Date   

Chicago Yiddish Radio #yiddish

Trudy Barch
 

Hello,

Is there a central location for the Chicago Yiddish Radio >from the
1920s-1940s? My grandfather was an actor back then but, unfortunately, no
records of his shows were kept within the family.

Thank you, Trudy

Moderator's Note: In 1927, Chicago Radio carried a Yiddish Hour on station WEDC.
Unfortunately, I believe the station went out of business in the 1990's. The
writer might try Boca Raton's, Florida Atlantic University, Wimberly Library, Judaica
Department. They maintain an extensive collection of old Yiddish recordings.


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Chicago Yiddish Radio #yiddish

Trudy Barch
 

Hello,

Is there a central location for the Chicago Yiddish Radio >from the
1920s-1940s? My grandfather was an actor back then but, unfortunately, no
records of his shows were kept within the family.

Thank you, Trudy

Moderator's Note: In 1927, Chicago Radio carried a Yiddish Hour on station WEDC.
Unfortunately, I believe the station went out of business in the 1990's. The
writer might try Boca Raton's, Florida Atlantic University, Wimberly Library, Judaica
Department. They maintain an extensive collection of old Yiddish recordings.


Meeting of the JGSGP Russian Interest Group #belarus

David R. Brill
 

Date: Sunday, June 12, 2005
Speaker: Deborah Glassman
Topic: 18th Century Document Sources for Belarus
Place: Klein Branch JCC, Red Lion and Jamison Roads, Philadelphia
Room: 114
Time: 1:30 pm

Deborah Glassman is the webmaster and research coordinator of the
Lyakhovichi (Belarus) ShtetLinks web site. Deborah will discuss her current
research projects for that town, including making available the 18th century
Grand Duchy of Lithuania censuses.

This is an opportunity to learn about Jewish records that predate the
nineteenth and twentieth century Russian sources with which we are familiar.
For directions or other information contact David Brill at
brilldr@comcast.net. For more information on the JGS of Greater Philadelphia
Russian Interest Group (RIG), visit http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp/RIG.htm.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Meeting of the JGSGP Russian Interest Group #belarus

David R. Brill
 

Date: Sunday, June 12, 2005
Speaker: Deborah Glassman
Topic: 18th Century Document Sources for Belarus
Place: Klein Branch JCC, Red Lion and Jamison Roads, Philadelphia
Room: 114
Time: 1:30 pm

Deborah Glassman is the webmaster and research coordinator of the
Lyakhovichi (Belarus) ShtetLinks web site. Deborah will discuss her current
research projects for that town, including making available the 18th century
Grand Duchy of Lithuania censuses.

This is an opportunity to learn about Jewish records that predate the
nineteenth and twentieth century Russian sources with which we are familiar.
For directions or other information contact David Brill at
brilldr@comcast.net. For more information on the JGS of Greater Philadelphia
Russian Interest Group (RIG), visit http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp/RIG.htm.


Re: FW: Gdansk/Danzig question #general

Gary Holtzman <garyholtzman@...>
 

"Terri " <terrib@sprintmail.com> wrote:

Hello, I have a relative who died in Danzig/Gdansk around 1926-1935.
Can someone tell me if Danzig/Gdansk records for 1926-1935 would be
located with Polish records, Ukrainian records, German records, etc.

Thanks,

Tom Erribe
At that time, Danzig was a free city in customs union with Poland, but
generally tied toGermany in administrative/bureaucratic matters. I would
think Germany would be your best bet for records, unless the free city
kept its own (which would seem at least to be a possibility).

Gary Holtzman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: FW: Gdansk/Danzig question #general

Gary Holtzman <garyholtzman@...>
 

"Terri " <terrib@sprintmail.com> wrote:

Hello, I have a relative who died in Danzig/Gdansk around 1926-1935.
Can someone tell me if Danzig/Gdansk records for 1926-1935 would be
located with Polish records, Ukrainian records, German records, etc.

Thanks,

Tom Erribe
At that time, Danzig was a free city in customs union with Poland, but
generally tied toGermany in administrative/bureaucratic matters. I would
think Germany would be your best bet for records, unless the free city
kept its own (which would seem at least to be a possibility).

