Date   

Re: asking #hungary

Stefano Groszy <steven@...>
 

Oblath Andras wrote:

Dear Stefano,

I saw your letter in the H-SIG. My hobby is to collect changed
name. The name Varhegyi is such a name. Can you write me what was
it before?

thank you,
Andras


Searching: GROSZ/GROSS - Mondok(Nyiregyhaza)
KLEIN - " "
VE0RHEGYI - " "
ROSENSTEIN - " "
WEISS " "
HEISZ " "
ADLER " "
Andras Oblath
Budapest,Hungary
w3.datanet.hu/~oblath
Dear Andras, the Varhegyi name was changed after WWII by my uncle who
survived the holocaust and who lived before the war in Mandok. His
original name was Sandor Grosz and he was born on the 20th April 1909.
from the little info I got he probably moved to Ukraine.
I'm trying to find about him or his brother Ferenc Grosz born on the 13th
December 1916, both may still be alive. If not, it would be great to find their children, if they exist (they could be between 40 and 60).
I don't know for sure the reason why the name was changed >from Grosz or how
was that possible. Ironically, my name too was changed when I was 8 years old in 1955: it was changed >from Grosz to Groszy. Believe me I'm still wondering why! Could you give me some advice for my research? Thanks.
Steven Grosz.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: asking #hungary

Stefano Groszy <steven@...>
 

Oblath Andras wrote:

Dear Stefano,

I saw your letter in the H-SIG. My hobby is to collect changed
name. The name Varhegyi is such a name. Can you write me what was
it before?

thank you,
Andras


Searching: GROSZ/GROSS - Mondok(Nyiregyhaza)
KLEIN - " "
VE0RHEGYI - " "
ROSENSTEIN - " "
WEISS " "
HEISZ " "
ADLER " "
Andras Oblath
Budapest,Hungary
w3.datanet.hu/~oblath
Dear Andras, the Varhegyi name was changed after WWII by my uncle who
survived the holocaust and who lived before the war in Mandok. His
original name was Sandor Grosz and he was born on the 20th April 1909.
from the little info I got he probably moved to Ukraine.
I'm trying to find about him or his brother Ferenc Grosz born on the 13th
December 1916, both may still be alive. If not, it would be great to find their children, if they exist (they could be between 40 and 60).
I don't know for sure the reason why the name was changed >from Grosz or how
was that possible. Ironically, my name too was changed when I was 8 years old in 1955: it was changed >from Grosz to Groszy. Believe me I'm still wondering why! Could you give me some advice for my research? Thanks.
Steven Grosz.


Re: Finding your Shtetl #lithuania

Sherribob@...
 

Jacqueline asked for advice on how she might locate the names of her ancestors
shtetls. First, I would recommend reading through the JewishGen FAQ's and
InfoFiles found at <http://www.jewishgen.org>.

Secondly, here are a few ideas off the top of my head:

Find out if they were naturalized here in the U.S., post 1906 nats will most
often have the town of birth (but, be cautious, it was common to name the
largest town in the area as a birthplace, for instance, my gf states his town
of birth as Kovno, rather than Rogala.

If they had any children born here acquire their birth certs.

If he was of age try to acquire his WW1 draft card.

Do try to acquire their U.S. passenger arrival, I do believe they aksed for
place of birth and last residence (the questions varied depending on the year
of arrival).

SS5's (original social security applications) are another possible source,
The person had to be born 1870 or later, and the first 1936 SS5's did not
ask for town, but by 1940 they were asking that question. Not everyone got
their SS5 in'36, so it's an option.

Death certs may or may not list town of birth.

Find out if they belonged to a landsmanshaftn. People often belonged to ones
that were shtetl based, however, it was not uncommon to belong to the society
of a friend or relative >from another town.

Information on "how to" the above can be found on the JewishGen homepage (URL
noted above.)

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Finding your Shtetl #lithuania

Sherribob@...
 

