Date   

Phone Volunteer in Ottowa #general

Diane Frankel <dlfrankel@...>
 

JewishGen LostnFound Support Desk is asking for a volunteer in Ottawa to
make a telephone call to a JewishGen researcher whose e-mail address is
bouncing.

If you can help, please reply privately and we will provide the details.

LostnFound Support Desk
Diane Frankel
dlfrankel@...


Re: Need Address of Ratner Center for Study of Conservative Judaism #general

Marcia Katzel DeVries <marciadv@...>
 

Babette,
A search on Google gives you:
Contact Information:
Ratner Center
Jewish Theological Seminary
3080 Broadway
New York, NY 10027

Website http://www.jtsa.edu/research/ratner/

Marcia Katzel DeVries
Concord Calif

I would appreciate receiving the address for the Ratner Center for
Study of Conservative Judaism. >>


A modern version of Icek and Aysyk #general

Steve Eller <steve-eller@...>
 

Parents will do anything to make life hard for genealogists. Picture the
researcher who 100 years >from now runs into the records of the identical
twins I had the pleasure of teaching:
Stephen and Steven!

Steve (Stephen) Eller
Baltimore MD


Re: University of Zurich Students, 1833-1910 #general

NFatouros@...
 

In her message of March 21, 2001, Renee Steinig called attention to this
very interesting websit:

http://www.rektorat.unizh.ch/matrikel/manual/home.html

I had visited it several times before, astonished that it exists and
recognizing with glee some of the names it lists of various
revolutionaries about whom I've read in books.

But Ms. Steinig's message today prompted me to return to look for a
particular name, that of Chaim Zhitlovsky, because for several months I
have harbored a suspicion that my grandfather Isidor BELKOVSKY. while
studying medicine in Switzerland, might have met Zhitlovsky and been
introduced by him into revolutionary thought and activities.

I did know that at the same time my grandfather was in Switzerland,
Zhitlovsky was studying in Zurich but today I just wanted to check to see
what the website reported about him. But to my surprise, I couldn't find
his name listed, even though I spelled it as "Zhitlovsky"
and "Zshitlowski". Surely all the biographies I've read about Zhitlovsky
couldn't have been wrong in asserting that he'd studied in Zurich!
Puzzled, I was about to give up the search, when suddenly I thought of
spelling it in a way I'd not yet seen anywhere transliterated into English
and didn't think could be a"right" way. And sure enough, I found Chaim
Zhitlovsky's name listed as "Schitlowsky." (His father's name was entered
as "Schiltkowsky" followed by a question mark in parentheses.)

So I remind you all, give your mind free rein in spelling names, whether
they be surnames or place names, And be stubbornly persistent in your
searches!

(By the way, with my scant knowledge of German and aided by a huge
dictionary, I am very, very slowly struggling through a book about women
students at the University of Bern, by Franziska Rogger: "Der Doctorhut im
Besenschrank: das abenteurerliche Leben der ersten Studentinnen am
Beispiel der Universitat Bern" eFeF Verlag, 1999, ISBN 3-905561-32-8.
I keep telling myself that if all those revolutionaries I've read about
could teach themselves to read and even speak other languages while they
were in prison, as a free person I ought to be able to teach myself to
read German,Yiddish, Hebrew and Russian. But this is so hard to do when
one's brain is atrophying with age and there seems to be so little time
left!)

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@...
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol; BEHAM,
Salok, Kharkov.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Phone Volunteer in Ottowa #general

Diane Frankel <dlfrankel@...>
 

JewishGen LostnFound Support Desk is asking for a volunteer in Ottawa to
make a telephone call to a JewishGen researcher whose e-mail address is
bouncing.

If you can help, please reply privately and we will provide the details.

LostnFound Support Desk
Diane Frankel
dlfrankel@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A modern version of Icek and Aysyk #general

Steve Eller <steve-eller@...>
 

Parents will do anything to make life hard for genealogists. Picture the
researcher who 100 years >from now runs into the records of the identical
twins I had the pleasure of teaching:
Stephen and Steven!

