Date   

Help in Sheepshead Bay #belarus

sman@...
 

I am looking for help with something in Sheepshead Bay, NY

In trying to trace a relative, I need help identifying the street
where they lived in Sheepshead Bay, NY. Of course a phonebook from
the 70's or 80's would help but I don't have access to that.

The address was about five streets away >from the Belt Parkway.
Coming >from the Verazzano Bridge on the Belt, it was the first exit
after the bay and ship docks you see on your right just as you go
through Sheepshead Bay. There were loads of little stores along the
streets leading to and including the one where their apartment building
was; almost all of the signs (store and restaurant) were in Russian.

Anyone know what street it may be?

Please reply privately,
Scott Noar
sman@uscom.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Help in Sheepshead Bay #belarus

sman@...
 

I am looking for help with something in Sheepshead Bay, NY

In trying to trace a relative, I need help identifying the street
where they lived in Sheepshead Bay, NY. Of course a phonebook from
the 70's or 80's would help but I don't have access to that.

The address was about five streets away >from the Belt Parkway.
Coming >from the Verazzano Bridge on the Belt, it was the first exit
after the bay and ship docks you see on your right just as you go
through Sheepshead Bay. There were loads of little stores along the
streets leading to and including the one where their apartment building
was; almost all of the signs (store and restaurant) were in Russian.

Anyone know what street it may be?

Please reply privately,
Scott Noar
sman@uscom.com


Death Certificate accuracy #belarus

Jennifer Meltzer <jmeltzer@...>
 

Just this weekend I received a copy of the death certificate of my
maternal great grandmother BESSIE (BOSHA) MELTZER. That was part of
what struck me - we had always thought the name was some variation
of MEZZE based on my grandfather's 1952 certificate. Hers was issued
in May 1910 - so certainly those supplying the info are long gone.
The father's first name appears to be "Flaae".
Anyone have any idea of what that might actually be?

Ditto my gggmother's name - SARAH WEINSTEIN - most likely SURA V?
since Weinstein wasn't a Russian name.

My Bosha was born in 1846 and came to New York City in approximately
1889. She died in May 1910. It is possible that her original port
of entry was Canada. She was originally married to FEITEL MOSHE
PEARLMAN (possibly before she immigrated), and then to JACOB RIFKIN.
My grandfather was PEARLMAN. Her last residence was W. 117th St.
in Manhattan.

Any info is greatly appreciated!

Jennifer Meltzer

Researching: FELDMAN, WEISMAN, KOPILOFF - Latvia
PEARLMAN, RIFKIN - Belarus to the Bronx
BECK - Vilna, Gt. Britian, Phillipines


Belarus SIG #Belarus Death Certificate accuracy #belarus

Jennifer Meltzer <jmeltzer@...>
 

Just this weekend I received a copy of the death certificate of my
maternal great grandmother BESSIE (BOSHA) MELTZER. That was part of
what struck me - we had always thought the name was some variation
of MEZZE based on my grandfather's 1952 certificate. Hers was issued
in May 1910 - so certainly those supplying the info are long gone.
The father's first name appears to be "Flaae".
Anyone have any idea of what that might actually be?

Ditto my gggmother's name - SARAH WEINSTEIN - most likely SURA V?
since Weinstein wasn't a Russian name.

My Bosha was born in 1846 and came to New York City in approximately
1889. She died in May 1910. It is possible that her original port
of entry was Canada. She was originally married to FEITEL MOSHE
PEARLMAN (possibly before she immigrated), and then to JACOB RIFKIN.
My grandfather was PEARLMAN. Her last residence was W. 117th St.
in Manhattan.

Any info is greatly appreciated!

Jennifer Meltzer

Researching: FELDMAN, WEISMAN, KOPILOFF - Latvia
PEARLMAN, RIFKIN - Belarus to the Bronx
BECK - Vilna, Gt. Britian, Phillipines


Re: Oknis - Ugionis #latvia

Bralshjon@...
 

There are no places in Latvia by the names of "Oknis" or "Ugionis."
Pasvytinis (and this, I know, isn' t the correct spelling , is in Lithuania.

Moderator Note:Please sign messages


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Oknis - Ugionis #latvia

Bralshjon@...
 

