider a single letter. It lists between
'h' and 'i' in the Czech alphabet.

Good luck and shalom >from Prague!

Rick Pinard


New York Times, August 17, 2012 on Spanish-origin Jews #germany

John Paul Lowens <jplowens@...>
 

Thanks to my son, just returned >from a summer semester in Spain,
I can cite this essay (not a news report of scientific data) in
the New York Times:

ESSAY - " In Andalusia, on the Trail of Inherited Memories "
By Doreen Carvajal New York Times Published: August 17, 2012

http://tinyurl.com/9kz3svs

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/21/science/in-andalusia-searching-for-inherited-memories.html?_r=1&ref=science

John Paul Lowens, suburban NYC yDNA Haplogroup J1 "Shorthand" J-M267

My message posted recently told of our family tradition
that ancestors fled Spain in 1492 and handed down a
wood box inscribed with that date.

A GerSIG message posted today by Bill Yoffee says:

"When I had my male DNA (yDNA) tested, the result placed me
in the catagory (haplogroup) J1. It immediately came to my
attention that haplogroup J1 was rare among Eastern European
Jewish men, although it is common among men living in the
Southern Levant ( Yemen, Arabia and Judea), and those living
along the northern rim of the Mediterranean, though less so
along the southern rim."


German SIG #Germany New York Times, August 17, 2012 on Spanish-origin Jews #germany

John Paul Lowens <jplowens@...>
 

Thanks to my son, just returned >from a summer semester in Spain,
I can cite this essay (not a news report of scientific data) in
the New York Times:

ESSAY - " In Andalusia, on the Trail of Inherited Memories "
By Doreen Carvajal New York Times Published: August 17, 2012

http://tinyurl.com/9kz3svs

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/21/science/in-andalusia-searching-for-inherited-memories.html?_r=1&ref=science

John Paul Lowens, suburban NYC yDNA Haplogroup J1 "Shorthand" J-M267

My message posted recently told of our family tradition
that ancestors fled Spain in 1492 and handed down a
wood box inscribed with that date.

A GerSIG message posted today by Bill Yoffee says:

"When I had my male DNA (yDNA) tested, the result placed me
in the catagory (haplogroup) J1. It immediately came to my
attention that haplogroup J1 was rare among Eastern European
Jewish men, although it is common among men living in the
Southern Levant ( Yemen, Arabia and Judea), and those living
along the northern rim of the Mediterranean, though less so
along the southern rim."


Re: Sephardic Origins of German Jews and DNA #germany

Sally Bruckheimer
 

The GerSIG Moderator wrote:
"Moderator Note: GerSIG would be grateful for informed comments on this
question. *** If *** they are clearly written and explain *** in simple
terms *** how DNA testing has already or could possibly give significant
evidence of Iberian origins of Jewish individuals or groups. Citation
of published studies on this subject will be appreciated."
The Moderator will not approve messages on DNA testing that
don't explain clearly how DNA testing results or published
DNA population studies support or refute theories of German
Jewish migration >from Spain and Portugal.

As always, text enclosed in squared brackets [like this]
has been added by the Moderator for purposes of clarification.

===============================>

DNA testing is all the rage, but I am a Molecular Geneticist with a graduate
education and many years of research, and I can tell you [my personal
opinions] about it.

DNA is great for paternity testing, as a child should have 50% of his
DNA markers >from each parent, but more distant relatives have progressively
lower percentages in common (25% for brothers and sisters, etc.).

So, you soon get to a point where you must ask, 'is this random or related'?

Any marker that delineates one group of people >from another is true for
a proportion of the population, not 100% The 'Aaronic DNA marker' is
present in some percentage of today's Cohanim, and it is also present
in a percentage of other Jews and non-Jews - so is it truly a marker
of Cohan status?

Similarly, any other marker for groups is true for a percentage. And by
group, I mean close families as well as large groups of people........
[SNIP - 3 Off topic paragraphs deleted by Moderator]

Sally Bruckheimer, Piscataway, NJ sallybruc@yahoo.com


German SIG #Germany Re: Sephardic Origins of German Jews and DNA #germany

Sally Bruckheimer
 

The GerSIG Moderator wrote:
"Moderator Note: GerSIG would be grateful for informed comments on this
question. *** If *** they are clearly written and explain *** in simple
terms *** how DNA testing has already or could possibly give significant
evidence of Iberian origins of Jewish individuals or groups. Citation
of published studies on this subject will be appreciated."
The Moderator will not approve messages on DNA testing that
don't explain clearly how DNA testing results or published
DNA population studies support or refute theories of German
Jewish migration >from Spain and Portugal.