Steve (Stephen) Eller
Baltimore MD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Need Address of Ratner Center for Study of Conservative Judaism #general

Marcia Katzel DeVries <marciadv@...>
 

Babette,
A search on Google gives you:
Contact Information:
Ratner Center
Jewish Theological Seminary
3080 Broadway
New York, NY 10027

Website http://www.jtsa.edu/research/ratner/

Marcia Katzel DeVries
Concord Calif

I would appreciate receiving the address for the Ratner Center for
Study of Conservative Judaism. >>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: University of Zurich Students, 1833-1910 #general

NFatouros@...
 

In her message of March 21, 2001, Renee Steinig called attention to this
very interesting websit:

http://www.rektorat.unizh.ch/matrikel/manual/home.html

I had visited it several times before, astonished that it exists and
recognizing with glee some of the names it lists of various
revolutionaries about whom I've read in books.

But Ms. Steinig's message today prompted me to return to look for a
particular name, that of Chaim Zhitlovsky, because for several months I
have harbored a suspicion that my grandfather Isidor BELKOVSKY. while
studying medicine in Switzerland, might have met Zhitlovsky and been
introduced by him into revolutionary thought and activities.

I did know that at the same time my grandfather was in Switzerland,
Zhitlovsky was studying in Zurich but today I just wanted to check to see
what the website reported about him. But to my surprise, I couldn't find
his name listed, even though I spelled it as "Zhitlovsky"
and "Zshitlowski". Surely all the biographies I've read about Zhitlovsky
couldn't have been wrong in asserting that he'd studied in Zurich!
Puzzled, I was about to give up the search, when suddenly I thought of
spelling it in a way I'd not yet seen anywhere transliterated into English
and didn't think could be a"right" way. And sure enough, I found Chaim
Zhitlovsky's name listed as "Schitlowsky." (His father's name was entered
as "Schiltkowsky" followed by a question mark in parentheses.)

So I remind you all, give your mind free rein in spelling names, whether
they be surnames or place names, And be stubbornly persistent in your
searches!

(By the way, with my scant knowledge of German and aided by a huge
dictionary, I am very, very slowly struggling through a book about women
students at the University of Bern, by Franziska Rogger: "Der Doctorhut im
Besenschrank: das abenteurerliche Leben der ersten Studentinnen am
Beispiel der Universitat Bern" eFeF Verlag, 1999, ISBN 3-905561-32-8.
I keep telling myself that if all those revolutionaries I've read about
could teach themselves to read and even speak other languages while they
were in prison, as a free person I ought to be able to teach myself to
read German,Yiddish, Hebrew and Russian. But this is so hard to do when
one's brain is atrophying with age and there seems to be so little time
left!)

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@...
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol; BEHAM,
Salok, Kharkov.


Re: Los Angeles CA death #general

Robert Strumwasser <RobertStrum@...>
 

On Wednesday, March 21, 2001 1:01 AM, "Ron Kaminker"
<Ronkam@...> wrote:
In order to attempt to find any children or relatives I will
1) send away for SSDI application
2) send away for death certificate
3) call the local cemeteries
4) call the local jewish paper
Does anybody have any other suggestions? <<

First you could also try funeral homes, there are typically fewer of them
than there are cemeteries.

Easier would be to try the following sites, offered by Rootsweb; both are
incredibly useful.
1) CA Birth Index: http://userdb.rootsweb.com/ca/birth/search.cgi
This database is searchable not only by last name (including soundex and
metaphone), but also by mother's maiden surname (very useful for when you
don't the name of a female cousin's husband). This database covers births
from 1905 through 1997. If this cousin had any children after moving to
CA, they should be in here.

2) CA Death Index: http://userdb.rootsweb.com/ca/death/search.cgi
This database is also searchable not only by last name (including soundex
and metaphone), but by father's surname (very useful for finding married
women) and by mother's maiden surname (not there for many entries). This
database includes deaths occuring in CA >from 1940 to 1995. For your
purposes, this may mainly be useful for confirming that this women is, in
fact, your cousin while waiting for her death certificate to arrive.

You can see a complete, alphabetical, listing of all of Rootswebs databases
here: http://searches.rootsweb.com/alpha.html

I hope this helps.

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA
RobertStrum@...