There are no places in Latvia by the names of "Oknis" or "Ugionis."
Pasvytinis (and this, I know, isn' t the correct spelling , is in Lithuania.

Moderator Note:Please sign messages


Name Changes/Maternal Surname/summary #belarus

Carlos Glikson
 

There has been an ongoing posting of messages regarding name changes.
Recently we had a thread in JewishGen concerning reasons behind surname
changes and the use of the maternal surname. This is the summary I
submitted after so many interesting inputs posted in this relation,
which may add to the reasons already shared in the SIG:

Thank you to all who helped me gain insight on the many reasons behind
surname changes in immigrants and use of maternal name. I wish to thank
all who took their time to answer. It was my first posting in JewishGen
and I felt the added strength of individual and collective knowledge
and experiences.

Here is a summary of many varied facts and theories mentioned by Genners
for different dates, areas, and circumstances - different >from the
unfairly blamed clerk in Ellis Island!

They could help to look into other cases and pinpoint the reason for the
change in names:

+ Different policies in terms of recording Jewish marriages and
legislating use of surnames among Jews.

+ Jewish marriages not being recognized, and children being given
documents with their mothers maiden name

+ Religious Marriage considered sufficient. Never bothering to
register a civil marriage with the authorities, with the option
for children of taking either surname

+ Having religious marriages, in general not registering until
after the first child was born, and scoffing at the notations
of illegitimacy in the eyes of the Polish government as of no
consequence at all.

+ Not being able to afford the fee for a civil marriage - children
born of the religious marriage had to take the surname of the mother

+ Only one marriage permit issued per Jew family descendance under
Austro-Hungarian law, and only if a significant fee was paid. So
marriage of more than one children would not be recorded by the
civil authorities and children of such couples would be listed
in the Austro-Hungarian metrical records as illegitimate.

+ Times when governments in Poland and in Hungary did not allow Jews
to marry more than once (even if his spouse was deceased). In that
case, they were married only by Jewish ceremony and the children
of this second (etc.) marriage bore the family name of the mother.

+ Civil marriages being conducted in front of a cross. Jews who
refused to marry in front of a cross were technically illegitimate

+ Marriages performed elsewhere and not formally registered in cities
where children were born

+ Many people in the United States, Irish in particular, had a
particular dislike for Russians, or what they perceived as Russian
sounding names... Consequently, many Russian or East-European Jews
Germanized their names.

+ Thinking that having a close maternal relative with the same surname
in the States would make it easier to be admitted if using the
maternal surname

+ Desire to avoid the authorities for some reason, probably connected
with military service - either to avoid conscription or to evade
punishment after deserting

+ In Russia outside the Kingdom of Poland, Jewish men except the first
born were draftable and sometimes not permitted to marry - so baby
boys were never registered or sometimes registered as the child of
another couple with no boys.

+ Inherited surnames were still relatively new and not especially
desired by Jews since they were forced on them by the government
in an effort to keep track of who was who (and draftable, etc.)

+ A Jew emmigrating to the US may give no second thought to getting
rid of a name forced on him by the Czar.

+ Inconsistent use amongst European Jews of what we consider to be
"surnames" (family names uniformly reflecting the paternal line)
until the 19th century as the earliest.

+ Marriages governed by religious law until fairly recently (typically
the 19th century) with individual names recorded in official documents
being a totally different question.

+ In 20th century not recognition of the state or synagogue as a power
proper for marriage authorization, not for reasons related to religion,
but for political ones

+ Need to be sponsored by a family member in order to be accepted as an
immigrant, and pretending to be related to the sponsor using papers
in the new name.

+ Jews who needed a surname often used the wife's name if they were (as
often occured) living with the wife's family.

+ Men marrying into a well known Rabbinical family taking the
father-in-law's family name

+ Men going into their father-in-law's profession, and the family's name
changing according to that profession

+ Anglicization, easier spelling or pronounciation, and even choosing a
name more in their liking, and ease in the States to "call yourself
anything you wanted"

+ Travelling under the mother's maiden name and resuming the father's
name on arrival

+ Travels under the mother's maiden name being thus noted by the
authorities on their certificate of arrival or naturalization papers.


Thank you very much for all these comments - hope they help and did
not skip any!

