Date   

March 2015 Course: Complex Genealogy in the United States #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer
 

This Intermediate Course will help you organize what you've found and
focus on what's missing. After researching Ancestry and Familysearch,
what are the minor websites and major archives to consider? What are
your brick walls and what advanced research will break them down?

This course proceeds at your pace (there is no time dependence, our
students are worldwide, you participate in our 24/7 forum when you are
available); there are eight pdf lessons for you to download. The
lessons cover U.S. Naturalization, Passports, Death Records (Probate,
Obituaries, Cemeteries), Newspapers, City Directories, Immigration
Ports, Major Archives and Libraries, Military records, Internet
Research and State and Federal Government Records. The emphasis is on
using your computer and the Internet efficiently and employing
advanced on-site or email techniques in U.S. research.

Students are encouraged to post one ancestral branch and the
instructor will work one on one to answer questions and suggest
avenues to research; this mentoring process is unique and quite
valuable. Requirements and tuition are detailed in the course
description; please read it at
www.jewishgen.org/education .
Registration is open

Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education, NYC & PBG Florida
www.JewishGen.org/education


Viewmate Translation requested - German #germany

rickglaser@...
 

I have posted the marriage record of Jacob GETREUER and Rosalie NALOS.
I would appreciate a transcription and a translation. I am especially
interested in the names of the parents of Rosalie NALOS, and which town
they are from. Thanks in advance for replies via ViewMate.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38222

Rick Glaser, Owings Mills MD


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech March 2015 Course: Complex Genealogy in the United States #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer
 

This Intermediate Course will help you organize what you've found and
focus on what's missing. After researching Ancestry and Familysearch,
what are the minor websites and major archives to consider? What are
your brick walls and what advanced research will break them down?

This course proceeds at your pace (there is no time dependence, our
students are worldwide, you participate in our 24/7 forum when you are
available); there are eight pdf lessons for you to download. The
lessons cover U.S. Naturalization, Passports, Death Records (Probate,
Obituaries, Cemeteries), Newspapers, City Directories, Immigration
Ports, Major Archives and Libraries, Military records, Internet
Research and State and Federal Government Records. The emphasis is on
using your computer and the Internet efficiently and employing
advanced on-site or email techniques in U.S. research.

Students are encouraged to post one ancestral branch and the
instructor will work one on one to answer questions and suggest
avenues to research; this mentoring process is unique and quite
valuable. Requirements and tuition are detailed in the course
description; please read it at
www.jewishgen.org/education .
Registration is open

Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education, NYC & PBG Florida
www.JewishGen.org/education


German SIG #Germany Viewmate Translation requested - German #germany

rickglaser@...
 

I have posted the marriage record of Jacob GETREUER and Rosalie NALOS.
I would appreciate a transcription and a translation. I am especially
interested in the names of the parents of Rosalie NALOS, and which town
they are from. Thanks in advance for replies via ViewMate.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38222

Rick Glaser, Owings Mills MD


Origin of family name DUB #austria-czech

stan.dub@...
 

Dear Siggers:

I've had great responses to some previous inquiries, so I thought I'd
give members a try at this...

My parents were both Holocaust survivors >from Subcarpathia Ruthenia
(just east of Slovakia, formerly part of Czechoslovakia from
1917-1938). My father's surviving relatives knew nothing of the story
of the origins of the DUB name which is described in the Encyclopedia
Judaica (entry on Hussites). But clearly the family came >from the
area around Bohemia-Moravia, and the name "DUB" is seemingly very
Czech in origin (it translates to Oak in Czech, and similar words in
Ukranian, Russian and Polish).

According to the Encyclopedia Judaica, after the Battle of White
Mountain (in 1620) a group of the defeated Bohemian Brethren were
faced with a choice of forced conversion to catholicism or exile, but
somehow avoided those fates by converting en masse to Judaism instead.
According to the Encyclopedia, this is where the Jewish families known
as KAFKA, KURANDA, JELINEK, DUB and BROD got their start.

(One further possible clue is that one of the last military leaders of
the Brethren was named Jan Rohack of Duba.)

I had never come across this story apart >from randomly running across
the entry on Hussites while browsing through the Encyclopedia, until I
met a Jewish man in New York around 1985 who grew up in pre-war
Prague, but left with his family as a teenager in 1937. He asked me
without prompting if I knew the origin of my name, and proceeded to
tell this story to me, relating that he had learned it in his History
classes as a young man growing up in Prague.

More recently, people I've mentioned this to responded with great
skepticism. The Encyclopedia cites a few written references which
might support this, but they are references to sources written in
German or Czech, and therefore not accessible to me.

So that's all I know, but I'd be interested in comments >from members
of this SIG who might have insights, or could perhaps access these
referenced sources.

Stanley M. Dub
Cleveland, OH


Origin of name DUB #austria-czech

stan.dub@...
 

Here is the article I mentioned >from the Encyclopedia Judaica (which I
see is now available online).