Jacqueline asked for advice on how she might locate the names of her ancestors
shtetls. First, I would recommend reading through the JewishGen FAQ's and
InfoFiles found at <http://www.jewishgen.org>.

Secondly, here are a few ideas off the top of my head:

Find out if they were naturalized here in the U.S., post 1906 nats will most
often have the town of birth (but, be cautious, it was common to name the
largest town in the area as a birthplace, for instance, my gf states his town
of birth as Kovno, rather than Rogala.

If they had any children born here acquire their birth certs.

If he was of age try to acquire his WW1 draft card.

Do try to acquire their U.S. passenger arrival, I do believe they aksed for
place of birth and last residence (the questions varied depending on the year
of arrival).

SS5's (original social security applications) are another possible source,
The person had to be born 1870 or later, and the first 1936 SS5's did not
ask for town, but by 1940 they were asking that question. Not everyone got
their SS5 in'36, so it's an option.

Death certs may or may not list town of birth.

Find out if they belonged to a landsmanshaftn. People often belonged to ones
that were shtetl based, however, it was not uncommon to belong to the society
of a friend or relative >from another town.

Information on "how to" the above can be found on the JewishGen homepage (URL
noted above.)

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish


Kohanim #general

Haim Fridman <fridman@...>
 

Candice Bradley wrote:

In response to Stan Goodman's comment, "If a man is a Kohen, his sons, all
of them are also Kohanim. There are no other rules for the transmission.
It
moves in the paternal line only, never in the maternal."
I also believed this, but I'm not so sure any more. A Galicia researcher
on this list and I have a common family name (Nebenzahl) which supposedly
is a single family. Although the male Nebenzahls of my family
essentially
"daughtered out," the Nebenzahl men in my line were Kohanim. However,
this researcher told me that the Nebenzahls in Galicia were not Kohanim,
and explained that he found in his research evidence of some matrilineal
transmission which might explain why my Nebenzahls are Kohanim. His
argument is interesting food for thought.
----------
In the technical Halakhic sense no person can be a Kohen unless his father
was a Kohen.
There are several explanations for the situation where a supposedly Kohanic
family name is carried by non-Kohanim.

1) People who were not related in any way to a certain family simply
adopted their surname. There was even litigation in Tsarist Russian brought
by the noble Gunzburg family against those who had borrowed their name.

2) There was an actual relationship between the Kohanic and non- kohanic
families which arose when a son-in-law adopted the surname of his wife's
family. This took place for several reasons, most frequently to avoid cruel
military service in Tsarist Russia, or for taxation purposes.
Some classic cases are Rapoports who are not Kohanim like the ancient
family that bears the name, Landaus and Epsteins who should be expected to
be Leviim and are not.

In the absence of documents or tombstones (which may also suffer from
omissions) it is difficult to suggest a means of verifying Kohen or Levi
descent. There may be no relationship at all, ot there may be an in-law
relationship.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
email: fridman@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kohanim #general

Haim Fridman <fridman@...>
 

Candice Bradley wrote:

In response to Stan Goodman's comment, "If a man is a Kohen, his sons, all
of them are also Kohanim. There are no other rules for the transmission.
It
moves in the paternal line only, never in the maternal."
I also believed this, but I'm not so sure any more. A Galicia researcher
on this list and I have a common family name (Nebenzahl) which supposedly
is a single family. Although the male Nebenzahls of my family
essentially
"daughtered out," the Nebenzahl men in my line were Kohanim. However,
this researcher told me that the Nebenzahls in Galicia were not Kohanim,
and explained that he found in his research evidence of some matrilineal
transmission which might explain why my Nebenzahls are Kohanim. His
argument is interesting food for thought.
----------
In the technical Halakhic sense no person can be a Kohen unless his father
was a Kohen.
There are several explanations for the situation where a supposedly Kohanic
family name is carried by non-Kohanim.