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires, Argentina
e-Mail cglikson@iname.com

Searching for:
GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN (Suwalki, Marijampole, Augustow,
Sejny,Sopotkin)
ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ (Kremenchug, Vilno)
POKROISKY, POKROJSKI, POKROY (Suwalki, Seirijai)
HOLLANDERSKY, HOLLENDERSKI, HOLLANDER (Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza)
TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL (Kremenchug, Kharkov)
FELCHINSKY (Kremenchug, Vilno), KARP (Grodno), GOLUMBIEWSKY, GOLOMB (?),
KRASNAPOLSKY (?)


Belarus SIG #Belarus Name Changes/Maternal Surname/summary #belarus

Carlos Glikson
 

There has been an ongoing posting of messages regarding name changes.
Recently we had a thread in JewishGen concerning reasons behind surname
changes and the use of the maternal surname. This is the summary I
submitted after so many interesting inputs posted in this relation,
which may add to the reasons already shared in the SIG:

Thank you to all who helped me gain insight on the many reasons behind
surname changes in immigrants and use of maternal name. I wish to thank
all who took their time to answer. It was my first posting in JewishGen
and I felt the added strength of individual and collective knowledge
and experiences.

Here is a summary of many varied facts and theories mentioned by Genners
for different dates, areas, and circumstances - different >from the
unfairly blamed clerk in Ellis Island!

They could help to look into other cases and pinpoint the reason for the
change in names:

+ Different policies in terms of recording Jewish marriages and
legislating use of surnames among Jews.

+ Jewish marriages not being recognized, and children being given
documents with their mothers maiden name

+ Religious Marriage considered sufficient. Never bothering to
register a civil marriage with the authorities, with the option
for children of taking either surname

+ Having religious marriages, in general not registering until
after the first child was born, and scoffing at the notations
of illegitimacy in the eyes of the Polish government as of no
consequence at all.

+ Not being able to afford the fee for a civil marriage - children
born of the religious marriage had to take the surname of the mother

+ Only one marriage permit issued per Jew family descendance under
Austro-Hungarian law, and only if a significant fee was paid. So
marriage of more than one children would not be recorded by the
civil authorities and children of such couples would be listed
in the Austro-Hungarian metrical records as illegitimate.

+ Times when governments in Poland and in Hungary did not allow Jews
to marry more than once (even if his spouse was deceased). In that
case, they were married only by Jewish ceremony and the children
of this second (etc.) marriage bore the family name of the mother.

+ Civil marriages being conducted in front of a cross. Jews who
refused to marry in front of a cross were technically illegitimate

+ Marriages performed elsewhere and not formally registered in cities
where children were born

+ Many people in the United States, Irish in particular, had a
particular dislike for Russians, or what they perceived as Russian
sounding names... Consequently, many Russian or East-European Jews
Germanized their names.

+ Thinking that having a close maternal relative with the same surname
in the States would make it easier to be admitted if using the
maternal surname

+ Desire to avoid the authorities for some reason, probably connected
with military service - either to avoid conscription or to evade
punishment after deserting

+ In Russia outside the Kingdom of Poland, Jewish men except the first
born were draftable and sometimes not permitted to marry - so baby
boys were never registered or sometimes registered as the child of
another couple with no boys.

+ Inherited surnames were still relatively new and not especially
desired by Jews since they were forced on them by the government
in an effort to keep track of who was who (and draftable, etc.)

+ A Jew emmigrating to the US may give no second thought to getting
rid of a name forced on him by the Czar.

+ Inconsistent use amongst European Jews of what we consider to be
"surnames" (family names uniformly reflecting the paternal line)
until the 19th century as the earliest.

+ Marriages governed by religious law until fairly recently (typically
the 19th century) with individual names recorded in official documents
being a totally different question.

+ In 20th century not recognition of the state or synagogue as a power
proper for marriage authorization, not for reasons related to religion,
but for political ones

+ Need to be sponsored by a family member in order to be accepted as an
immigrant, and pretending to be related to the sponsor using papers
in the new name.

+ Jews who needed a surname often used the wife's name if they were (as
often occured) living with the wife's family.