Stan Dub


HUSSITES, Christian reform movement, closely interwoven with the
national and social conflicts prevailing in Bohemia in the 15th
century, named after John Huss (Jan Hus; c. 1369=E2=80=931415). They
influenced European history through their reform ideology and their
victories in the five crusades launched to subdue them (1420=E2=80=9334).
Mainly because of their attitude to the Old Testament and their
rejection of the adoration of relics and saints, contemporary Roman
Catholics accused them of being a Judaizing sect. (An extremist group
even insisted on introducing kashrut and she=E1=B8=A5itah.) The Jews
sympathized with the "Benei Hushim" or "Avazim" (Czech husa, Heb.
avaz: "goose"), seeing in their actions an approach toward Judaism.
The Taborites, the belligerent radical wing, identified themselves
with biblical Israel, calling their centers by the biblical names of
Horeb and Tabor. The latter remained as the name of the town in
southern Bohemia and as the designation of an assembly in the Czech
language. The last refuge of Hussite opposition after its defeat
(1434) was called Zion.

However curious these biblical and linguistic influences may be, the
fact is that the Hussites initiated an important change in the
attitude toward the Jews through the interpretations of one of their
leaders, Matthias of Janov (d. 1394), of figures like Antichrist as
being Catholic and not Jewish, as was maintained by medieval
Christianity. However, Huss himself attacked the Jews for their
implacable opposition to Christianity. There is no proof in the
assertion, read out when Huss was on the stake (1415), that he had
"counseled with the Jews." Jacobellus of Stribro (Mies), the leader of
the moderate Calixtine faction, in his treatise De usurae ("On usury")
said that it would be much easier to convert the Jews to Christianity
if they would work in agriculture and crafts like the gentiles. They
would thus have less time for study and would more easily be
converted. The regents protected the Jews out of greed, but Jacobellus
suggested that this protection should be continued because Jews had
once been the object of divine revelation. However, as in many other
matters, in their approach to the Jews the Hussites followed the lead
of Matthias of Janov and not that of Huss, as revealed in the writings
of Jacobellus in 1412 and the Anatomia Antichristi (1420) by the
radical Taborite Pavel Kravar. The Hussite approach to the Jews was
also determined by their concretization of history as a struggle
between Christ and Antichrist. Every Christian is a limb (membrum) of
one of these two bodies (corpora), and the Jews now have no part in
this struggle. They had in the past, however, when Christianity first
emerged.

The Hussites considered themselves "God's warriors" (Bo=C5=BE=C3=AD bojovn=
=C3=ADci)
subduing the "soldiers of the Antichrist," i.e., the German Catholic
crusaders. There were no direct attacks by the Hussites on the Jews,
although they incidentally became victims of the Hussites, as after
the capture of Chomutov (Komotau) in 1421, where Jews were burned at
the stake together with the Catholics (although the Jews were given
the choice between adopting Hussitism or death, a choice denied to the
Catholics); and in Prague (in 1422) the Jewish quarter was plundered
along with the Old City. However, these attacks were incidental to
attacks on Catholics. In the 1420s thePage 645 | Top of ArticleJews
were accused of supplying arms to the Hussites and on that account
suffered massacres and expulsions at the hands of the Catholics from
Austria in 1421, Bavaria in 1422, and Iglau (Jiniouva) in 1428. The
rabbinical authorities of the period, such as Israel *Isserlein ,
Israel *Bruna , Jacob *Weil , and Yom Tov Lipmann *Muehlhausen
expressed guarded sympathy with the Hussites, while an anonymous
chronicler (writing in Hebrew c. 1470; see Ben-Sasson in bibl.)
expressed it freely seeing Hussitism as inspired by Avigdor *Kara .
Consequently the chronicler reports outstanding events of the
Hussiteperiod, mingling truth and fantasy. According to this Hebrew
chronicler, Kara was in close contact with the Hussites and composed a
piyyut, which seems to reflect the messianic hopes roused among Prague
Jewry by the rise of the Hussites. He states that it was sung openly
in Hebrew and Yiddish. The tune the piyyut was sung to seems to have
been that of a Hussitic hymn. The collapse of Hussitism was a
disappointment to the Jews.

The later followers of Hussitism, the Bohemian Brethren, also showed
much interest in Judaism and Jewish history. They too identified
themselves with biblical Israel and likened their expulsion (1548) to
the galut. They published the Czech translation of the Hegesippus
version of Josephus' Wars three times in the second half of the 16th
century. In 1592 V=C3=A1clav=CB=87 Pl=C3=A1cel published a Hystoria =C5=BEi=
dovsk=C3=A1=C3=A1
("Jewish History"), also based on Josephus but continuing until the
seventh century C.E., which displays an unusual measure of sympathetic
understanding for the fate of the Jews. When the Brethren founded
their community in Poznan (Posen) some Jews joined them. One, who was
baptized and adopted the name of Lukas Helic, collaborated in the
translation of the Bible into Czech (Kr=C3=A1lick=C3=A1 Bible).

As an outcome of the persecutions, some of the Brethren preferred
adopting Judaism to forced conversion to Catholicism or emigration.
Some Bohemian Jewish families traced their descent to these converted
Brethren, among them Brod, Dub, Jellinek, Kafka, Kuranda, and
Pacovsky.

