Date   

Re: Palestine Office List 1929-1940 #lithuania

Aviva M Neeman
 

Dear Bill, Try writing to the Jewish Agency, Jerusalem (Sochnut Yehudit),
they were the ones who acted then as representative of Jewish authority.

Aviva Neeman

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Yoffee [mailto:kidsbks@verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2013 8:29 PM
To: LitvakSIG
Subject: [litvaksig] Palestine Office List 1929-1940

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Palestine Office List 1929-1940

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) is posting on its Shutterfly
website a list of 1362 names of persons who made or were associated with
making aliyah to Palestine before the establishment of the State of Israel.
Actually, this list includes individuals who were registered >from 1931 until

1944. Which Palestine Office compiled these data or whether this list was
compiled by a central office is not clear. Suffice it to say that in this
period offices existed in most European capitals and ports to Palestine such

as Trieste. The most active offices were in Warsaw and, after the Nazi
invasion of Poland, in Vilna. Rescue operations during the war were
conducted >from Geneva. Most of the individuals on this list declared that
their residences were in Lithuania. Also listed were Bucharest,
Johannesburg, Kopenhaven, Krakow and Tilsit. The Comments column L)
indicates that some individuals had lived in Germany. It also lists numerous

individuals as sponsors.

The Palestine Office (Misrad Eretz Yisrael) was a Zionist institution
primarily charged with the implementation of immigration to Eretz Yisrael.
It was founded in 1908 by the World Zionist Organization, and was originally

under the direction of Arthur Ruppin (after whom Kfar Ruppin was later
named). Until the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, Palestine
Offices in many countries acted as Zionist consulates aiding the flow of
legal and illegal immigrants, aiding settlement activities, and purchasing
land. The Offices went through many organizational changes. Eventually they
became offices of the immigration department of the Jewish Agency,
complementing the functions of Israeli Government missions abroad. A fuller
description can be found in the Jewish Virtual Library at
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org . Discussion of their activities is included in

a book by Dov Levin, "The Lesser of Two Evils, European Jewry under Soviet
Rule, 1939-1941" (JPS, Phila., 1995), Chapter 9, "Lithuania as a Gateway to
the Free World".

The number of individuals recorded on this list, including sponsors, began
to increase in years that coincided with the increase of activity of the
Nazi Party in Germany leading up to the beginning of WW2. After 1934, when
128 individuals were recorded, the numbers peaked in 1935 and 1936 combined
at 591, and in 1938 through 1940 combined at 550. The number in 1937 was
only 76. Between 1941 and 1944 only 12 individuals were recorded. None were
recorded in 1943.

The Panevezys District Research Group invites everyone who is interested in
tracing family in the Panevezys District of Lithuania before and during WWI
and in the inter-war period to join in our effort to have additional records

translated. Access to the Panevezys District Research Group's (PDRG)
Shutterfly website is available to contributors. Contributions totaling $100
or more qualifies an individual, and, for the next five years, provides
access to the website, as well as exclusive access to all newly translated
records for at least 18 months before they are made publicly available on
the All Lithuania Database (ALD). Your tax deductible (for US taxpayers)
contributions can be made to www.litvaksig.org/contribute by credit card,
or by check at the address that is listed there. Please be sure to
designate the Panevezys DRG as the recipient.

A list of Jewish surnames is available to ANYONE >from me at my email
address below.

Regards,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Palestine Office List 1929-1940 #lithuania

Aviva M Neeman
 

Dear Bill, Try writing to the Jewish Agency, Jerusalem (Sochnut Yehudit),
they were the ones who acted then as representative of Jewish authority.