+ Men marrying into a well known Rabbinical family taking the
father-in-law's family name

+ Men going into their father-in-law's profession, and the family's name
changing according to that profession

+ Anglicization, easier spelling or pronounciation, and even choosing a
name more in their liking, and ease in the States to "call yourself
anything you wanted"

+ Travelling under the mother's maiden name and resuming the father's
name on arrival

+ Travels under the mother's maiden name being thus noted by the
authorities on their certificate of arrival or naturalization papers.


Thank you very much for all these comments - hope they help and did
not skip any!

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires, Argentina
e-Mail cglikson@iname.com

Searching for:
GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN (Suwalki, Marijampole, Augustow,
Sejny,Sopotkin)
ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ (Kremenchug, Vilno)
POKROISKY, POKROJSKI, POKROY (Suwalki, Seirijai)
HOLLANDERSKY, HOLLENDERSKI, HOLLANDER (Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza)
TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL (Kremenchug, Kharkov)
FELCHINSKY (Kremenchug, Vilno), KARP (Grodno), GOLUMBIEWSKY, GOLOMB (?),
KRASNAPOLSKY (?)


Re: Oknis - Ugionis #latvia

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

Wendy Roth wrote:


Can anyone tell me if they have heard of and if so where exactly is situated
the Shtetl OKNIS - UGIONIS ( PAZVINTYS ), supposed to be in Latvia.
There was an Oknist, which today is Aknistes in the Illukstes region. I would
join the moderator in thinking that Pazvintys was in Lita.

Martha LEVINSON Lev-Zion


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Oknis - Ugionis #latvia

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

Wendy Roth wrote:


Can anyone tell me if they have heard of and if so where exactly is situated
the Shtetl OKNIS - UGIONIS ( PAZVINTYS ), supposed to be in Latvia.
There was an Oknist, which today is Aknistes in the Illukstes region. I would
join the moderator in thinking that Pazvintys was in Lita.

Martha LEVINSON Lev-Zion


The First World Litvak Congress #lithuania

shaul <shaul@...>
 

This was in H-Judaic: The Jewish Studies Network newsletter. Please do not
ask me for more information as I do not have any and will not reply.

Saul

Dr Saul Issroff
London2001 - 21st International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
8-13 July 2001 www.jewishgen.org/london2001
info.london2001@talk21.com
------


From: litvaks@litjews.org
Subject: The First World Litvak Congress

THE FIRST WORLD LITVAK CONGRESS
August 24-30, 2001 in Vilnius,Lithuania

Lithuania was once the home of the thriving Lithuanian Jewish culture of
the Litvakes (as Lithuanian Jews are known in Yiddish), and
Vilnius(Yiddish Vilne) was known as the "Jerusalem of Lithuania". The
Holocaust almost completely swept away this glorious community. The Soviet
regime did much to bring to the edge of extinction what little was left
after the war of the rich civilization of Lithuanian Jewry. Still, a small
but vibrant Lithuanian Jewish community survives, continues to live in
Lithuania, and is now trying to carry on the traditions of its
forefathers. Lithuanian Jews have always been conscious and proud of their
origin, and today too, every Litvak is proud of his or her heritage, no
matter what spot on earth he or she may inhabit,no matter which generation
of emigrants he or she may represent.

The Soviet regime prevented the Litvakes, scattered all over the world,
from helping to revive the foundations of the culture of Lithuanian Jewry.
So far there has not been a center that would cherish and promote the
unique Lithuanian Jewish heritage on an international non-parochial scale.
Therefore we invite all Litvakes to participate in the Congress whose main
OBJECTIVES are:

* Bringing together Litvakes of various generations in the land of
their ancestors.

* Sharing experiences and opinions in cultural, social, and
economic spheres.

* Providing information on Lithuanian Jewish organizations around
the world.

* Building strong bonds between Litvakes all over the world and
the Jewish Community of Lithuania, that would help in cherishing
and preserving the rich Lithuanian Jewish heritage.

* Discussing the various ways of strengthening our identity and
keeping assimilation at bay.

* Reviewing the issues of Jewish property, including looted cultural
assets, and the question of just restitution.

* Setting up the World Litvak Committee that would initiate and
supervise various projects and programs dedicated to strengthening
the cultural, economic and social status of Litvakes and the Jewish
Community of Lithuania (as well as the Litvak communities in our
neighboring countries, Belarus and Latvia), as well as coordinating
relations among the world's Litvak organizations.