Under Catholic Hapsburg rule, there was rapprochement and
understanding between the clandestine Brethren and the Jews. Their
heritage was manifest once more with the emergence of the sect of the
*Abrahamites in the 18th century.

After the Holocaust, many synagogue buildings in Czech localities
became prayer rooms of the Bohemian Brethren or the Czechoslovakian
Church, and in these localities they took over the care of the Jewish
cemeteries. They had a special prayer for these occasions (V=C4=9Bstn=C3=AD=
k
=C5=BEidovsk=C3=BDch n=C3=A1bo=C5=BEensk=C3=BDch obc=C3=AD v =C4=8Deskoslov=
ensku, 11 (1949), 532).

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

E. Schwarz, in: JGGJ=C4=8C, 5 (1933), 429=E2=80=9337; R. Kestenberg, ibid.,=
8
(1936), 1=E2=80=9325 (incl. bibl.); J. Macek, Hussite Movement in Bohemia
(19582); Baron, Social2, 13 (1969), 209=E2=80=9316, 416=E2=80=9321; H.H. Be=
n-Sasson,
in: Divrei ha-Akademyah ha-Le'ummit le-Madda'im, 4 (1969/70), 66=E2=80=9369=
;
R.R. Betts, Essays in Czech History (1969); H. Kaminsky, A History of
the HussiteRevolution (1967); Kestenberg Gladstein, in: Journal of the
Warburg Institutes, 18 (1955), 245, 254, 288=E2=80=939; idem, in: Judaica
Bohemiae, 4 (1968), 64=E2=80=9368.

[Ruth Kestenberg-Gladstein]

Source Citation (MLA 7th Edition)
Kestenberg-Gladstein, Ruth. "Hussites." Encyclopaedia Judaica. Ed.
Michael Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik. 2nd ed. Vol. 9. Detroit: Macmillan
Reference USA, 2007. 644-645. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 9
Feb. 2015.


Gale Document Number: GALE|CX2587509349
--=20

Stanley M. Dub

Cleveland, OH


I've hit the wall looking for Aleksandrowicz....Help #austria-czech

Palekaiko
 

In Stanislawow, Poland, my great great Uncle Meir Weissberg and his
wife, had four children. One of them, Frydryka (b 1892 Stanislawow)
married Alexander Aleksandrowicz. Alexander was born (1887) in
Brody, Poland and was the vice president of an Austrian Bank. He
traveled to Vienna frequently. The children of Frydryka and Alexander
(Lidia, Irena and Norbert, (b1915 & 1917) were born in Vienna. Irena
and Norbert were twins. Eventually, after some time in Lipnik,
Bielsko-Biala, where Alexander's father lived, they family returned to
Stanislawow. This is where the trail goes cold.

I have documents >from the archives in Ivano-Frankivsk (formerly
Stanislawow), Vienna and Lipnik >from which I have gleaned the above
information.

In addition, Frydryka Weissberg had three siblings. Jozef Karol (who
later changed his name to Bialogorski, under which he penned several
novels with erotic themes) moved to L'viv, where he worked in the tax
office. Klara, who married Adolph Lax, had no children and both
murdered by the Nazis. And lastly, Wilhelm, about whom I know
nothing, other than he was born in Stanislawow, 08 Nov 1897.

I've not gotten a reply >from ITS, but there is no listing in the Yad
Vashem database.

Anyone with any information, ideas, suggestions as to where I can go
for information about the Aleksandrowicz family, specifically their
children and their children's children, I would be most grateful.

Please contact me privately, palekaiko@gmail.com.

Thank you,

Michael Diamant


Vienna Probate Records #austria-czech

Alex Calzareth
 

In the past (2004 and 2008) I was able to order copies of relatives'
probate files stored in the Vienna Stadt- und Landesarchiv(MA 8) by
e-mailing the archives. A few weeks later I would receive back a
letter detailing the copying charges.

This week I contacted the archive by e-mail with another request and
received back a form response directing me to their paid research
service (at 70 euros per hour). In addition, the archive now charges 1
euro per page.

Has anyone had a recent experience with the archive's paid research
service? Would there only be charges for the time it takes to look up
the files in the indexes?

I also see >from the archive's web site however that scans made by
visitors to the archives can be made for around 18 cents each. Can
anyone recommend someone who could be hired to research these files?
Please respond privately with any recommendations.

Thank you


Alex Calzareth
alcalz@gmail.com
Wantagh, New York


YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe #austria-czech

Tony Hausner
 

Many of you may know this, but I just learned about this valuable resoource

The YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe


http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/default.aspx

It covers most of the towns in which I am town leader. Many items in it that I did not know about.


Tony Hausner
Silver Spring, MD 20901
301--587-6943
(primary email address: thausner@gmail.com)


ViewMate translation request - Czech #austria-czech

ellie.carson@...
 

Hi All,

I've posted a copy of a postcard sent by my grandfather during WWI written
in Czech for which I need a translation. If you can help, please go to.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38089

Thanks for your help!

Ellie Carson
Albany, Oregon
USA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Origin of family name DUB #austria-czech

stan.dub@...
 

