Date   

Re: geographical question #general

Gary Goldberg <XGaryG@...>
 

Betty Provizer-Starkman wrote:

Perhaps the island you seek is Curacao in the Netherlands Antilles. The
Jewish people first arrived there in 1656 >from Holland. Their origins
were in Spain and Portugal. The synagoue which they built is beautiful
and the oldest in the Western Hemisphere.
Indeed, one of the rabbis >from my home shul is >from Curacao and Panama!
His name is Dennis Sasso.

Gary Goldberg
(Remove "X" >from address to reply)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: geographical question #general

Gary Goldberg <XGaryG@...>
 

Betty Provizer-Starkman wrote:

Perhaps the island you seek is Curacao in the Netherlands Antilles. The
Jewish people first arrived there in 1656 >from Holland. Their origins
were in Spain and Portugal. The synagoue which they built is beautiful
and the oldest in the Western Hemisphere.
Indeed, one of the rabbis >from my home shul is >from Curacao and Panama!
His name is Dennis Sasso.

Gary Goldberg
(Remove "X" >from address to reply)


New Project: Creating Data Base for Jewish Given Names #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Dear LitvakSIGers,

The purpose of this posting is to announce and solicite your help in
the creation of a new data base of Jewish given/personal names for
Eastern Europe and Europe. David Curwin and I (both of Israel) are
working together on this data base and we are seeking others who might
also want to collaborate or contribute relevant information.

This data base will include those given names which our ancestors used
in their daily lives (Hebrew, Yiddish, and secular) as well as those
which they took on when they emigrated to other countries (English,
Spanish, Portuguese, etc.). It is felt that such a linked list of
given names will be an important resource for those researching their
ancestors in Eastern Europe and Europe.

GOAL

Our goal is to establish a data base of linked given names for Jews who
lived in Eastern Europe and Europe, and who may have emigrated to other
countries. The data base will be published to the web and will also be
distributed to interested persons in a format which will allow it to be
imported to their data base and spreadsheet programs for personal use.

RATIONALE

Our ancestors had three sets of names which they used in their daily
lives: Hebrew names used for ritual purposes (aliyot in shul, marriage
contracts, etc.), Yiddish names (used as the language of communication
among Jews), and Secular names (used in contacts with non-Jews and
government agents). In each case, there was a widespread use of
nicknames based on the original names. Inevitably, some names >from one
category crossed over into the others. Thus, we see Yiddish names
which were combined with the original Hebrew names and were then used
for ritual purposes as if they were truly Hebrew names (these are
called kinuim in Hebrew).

Nearly all of the archival documents which we Jewish researchers obtain
in the course of our research, use the Yiddish and secular names, and
occasionally, the Hebrew names. In most cases, the Yiddish names (or
their nicknames) are the ones found in these documents. But the Hebrew
names are quite important to us as Jewish genealgists because they
express the continuity of the use of given names >from generation to
generation, and in the absence of other information, make it possible
to make educated guesses as to what were the likely names of
grandparents -- previous generations. So, being able to link Yiddish
or secular names to Hebrew names is of major importance.

When our ancestors emigrated to other countries, they took on secular
names (and nicknames) associated with that country's language. This
process of absorption was such that, statistically, certain foreign
language names were more desirable than others, so that those names
became associated with the original names >from the "old country"; this
association varies with the locale and date of immigration. This
linkage is statistical and not deterministic, but it is never the less
very useful to know this if one is beginning research knowing only
family members >from one's own country and wants to work backwards to
the "home." Again, knowing the nature of the linkage to, say, English
given names and nicknames, can be very useful in making educated
guesses as to the family Hebrew, Yiddish, and secular names in Eastern Europe.

One can reasonably expect differences in the foreign-language given
names for family members who immigrated to different English-speaking
countries (e.g., the U.S. or South Africa), but there should also be
certain types of similarities. A knowledge of these differences would
also be useful in tracing family members in countries other than one's
own country.

Accordingly, it is reasonable to consider that a linked data base of
given names as described above would be a useful genealgical research tool.