1) People who were not related in any way to a certain family simply
adopted their surname. There was even litigation in Tsarist Russian brought
by the noble Gunzburg family against those who had borrowed their name.

2) There was an actual relationship between the Kohanic and non- kohanic
families which arose when a son-in-law adopted the surname of his wife's
family. This took place for several reasons, most frequently to avoid cruel
military service in Tsarist Russia, or for taxation purposes.
Some classic cases are Rapoports who are not Kohanim like the ancient
family that bears the name, Landaus and Epsteins who should be expected to
be Leviim and are not.

In the absence of documents or tombstones (which may also suffer from
omissions) it is difficult to suggest a means of verifying Kohen or Levi
descent. There may be no relationship at all, ot there may be an in-law
relationship.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
email: fridman@...


Gemzse and Mandok + H-SIG missing digests #hungary

Stefano Groszy <steven@...>
 

Re.: Gemzse and Mandok
Hi Peter, do you mind to tell me if Gemzse is in the vicinity of Mandok?
I'm also asking if any of the H-SIGGERS had any relative or friend in
Mandok. I realized >from Gabor Hirsch - who is really a mine of infos and
documents! - that in April 1944 there were in that small town 373 Jews;
and I know for sure that some of them survived the holocaust: I would be
very grateful to anybody pointing to me any information about the
Mandok's jewish community, now or in the past.

Re.: H-SIG missing messages
Due to malfunction of my email I didn't receive H-SIG digests of 2-3-4
September: is that possible to have them? Thanks!

Best regards and ciao, Steven Grosz - Milano.

Moderater: If someone still has the digest for those days on their e-mail program all one needs to do is forward the entire digest "message" to Steven at steven@... It's the not the same as traveling to Italy, but its something.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Gemzse and Mandok + H-SIG missing digests #hungary

Stefano Groszy <steven@...>
 

Re.: Gemzse and Mandok
Hi Peter, do you mind to tell me if Gemzse is in the vicinity of Mandok?
I'm also asking if any of the H-SIGGERS had any relative or friend in
Mandok. I realized >from Gabor Hirsch - who is really a mine of infos and
documents! - that in April 1944 there were in that small town 373 Jews;
and I know for sure that some of them survived the holocaust: I would be
very grateful to anybody pointing to me any information about the
Mandok's jewish community, now or in the past.

Re.: H-SIG missing messages
Due to malfunction of my email I didn't receive H-SIG digests of 2-3-4
September: is that possible to have them? Thanks!

Best regards and ciao, Steven Grosz - Milano.

Moderater: If someone still has the digest for those days on their e-mail program all one needs to do is forward the entire digest "message" to Steven at steven@... It's the not the same as traveling to Italy, but its something.


Wall of Honor addendum #hungary

Robert & Sarah Klein <hamoreh@...>
 

Sorry to have to send an immediate addendum, but I just noticed that the key
to a successful search of the Wall of Honor seems to be writing the
information and hitting enter *before* the page finishes loading. Hitting
stop doesn't seem to help, so you have to be nimble. I know it sounds
crazy, but I just tested my theory several times, and each time the theory
got confirmed. Maybe the problem lies with the chain of computers I have to
go through >from Israel.

Robert


Hungary SIG #Hungary Wall of Honor addendum #hungary

Robert & Sarah Klein <hamoreh@...>
 

Sorry to have to send an immediate addendum, but I just noticed that the key
to a successful search of the Wall of Honor seems to be writing the
information and hitting enter *before* the page finishes loading. Hitting
stop doesn't seem to help, so you have to be nimble. I know it sounds
crazy, but I just tested my theory several times, and each time the theory
got confirmed. Maybe the problem lies with the chain of computers I have to
go through >from Israel.

Robert


Wall of Honor search engine idiosyncrasy #hungary

Robert & Sarah Klein <hamoreh@...>
 

I don't know if others have encountered the following problem, but I thought
I should share the solution I've just discovered.