Aviva Neeman

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Yoffee [mailto:kidsbks@verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2013 8:29 PM
To: LitvakSIG
Subject: [litvaksig] Palestine Office List 1929-1940

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Palestine Office List 1929-1940

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) is posting on its Shutterfly
website a list of 1362 names of persons who made or were associated with
making aliyah to Palestine before the establishment of the State of Israel.
Actually, this list includes individuals who were registered >from 1931 until

1944. Which Palestine Office compiled these data or whether this list was
compiled by a central office is not clear. Suffice it to say that in this
period offices existed in most European capitals and ports to Palestine such

as Trieste. The most active offices were in Warsaw and, after the Nazi
invasion of Poland, in Vilna. Rescue operations during the war were
conducted >from Geneva. Most of the individuals on this list declared that
their residences were in Lithuania. Also listed were Bucharest,
Johannesburg, Kopenhaven, Krakow and Tilsit. The Comments column L)
indicates that some individuals had lived in Germany. It also lists numerous

individuals as sponsors.

The Palestine Office (Misrad Eretz Yisrael) was a Zionist institution
primarily charged with the implementation of immigration to Eretz Yisrael.
It was founded in 1908 by the World Zionist Organization, and was originally

under the direction of Arthur Ruppin (after whom Kfar Ruppin was later
named). Until the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, Palestine
Offices in many countries acted as Zionist consulates aiding the flow of
legal and illegal immigrants, aiding settlement activities, and purchasing
land. The Offices went through many organizational changes. Eventually they
became offices of the immigration department of the Jewish Agency,
complementing the functions of Israeli Government missions abroad. A fuller
description can be found in the Jewish Virtual Library at
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org . Discussion of their activities is included in

a book by Dov Levin, "The Lesser of Two Evils, European Jewry under Soviet
Rule, 1939-1941" (JPS, Phila., 1995), Chapter 9, "Lithuania as a Gateway to
the Free World".

The number of individuals recorded on this list, including sponsors, began
to increase in years that coincided with the increase of activity of the
Nazi Party in Germany leading up to the beginning of WW2. After 1934, when
128 individuals were recorded, the numbers peaked in 1935 and 1936 combined
at 591, and in 1938 through 1940 combined at 550. The number in 1937 was
only 76. Between 1941 and 1944 only 12 individuals were recorded. None were
recorded in 1943.

The Panevezys District Research Group invites everyone who is interested in
tracing family in the Panevezys District of Lithuania before and during WWI
and in the inter-war period to join in our effort to have additional records

translated. Access to the Panevezys District Research Group's (PDRG)
Shutterfly website is available to contributors. Contributions totaling $100
or more qualifies an individual, and, for the next five years, provides
access to the website, as well as exclusive access to all newly translated
records for at least 18 months before they are made publicly available on
the All Lithuania Database (ALD). Your tax deductible (for US taxpayers)
contributions can be made to www.litvaksig.org/contribute by credit card,
or by check at the address that is listed there. Please be sure to
designate the Panevezys DRG as the recipient.

A list of Jewish surnames is available to ANYONE >from me at my email
address below.

Regards,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net


JGS of Montreal's next program - Monday, March 04, 2013 #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

For genealogists of all levels - beginners, intermediates, experts:

The JGS of Montreal, in association with the Jewish Public Library
presents:

"Following False Trails - Back to First Principles"
We bring you - direct >from Washington - live on our big screen!
Jeff Miller's analytical, management, and consulting accomplishments as an
information technology professional taught him to conduct research while
pursuing ill-defined goals, perfect training for a future genealogist.
He's a Past President of JGSGW (Washington, DC).
Documenting his family's history for the past fourteen years, he's visited
ancestral towns and villages throughout Lithuania and conducted
research in archives. A special area of interest is finding
relatives and organizing family reunions.