This is the rationale for the creation of a linked given-name data base.

DATA BASE ORGANIZATION

So far, nearly 450 records (sets of given names) have been entered into
the data base. The sources for these data have been: (1) Our own
knowledge and acquired data, (2) Data obtained >from others, (3) Data
extracted >from the new 1858 Revision Lists acquired through the
LitvakSIG Uyezd Project, (4) Literature sources, and so on. We had
also hoped to be able to obtain data >from the results of the Cemetery
Project, but unfortunately, the given names listed there are only the
English ones, and no given names in Yiddish or Hebrew seem to be listed
on the CD-ROM which I have.

The fields used so far in the existing data base include the following
categories:

1. Gender
2. Hebrew given name
3. Hebrew nickname
4. Yiddish given name and kinui
5. Yiddish nickname and kinui
6. East European secular name
7. East European secular nickname
8. English given name (U.S./Canada)
9. English nickname (U.S./Canada)

We are inviting persons in South Africa, the U.K., Australia, and New
Zealand to help us to find the linkages between the original
Hebrew/Yiddish/Secular names and the corresponding names in those
countries of immigration, and will expand the fields in the data base
correspondingly.

CURRENT STATUS

In accord with this approach, we have put together a data base of
nearly 450 records. In some cases, we have nearly a full complement of
names for all of the above fields (English only). In other cases, we
have only Yiddish and Eastern European secular names (this is typically
what one finds in the available Revision Lists and other archival
documents). There are cases for which we have only the Yiddish given
names, Yiddish nicknames, or Yiddish
kinuim.

The current draft version of the data base requires much work in order
to find, for example, the Hebrew and/or English given names which
generally are linked with the Yiddish and/or Eastern European secular
names, or their nicknames.

There are the beginnings of research in the U.S. to examine cemetery
gravestones in order to study statistically the connections between the
Hebrew/Yiddish names and the English names listed on the tombstones.
This type of research will be of major importance in discovering the
links between the original Eastern European names and those in the
countries of immigration.

There are other types of research along these lines which can be
defined, but this will have to wait until later, or until others become
interested.

CAN YOU HELP?

We want to invite you to participate in this project, either as a
collaborator, or as a contributor of data which you may have collected
in your own research, or which you can extract >from your own genealogy
data base. If you do have data which you can submit, please do send it
to me for inclusion in the data base. If you want to become involved,
please write to me.

We would be delighted if you have the time, and would be willing to
collaborate or give us data. We are also be eager to hear your ideas
on other approaches which could be undertaken.

Please write!

--
Professor G. L. Esterson E-mail: jerry@vms.huji.ac.il


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania New Project: Creating Data Base for Jewish Given Names #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Dear LitvakSIGers,

The purpose of this posting is to announce and solicite your help in
the creation of a new data base of Jewish given/personal names for
Eastern Europe and Europe. David Curwin and I (both of Israel) are
working together on this data base and we are seeking others who might
also want to collaborate or contribute relevant information.

This data base will include those given names which our ancestors used
in their daily lives (Hebrew, Yiddish, and secular) as well as those
which they took on when they emigrated to other countries (English,
Spanish, Portuguese, etc.). It is felt that such a linked list of
given names will be an important resource for those researching their
ancestors in Eastern Europe and Europe.

GOAL

Our goal is to establish a data base of linked given names for Jews who
lived in Eastern Europe and Europe, and who may have emigrated to other
countries. The data base will be published to the web and will also be
distributed to interested persons in a format which will allow it to be
imported to their data base and spreadsheet programs for personal use.

RATIONALE

Our ancestors had three sets of names which they used in their daily
lives: Hebrew names used for ritual purposes (aliyot in shul, marriage
contracts, etc.), Yiddish names (used as the language of communication
among Jews), and Secular names (used in contacts with non-Jews and
government agents). In each case, there was a widespread use of
nicknames based on the original names. Inevitably, some names >from one
category crossed over into the others. Thus, we see Yiddish names
which were combined with the original Hebrew names and were then used
for ritual purposes as if they were truly Hebrew names (these are
called kinuim in Hebrew).