As always, text enclosed in squared brackets [like this]
has been added by the Moderator for purposes of clarification.

===============================>

DNA testing is all the rage, but I am a Molecular Geneticist with a graduate
education and many years of research, and I can tell you [my personal
opinions] about it.

DNA is great for paternity testing, as a child should have 50% of his
DNA markers >from each parent, but more distant relatives have progressively
lower percentages in common (25% for brothers and sisters, etc.).

So, you soon get to a point where you must ask, 'is this random or related'?

Any marker that delineates one group of people >from another is true for
a proportion of the population, not 100% The 'Aaronic DNA marker' is
present in some percentage of today's Cohanim, and it is also present
in a percentage of other Jews and non-Jews - so is it truly a marker
of Cohan status?

Similarly, any other marker for groups is true for a percentage. And by
group, I mean close families as well as large groups of people........
[SNIP - 3 Off topic paragraphs deleted by Moderator]

Sally Bruckheimer, Piscataway, NJ sallybruc@yahoo.com


Re: Using DNA as evidence of Sephardic Origin #germany

William Yoffee
 

This is my effort to respond to the issue raised by Carolyn Lea on the
subject "Sephardic Origins of German Jews and DNA"

First let me introduce myself. I have been researching the genealogy of my
family for almost 50 years. I was brought up with the tradition that my
father's family originated in Kovna Gubernia and that my mother's family
came >from Minsk Gubernia. More recently, I learned that my mother was born
when the town of her birth was part of Vilna Gubernia. So in every respect
I was led to believe that I was 100% Litvak.

With the encouragement of Bennett Greenspan, head of Family Tree DNA,
[a for-profit business] I agreed to establish and administer the
Jaffe Surname Project which invited anyone with that surname or who
could also establish direct descent >from a Jaffe to join and have
DNA results compared with those of other members, including mine.
Incidentally, there are many varient spellings of the surname, but
they all derive >from the Hebrew word "Yafeh", meaning "pretty" or
"beautiful". So far about twenty qualified males have signed up.

When I had my male DNA (yDNA) tested, the result placed me
in the catagory (haplogroup) J1. It immediately came to my
attention that haplogroup J1 was rare among Eastern European
Jewish men, although it is common among men living in the
Southern Levant ( Yemen, Arabia and Judea), and those living
along the northern rim of the Mediterranean, though less so
along the southern rim.

A map showing the distribution of J1 showed concentrations of J1 in Italy,
Sicily and in Andaluscia Spain. As members of the Jaffe Surname Project
began to accumulate, most of the others were in haplogroups E1 or R.
No other Jaffes showed up in haplogroup J1 or J2. One other Eastern
European member is a J1, but he has no known Jaffe connection.

In time, I subscribed to more sensitive DNA tests and these ultimately
established that my haplogroup is J1c3* P58, an even more rare
variation of the J1, which is common among Jews >from the Middle East
and among Sephardic Jews.

This of course doesn't prove anything. But I have been making
an effort to locate Jews living in countries where Sephardim settled
after the Expulsion of 1492 >from Spain who have the surname Jaffe
or some variation.

The records of the Inquisition in Spain lists persons with the Jaffe surname
as early as 1391, and later records of the Kingdom of Aragon also listed
that surname. I uncovered a record of a person named Joffa in a baptismal
record in the Sicilian town of Carini dated September 5, 1538 which,
not coincidentally, was the day after Yom Kippur in the Jewish
year 5299. I also learned that Jaffe was a name known among Jews in Sicily
before they were officially expelled also in 1492, and that haplogroup
J1c3* P58 was also common among them.

I found evidence of the Jaffe surname in Turkey, the Isle of Rhodes,
and Egypt, and one is even buried in the Jewish cemetery of Tetuan Morocco.

The Family Tree DNA Family Finder test of the autosomal DNA (not connected
to the X and Y chromasomes that determine a person's sex) has yielded
matches with me of over 1200 other individuals, both Jew and Non-Jew,
male and female, who are my cousins to at least the 5th degree [according
to Family Tree DNA reports].

Needless to say, the ancestry of the vast majority originated in Eastern
and Central Europe. Only one has the surname Jaffe. Four claim but cannot
document that they have Sephardic ancestry. However very recently,
there was a match with a Jewish person whose ancestry was >from Syria,
who is either Sephardic or Mizrachi. Two weeks ago, I was matched with
someone who claims ancestry >from 16th Century Portugal that migrated to
Holland. Most likely they were Conversos or Anusim. One of his earliest
known Jewish ancestors >from the 17th century was named Simon Isaac
de Vries Jaffe.