Researching: >from Taurage, Lith: COHN, GLICKMAN, ROZ, SIEGAL, HURWITZ;
ABRAMAWITZ >from Taurage & Vainutas; any STRUMWASSER, STROMWASSER,
STRONGWATER, STONEWATER; >from Kamenets Pod., Ukr: JURIST, URIST,
SAPOSNICK, PETCHEKOVSKY, CZAP; >from Sadgura, Ukr: KARPEL, LOBL; KALTER
from Zhelibory & Voynilov, Ukr; >from Sudilkov, Ukr: KUDISH, RUTFIELD,
LERNER, KATZ; >from Rafalowka & Manevichi, Ukr: ROSENFELD, BRATT


Mandatory citizenship records #general

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

A few weeks ago, Ilan Ganot mentioned the citizenship papers that his
grandparents were granted under the British Mandate for Palestine.

Ilan was gracious enough to send me a copy of the two pages, but
since he had his gp's originals, he had no idea where one finds such
things today. I know now.

You have to go to the National Archives on Makor Haim Street, in the
Talpiyot neighborhood of Jerusalem. (Little traffic and lots of
parking.) they are open Sun-thurs, 8AM-3PM. An extra two hours on
Mondays and Wednesdays but you cannot order new materials during
those hours.

They have two resources of interest to genealogists - immigrant
information and Mandatory citizenship files.

The immigrant information is the same database that Batya
Untershatz uses, but without the computerization and her expertise.
It might be useful as something to look through (microfilms) if
fishing without a specific name.

There is an index of citizenship applications on about eight
microfilms. Their microfilm reader is ever so much better than Yad
VaShem's - the only thing I know to compare it to - there are two
machines and the second wasn't in use while I was there. (There
were maybe six other researchers in the whole place.)

You look up the last name and all those with that name are together.
In my case, I looked for Pickholz and they referred me to Pikholz,
where I found twelve entries on a single card. One of the twelve was
someone I had never heard of.

The card is handwritten and some are hard to read. (The original
cards are at the Internal Affairs Ministry - Misrad HaPenim - and not
accessible by the public.) The information on the card is: first name,
birth year, birth place (all of them had towns - "Austria" or "Russia"
wasn't good enough) and file number.

Just seeing the index van be useful and sometimes that's all there is.
The British turned over the index but only about half the files. The
rest - who knows what happened to them. So you order the files you want
and they bring them after an hour or two. (They'll hold them in the
reading room for two weeks, so you can come back later.) That's if
they have them. I ordered three hoping for one or two - and got two,
including my mystery man.

Cost - well, that's a problem. Looking at a file costs NIS 100, about
twenty-five US dollars. They take credit cards. Copying is extra - NIS
1.5 a page. (And they charge NIS 3/page for printing >from the
microfilm reader!) You label what you want copied and they do it when
they have time. I asked that my two files (maybe ten pages each) be
copied completely and they said ("they" is Galia, who is very helpful
and friendly) They would mail them to me and I could pay for the
copies later.

They files I saw did not have precise birthdays - just years - for the
men, but did have for the wives. No parents names etc, but did have
records of events that took place after immigration. Also passport
photos and in one case an expired passport. the price is high, but you
may get just the missing piece you need and it's certainly useful to
flesh out the person's life.

Israel Pickholtz


Important Information for East Galician Researchers #general

Mark Halpern <Willie46@...>
 

Recently, on this forum, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland announced the
commencement of Phase 2 of the AGAD Archives Project -- The Great Galician
Indexing Race. In that announcement, we indicated that the records for the
remaining 79 towns, whose record registers are housed at the AGAD Archives
in Warsaw, would be opened up for indexing. There are a total of 90 towns
-- 86 were in East Galicia (currently Ukraine), 3 were in West Galicia
(currently Poland), and one was >from outside Galicia.

If your ancestral town in East Galicia (the portion of the Austrian
Province of Galicia which is now Ukraine) is not amongst the 86 towns,
their vital events were likely to have been registered in one of these
towns. The towns included in the AGAD Archives Project are all District or
Subdistrict towns. The Jewish Community in each of these towns was
required by law to collect the vital records for all the towns that were
part of the Subdistrict or District.

Now that you know that your ancestral town records may be included in one
of the 86 District or Subdistrict towns, you will ask how do I find where
my town's records were registered? There are two sources I know of.