Nearly all of the archival documents which we Jewish researchers obtain
in the course of our research, use the Yiddish and secular names, and
occasionally, the Hebrew names. In most cases, the Yiddish names (or
their nicknames) are the ones found in these documents. But the Hebrew
names are quite important to us as Jewish genealgists because they
express the continuity of the use of given names >from generation to
generation, and in the absence of other information, make it possible
to make educated guesses as to what were the likely names of
grandparents -- previous generations. So, being able to link Yiddish
or secular names to Hebrew names is of major importance.

When our ancestors emigrated to other countries, they took on secular
names (and nicknames) associated with that country's language. This
process of absorption was such that, statistically, certain foreign
language names were more desirable than others, so that those names
became associated with the original names >from the "old country"; this
association varies with the locale and date of immigration. This
linkage is statistical and not deterministic, but it is never the less
very useful to know this if one is beginning research knowing only
family members >from one's own country and wants to work backwards to
the "home." Again, knowing the nature of the linkage to, say, English
given names and nicknames, can be very useful in making educated
guesses as to the family Hebrew, Yiddish, and secular names in Eastern Europe.

One can reasonably expect differences in the foreign-language given
names for family members who immigrated to different English-speaking
countries (e.g., the U.S. or South Africa), but there should also be
certain types of similarities. A knowledge of these differences would
also be useful in tracing family members in countries other than one's
own country.

Accordingly, it is reasonable to consider that a linked data base of
given names as described above would be a useful genealgical research tool.

This is the rationale for the creation of a linked given-name data base.

DATA BASE ORGANIZATION

So far, nearly 450 records (sets of given names) have been entered into
the data base. The sources for these data have been: (1) Our own
knowledge and acquired data, (2) Data obtained >from others, (3) Data
extracted >from the new 1858 Revision Lists acquired through the
LitvakSIG Uyezd Project, (4) Literature sources, and so on. We had
also hoped to be able to obtain data >from the results of the Cemetery
Project, but unfortunately, the given names listed there are only the
English ones, and no given names in Yiddish or Hebrew seem to be listed
on the CD-ROM which I have.

The fields used so far in the existing data base include the following
categories:

1. Gender
2. Hebrew given name
3. Hebrew nickname
4. Yiddish given name and kinui
5. Yiddish nickname and kinui
6. East European secular name
7. East European secular nickname
8. English given name (U.S./Canada)
9. English nickname (U.S./Canada)

We are inviting persons in South Africa, the U.K., Australia, and New
Zealand to help us to find the linkages between the original
Hebrew/Yiddish/Secular names and the corresponding names in those
countries of immigration, and will expand the fields in the data base
correspondingly.

CURRENT STATUS

In accord with this approach, we have put together a data base of
nearly 450 records. In some cases, we have nearly a full complement of
names for all of the above fields (English only). In other cases, we
have only Yiddish and Eastern European secular names (this is typically
what one finds in the available Revision Lists and other archival
documents). There are cases for which we have only the Yiddish given
names, Yiddish nicknames, or Yiddish
kinuim.

The current draft version of the data base requires much work in order
to find, for example, the Hebrew and/or English given names which
generally are linked with the Yiddish and/or Eastern European secular
names, or their nicknames.

There are the beginnings of research in the U.S. to examine cemetery
gravestones in order to study statistically the connections between the
Hebrew/Yiddish names and the English names listed on the tombstones.
This type of research will be of major importance in discovering the
links between the original Eastern European names and those in the
countries of immigration.

There are other types of research along these lines which can be
defined, but this will have to wait until later, or until others become
interested.

CAN YOU HELP?

We want to invite you to participate in this project, either as a
collaborator, or as a contributor of data which you may have collected
in your own research, or which you can extract >from your own genealogy
data base. If you do have data which you can submit, please do send it
to me for inclusion in the data base. If you want to become involved,
please write to me.