Dear Siggers:

I've had great responses to some previous inquiries, so I thought I'd
give members a try at this...

My parents were both Holocaust survivors >from Subcarpathia Ruthenia
(just east of Slovakia, formerly part of Czechoslovakia from
1917-1938). My father's surviving relatives knew nothing of the story
of the origins of the DUB name which is described in the Encyclopedia
Judaica (entry on Hussites). But clearly the family came >from the
area around Bohemia-Moravia, and the name "DUB" is seemingly very
Czech in origin (it translates to Oak in Czech, and similar words in
Ukranian, Russian and Polish).

According to the Encyclopedia Judaica, after the Battle of White
Mountain (in 1620) a group of the defeated Bohemian Brethren were
faced with a choice of forced conversion to catholicism or exile, but
somehow avoided those fates by converting en masse to Judaism instead.
According to the Encyclopedia, this is where the Jewish families known
as KAFKA, KURANDA, JELINEK, DUB and BROD got their start.

(One further possible clue is that one of the last military leaders of
the Brethren was named Jan Rohack of Duba.)

I had never come across this story apart >from randomly running across
the entry on Hussites while browsing through the Encyclopedia, until I
met a Jewish man in New York around 1985 who grew up in pre-war
Prague, but left with his family as a teenager in 1937. He asked me
without prompting if I knew the origin of my name, and proceeded to
tell this story to me, relating that he had learned it in his History
classes as a young man growing up in Prague.

More recently, people I've mentioned this to responded with great
skepticism. The Encyclopedia cites a few written references which
might support this, but they are references to sources written in
German or Czech, and therefore not accessible to me.

So that's all I know, but I'd be interested in comments >from members
of this SIG who might have insights, or could perhaps access these
referenced sources.

Stanley M. Dub
Cleveland, OH


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Origin of name DUB #austria-czech

stan.dub@...
 

Here is the article I mentioned >from the Encyclopedia Judaica (which I
see is now available online).

Stan Dub


HUSSITES, Christian reform movement, closely interwoven with the
national and social conflicts prevailing in Bohemia in the 15th
century, named after John Huss (Jan Hus; c. 1369=E2=80=931415). They
influenced European history through their reform ideology and their
victories in the five crusades launched to subdue them (1420=E2=80=9334).
Mainly because of their attitude to the Old Testament and their
rejection of the adoration of relics and saints, contemporary Roman
Catholics accused them of being a Judaizing sect. (An extremist group
even insisted on introducing kashrut and she=E1=B8=A5itah.) The Jews
sympathized with the "Benei Hushim" or "Avazim" (Czech husa, Heb.
avaz: "goose"), seeing in their actions an approach toward Judaism.
The Taborites, the belligerent radical wing, identified themselves
with biblical Israel, calling their centers by the biblical names of
Horeb and Tabor. The latter remained as the name of the town in
southern Bohemia and as the designation of an assembly in the Czech
language. The last refuge of Hussite opposition after its defeat
(1434) was called Zion.

However curious these biblical and linguistic influences may be, the
fact is that the Hussites initiated an important change in the
attitude toward the Jews through the interpretations of one of their
leaders, Matthias of Janov (d. 1394), of figures like Antichrist as
being Catholic and not Jewish, as was maintained by medieval
Christianity. However, Huss himself attacked the Jews for their
implacable opposition to Christianity. There is no proof in the
assertion, read out when Huss was on the stake (1415), that he had
"counseled with the Jews." Jacobellus of Stribro (Mies), the leader of
the moderate Calixtine faction, in his treatise De usurae ("On usury")
said that it would be much easier to convert the Jews to Christianity
if they would work in agriculture and crafts like the gentiles. They
would thus have less time for study and would more easily be
converted. The regents protected the Jews out of greed, but Jacobellus
suggested that this protection should be continued because Jews had
once been the object of divine revelation. However, as in many other
matters, in their approach to the Jews the Hussites followed the lead
of Matthias of Janov and not that of Huss, as revealed in the writings
of Jacobellus in 1412 and the Anatomia Antichristi (1420) by the
radical Taborite Pavel Kravar. The Hussite approach to the Jews was
also determined by their concretization of history as a struggle
between Christ and Antichrist. Every Christian is a limb (membrum) of
one of these two bodies (corpora), and the Jews now have no part in
this struggle. They had in the past, however, when Christianity first
emerged.