The Ellis Island Wall of Honor search engine seems to get stuck *after* the
first search. I've found that by hitting "refresh" after returning to the
data-posting page allows for a successful search >from the newly reloaded
page. It's a little annoying, but for anyone who has encountered this
phenomenon, it's much better than sitting for minutes on end and getting a
"timed out" message half the time.

Robert


Hungary SIG #Hungary Wall of Honor search engine idiosyncrasy #hungary

Robert & Sarah Klein <hamoreh@...>
 

I don't know if others have encountered the following problem, but I thought
I should share the solution I've just discovered.

The Ellis Island Wall of Honor search engine seems to get stuck *after* the
first search. I've found that by hitting "refresh" after returning to the
data-posting page allows for a successful search >from the newly reloaded
page. It's a little annoying, but for anyone who has encountered this
phenomenon, it's much better than sitting for minutes on end and getting a
"timed out" message half the time.

Robert


Re: 1848 Tax Census from Munkacs #hungary

Lawrence Korman <korman3@...>
 

So, who is going to look at this film no 1529782 and see what it really
is? Perhaps a Munkacs researcher will volunteer and report??

Debbi


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: 1848 Tax Census from Munkacs #hungary

Lawrence Korman <korman3@...>
 

So, who is going to look at this film no 1529782 and see what it really
is? Perhaps a Munkacs researcher will volunteer and report??

Debbi


DISNA DISTRICT RESEARCH GROUP #belarus

ELGOLD1@...
 

A new research group for Disna Uezd (or Disna District) is in formation. Disna
District was located in Vilna Gubernia and is today part of Belarus. Because
it was historically located in the Lithuanian province of Vilna, the revision
lists are held by the Lithuanian archives. The project is being organized as
part of the LitvakSIG's effort to copy revision lists for the 14 districts of
Vilna and Kovno gubernia, but because the area is now part of Belarus we are
hoping that it may be of interest to some members of the Belarus SIG.

The towns in Disna district include:
Disna (Dzisna), Druya, Germanovce (Germanovichi, Hermanovicy), Glubokie
(Glubokoye), Golubicy (Golubichi), Leonopol, Luzhek (Luzki), Plisa (Plisse),
Postavy, and Sharkovshchina (Sarkauscyna).

If you have an interest in any of these towns and want to partcipate, please
contact me for further information.

Best,
Eric L. Goldstein
<ELGOLD1@...>


Belarus SIG #Belarus DISNA DISTRICT RESEARCH GROUP #belarus

ELGOLD1@...
 

A new research group for Disna Uezd (or Disna District) is in formation. Disna
District was located in Vilna Gubernia and is today part of Belarus. Because
it was historically located in the Lithuanian province of Vilna, the revision
lists are held by the Lithuanian archives. The project is being organized as
part of the LitvakSIG's effort to copy revision lists for the 14 districts of
Vilna and Kovno gubernia, but because the area is now part of Belarus we are
hoping that it may be of interest to some members of the Belarus SIG.

The towns in Disna district include:
Disna (Dzisna), Druya, Germanovce (Germanovichi, Hermanovicy), Glubokie
(Glubokoye), Golubicy (Golubichi), Leonopol, Luzhek (Luzki), Plisa (Plisse),
Postavy, and Sharkovshchina (Sarkauscyna).

If you have an interest in any of these towns and want to partcipate, please
contact me for further information.

Best,
Eric L. Goldstein
<ELGOLD1@...>


Re: CZENSTOCHOV #belarus

Hal Maggied PhD <drmaggoo@...>
 

Belarus members


Shalom Khaverim: <italic>CZENSTOCHOV: Our Legacy </italic>is available
from the Judaica Collections at the Florida Atlantic University
Library. We have numerous brand new copies of this Yizkor Bukh which
was edited, translated to English, and published in 1993, by Harry
Klein. This Yizkor Bukh contains a 360 page English section and a 117
page Yiddush section. Co-Editor was Ruth Klein Tatner and Consulting
Editor was Prof.: Menachem Rotstein.