We would be delighted if you have the time, and would be willing to
collaborate or give us data. We are also be eager to hear your ideas
on other approaches which could be undertaken.

Please write!

--
Professor G. L. Esterson E-mail: jerry@vms.huji.ac.il


Vilenski provice/uezd #belarus

ELGOLD1@...
 

In response to Eve Sacker, VILENSKI GUBERNIA or province refers to Vilna
Gubernia, which is today partly in Belarus and partly in Lithuania. The
province was broken down into several administrative districts called "uezd"s.
One of these sitricts was also called Vilenski or Vilna uezd, around the city
of Vilna (Vilnius). There was also a Vileyka Uezd in Vilna Gubernia, so check
the spelling to see which uezd you are talking about.

Eric Goldstein
ELGOLD1@aol.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Vilenski provice/uezd #belarus

ELGOLD1@...
 

In response to Eve Sacker, VILENSKI GUBERNIA or province refers to Vilna
Gubernia, which is today partly in Belarus and partly in Lithuania. The
province was broken down into several administrative districts called "uezd"s.
One of these sitricts was also called Vilenski or Vilna uezd, around the city
of Vilna (Vilnius). There was also a Vileyka Uezd in Vilna Gubernia, so check
the spelling to see which uezd you are talking about.

Eric Goldstein
ELGOLD1@aol.com


Vilenskaya Province - Vilenski Uyezd #belarus

Harold Rhode <hrhode@...>
 

This is Vilna Guberniia, in the Vilna District. This area today is largely the area
including Vilna city, the area slightly to the north in Lithuania, and the area immediately
adjacent today in Belarus.

Harold Rhode
<hrhode@erols.com>


Kudirkos Naumiestis #lithuania

LithHands@...
 

I have been receiving many inquiries about Kudirkos Naumiestis. Regretfully my
ancestry is not >from KUDIKOS Naumiestis but rather >from ZEMAICIU Naumiestis. I
welcome inquiries about ZEMAICIU Naumiestis.

There were three (Yiddish)Neishtots or (Lithuanian) Naumiestis' in Lithuania.
1. Zemaiciu Naumiestis was called in Yiddish prior to WWII, Neishtot-Tavrig.
Before WWI it was called Neishtot-Sugind. It is near Silute.
2. Kudirkos Naumiestis was called Neishtot-Shaki and Neishtot-Shirvint. It
was on the Prussian border. The Shirvint River separated Neishtot from
Prussia. It is further south than Zemaiciu Naumiestis.
3. Naujamiestis Panevezys was called in Yiddish Neishtot-Panevezys. It is
south of Panevezys.

I hope I have not made this more confusing.

Ben Lesin, M.D.
Encino, CA


Belarus SIG #Belarus Vilenskaya Province - Vilenski Uyezd #belarus

Harold Rhode <hrhode@...>
 

This is Vilna Guberniia, in the Vilna District. This area today is largely the area
including Vilna city, the area slightly to the north in Lithuania, and the area immediately
adjacent today in Belarus.

Harold Rhode
<hrhode@erols.com>


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Kudirkos Naumiestis #lithuania

LithHands@...
 

I have been receiving many inquiries about Kudirkos Naumiestis. Regretfully my
ancestry is not >from KUDIKOS Naumiestis but rather >from ZEMAICIU Naumiestis. I
welcome inquiries about ZEMAICIU Naumiestis.

There were three (Yiddish)Neishtots or (Lithuanian) Naumiestis' in Lithuania.
1. Zemaiciu Naumiestis was called in Yiddish prior to WWII, Neishtot-Tavrig.
Before WWI it was called Neishtot-Sugind. It is near Silute.
2. Kudirkos Naumiestis was called Neishtot-Shaki and Neishtot-Shirvint. It
was on the Prussian border. The Shirvint River separated Neishtot from
Prussia. It is further south than Zemaiciu Naumiestis.
3. Naujamiestis Panevezys was called in Yiddish Neishtot-Panevezys. It is
south of Panevezys.

I hope I have not made this more confusing.