The Hussites considered themselves "God's warriors" (Bo=C5=BE=C3=AD bojovn=
=C3=ADci)
subduing the "soldiers of the Antichrist," i.e., the German Catholic
crusaders. There were no direct attacks by the Hussites on the Jews,
although they incidentally became victims of the Hussites, as after
the capture of Chomutov (Komotau) in 1421, where Jews were burned at
the stake together with the Catholics (although the Jews were given
the choice between adopting Hussitism or death, a choice denied to the
Catholics); and in Prague (in 1422) the Jewish quarter was plundered
along with the Old City. However, these attacks were incidental to
attacks on Catholics. In the 1420s thePage 645 | Top of ArticleJews
were accused of supplying arms to the Hussites and on that account
suffered massacres and expulsions at the hands of the Catholics from
Austria in 1421, Bavaria in 1422, and Iglau (Jiniouva) in 1428. The
rabbinical authorities of the period, such as Israel *Isserlein ,
Israel *Bruna , Jacob *Weil , and Yom Tov Lipmann *Muehlhausen
expressed guarded sympathy with the Hussites, while an anonymous
chronicler (writing in Hebrew c. 1470; see Ben-Sasson in bibl.)
expressed it freely seeing Hussitism as inspired by Avigdor *Kara .
Consequently the chronicler reports outstanding events of the
Hussiteperiod, mingling truth and fantasy. According to this Hebrew
chronicler, Kara was in close contact with the Hussites and composed a
piyyut, which seems to reflect the messianic hopes roused among Prague
Jewry by the rise of the Hussites. He states that it was sung openly
in Hebrew and Yiddish. The tune the piyyut was sung to seems to have
been that of a Hussitic hymn. The collapse of Hussitism was a
disappointment to the Jews.

The later followers of Hussitism, the Bohemian Brethren, also showed
much interest in Judaism and Jewish history. They too identified
themselves with biblical Israel and likened their expulsion (1548) to
the galut. They published the Czech translation of the Hegesippus
version of Josephus' Wars three times in the second half of the 16th
century. In 1592 V=C3=A1clav=CB=87 Pl=C3=A1cel published a Hystoria =C5=BEi=
dovsk=C3=A1=C3=A1
("Jewish History"), also based on Josephus but continuing until the
seventh century C.E., which displays an unusual measure of sympathetic
understanding for the fate of the Jews. When the Brethren founded
their community in Poznan (Posen) some Jews joined them. One, who was
baptized and adopted the name of Lukas Helic, collaborated in the
translation of the Bible into Czech (Kr=C3=A1lick=C3=A1 Bible).

As an outcome of the persecutions, some of the Brethren preferred
adopting Judaism to forced conversion to Catholicism or emigration.
Some Bohemian Jewish families traced their descent to these converted
Brethren, among them Brod, Dub, Jellinek, Kafka, Kuranda, and
Pacovsky.

Under Catholic Hapsburg rule, there was rapprochement and
understanding between the clandestine Brethren and the Jews. Their
heritage was manifest once more with the emergence of the sect of the
*Abrahamites in the 18th century.

After the Holocaust, many synagogue buildings in Czech localities
became prayer rooms of the Bohemian Brethren or the Czechoslovakian
Church, and in these localities they took over the care of the Jewish
cemeteries. They had a special prayer for these occasions (V=C4=9Bstn=C3=AD=
k
=C5=BEidovsk=C3=BDch n=C3=A1bo=C5=BEensk=C3=BDch obc=C3=AD v =C4=8Deskoslov=
ensku, 11 (1949), 532).

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

E. Schwarz, in: JGGJ=C4=8C, 5 (1933), 429=E2=80=9337; R. Kestenberg, ibid.,=
8
(1936), 1=E2=80=9325 (incl. bibl.); J. Macek, Hussite Movement in Bohemia
(19582); Baron, Social2, 13 (1969), 209=E2=80=9316, 416=E2=80=9321; H.H. Be=
n-Sasson,
in: Divrei ha-Akademyah ha-Le'ummit le-Madda'im, 4 (1969/70), 66=E2=80=9369=
;
R.R. Betts, Essays in Czech History (1969); H. Kaminsky, A History of
the HussiteRevolution (1967); Kestenberg Gladstein, in: Journal of the
Warburg Institutes, 18 (1955), 245, 254, 288=E2=80=939; idem, in: Judaica
Bohemiae, 4 (1968), 64=E2=80=9368.

[Ruth Kestenberg-Gladstein]

Source Citation (MLA 7th Edition)
Kestenberg-Gladstein, Ruth. "Hussites." Encyclopaedia Judaica. Ed.
Michael Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik. 2nd ed. Vol. 9. Detroit: Macmillan
Reference USA, 2007. 644-645. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 9
Feb. 2015.


Gale Document Number: GALE|CX2587509349
--=20

Stanley M. Dub

Cleveland, OH


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech I've hit the wall looking for Aleksandrowicz....Help #austria-czech

Palekaiko
 

In Stanislawow, Poland, my great great Uncle Meir Weissberg and his
wife, had four children. One of them, Frydryka (b 1892 Stanislawow)
married Alexander Aleksandrowicz. Alexander was born (1887) in
Brody, Poland and was the vice president of an Austrian Bank. He
traveled to Vienna frequently. The children of Frydryka and Alexander
(Lidia, Irena and Norbert, (b1915 & 1917) were born in Vienna. Irena
and Norbert were twins. Eventually, after some time in Lipnik,
Bielsko-Biala, where Alexander's father lived, they family returned to
Stanislawow. This is where the trail goes cold.

I have documents >from the archives in Ivano-Frankivsk (formerly
Stanislawow), Vienna and Lipnik >from which I have gleaned the above
information.