The meeting will be held on
Monday, March 04, 2013, 7:30 pm
Gelber Conference Centre, 5151 Cote Ste-Catherine/1 Carré Cummings
For all information on our upcoming meetings & Sunday Morning Family Tree
Workshops call the JGS of Montreal Hotline - 24 hours a day:
514-484-0969
Please view the JGS of Montreal website:
http://jgs-montreal.org/ and find us in Facebook

Merle Kastner, Programming
merlek@videotron.ca


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Montreal's next program - Monday, March 04, 2013 #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

For genealogists of all levels - beginners, intermediates, experts:

The JGS of Montreal, in association with the Jewish Public Library
presents:

"Following False Trails - Back to First Principles"
We bring you - direct >from Washington - live on our big screen!
Jeff Miller's analytical, management, and consulting accomplishments as an
information technology professional taught him to conduct research while
pursuing ill-defined goals, perfect training for a future genealogist.
He's a Past President of JGSGW (Washington, DC).
Documenting his family's history for the past fourteen years, he's visited
ancestral towns and villages throughout Lithuania and conducted
research in archives. A special area of interest is finding
relatives and organizing family reunions.

The meeting will be held on
Monday, March 04, 2013, 7:30 pm
Gelber Conference Centre, 5151 Cote Ste-Catherine/1 Carré Cummings
For all information on our upcoming meetings & Sunday Morning Family Tree
Workshops call the JGS of Montreal Hotline - 24 hours a day:
514-484-0969
Please view the JGS of Montreal website:
http://jgs-montreal.org/ and find us in Facebook

Merle Kastner, Programming
merlek@videotron.ca


JGSCT Program, March 17, 2013, 1:30 pm, Middletown, CT #general

gkr
 

How A Jewish Family Escaped >from Hitler's Czechoslovakia In 1939

Sunda, March 17, 2013, 1:30 pm

Godfrey Memorial Library, 134 Newfield Street, Middletown, CT 06457

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut presents West Hartford
resident Ivan Backer as he details the four separate escapes of his father,
mother, older brother, and himself >from Czechoslovakia in 1939.
Each story typifies how families survived those turbulent times. Ivan
will read his mother's dramatic description of her own journey that he
recorded through an interview. Ivan escaped on a kindertransport, which he
will describe.

The program is free and open to all.

For additional information, please see www.jgsct.org.

This program was originally scheduled for December 2012 but was postponed
due to inclement weather.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSCT Program, March 17, 2013, 1:30 pm, Middletown, CT #general

gkr
 

How A Jewish Family Escaped >from Hitler's Czechoslovakia In 1939

Sunda, March 17, 2013, 1:30 pm

Godfrey Memorial Library, 134 Newfield Street, Middletown, CT 06457

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut presents West Hartford
resident Ivan Backer as he details the four separate escapes of his father,
mother, older brother, and himself >from Czechoslovakia in 1939.
Each story typifies how families survived those turbulent times. Ivan
will read his mother's dramatic description of her own journey that he
recorded through an interview. Ivan escaped on a kindertransport, which he
will describe.

The program is free and open to all.

For additional information, please see www.jgsct.org.

This program was originally scheduled for December 2012 but was postponed
due to inclement weather.


Announcement - Pittsburgh Genealogy Day - March 10, 2013 #general

Deborah Scheimer <debscheim@...>
 

FREE South Hills Genealogy Day & Pancake Festival

Join us for a FREE day of genealogy programming, with demonstrations
and discussions of online resources with professional genealogists.
Enjoy all-you-can-eat pancakes and eggs at the Pancake Festival in the
next room for a nominal fee (no requirement to attend the Pancake Festival).

Date: Sunday, March 10, 2013
Time: 9:00a.m.-2:00p.m.
Cost: FREE
RSVP: Deb Scheimer at 412-344-2526 or debscheim@gmail.com
Location: Beth El Congregation
1900 Cochran Rd
Pittsburgh, PA 15220

Directions: I-376 to Greentree Rd Exit. Turn Right on Greentree Rd.
Go to end. Turn Left on Cochran Rd.
First Left onto Roessler Rd (between Manor Oak and Taco Bell).
Roessler Rd ends in our parking lot.

Schedule:

9:00 - 10:00 a.m.
Debbie Kapp - Building on the Basics
This session will review sound principles of family history research
and emphasize opportunities for self-education. Whether you're just
starting your genealogy or have already discovered several
generations, you can always use the basics to expand your research
project wisely.