OUTLINE OF THE PROGRAM OF THE CONGRESS:
* Presentation of the activities of the Jewish Community of Lithuania and
the activities of its Community Center.

* Visiting the Sholem Aleichem Jewish school, the Vilna Gaon Jewish State
Museum, the Judaica sector at the National Library, the Program in
Judaic Studies at Vilnius University, the Vilnius Yiddish Institute and
the Vilnius Summer Program in Yiddish Language and Culture;
also visits to historic sites including the grave of the Gaon of Vilna,
the Old Jewish Quarter, and much more.

* Session dedicated to Litvak culture, as well as to the practical issues
arising in the life of Litvakes internationally, and the Jewish
Community of Lithuania.

* The handing over of Torahs, stored at the National M. Mazhvydas Library,
to the representatives of religious communities abroad (to be
confirmed).

* Evenings of Yiddish culture, including drama, singing, dancing,
Lithuanian Jewish musical traditions and more.

* Honoring the memory of the victims of the Holocaust at the Ponar
(Paneriai) memorial, the Ninth Fort in Kovna (Kaunas), and other sites
of mass murder.

* Tours of Jewish Vilna, Kovna, and other places of historical
significance.

* Family roots trips.

* Meetings with high Lithuanian officials and businessmen.

* Discussion on the state of synagogues in Lithuania. Visiting the
functioning synagogues in Vilnius and Kaunas.

* Exhibitions dedicated to the legacy of Lithuanian Jewry ("Prominent
Litvaks" and "Jewish Books of Lithuania").

* Acquaintanceship with the possibilities of genealogical and archival
research.

REGISTRATION
To register for the Congress, please fill in the application form
(obtainable >from the office of the Jewish Community of Lithuania).
Applications should be sent along with a non-refundable $50 registration
fee (checks made out to: LITHUANIAN JEWISH COMMUNITY'S CHARITY FUND. In
addition, a fee will be charged for some of the Congress's events. Parties
wishing to support the Congress may send their donations by checks made
out to the same name.

The First World Litvak Congress
Jewish Community of Lithuania
Pylimo 4,
Vilnius 2001
Lithuania

Tel.: +3702 613 003
Fax: +3702 227 915
e-mail: litvaks@litjews.org

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This announcement is being presented for information purposes only, as a one-time announcement and not the beginning of a discussion thread. If any LitvakSIG Digest subscribers have questions,
they should be addressed to the e-mail address at the end of the message.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania The First World Litvak Congress #lithuania

shaul <shaul@...>
 

This was in H-Judaic: The Jewish Studies Network newsletter. Please do not
ask me for more information as I do not have any and will not reply.

Saul

Dr Saul Issroff
London2001 - 21st International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
8-13 July 2001 www.jewishgen.org/london2001
info.london2001@talk21.com
------


From: litvaks@litjews.org
Subject: The First World Litvak Congress

THE FIRST WORLD LITVAK CONGRESS
August 24-30, 2001 in Vilnius,Lithuania

Lithuania was once the home of the thriving Lithuanian Jewish culture of
the Litvakes (as Lithuanian Jews are known in Yiddish), and
Vilnius(Yiddish Vilne) was known as the "Jerusalem of Lithuania". The
Holocaust almost completely swept away this glorious community. The Soviet
regime did much to bring to the edge of extinction what little was left
after the war of the rich civilization of Lithuanian Jewry. Still, a small
but vibrant Lithuanian Jewish community survives, continues to live in
Lithuania, and is now trying to carry on the traditions of its
forefathers. Lithuanian Jews have always been conscious and proud of their
origin, and today too, every Litvak is proud of his or her heritage, no
matter what spot on earth he or she may inhabit,no matter which generation
of emigrants he or she may represent.

The Soviet regime prevented the Litvakes, scattered all over the world,
from helping to revive the foundations of the culture of Lithuanian Jewry.
So far there has not been a center that would cherish and promote the
unique Lithuanian Jewish heritage on an international non-parochial scale.
Therefore we invite all Litvakes to participate in the Congress whose main
OBJECTIVES are:

* Bringing together Litvakes of various generations in the land of
their ancestors.