Gary Holtzman


Re: 1811 date and writing permitted on shabbat? #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <80.29186306.2fd4e14b@aol.com>, <MBernet@aol.com> wrote:

According to an on line calendar at
http://www.travelfurther.net/dates/datesrus.asp
this date - 24 December 1811 was a Tuesday.
==This was about the time that most European nations adjusted the Julian
calendar and adopted the Gregorian calendar, which also required adjusting dates
by about 11 days. In France an entirely new calendar was created. Either
of these could expllain the why of the date of the week.
Not in this case, I think.
France, being a Catholic country, adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1582.
The French revolutionary calendar (which used completely different month
names) was in use >from October 1793 to January 1806. Then the Gregorian
calendar came back.
See <http://www.norbyhus.dk/calendar.html> for lots of information
on when various places switched calendars.

Robert Israel israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 1811 date and writing permitted on shabbat? #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <80.29186306.2fd4e14b@aol.com>, <MBernet@aol.com> wrote:

According to an on line calendar at
http://www.travelfurther.net/dates/datesrus.asp
this date - 24 December 1811 was a Tuesday.
==This was about the time that most European nations adjusted the Julian
calendar and adopted the Gregorian calendar, which also required adjusting dates
by about 11 days. In France an entirely new calendar was created. Either
of these could expllain the why of the date of the week.
Not in this case, I think.
France, being a Catholic country, adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1582.
The French revolutionary calendar (which used completely different month
names) was in use >from October 1793 to January 1806. Then the Gregorian
calendar came back.
See <http://www.norbyhus.dk/calendar.html> for lots of information
on when various places switched calendars.

Robert Israel israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Re: 1811 date and writing permitted on shabbat? #general

Tom Chatt
 

Following some discussion about whether 24 Dec 1811 fell on Shabbas, Michael
Bernet offers:
This was about the time that most European nations adjusted the
Julian calendar and adopted the Gregorian calendar, which also
required adjusting dates by about 11 days. In France an entirely
new calendar was created. Either of these could expllain the why
of the date of the week.
Michael is correct to raise the consideration of the shift >from Julian to
Gregorian calendar, which occurred at different times in different
countries. Catholic nations generally changed in 1582, while many Protestant
nations did not change until as late as 1752 (eg British Empire), and
eastern Orthodox nations mostly changed in the early 20th century. This is
important when trying to figure out "what day of the week was Jan 1, 1700"
(answer is, it depends which country).

However, France changed their calendar in 1582, so by the date in question
in 1811, France had been on the Gregorian calendar for over a couple
centuries, and 24 Dec 1811 was indeed a Tuesday as has been pointed out.

Michael is also correct in noting that France had an entirely unique
calendar system for a brief period, a by-product of Revolutionary
exuberance. However, the Republican calendar was only in effect >from 1793 to
1806. Also, it was a complete overhaul of the traditional calendar, with the
new year starting on the fall equinox, 12 months of exactly 30 days each
(with completely new month names), and the traditional 7-day week abolished
in favor of a 10-day week called a "decade". (Since 12 30-day months only
makes 360 days, they had a handful of festival days at the end of each year
that didn't belong to any month.)

Had France still been on the Republican calendar on the date in question (24
Dec 1811), I estimate that it would have fallen on the second day ("Duodi")
of the first 10-day "decade" in the fourth month ("Nivo^se") of the year 18.
In other words, there would be no confusion should you come across a
Republican date in France, because it would look completely unlike a Julian
or Gregorian date.

Cheers,
Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: 1811 date and writing permitted on shabbat? #general

Tom Chatt
 

Following some discussion about whether 24 Dec 1811 fell on Shabbas, Michael
Bernet offers:
This was about the time that most European nations adjusted the
Julian calendar and adopted the Gregorian calendar, which also
required adjusting dates by about 11 days. In France an entirely
new calendar was created. Either of these could expllain the why
of the date of the week.
Michael is correct to raise the consideration of the shift >from Julian to
Gregorian calendar, which occurred at different times in different
countries. Catholic nations generally changed in 1582, while many Protestant
nations did not change until as late as 1752 (eg British Empire), and
eastern Orthodox nations mostly changed in the early 20th century. This is
important when trying to figure out "what day of the week was Jan 1, 1700"
(answer is, it depends which country).