1. "Finding Your Jewish Roots in Galicia: A Resource Guide" by Suzan F.
Wynne and published by Avotaynu, Inc. has a finding aid, starting on page
132, that alphabetically lists Galician towns where Jews were living
during the 1870 census. Alongside it lists the Main District and
Subdistrict. The town listed as Subdistrict is where those records were
registered. This book also provides much more information pertinent to the
life of your Galician family and the records that you may find.

2. At the Polish Roots website
<http://www.polishroots.com/galicia_towns.htm>
is a Galician Town Locator which will identify where Jewish vital records
were registered and kept. This search engine uses the Austrian era name
for the town. Insert your town's name and click on "search." The resultant
table will show, amongst other information, where Jewish records were kept.

Just one word of caution. Not all subdistrict town records are housed at
the AGAD Archives and not all years of the records of a subdistrict town
are maintained at AGAD. Certain subdistrict town records or certain years
of that town's records could also be housed at the Lviv, Ukraine State
Archives. And for some subdistrict towns, no record have been found. Suzan
Wynne's book, mentioned above, is also a good resource for identifying the
existence and location of 19th Century records for these subdistrict towns.

For more information about the AGAD Project, see our web site at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/>. On this page, click on "table"
and the Excel table that becomes visible lists the 90 towns of the AGAD
Project.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mandatory citizenship records #general

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

A few weeks ago, Ilan Ganot mentioned the citizenship papers that his
grandparents were granted under the British Mandate for Palestine.

Ilan was gracious enough to send me a copy of the two pages, but
since he had his gp's originals, he had no idea where one finds such
things today. I know now.

You have to go to the National Archives on Makor Haim Street, in the
Talpiyot neighborhood of Jerusalem. (Little traffic and lots of
parking.) they are open Sun-thurs, 8AM-3PM. An extra two hours on
Mondays and Wednesdays but you cannot order new materials during
those hours.

They have two resources of interest to genealogists - immigrant
information and Mandatory citizenship files.

The immigrant information is the same database that Batya
Untershatz uses, but without the computerization and her expertise.
It might be useful as something to look through (microfilms) if
fishing without a specific name.

There is an index of citizenship applications on about eight
microfilms. Their microfilm reader is ever so much better than Yad
VaShem's - the only thing I know to compare it to - there are two
machines and the second wasn't in use while I was there. (There
were maybe six other researchers in the whole place.)

You look up the last name and all those with that name are together.
In my case, I looked for Pickholz and they referred me to Pikholz,
where I found twelve entries on a single card. One of the twelve was
someone I had never heard of.

The card is handwritten and some are hard to read. (The original
cards are at the Internal Affairs Ministry - Misrad HaPenim - and not
accessible by the public.) The information on the card is: first name,
birth year, birth place (all of them had towns - "Austria" or "Russia"
wasn't good enough) and file number.

Just seeing the index van be useful and sometimes that's all there is.
The British turned over the index but only about half the files. The
rest - who knows what happened to them. So you order the files you want
and they bring them after an hour or two. (They'll hold them in the
reading room for two weeks, so you can come back later.) That's if
they have them. I ordered three hoping for one or two - and got two,
including my mystery man.

Cost - well, that's a problem. Looking at a file costs NIS 100, about
twenty-five US dollars. They take credit cards. Copying is extra - NIS
1.5 a page. (And they charge NIS 3/page for printing >from the
microfilm reader!) You label what you want copied and they do it when
they have time. I asked that my two files (maybe ten pages each) be
copied completely and they said ("they" is Galia, who is very helpful
and friendly) They would mail them to me and I could pay for the
copies later.

They files I saw did not have precise birthdays - just years - for the
men, but did have for the wives. No parents names etc, but did have
records of events that took place after immigration. Also passport
photos and in one case an expired passport. the price is high, but you
may get just the missing piece you need and it's certainly useful to
flesh out the person's life.

Israel Pickholtz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Los Angeles CA death #general

Robert Strumwasser <RobertStrum@...>
 

On Wednesday, March 21, 2001 1:01 AM, "Ron Kaminker"
<Ronkam@...> wrote:
In order to attempt to find any children or relatives I will
1) send away for SSDI application
2) send away for death certificate
3) call the local cemeteries
4) call the local jewish paper
Does anybody have any other suggestions? <<

First you could also try funeral homes, there are typically fewer of them
than there are cemeteries.