Ben Lesin, M.D.
Encino, CA


The Place Gorky #belarus

kudish <kudish@...>
 

Hi,
I am a new member in the discussion group. For the last couple years I am
writing a book about my family and trying to create a family tree for the
surname LIBKIND. Originally my great great grandfather >from GORKY of
Mogilev guberniya. I made research about the origin of the name and about
migration of my ancestors to Ekaterinoslav and Kherson guberniyas.
Unfortunately there is no information available about shtetl Gorky. I
appreciate enormously if somebody has a knowledge about this matter or
could refer me literature about it. Also I'll be interested to hear if
somebody ever heard or knew the people by the name LIBKIND.

I have started my search with 30 family members,
now we are 350! I have more than 100 pictures new ones and very old of the
XIXth century Some of them are unidentified. As soon as I copy them on
computer I believe it will be possible to display them for all our members.
Thank you very much in advance.

Sincerely,

Irene Kudish
kudish@netcom.ca


Vilkomir Uyezd 1858 Revision List Distribution #lithuania

DBH12345
 

The Vilkomir uyezd 1858 revision list is nearing completion of processing and
members of the research group have been contacted about being sent copies of
the data. My list of contributors is incomplete, and some people may have
made donations qualifying them for copies of the data without notifying me.

If you did not receive a copy of a letter addressed to you about the details,
you were not on my list. If you should be, please contact me privately.

The data will be going into the LitvakSIG's searchable database, but it is
worthwhile to have the complete set of records to analyze.

David Hoffman
DBH12345@aol.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus The Place Gorky #belarus

kudish <kudish@...>
 

Hi,
I am a new member in the discussion group. For the last couple years I am
writing a book about my family and trying to create a family tree for the
surname LIBKIND. Originally my great great grandfather >from GORKY of
Mogilev guberniya. I made research about the origin of the name and about
migration of my ancestors to Ekaterinoslav and Kherson guberniyas.
Unfortunately there is no information available about shtetl Gorky. I
appreciate enormously if somebody has a knowledge about this matter or
could refer me literature about it. Also I'll be interested to hear if
somebody ever heard or knew the people by the name LIBKIND.

I have started my search with 30 family members,
now we are 350! I have more than 100 pictures new ones and very old of the
XIXth century Some of them are unidentified. As soon as I copy them on
computer I believe it will be possible to display them for all our members.
Thank you very much in advance.

Sincerely,

Irene Kudish
kudish@netcom.ca


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Vilkomir Uyezd 1858 Revision List Distribution #lithuania

DBH12345
 

The Vilkomir uyezd 1858 revision list is nearing completion of processing and
members of the research group have been contacted about being sent copies of
the data. My list of contributors is incomplete, and some people may have
made donations qualifying them for copies of the data without notifying me.

If you did not receive a copy of a letter addressed to you about the details,
you were not on my list. If you should be, please contact me privately.

The data will be going into the LitvakSIG's searchable database, but it is
worthwhile to have the complete set of records to analyze.

David Hoffman
DBH12345@aol.com


Re: Looking for Panevezys Uyezd Coordinator #lithuania

Jill <kayjd@...>
 

Howard,

I am more than willing to make a contribution so that I can find out more
information about my family. The only thing is that I have tried contacting the
Witkins, but so far have had no reply...are they still active?

Thanks,

Jill


Re: Looking for Panevezys Uyezd Coordinator #lithuania

KaunasCat1@...
 

The Witkins are currently putting together a coordinated plan to get the most
coverage of Panevezys uyezd for their combined resources - a number of
different kinds of Jewish community records >from the Kaunas Regional Archives
and a couple of revision lists for towns in that district >from the State
Historical Archives in Vilnius. As soon as this decision is made, it will be
faxed to Vitalija Gircyte, who usually has the order back to us within two
weeks. It takes another two weeks to translate and input the data into a
database format. So all in all the system works well and pretty quickly. Look
at the Catalog of the Jewish Holdings of the Kaunas Archives on our website
<http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/> and let the Witkins know what you are
interested in supporting. This system of ordering is available to dues paying
members of the LitvakSIG.