In addition, Frydryka Weissberg had three siblings. Jozef Karol (who
later changed his name to Bialogorski, under which he penned several
novels with erotic themes) moved to L'viv, where he worked in the tax
office. Klara, who married Adolph Lax, had no children and both
murdered by the Nazis. And lastly, Wilhelm, about whom I know
nothing, other than he was born in Stanislawow, 08 Nov 1897.

I've not gotten a reply >from ITS, but there is no listing in the Yad
Vashem database.

Anyone with any information, ideas, suggestions as to where I can go
for information about the Aleksandrowicz family, specifically their
children and their children's children, I would be most grateful.

Please contact me privately, palekaiko@gmail.com.

Thank you,

Michael Diamant


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Vienna Probate Records #austria-czech

Alex Calzareth
 

In the past (2004 and 2008) I was able to order copies of relatives'
probate files stored in the Vienna Stadt- und Landesarchiv(MA 8) by
e-mailing the archives. A few weeks later I would receive back a
letter detailing the copying charges.

This week I contacted the archive by e-mail with another request and
received back a form response directing me to their paid research
service (at 70 euros per hour). In addition, the archive now charges 1
euro per page.

Has anyone had a recent experience with the archive's paid research
service? Would there only be charges for the time it takes to look up
the files in the indexes?

I also see >from the archive's web site however that scans made by
visitors to the archives can be made for around 18 cents each. Can
anyone recommend someone who could be hired to research these files?
Please respond privately with any recommendations.

Thank you


Alex Calzareth
alcalz@gmail.com
Wantagh, New York


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe #austria-czech

Tony Hausner
 

Many of you may know this, but I just learned about this valuable resoource

The YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe


http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/default.aspx

It covers most of the towns in which I am town leader. Many items in it that I did not know about.


Tony Hausner
Silver Spring, MD 20901
301--587-6943
(primary email address: thausner@gmail.com)


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech ViewMate translation request - Czech #austria-czech

ellie.carson@...
 

Hi All,

I've posted a copy of a postcard sent by my grandfather during WWI written
in Czech for which I need a translation. If you can help, please go to.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38089

Thanks for your help!

Ellie Carson
Albany, Oregon
USA


2015 Jerusalem Conference Update #austria-czech

IAJGS2015 Publicity
 

Plans for the 35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
in Jerusalem >from July 6-10, 2015 are in full swing. The full program
is rich in activities and possibilities. Visit www.iajgs2015.org to
see our plans and register now. There is much that makes this
conference unique.

BE A BIG WINNER! Starting February 15th, to encourage registration
and help our pre-planning, we are running a biweekly drawing with
prizes including Banquet tickets, Exploration Sunday Registration,
MyHeritage.com subscriptions, Ancestry.com subscriptions, free hotel
nights and more. The earlier you register, the greater your chances to
win! Prizes will be added on an ongoing basis. Remember to register at
iajgs2015.org under the Registration tab.


ENHANCED CANCELATION/REFUND: Ortra, our conference organizer, is
offering an enhanced cancellation/refund that will cover both hotel
and total registration refunds, valid up to almost the eve of the
conference (see details at www.iajgs2015.org Go to the Registration
Tab, Registration FAQ)


WHAT IF I'M SELECTED AS A SPEAKER? Unless you only plan to attend if
you are accepted as a speaker, register now. If accepted as a speaker -
following your registration - you will receive a partial registration
discount which at your discretion may be used for another conference
item (hotel, SIG lunch, Banquet, tour, etc.) or receive the refund in
the same form of payment. Because we value your contribution to making
the conference a success we want you to benefit >from the opportunity to
share in the drawing.

ARCHIVES: Israel is the home of about 500 archives having information
relevant to Jewish Genealogy worldwide. Israeli archives contain
information on Israel, Eretz Israel, about Jewish families in Eastern
Europe, the Sephardic world, America and even Australia. The bounds are
limitless and the conference is your unique opportunity to open these
doors. (More information will be made available.

FIND YOUR FAMILY: Six million Jews live in Israel and they are related
to Jews throughout the world. This conference is the opportunity for you
to pre plan to find your relatives and take advantage of having a family
reunion with your relatives living in Israel. Use our volunteer experts
to help you search out, locate and contact your relatives and to arrange
for a family reunion during the conference period. Look for our guide
and tips to planning for your meeting here. Many of us have found
testimony at Yad Vashem on our family members by Israelis whom we do not
know. Now is the time to enlist our help and connect with them and their
descendants. Information will be available under the Program tab, Family
Reunion. You may also write to family-reunions@iajgs2015.org.

SHABBATON and EXPLORATION SUNDAY : a Shabbaton (Friday-Saturday) weekend
will precede the Conference, followed by an Exploration Sunday of tours
and programs (including a Yad Vashem option) prior to the official
Conference opening on Monday. Details will be available shortly under the
Program tab of IAJGS2015.org.

CONFERENCE DISCUSSION GROUP AND OTHER MEDIA:
Sign up for our ongoing Conference discussion group
<http://lists.iajgs2015.org/mailman/listinfo/discussion--3>;, where
announcements and special offers are being posted. You will also find
a direct link to sign-up for the discussion group under the FAQ tab at
IAJGS2015.org

Follow us on Facebook <http://www.facebook.com/IAJGSConference>; and
Twitter <http://www.twitter.com/IAJGSConf>;.