Easier would be to try the following sites, offered by Rootsweb; both are
incredibly useful.
1) CA Birth Index: http://userdb.rootsweb.com/ca/birth/search.cgi
This database is searchable not only by last name (including soundex and
metaphone), but also by mother's maiden surname (very useful for when you
don't the name of a female cousin's husband). This database covers births
from 1905 through 1997. If this cousin had any children after moving to
CA, they should be in here.

2) CA Death Index: http://userdb.rootsweb.com/ca/death/search.cgi
This database is also searchable not only by last name (including soundex
and metaphone), but by father's surname (very useful for finding married
women) and by mother's maiden surname (not there for many entries). This
database includes deaths occuring in CA >from 1940 to 1995. For your
purposes, this may mainly be useful for confirming that this women is, in
fact, your cousin while waiting for her death certificate to arrive.

You can see a complete, alphabetical, listing of all of Rootswebs databases
here: http://searches.rootsweb.com/alpha.html

I hope this helps.

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA
RobertStrum@...

Researching: >from Taurage, Lith: COHN, GLICKMAN, ROZ, SIEGAL, HURWITZ;
ABRAMAWITZ >from Taurage & Vainutas; any STRUMWASSER, STROMWASSER,
STRONGWATER, STONEWATER; >from Kamenets Pod., Ukr: JURIST, URIST,
SAPOSNICK, PETCHEKOVSKY, CZAP; >from Sadgura, Ukr: KARPEL, LOBL; KALTER
from Zhelibory & Voynilov, Ukr; >from Sudilkov, Ukr: KUDISH, RUTFIELD,
LERNER, KATZ; >from Rafalowka & Manevichi, Ukr: ROSENFELD, BRATT


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Important Information for East Galician Researchers #general

Mark Halpern <Willie46@...>
 

Recently, on this forum, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland announced the
commencement of Phase 2 of the AGAD Archives Project -- The Great Galician
Indexing Race. In that announcement, we indicated that the records for the
remaining 79 towns, whose record registers are housed at the AGAD Archives
in Warsaw, would be opened up for indexing. There are a total of 90 towns
-- 86 were in East Galicia (currently Ukraine), 3 were in West Galicia
(currently Poland), and one was >from outside Galicia.

If your ancestral town in East Galicia (the portion of the Austrian
Province of Galicia which is now Ukraine) is not amongst the 86 towns,
their vital events were likely to have been registered in one of these
towns. The towns included in the AGAD Archives Project are all District or
Subdistrict towns. The Jewish Community in each of these towns was
required by law to collect the vital records for all the towns that were
part of the Subdistrict or District.

Now that you know that your ancestral town records may be included in one
of the 86 District or Subdistrict towns, you will ask how do I find where
my town's records were registered? There are two sources I know of.

1. "Finding Your Jewish Roots in Galicia: A Resource Guide" by Suzan F.
Wynne and published by Avotaynu, Inc. has a finding aid, starting on page
132, that alphabetically lists Galician towns where Jews were living
during the 1870 census. Alongside it lists the Main District and
Subdistrict. The town listed as Subdistrict is where those records were
registered. This book also provides much more information pertinent to the
life of your Galician family and the records that you may find.

2. At the Polish Roots website
<http://www.polishroots.com/galicia_towns.htm>
is a Galician Town Locator which will identify where Jewish vital records
were registered and kept. This search engine uses the Austrian era name
for the town. Insert your town's name and click on "search." The resultant
table will show, amongst other information, where Jewish records were kept.

Just one word of caution. Not all subdistrict town records are housed at
the AGAD Archives and not all years of the records of a subdistrict town
are maintained at AGAD. Certain subdistrict town records or certain years
of that town's records could also be housed at the Lviv, Ukraine State
Archives. And for some subdistrict towns, no record have been found. Suzan
Wynne's book, mentioned above, is also a good resource for identifying the
existence and location of 19th Century records for these subdistrict towns.

For more information about the AGAD Project, see our web site at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/agad/>. On this page, click on "table"
and the Excel table that becomes visible lists the 90 towns of the AGAD
Project.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland


SSDI Lists are Unstable #belarus

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

In searching both the Rootsweb and Ancestry SSDI databases today,
I noticed that a relative whose records I had previously found in
both, is now listed in neither. Practically speaking, this suggests
that if we can't find individuals the first time around, it might
pay to keep trying every quarter or so.