10:15 - 11:15 a.m.
Mary Dzurichko - Caring for your Archives
This program will provide information on storing and protecting your
archives and heirlooms, labeling and storing photographs and
negatives, how to avoid common mistakes, and sources for products and
supplies.

11:15 - 11:45 a.m.
Brunch Break - Enjoy All-You-Can-Eat pancakes & eggs in the room next
door for a nominal fee or go out to a nearby restaurant.

11:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL - Sailing into the Sunset: Tips for
Finding Your Ancestors on Passenger Lists
Understanding the history of passenger lists and extant online and
printindexes are key to success in finding your ancestor's record.
Once found,learning effective usage will help further your research.

1:00 - 2:00 p.m.
Marilyn Holt - Internet Resources for Eastern European Genealogy
Learn about websites useful for researchers with Eastern European
roots - both subscription sites and free resources.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Announcement - Pittsburgh Genealogy Day - March 10, 2013 #general

Deborah Scheimer <debscheim@...>
 

FREE South Hills Genealogy Day & Pancake Festival

Join us for a FREE day of genealogy programming, with demonstrations
and discussions of online resources with professional genealogists.
Enjoy all-you-can-eat pancakes and eggs at the Pancake Festival in the
next room for a nominal fee (no requirement to attend the Pancake Festival).

Date: Sunday, March 10, 2013
Time: 9:00a.m.-2:00p.m.
Cost: FREE
RSVP: Deb Scheimer at 412-344-2526 or debscheim@gmail.com
Location: Beth El Congregation
1900 Cochran Rd
Pittsburgh, PA 15220

Directions: I-376 to Greentree Rd Exit. Turn Right on Greentree Rd.
Go to end. Turn Left on Cochran Rd.
First Left onto Roessler Rd (between Manor Oak and Taco Bell).
Roessler Rd ends in our parking lot.

Schedule:

9:00 - 10:00 a.m.
Debbie Kapp - Building on the Basics
This session will review sound principles of family history research
and emphasize opportunities for self-education. Whether you're just
starting your genealogy or have already discovered several
generations, you can always use the basics to expand your research
project wisely.

10:15 - 11:15 a.m.
Mary Dzurichko - Caring for your Archives
This program will provide information on storing and protecting your
archives and heirlooms, labeling and storing photographs and
negatives, how to avoid common mistakes, and sources for products and
supplies.

11:15 - 11:45 a.m.
Brunch Break - Enjoy All-You-Can-Eat pancakes & eggs in the room next
door for a nominal fee or go out to a nearby restaurant.

11:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL - Sailing into the Sunset: Tips for
Finding Your Ancestors on Passenger Lists
Understanding the history of passenger lists and extant online and
printindexes are key to success in finding your ancestor's record.
Once found,learning effective usage will help further your research.

1:00 - 2:00 p.m.
Marilyn Holt - Internet Resources for Eastern European Genealogy
Learn about websites useful for researchers with Eastern European
roots - both subscription sites and free resources.


Bendery Cemetery project update #general

Yefim Kogan
 

To Bessarabia researchers:

Since you are searching for family history in Bessarabia, I write to tell
you about a project now under way that may help you locate the graves of
your ancestors, the Bendery Cemetery project, which our Bessarabia SIG is
sponsoring. We are lucky to have an enthusiastic young Ukrainian researcher
living in Kaushany to photograph every stone in the Bendery Cemetery for us.

We have already finished half of the project: 2654 burial records have been
digitized, 2364 of them with photographs. These records have been sent to
JewishGen and are now available for your research.

Now we are working on the second part of the project: another 2500-2700
records will be ready to share with JewishGen this spring. Most of the
photos are already received in this second part. After all the project is
done, we are going to post the plan of all sectors of Bendery Cemetery, and
the history of the cemetery.

But in order to complete this phase of the project, we need to pay the
photographer, who is doing a great job, and promises to continue working on
other cemeteries in Bessarabia after the Bendery project is completed.