All of this proves to me that DNA testing can lead to
**circumstantial evidence**
of Sephardic ancestry, even though **documentary proof is elusive**
and pehaps impossible to obtain. [Emphasis added by Moderator **]

Bill Yoffee, Administrator, Jaffe Surname Project of FTDNA
kidsbks@verizon.net


German SIG #Germany Re: Using DNA as evidence of Sephardic Origin #germany

William Yoffee
 

This is my effort to respond to the issue raised by Carolyn Lea on the
subject "Sephardic Origins of German Jews and DNA"

First let me introduce myself. I have been researching the genealogy of my
family for almost 50 years. I was brought up with the tradition that my
father's family originated in Kovna Gubernia and that my mother's family
came >from Minsk Gubernia. More recently, I learned that my mother was born
when the town of her birth was part of Vilna Gubernia. So in every respect
I was led to believe that I was 100% Litvak.

With the encouragement of Bennett Greenspan, head of Family Tree DNA,
[a for-profit business] I agreed to establish and administer the
Jaffe Surname Project which invited anyone with that surname or who
could also establish direct descent >from a Jaffe to join and have
DNA results compared with those of other members, including mine.
Incidentally, there are many varient spellings of the surname, but
they all derive >from the Hebrew word "Yafeh", meaning "pretty" or
"beautiful". So far about twenty qualified males have signed up.

When I had my male DNA (yDNA) tested, the result placed me
in the catagory (haplogroup) J1. It immediately came to my
attention that haplogroup J1 was rare among Eastern European
Jewish men, although it is common among men living in the
Southern Levant ( Yemen, Arabia and Judea), and those living
along the northern rim of the Mediterranean, though less so
along the southern rim.

A map showing the distribution of J1 showed concentrations of J1 in Italy,
Sicily and in Andaluscia Spain. As members of the Jaffe Surname Project
began to accumulate, most of the others were in haplogroups E1 or R.
No other Jaffes showed up in haplogroup J1 or J2. One other Eastern
European member is a J1, but he has no known Jaffe connection.

In time, I subscribed to more sensitive DNA tests and these ultimately
established that my haplogroup is J1c3* P58, an even more rare
variation of the J1, which is common among Jews >from the Middle East
and among Sephardic Jews.

This of course doesn't prove anything. But I have been making
an effort to locate Jews living in countries where Sephardim settled
after the Expulsion of 1492 >from Spain who have the surname Jaffe
or some variation.

The records of the Inquisition in Spain lists persons with the Jaffe surname
as early as 1391, and later records of the Kingdom of Aragon also listed
that surname. I uncovered a record of a person named Joffa in a baptismal
record in the Sicilian town of Carini dated September 5, 1538 which,
not coincidentally, was the day after Yom Kippur in the Jewish
year 5299. I also learned that Jaffe was a name known among Jews in Sicily
before they were officially expelled also in 1492, and that haplogroup
J1c3* P58 was also common among them.

I found evidence of the Jaffe surname in Turkey, the Isle of Rhodes,
and Egypt, and one is even buried in the Jewish cemetery of Tetuan Morocco.

The Family Tree DNA Family Finder test of the autosomal DNA (not connected
to the X and Y chromasomes that determine a person's sex) has yielded
matches with me of over 1200 other individuals, both Jew and Non-Jew,
male and female, who are my cousins to at least the 5th degree [according
to Family Tree DNA reports].

Needless to say, the ancestry of the vast majority originated in Eastern
and Central Europe. Only one has the surname Jaffe. Four claim but cannot
document that they have Sephardic ancestry. However very recently,
there was a match with a Jewish person whose ancestry was >from Syria,
who is either Sephardic or Mizrachi. Two weeks ago, I was matched with
someone who claims ancestry >from 16th Century Portugal that migrated to
Holland. Most likely they were Conversos or Anusim. One of his earliest
known Jewish ancestors >from the 17th century was named Simon Isaac
de Vries Jaffe.

All of this proves to me that DNA testing can lead to
**circumstantial evidence**
of Sephardic ancestry, even though **documentary proof is elusive**
and pehaps impossible to obtain. [Emphasis added by Moderator **]

Bill Yoffee, Administrator, Jaffe Surname Project of FTDNA
kidsbks@verizon.net

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