Still, I find it odd. Anyone have any knowledge as to why this
would happen?

Michelle Frager, NYC


Searching:
***BELARUS (Grodno, Bobruisk, Hlusk, Kaslovich): FRAKT, WOLFSON,
PADOVSCHIK, LIFSHITZ, SHAPIRO, DINABURSKY
***UKRAINE Podolia (Mogilov-Podolski, Snitkov, Zmerinka, Zamekov,
Liadova, Vinkivtsi): FRAGER/TRAGER, SEROTA, ZECKSER, SCHWEISBERG,
BASSUK, TRACHTENBERG


Belarus SIG #Belarus SSDI Lists are Unstable #belarus

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

In searching both the Rootsweb and Ancestry SSDI databases today,
I noticed that a relative whose records I had previously found in
both, is now listed in neither. Practically speaking, this suggests
that if we can't find individuals the first time around, it might
pay to keep trying every quarter or so.

Still, I find it odd. Anyone have any knowledge as to why this
would happen?

Michelle Frager, NYC


Searching:
***BELARUS (Grodno, Bobruisk, Hlusk, Kaslovich): FRAKT, WOLFSON,
PADOVSCHIK, LIFSHITZ, SHAPIRO, DINABURSKY
***UKRAINE Podolia (Mogilov-Podolski, Snitkov, Zmerinka, Zamekov,
Liadova, Vinkivtsi): FRAGER/TRAGER, SEROTA, ZECKSER, SCHWEISBERG,
BASSUK, TRACHTENBERG


unusual family tree #belarus

Constance Rossoff <ConArtRossoff@...>
 

Judy:

I too have seen an unusual tree. There is a family I know that has an
annual reunion to which I and my wife were invited. The reunion is very
much of an informal, intergenerational family party with but one ritual.
When that is performed, the group crowds into a room with a large
two-dimensional tree on one wall. The trunk, close to the floor, has the
name of the family patriarch and the names (small tags) of later
generations hang >from succeedingly higher branches. Each year, the name
tags of the infants born during the past year are hung ceremonially on th=
e
upper branches with welcoming applause and toasts. =


I don't know what they will do when they reach the ceiling.

Art Rossoff
Moriches, NY


Belarus SIG #Belarus unusual family tree #belarus

Constance Rossoff <ConArtRossoff@...>
 

Judy:

I too have seen an unusual tree. There is a family I know that has an
annual reunion to which I and my wife were invited. The reunion is very
much of an informal, intergenerational family party with but one ritual.
When that is performed, the group crowds into a room with a large
two-dimensional tree on one wall. The trunk, close to the floor, has the
name of the family patriarch and the names (small tags) of later
generations hang >from succeedingly higher branches. Each year, the name
tags of the infants born during the past year are hung ceremonially on th=
e
upper branches with welcoming applause and toasts. =


I don't know what they will do when they reach the ceiling.

Art Rossoff
Moriches, NY


Kabbalah in 19th Century Belarus #belarus

Simpson, Joseph <JSimpson@...>
 

Dear Sig,

Lately I have been doing some study of the Kabbalistic tradition
within Judaism, and am curious to know how common was this tradition in the
jewish communities in 19th Belarus? Was it frowned upon by mainstream
Judaism in this time and era, or was it popular? Any input would be
appreciated. My great great grandfather's family was in Brest Litovsk during
that time.


Thanks,


Joseph Simpson
Glens Falls, NY USA
Researching ROSENFELD in Brest


Belarus SIG #Belarus Kabbalah in 19th Century Belarus #belarus

Simpson, Joseph <JSimpson@...>
 

Dear Sig,

Lately I have been doing some study of the Kabbalistic tradition
within Judaism, and am curious to know how common was this tradition in the
jewish communities in 19th Belarus? Was it frowned upon by mainstream
Judaism in this time and era, or was it popular? Any input would be
appreciated. My great great grandfather's family was in Brest Litovsk during
that time.


Thanks,


Joseph Simpson
Glens Falls, NY USA
Researching ROSENFELD in Brest