Will you help us? Your contribution, no matter the amount, will mean we
can finish this important project. Help us help you to find your ancestors:
Please donate to Bendery Cemetery Project online at

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=43

If you have any questions, please let me know.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bendery Cemetery project update #general

Yefim Kogan
 

To Bessarabia researchers:

Since you are searching for family history in Bessarabia, I write to tell
you about a project now under way that may help you locate the graves of
your ancestors, the Bendery Cemetery project, which our Bessarabia SIG is
sponsoring. We are lucky to have an enthusiastic young Ukrainian researcher
living in Kaushany to photograph every stone in the Bendery Cemetery for us.

We have already finished half of the project: 2654 burial records have been
digitized, 2364 of them with photographs. These records have been sent to
JewishGen and are now available for your research.

Now we are working on the second part of the project: another 2500-2700
records will be ready to share with JewishGen this spring. Most of the
photos are already received in this second part. After all the project is
done, we are going to post the plan of all sectors of Bendery Cemetery, and
the history of the cemetery.

But in order to complete this phase of the project, we need to pay the
photographer, who is doing a great job, and promises to continue working on
other cemeteries in Bessarabia after the Bendery project is completed.

Will you help us? Your contribution, no matter the amount, will mean we
can finish this important project. Help us help you to find your ancestors:
Please donate to Bendery Cemetery Project online at

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=43

If you have any questions, please let me know.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania.


Three more chapters translated for "Sefer Serock," Yizkor Book for Serock, Poland #general

Howard Orenstein
 

Dear Friends,
When I undertook the job of coordinating the translation of the Yiddish
chapters of "Sefer Serock" several years ago, I expected to be engaged
for a long time. Initially, my goal was selfish; I wanted to know more
about my family's life in the Shtetl that I visited briefly in 2004.
Also, I wanted the translation to be a tribute to my ORENSTEIN/ORENSZTEJN
ancestors, many of whom were victims of the Holocaust.

My grandfather, i.e., my father's father, Simcha Bunem, was born and
raised in Serock, during the late 19th and early 20th centuries,
respectively. He and (only) one of his older brothers came separately to
the US in the years prior to the Holocaust. The rest of the extended
ORENSTEIN family were not so fortunate. My zeyde did not speak much
about his family due to the horrors in Poland, so I new very little
about life in Serock prior to, during and after the Holocaust. In fact,
I did not know until the late 1990s that my zeyde had more than the one
brother who came to the US and at least 3 sisters.

Although "Sefer Serock" was readily available on the internet at the New
York Public Library website, I had little ability to read and understand
Yiddish. With some good luck and the cooperation of a number of people,
however, I am happy to announce that I've accomplished my initial goal.
Several people must be acknowledged and thanked for that. First, of course, is
Pamela Russ, who completed the vast majority of the translations. Next is
Israel Mida, a son of a Serocker, whose generosity sped up the pace of
translation. And last, I want to thank Lance Ackerfeld, JewishGen.org's
Yizkor Book Project Manager, for his help and encouragement throughout
the process.

Here are the latest chapters and links that have been added to the
online translation.

(a) Memories of our childhood-years by Sh. Rozental
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/ser123.html#Page150

(b) Khannuka in the Big Shul by Yakov Mendzelewski
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/ser540.html#Page554

(c) Aliyah >from Serock to Israel by Khanokh Werdi
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/ser559.html#Page566

Howard Orenstein
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu

Howard Orenstein, Ph.D.
Westminster,MD
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu
Explore Your Jewish Heritage in Wyszkow,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHWyszkow3.html
Jewish Heritage in Serock,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHSerock3/Welcome.html
Searching for:
ORENSTEIN -- Serock, Wyszkow, Pultusk, Poland
HOLLAND (GOLAND), PIENIEK, OSTROWIAK -- Serock, Wyszkow, Poland
BLUM (BLOOM) -- Wyszkow, Poland; London, England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Three more chapters translated for "Sefer Serock," Yizkor Book for Serock, Poland #general

Howard Orenstein
 

Dear Friends,
When I undertook the job of coordinating the translation of the Yiddish
chapters of "Sefer Serock" several years ago, I expected to be engaged
for a long time. Initially, my goal was selfish; I wanted to know more
about my family's life in the Shtetl that I visited briefly in 2004.
Also, I wanted the translation to be a tribute to my ORENSTEIN/ORENSZTEJN
ancestors, many of whom were victims of the Holocaust.