"Czenstochova is located approximately 125 miles southwest of Warsaw;
the shrine of Jasna Gora Madonna in Czenstochova was celebrated as a
center of Catholic pilgrimage. Seventy-five Jewish residents were
recorded in Czenstochova in 1765 and 495 in 1808, when an organized
community was established. Although Jewish residence was prohibited in
certain districts, the Jewish population grew.... and in 1863, with the
abolition of the Jewish quarter, to 3,360 [37.3%]. By 1900, it numbered
11, 764....and in 1939, 28,486."

" The German Army entered the city on 3 September 1939. The next day,
later called 'Bloody Monday", a pogrom was organized in which a few
hundred Jews were murdered." ".... When a greater number of Jews from
other parts of western Poland came in 1940-41, the city's population
grew by several thousands. On 9 April 1941, a ghetto was
established.... On 23 September a large-scale 'aktion' began. By 5
October, about 39,000 people had been deported to Treblinka and
exterminated [sic], while 2,000 were executed on the spot."

This Yizkor Bukh is bound in hard-cover and printed in 12-point type.
It contains several photos and maps. If you are interested in barter,
exchange, or trade, please contact:

Judaica Librarian Elliot Gertel <<egertel@...> or 561/297-3990.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: CZENSTOCHOV #belarus

Hal Maggied PhD <drmaggoo@...>
 

Belarus members


Shalom Khaverim: <italic>CZENSTOCHOV: Our Legacy </italic>is available
from the Judaica Collections at the Florida Atlantic University
Library. We have numerous brand new copies of this Yizkor Bukh which
was edited, translated to English, and published in 1993, by Harry
Klein. This Yizkor Bukh contains a 360 page English section and a 117
page Yiddush section. Co-Editor was Ruth Klein Tatner and Consulting
Editor was Prof.: Menachem Rotstein.

"Czenstochova is located approximately 125 miles southwest of Warsaw;
the shrine of Jasna Gora Madonna in Czenstochova was celebrated as a
center of Catholic pilgrimage. Seventy-five Jewish residents were
recorded in Czenstochova in 1765 and 495 in 1808, when an organized
community was established. Although Jewish residence was prohibited in
certain districts, the Jewish population grew.... and in 1863, with the
abolition of the Jewish quarter, to 3,360 [37.3%]. By 1900, it numbered
11, 764....and in 1939, 28,486."

" The German Army entered the city on 3 September 1939. The next day,
later called 'Bloody Monday", a pogrom was organized in which a few
hundred Jews were murdered." ".... When a greater number of Jews from
other parts of western Poland came in 1940-41, the city's population
grew by several thousands. On 9 April 1941, a ghetto was
established.... On 23 September a large-scale 'aktion' began. By 5
October, about 39,000 people had been deported to Treblinka and
exterminated [sic], while 2,000 were executed on the spot."

This Yizkor Bukh is bound in hard-cover and printed in 12-point type.
It contains several photos and maps. If you are interested in barter,
exchange, or trade, please contact:

Judaica Librarian Elliot Gertel <<egertel@...> or 561/297-3990.


Re: yizkor diges: Solon/Zolondz #yizkorbooks

SMBGoldenb@...
 

Sorry, but the name Goldenberg, which is my husband's name is probably derived
from "Gollinger," according to some family story that cannot any longer be
traced. That family came >from Rumania, the area around Transylvania, I
believe.

Good luck,


Bonnie Goldenberg


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Re: yizkor diges: Solon/Zolondz #yizkorbooks

SMBGoldenb@...
 

Sorry, but the name Goldenberg, which is my husband's name is probably derived
from "Gollinger," according to some family story that cannot any longer be
traced. That family came >from Rumania, the area around Transylvania, I
believe.

Good luck,


Bonnie Goldenberg