Just click to sign up and stay informed.

See you in Jerusalem in July for the momentous and exciting 35th IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy!

Michael Goldstein, Chairman
chairman@iajgs2015.org
35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


KehilaLinks Project Report for December 2014 / January 2015 #austria-czech

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a valuable
resource for future generations of their descendants:

Baranow Sandomierski (Baranow , Barnov) (G)
Crated by Susana Leistner Bloch
Webmaster: Neil Emmer
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/baranow/sl_baranow.htm
~~~

Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Canonsburg/
~~~

Connellsville, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Connellsville/
~~~

Donora, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Donora/
~~~

Jeannette, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Jeannette/
~~~

Latrobe, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Latrobe/
~~~

Masontown, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Masontown/
~~~

Perth, Australia
Created by Eli Rabinowitz
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/perth
~~~

Pyatyhory (Pyatigory,Piatohor), Ukraine
Created by Fern Greenberg Blood
Webpage Design by Richie Baum
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/pyatyhory/index.html
~~~

KEHILALINKS WEBPAGES RECENTLY UPDATED:

Borshchiv (Borszczow) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostaw/sl_borszczow.htm
~~~

Dresden, Germany
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/dresden/Zwecher_Visit.html
~~~

Harbin, China
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/harbin/index.htm
~~~

Irshava (Ilosva, Irsava), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Irshava/
~~~

Lyuta (Havaskoz, Ljuta), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lyuta/
~~~

Mizhhirya (Okormezo), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Mizhhirya/
~~~

Nyzhnya Apsha (Alsoapsa, Nizni Apsa), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Nyzhnya_Apsha/
~~~

Nove Selo (Tiszaujheley, Tisaujhel), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Nove_Selo/
~~~

Onok (Ilonokujfalu, Onyk), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Onok/
~~~

Pallo (Pallo, Palov), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Pallo/
~~~

Pavlovo (Kispalos, Pavlova), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Pavlovo/
~~~

Riga, Latvia
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/riga/rigapage.htm
~~~

Ternivka (Ternovka, Ternevke) , Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/ternivka/
~~~

Troskunai (Troshkun), Lithuania
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/troskunai/
~~~

Velykyi Beregi (Nagybereg, Berehy), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Beregi/
~~~
Velyka Palad' (Nagypalad, Ve ka Palad), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Velyka_Palad/
~~~

Vodytsya (Kisapsa, Apsica), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Vodytsya/
~~~

Vonihovo (Vajnag, Vonyhove), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Vonihovo/
~~~

Uzhhorod (Ungvar), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Uzhhorod/
~~~

Vylok (Tiszaujlak/Vylok), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Vylok/
~~~

Zagare (Zhager), Lithuania
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Zagare/
~~~

Zapson' (Zapszony, Zapson), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Zapson/
~~~

Some of our KehilaLinks webpages were created by people who are no
longer able to maintain them.
The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Kamiensk (Kaminska), Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kamiensk/
~~~

Kopatkevichi (Kopatkevich), Belarus
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kopatkevichi/
~~~

Lomza, Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lomza/
~~~

GOOD NEWS! The following webpages was adopted:
Chisinau (Kishinev) (B), Moldova
Adopted by Ariel Parkansky
~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage please contact us at:
<bloch@mts.net>.