My grandfather, i.e., my father's father, Simcha Bunem, was born and
raised in Serock, during the late 19th and early 20th centuries,
respectively. He and (only) one of his older brothers came separately to
the US in the years prior to the Holocaust. The rest of the extended
ORENSTEIN family were not so fortunate. My zeyde did not speak much
about his family due to the horrors in Poland, so I new very little
about life in Serock prior to, during and after the Holocaust. In fact,
I did not know until the late 1990s that my zeyde had more than the one
brother who came to the US and at least 3 sisters.

Although "Sefer Serock" was readily available on the internet at the New
York Public Library website, I had little ability to read and understand
Yiddish. With some good luck and the cooperation of a number of people,
however, I am happy to announce that I've accomplished my initial goal.
Several people must be acknowledged and thanked for that. First, of course, is
Pamela Russ, who completed the vast majority of the translations. Next is
Israel Mida, a son of a Serocker, whose generosity sped up the pace of
translation. And last, I want to thank Lance Ackerfeld, JewishGen.org's
Yizkor Book Project Manager, for his help and encouragement throughout
the process.

Here are the latest chapters and links that have been added to the
online translation.

(a) Memories of our childhood-years by Sh. Rozental
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/ser123.html#Page150

(b) Khannuka in the Big Shul by Yakov Mendzelewski
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/ser540.html#Page554

(c) Aliyah >from Serock to Israel by Khanokh Werdi
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/ser559.html#Page566

Howard Orenstein
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu

Howard Orenstein, Ph.D.
Westminster,MD
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu
Explore Your Jewish Heritage in Wyszkow,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHWyszkow3.html
Jewish Heritage in Serock,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHSerock3/Welcome.html
Searching for:
ORENSTEIN -- Serock, Wyszkow, Pultusk, Poland
HOLLAND (GOLAND), PIENIEK, OSTROWIAK -- Serock, Wyszkow, Poland
BLUM (BLOOM) -- Wyszkow, Poland; London, England


Book Site: Czechs, Germans, Jews? #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

I received the new English version of Katerina Capkova's book "Czechs,
Germans, Jews? National Identity & the Jews of Bohemia" which really
gives an excellent, scholarly account of the movement of Jews in Bohemia
from Judeo-Deutsch to German to Czech, and the resulting confusion over
their national identity, whether Jewish, German or Czech. (In Czech it
was called "Cesi, Nemci, Zide?" See the review
at http://www.knihovnice.cz/recenze/capkova-k-cesi-nemci-zide.html .)
Until reading the book, I did not completely understand the political
dimensions to the Jewish-Czech identity issue in the First Republic
period. I recommend the book very highly. A summary of her argument is
at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~oaces/conference/papers/Katerina_Capkova.pdf

Relevant to some of our discussions, Capkova writes: "In the first
half of the nineteenth century, the period of Jewish emancipation, by
far most Bohemian Jews used German as the language of everyday
communication and adopted German culture in general." This began to
change only after about 1880 when the first Czech-language schools were
established. After the establishment of Czechoslovakia in 1918,
naturally the adoption of Czech accelerated. Nevertheless, there
remained a Jewish German elite that still clung to German culture. As
Capkova writes, "In the 1920s and 1930s the German Jewish elite of the
Bohemian Lands was the richest, most prosperous elite of any Central
European Jewish community."