* Sharing experiences and opinions in cultural, social, and
economic spheres.

* Providing information on Lithuanian Jewish organizations around
the world.

* Building strong bonds between Litvakes all over the world and
the Jewish Community of Lithuania, that would help in cherishing
and preserving the rich Lithuanian Jewish heritage.

* Discussing the various ways of strengthening our identity and
keeping assimilation at bay.

* Reviewing the issues of Jewish property, including looted cultural
assets, and the question of just restitution.

* Setting up the World Litvak Committee that would initiate and
supervise various projects and programs dedicated to strengthening
the cultural, economic and social status of Litvakes and the Jewish
Community of Lithuania (as well as the Litvak communities in our
neighboring countries, Belarus and Latvia), as well as coordinating
relations among the world's Litvak organizations.

OUTLINE OF THE PROGRAM OF THE CONGRESS:
* Presentation of the activities of the Jewish Community of Lithuania and
the activities of its Community Center.

* Visiting the Sholem Aleichem Jewish school, the Vilna Gaon Jewish State
Museum, the Judaica sector at the National Library, the Program in
Judaic Studies at Vilnius University, the Vilnius Yiddish Institute and
the Vilnius Summer Program in Yiddish Language and Culture;
also visits to historic sites including the grave of the Gaon of Vilna,
the Old Jewish Quarter, and much more.

* Session dedicated to Litvak culture, as well as to the practical issues
arising in the life of Litvakes internationally, and the Jewish
Community of Lithuania.

* The handing over of Torahs, stored at the National M. Mazhvydas Library,
to the representatives of religious communities abroad (to be
confirmed).

* Evenings of Yiddish culture, including drama, singing, dancing,
Lithuanian Jewish musical traditions and more.

* Honoring the memory of the victims of the Holocaust at the Ponar
(Paneriai) memorial, the Ninth Fort in Kovna (Kaunas), and other sites
of mass murder.

* Tours of Jewish Vilna, Kovna, and other places of historical
significance.

* Family roots trips.

* Meetings with high Lithuanian officials and businessmen.

* Discussion on the state of synagogues in Lithuania. Visiting the
functioning synagogues in Vilnius and Kaunas.

* Exhibitions dedicated to the legacy of Lithuanian Jewry ("Prominent
Litvaks" and "Jewish Books of Lithuania").

* Acquaintanceship with the possibilities of genealogical and archival
research.

REGISTRATION
To register for the Congress, please fill in the application form
(obtainable >from the office of the Jewish Community of Lithuania).
Applications should be sent along with a non-refundable $50 registration
fee (checks made out to: LITHUANIAN JEWISH COMMUNITY'S CHARITY FUND. In
addition, a fee will be charged for some of the Congress's events. Parties
wishing to support the Congress may send their donations by checks made
out to the same name.

The First World Litvak Congress
Jewish Community of Lithuania
Pylimo 4,
Vilnius 2001
Lithuania

Tel.: +3702 613 003
Fax: +3702 227 915
e-mail: litvaks@litjews.org

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This announcement is being presented for information purposes only, as a one-time announcement and not the beginning of a discussion thread. If any LitvakSIG Digest subscribers have questions,
they should be addressed to the e-mail address at the end of the message.


Rietevas #lithuania

shaul <shaul@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
On Monday, February 05, 2001
re rietevas raymond epstein <rayepstein@earthlink.net>
<<looking for data on family names Grol, Grolman and Sachs in Rietevas.>>


There are the following Grolls mentioned in 'Rieteve, A Jewish shtetl in
Lithuania' ed by Alter levine with revised edition ed. by Dina Porat and
Roni Stauber, Kaplan Kushlick Foundation, Cape Town 2000

David
Israel
Rachel
Rochel
Ura.

No Grolman

several Saks.

Copies of the book are available for a nominal donation ot suggested
charities in SA, Israel, UK and USA. I have previously posted full details
on Litvak SIG and written a review in SHEMOT, Journal of the Jewish
Genealogy Society of Great Britain. Contact me privately for additional
details.

The Grolls are also mentioned in several other books that were privately
published by Mendel Kaplan.