If you want to "sponsor" (eg buy and pay for translation) a specific list,
which is of most interest to you, send inquiry to Kaunas1@aol.com to begin the
process of determining the length of lists and costs. But it is important to
coordinate your efforts with the Witkins, who as uyezd coordinators are in the
best place to have learned what is most useful to buy, and what is already on
order, etc.

David Hoffman
Co-Coordinator, LitvakSIG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Looking for Panevezys Uyezd Coordinator #lithuania

Jill <kayjd@...>
 

Howard,

I am more than willing to make a contribution so that I can find out more
information about my family. The only thing is that I have tried contacting the
Witkins, but so far have had no reply...are they still active?

Thanks,

Jill


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Looking for Panevezys Uyezd Coordinator #lithuania

KaunasCat1@...
 

The Witkins are currently putting together a coordinated plan to get the most
coverage of Panevezys uyezd for their combined resources - a number of
different kinds of Jewish community records >from the Kaunas Regional Archives
and a couple of revision lists for towns in that district >from the State
Historical Archives in Vilnius. As soon as this decision is made, it will be
faxed to Vitalija Gircyte, who usually has the order back to us within two
weeks. It takes another two weeks to translate and input the data into a
database format. So all in all the system works well and pretty quickly. Look
at the Catalog of the Jewish Holdings of the Kaunas Archives on our website
<http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/> and let the Witkins know what you are
interested in supporting. This system of ordering is available to dues paying
members of the LitvakSIG.

If you want to "sponsor" (eg buy and pay for translation) a specific list,
which is of most interest to you, send inquiry to Kaunas1@aol.com to begin the
process of determining the length of lists and costs. But it is important to
coordinate your efforts with the Witkins, who as uyezd coordinators are in the
best place to have learned what is most useful to buy, and what is already on
order, etc.

David Hoffman
Co-Coordinator, LitvakSIG


Re: Vinnitsa Archives #general

MarkGrekin <markgrekin@...>
 

Esther Feinstein Sackheim wrote

<< Hello

I would like to write to the Vinnitza Archives 287100 gorod Vinnitsa Ulitsa 17
Vinnita Ukraine. What kind of postage would that require and in what kind of
money or stamps. >>

This is another example of question that the questioner would easily find the
answer to without going to Jewishgen and with little effort of her own. A post
office clerk would tell her that the cost for oversea mail is 60 cents for 1st
half-ounce.
But the reason I decided to answer this e-mail is a question that was not
mentioned but should be and can be of interest to other Jewishgenners: how to
relieve a person who might answer your mail of paying his/her own money for
postage?
You may buy at the post office for $1.05 a special coupon called
"Coupon -Reponse International" (post form # CN 01) that is exchangeable in any
country of the Universal Postal Union for one or more postage stamps
representing the minimum postage for a priority item or an unregistered letter
sent by air to a foreign country and include this coupon with a self addressed
envelope in your letter.
Mark Grekin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Vinnitsa Archives #general

MarkGrekin <markgrekin@...>
 

Esther Feinstein Sackheim wrote

<< Hello

I would like to write to the Vinnitza Archives 287100 gorod Vinnitsa Ulitsa 17
Vinnita Ukraine. What kind of postage would that require and in what kind of
money or stamps. >>

This is another example of question that the questioner would easily find the
answer to without going to Jewishgen and with little effort of her own. A post
office clerk would tell her that the cost for oversea mail is 60 cents for 1st
half-ounce.
But the reason I decided to answer this e-mail is a question that was not
mentioned but should be and can be of interest to other Jewishgenners: how to
relieve a person who might answer your mail of paying his/her own money for
postage?
You may buy at the post office for $1.05 a special coupon called
"Coupon -Reponse International" (post form # CN 01) that is exchangeable in any
country of the Universal Postal Union for one or more postage stamps
representing the minimum postage for a priority item or an unregistered letter
sent by air to a foreign country and include this coupon with a self addressed
envelope in your letter.
Mark Grekin