What I found very interesting was the apparent split between those Jews
who adopted Czech. Some were assimilationist, and wished Jews to be
considered as just Czech. While the Zionists wished for Jews to be
treated as a separate nationality (like Hungarians). Capkova discusses
the various political machinations, including lobbying of Masaryk, and
the ramifications for Jews of measures to resolve this conflict.

We have started a discussion about the book on Geni at
http://www.geni.com/discussions/120424 and you are all welcome to post
your thoughts there.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Book Site: Czechs, Germans, Jews? #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

I received the new English version of Katerina Capkova's book "Czechs,
Germans, Jews? National Identity & the Jews of Bohemia" which really
gives an excellent, scholarly account of the movement of Jews in Bohemia
from Judeo-Deutsch to German to Czech, and the resulting confusion over
their national identity, whether Jewish, German or Czech. (In Czech it
was called "Cesi, Nemci, Zide?" See the review
at http://www.knihovnice.cz/recenze/capkova-k-cesi-nemci-zide.html .)
Until reading the book, I did not completely understand the political
dimensions to the Jewish-Czech identity issue in the First Republic
period. I recommend the book very highly. A summary of her argument is
at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~oaces/conference/papers/Katerina_Capkova.pdf

Relevant to some of our discussions, Capkova writes: "In the first
half of the nineteenth century, the period of Jewish emancipation, by
far most Bohemian Jews used German as the language of everyday
communication and adopted German culture in general." This began to
change only after about 1880 when the first Czech-language schools were
established. After the establishment of Czechoslovakia in 1918,
naturally the adoption of Czech accelerated. Nevertheless, there
remained a Jewish German elite that still clung to German culture. As
Capkova writes, "In the 1920s and 1930s the German Jewish elite of the
Bohemian Lands was the richest, most prosperous elite of any Central
European Jewish community."

What I found very interesting was the apparent split between those Jews
who adopted Czech. Some were assimilationist, and wished Jews to be
considered as just Czech. While the Zionists wished for Jews to be
treated as a separate nationality (like Hungarians). Capkova discusses
the various political machinations, including lobbying of Masaryk, and
the ramifications for Jews of measures to resolve this conflict.

We have started a discussion about the book on Geni at
http://www.geni.com/discussions/120424 and you are all welcome to post
your thoughts there.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Additional bibliography for Liberec and Roudnice nad Labem #austria-czech

Paul King
 

The translations into English by Hellman and Pearman of articles on the
Jewish communities of Liberec (Reichenberg), Roudnice nad Labem, and Beroun
(announced 23.2.2013) are a major contribution for those who do not read
German or Czech to an understanding of these specific locales, as well as of
Jewish Bohemian history. Supplemental reading may be obtained in the
following texts:

Isa Engelmann, Zide v Liberce [Czech edition]
Reichenberg und seine juedischen Buerger [German edition]
(ISBN 10: 364311737X / ISBN 13: 9783643117373 )
Unfortunately, new and used editions are somewhat pricey.

Fritz Neubauer's response to two comments on Isa Engelmann's book may be
found at:

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GERMAN-BOHEMIAN/2007-10/1192712922

In personal correspondence several years ago, Ms Engelmann noted in relation
to my question about the use of material >from the article in Hugo Gold's
book that "Having registered all the files of the Jewish inhabitants, I was
able to give the follow-up after 1933 including the list of victims of the
Shoah and I could also include the very many Reichenberg residents of Jewish
origin, who had converted or married Christians and were not considered by
Dr. Hoffmann, who refers only to the members of the Jewish Community."

Rabbi, Prof., Dr. Hoffmann also wrote a short article entitled "Wallensteins
Stellung zu den Juden Ein Gedenkblatt zum dreihundertsten Todestage des
Generalissimus," in Zeitschrift fur die Geschichte der Juden in der
Tschechoslowakei, January 1934: 1-5. Wallenstein was responsible for
settling the Bassevi family and other Jews on his Frydland estate.