Dr Saul Issroff
<shaul@shaul.homechoice.co.uk>

London2001 - 21st International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
8-13 July 2001 www.jewishgen.org/london2001
info.london2001@talk21.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Rietevas #lithuania

shaul <shaul@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
On Monday, February 05, 2001
re rietevas raymond epstein <rayepstein@earthlink.net>
<<looking for data on family names Grol, Grolman and Sachs in Rietevas.>>


There are the following Grolls mentioned in 'Rieteve, A Jewish shtetl in
Lithuania' ed by Alter levine with revised edition ed. by Dina Porat and
Roni Stauber, Kaplan Kushlick Foundation, Cape Town 2000

David
Israel
Rachel
Rochel
Ura.

No Grolman

several Saks.

Copies of the book are available for a nominal donation ot suggested
charities in SA, Israel, UK and USA. I have previously posted full details
on Litvak SIG and written a review in SHEMOT, Journal of the Jewish
Genealogy Society of Great Britain. Contact me privately for additional
details.

The Grolls are also mentioned in several other books that were privately
published by Mendel Kaplan.

Dr Saul Issroff
<shaul@shaul.homechoice.co.uk>

London2001 - 21st International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
8-13 July 2001 www.jewishgen.org/london2001
info.london2001@talk21.com


Names #belarus

Carleolady@...
 

Hello,

My gggm was named Rhoda SHANIN. I have also seen the name Sima
associated with her. On a surf around the web, I found the name
Roda Sima in reference to the sister of a Lubavitcher rabbi.

I'm guessing that Roda Sima is a common name?

Elaine Bush
Carmel, CA


Belarus SIG #Belarus Names #belarus

Carleolady@...
 

Hello,

My gggm was named Rhoda SHANIN. I have also seen the name Sima
associated with her. On a surf around the web, I found the name
Roda Sima in reference to the sister of a Lubavitcher rabbi.

I'm guessing that Roda Sima is a common name?

Elaine Bush
Carmel, CA


Re: exempt from draft #belarus

Irene Newhouse <newhoir@...>
 

There was a question about oldest sons being exempt >from draft. In the
period preceding WWI, as I posted recently, though I can't recall if
it was on this SIG or Jewishgen, there weren't any exemptions for only
sons or oldest sons. Among my paternal grandmother's cousins & nephews,
I have been given examples of only sons being drafted, all 4 sons in a
family being drafted, both of 2 sons being drafted, etc., by a researcher
in Vilnius. >from the 1890s on, then, nothing aobut your birth order
exempted you >from the draft.

As the draconican pre-1858 draft laws [20 years, etc] were drafted with
a view to trying to remove Jewish males >from their environment in hopes
they could be induced to convert, I strongly doubt any consideration was
taken of birth order or only son status.

That leaves the period between 1858 & 1890 to consider, for which I have
no direct evidence.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: exempt from draft #belarus

Irene Newhouse <newhoir@...>
 

There was a question about oldest sons being exempt >from draft. In the
period preceding WWI, as I posted recently, though I can't recall if
it was on this SIG or Jewishgen, there weren't any exemptions for only
sons or oldest sons. Among my paternal grandmother's cousins & nephews,
I have been given examples of only sons being drafted, all 4 sons in a
family being drafted, both of 2 sons being drafted, etc., by a researcher
in Vilnius. >from the 1890s on, then, nothing aobut your birth order
exempted you >from the draft.

As the draconican pre-1858 draft laws [20 years, etc] were drafted with
a view to trying to remove Jewish males >from their environment in hopes
they could be induced to convert, I strongly doubt any consideration was
taken of birth order or only son status.

That leaves the period between 1858 & 1890 to consider, for which I have
no direct evidence.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI


SITE CITE: Books on Jewish life in Eastern Europe #poland

Ginsburg, Paul <GinsburgP@...>
 

Books on Jewish life in Eastern Europe can be found
at:

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~pauldana/shtetlbookstore.htm

Paul Ginsburg
Bethesda, MD


JRI Poland #Poland SITE CITE: Books on Jewish life in Eastern Europe #poland

Ginsburg, Paul <GinsburgP@...>
 

Books on Jewish life in Eastern Europe can be found
at:

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~pauldana/shtetlbookstore.htm

Paul Ginsburg
Bethesda, MD