NEED TECHNICAL HELP CREATING A WEBPAGE?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteer webpage designers who will help you create a webpage.
~~~

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech 2015 Jerusalem Conference Update #austria-czech

IAJGS2015 Publicity
 

Plans for the 35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
in Jerusalem >from July 6-10, 2015 are in full swing. The full program
is rich in activities and possibilities. Visit www.iajgs2015.org to
see our plans and register now. There is much that makes this
conference unique.

BE A BIG WINNER! Starting February 15th, to encourage registration
and help our pre-planning, we are running a biweekly drawing with
prizes including Banquet tickets, Exploration Sunday Registration,
MyHeritage.com subscriptions, Ancestry.com subscriptions, free hotel
nights and more. The earlier you register, the greater your chances to
win! Prizes will be added on an ongoing basis. Remember to register at
iajgs2015.org under the Registration tab.


ENHANCED CANCELATION/REFUND: Ortra, our conference organizer, is
offering an enhanced cancellation/refund that will cover both hotel
and total registration refunds, valid up to almost the eve of the
conference (see details at www.iajgs2015.org Go to the Registration
Tab, Registration FAQ)


WHAT IF I'M SELECTED AS A SPEAKER? Unless you only plan to attend if
you are accepted as a speaker, register now. If accepted as a speaker -
following your registration - you will receive a partial registration
discount which at your discretion may be used for another conference
item (hotel, SIG lunch, Banquet, tour, etc.) or receive the refund in
the same form of payment. Because we value your contribution to making
the conference a success we want you to benefit >from the opportunity to
share in the drawing.

ARCHIVES: Israel is the home of about 500 archives having information
relevant to Jewish Genealogy worldwide. Israeli archives contain
information on Israel, Eretz Israel, about Jewish families in Eastern
Europe, the Sephardic world, America and even Australia. The bounds are
limitless and the conference is your unique opportunity to open these
doors. (More information will be made available.

FIND YOUR FAMILY: Six million Jews live in Israel and they are related
to Jews throughout the world. This conference is the opportunity for you
to pre plan to find your relatives and take advantage of having a family
reunion with your relatives living in Israel. Use our volunteer experts
to help you search out, locate and contact your relatives and to arrange
for a family reunion during the conference period. Look for our guide
and tips to planning for your meeting here. Many of us have found
testimony at Yad Vashem on our family members by Israelis whom we do not
know. Now is the time to enlist our help and connect with them and their
descendants. Information will be available under the Program tab, Family
Reunion. You may also write to family-reunions@iajgs2015.org.

SHABBATON and EXPLORATION SUNDAY : a Shabbaton (Friday-Saturday) weekend
will precede the Conference, followed by an Exploration Sunday of tours
and programs (including a Yad Vashem option) prior to the official
Conference opening on Monday. Details will be available shortly under the
Program tab of IAJGS2015.org.

CONFERENCE DISCUSSION GROUP AND OTHER MEDIA:
Sign up for our ongoing Conference discussion group
<http://lists.iajgs2015.org/mailman/listinfo/discussion--3>;, where
announcements and special offers are being posted. You will also find
a direct link to sign-up for the discussion group under the FAQ tab at
IAJGS2015.org

Follow us on Facebook <http://www.facebook.com/IAJGSConference>; and
Twitter <http://www.twitter.com/IAJGSConf>;.

Just click to sign up and stay informed.

See you in Jerusalem in July for the momentous and exciting 35th IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy!

Michael Goldstein, Chairman
chairman@iajgs2015.org
35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech KehilaLinks Project Report for December 2014 / January 2015 #austria-czech

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a valuable
resource for future generations of their descendants:

Baranow Sandomierski (Baranow , Barnov) (G)
Crated by Susana Leistner Bloch
Webmaster: Neil Emmer
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/baranow/sl_baranow.htm
~~~

Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Canonsburg/
~~~

Connellsville, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Connellsville/
~~~

Donora, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Donora/
~~~

Jeannette, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Jeannette/
~~~

Latrobe, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Latrobe/
~~~

Masontown, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by Marshall J. KATZ
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Masontown/
~~~

Perth, Australia
Created by Eli Rabinowitz
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/perth
~~~

Pyatyhory (Pyatigory,Piatohor), Ukraine
Created by Fern Greenberg Blood
Webpage Design by Richie Baum
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/pyatyhory/index.html
~~~

KEHILALINKS WEBPAGES RECENTLY UPDATED:

Borshchiv (Borszczow) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostaw/sl_borszczow.htm
~~~

Dresden, Germany
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/dresden/Zwecher_Visit.html
~~~

Harbin, China
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/harbin/index.htm
~~~

Irshava (Ilosva, Irsava), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Irshava/
~~~

Lyuta (Havaskoz, Ljuta), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lyuta/
~~~

Mizhhirya (Okormezo), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Mizhhirya/
~~~

Nyzhnya Apsha (Alsoapsa, Nizni Apsa), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Nyzhnya_Apsha/
~~~

Nove Selo (Tiszaujheley, Tisaujhel), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Nove_Selo/
~~~

Onok (Ilonokujfalu, Onyk), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Onok/
~~~

Pallo (Pallo, Palov), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Pallo/
~~~

Pavlovo (Kispalos, Pavlova), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Pavlovo/
~~~

Riga, Latvia
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/riga/rigapage.htm
~~~

Ternivka (Ternovka, Ternevke) , Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/ternivka/
~~~

Troskunai (Troshkun), Lithuania
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/troskunai/
~~~

Velykyi Beregi (Nagybereg, Berehy), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Beregi/
~~~
Velyka Palad' (Nagypalad, Ve ka Palad), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Velyka_Palad/
~~~

Vodytsya (Kisapsa, Apsica), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Vodytsya/
~~~

Vonihovo (Vajnag, Vonyhove), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Vonihovo/
~~~

Uzhhorod (Ungvar), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Uzhhorod/
~~~

Vylok (Tiszaujlak/Vylok), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Vylok/
~~~

Zagare (Zhager), Lithuania
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Zagare/
~~~

Zapson' (Zapszony, Zapson), (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Zapson/
~~~

Some of our KehilaLinks webpages were created by people who are no
longer able to maintain them.
The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Kamiensk (Kaminska), Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kamiensk/
~~~

Kopatkevichi (Kopatkevich), Belarus
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kopatkevichi/
~~~

Lomza, Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lomza/
~~~

GOOD NEWS! The following webpages was adopted:
Chisinau (Kishinev) (B), Moldova
Adopted by Ariel Parkansky
~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage please contact us at:
<bloch@mts.net>.

NEED TECHNICAL HELP CREATING A WEBPAGE?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteer webpage designers who will help you create a webpage.
~~~

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator

91841 - 91860 of 654977