For the tribulations of the Jews in Roudnice nad Lebam see Legnerova, Hana
(2003) "Self-government of Jewish Communities in Nobility-owned Towns in the
Second Half of the Seventeenth and Beginning of the Eighteen Centuries
Roudnice nad Labem (Raudnitz), Postoloprty ((Postelberg) and Udlice
(Eidlitz)," Judaica Bohemiae XXXIX, 5-26. [Appendices 27 ff.] Less genealogy
but there are names.

I give the usual disclaimer re no financial interest in the Engelmann book.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Don't forget to search in Hungary #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

If you are researching a particular town in Bohemia and Moravia, don't
forget to search that town in the JewishGen Hungary database,
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/#Hungary

You'll find many folks who migrated to Hungary and appear in the records there.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Additional bibliography for Liberec and Roudnice nad Labem #austria-czech

Paul King
 

The translations into English by Hellman and Pearman of articles on the
Jewish communities of Liberec (Reichenberg), Roudnice nad Labem, and Beroun
(announced 23.2.2013) are a major contribution for those who do not read
German or Czech to an understanding of these specific locales, as well as of
Jewish Bohemian history. Supplemental reading may be obtained in the
following texts:

Isa Engelmann, Zide v Liberce [Czech edition]
Reichenberg und seine juedischen Buerger [German edition]
(ISBN 10: 364311737X / ISBN 13: 9783643117373 )
Unfortunately, new and used editions are somewhat pricey.

Fritz Neubauer's response to two comments on Isa Engelmann's book may be
found at:

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GERMAN-BOHEMIAN/2007-10/1192712922

In personal correspondence several years ago, Ms Engelmann noted in relation
to my question about the use of material >from the article in Hugo Gold's
book that "Having registered all the files of the Jewish inhabitants, I was
able to give the follow-up after 1933 including the list of victims of the
Shoah and I could also include the very many Reichenberg residents of Jewish
origin, who had converted or married Christians and were not considered by
Dr. Hoffmann, who refers only to the members of the Jewish Community."

Rabbi, Prof., Dr. Hoffmann also wrote a short article entitled "Wallensteins
Stellung zu den Juden Ein Gedenkblatt zum dreihundertsten Todestage des
Generalissimus," in Zeitschrift fur die Geschichte der Juden in der
Tschechoslowakei, January 1934: 1-5. Wallenstein was responsible for
settling the Bassevi family and other Jews on his Frydland estate.

For the tribulations of the Jews in Roudnice nad Lebam see Legnerova, Hana
(2003) "Self-government of Jewish Communities in Nobility-owned Towns in the
Second Half of the Seventeenth and Beginning of the Eighteen Centuries
Roudnice nad Labem (Raudnitz), Postoloprty ((Postelberg) and Udlice
(Eidlitz)," Judaica Bohemiae XXXIX, 5-26. [Appendices 27 ff.] Less genealogy
but there are names.

I give the usual disclaimer re no financial interest in the Engelmann book.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Don't forget to search in Hungary #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

If you are researching a particular town in Bohemia and Moravia, don't
forget to search that town in the JewishGen Hungary database,
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/#Hungary

You'll find many folks who migrated to Hungary and appear in the records there.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Request to identify faces with Jabotinsky in South Africa #southafrica

Bennie Penzik <benzipen@...>
 

Shalom!

I've posted a photo of a group of people with Zeev Jabotinsky in South
Africa circa 1937. Can anyone help identify the participants?

Kindly view it on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=26214

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Many thanks!

Bennie Penzik
Ramat Hasharon
ISRAEL 47205


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Request to identify faces with Jabotinsky in South Africa #southafrica

Bennie Penzik <benzipen@...>
 

Shalom!

I've posted a photo of a group of people with Zeev Jabotinsky in South
Africa circa 1937. Can anyone help identify the participants?

Kindly view it on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=26214

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Many thanks!

Bennie Penzik
Ramat Hasharon
ISRAEL 47205

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