However, France changed their calendar in 1582, so by the date in question
in 1811, France had been on the Gregorian calendar for over a couple
centuries, and 24 Dec 1811 was indeed a Tuesday as has been pointed out.

Michael is also correct in noting that France had an entirely unique
calendar system for a brief period, a by-product of Revolutionary
exuberance. However, the Republican calendar was only in effect >from 1793 to
1806. Also, it was a complete overhaul of the traditional calendar, with the
new year starting on the fall equinox, 12 months of exactly 30 days each
(with completely new month names), and the traditional 7-day week abolished
in favor of a 10-day week called a "decade". (Since 12 30-day months only
makes 360 days, they had a handful of festival days at the end of each year
that didn't belong to any month.)

Had France still been on the Republican calendar on the date in question (24
Dec 1811), I estimate that it would have fallen on the second day ("Duodi")
of the first 10-day "decade" in the fourth month ("Nivo^se") of the year 18.
In other words, there would be no confusion should you come across a
Republican date in France, because it would look completely unlike a Julian
or Gregorian date.

Cheers,
Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA


Re: Sexton? Rabbi? Rev.? #rabbinic

Adelle Gloger
 

On 2005.06.03, Ethel Jean (Kowan) Saltz nietgal@airmail.net writes:

My brother, who was named for our paternal grandfather, and I have
always been told our grandfather, Elias KOHN of Cleveland, OH, was
an ordained rabbi.
He was employed at Temple On The Heights Cleveland, OH and I do
have his burial notice which included people I know nothing of."
Since Ethel Jean (Kowan) Saltz did not indicate her location, I hope
I am not giving her information that she has in "her own backyard."

I suggest that she log onto the website for Congregation B'nai
Jeshurun (aka Temple on the Heights): http://www.bnaijeshurun.org/
In May 1980, the congregation moved to it's present location, and
began using it's Hebrew name.

There is a history of the Temple. When the building, at the old
location, was expanded in the 1950s a chapel was given the name of
Kohn Chapel. It does not indicate who the Kohn person was that it
was named for. Possibly Ethel's relative, since he died in 1930
unexpectedly in his 40s. I'm sure that if Ethel contacted the shul
they might be able to give her the information she is seeking.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Shaker Hts., Ohio (Cleveland)
agloger@aol.com


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Sexton? Rabbi? Rev.? #rabbinic

Adelle Gloger
 

On 2005.06.03, Ethel Jean (Kowan) Saltz nietgal@airmail.net writes:

My brother, who was named for our paternal grandfather, and I have
always been told our grandfather, Elias KOHN of Cleveland, OH, was
an ordained rabbi.
He was employed at Temple On The Heights Cleveland, OH and I do
have his burial notice which included people I know nothing of."
Since Ethel Jean (Kowan) Saltz did not indicate her location, I hope
I am not giving her information that she has in "her own backyard."

I suggest that she log onto the website for Congregation B'nai
Jeshurun (aka Temple on the Heights): http://www.bnaijeshurun.org/
In May 1980, the congregation moved to it's present location, and
began using it's Hebrew name.

There is a history of the Temple. When the building, at the old
location, was expanded in the 1950s a chapel was given the name of
Kohn Chapel. It does not indicate who the Kohn person was that it
was named for. Possibly Ethel's relative, since he died in 1930
unexpectedly in his 40s. I'm sure that if Ethel contacted the shul
they might be able to give her the information she is seeking.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Shaker Hts., Ohio (Cleveland)
agloger@aol.com


Rabbi Mordechai Landa from Tetiev #rabbinic

Adelle Gloger
 

In 1931 Rabbi Mordechai Landa came to Cleveland, Ohio to be the
spiritual leader of the Tetiever Congregation (Orthodox). I believe
he remained until 1953. I am not sure if he left to go to another
congregation or if he died. I cannot find an obituary, a death
notice or anything about him.

Does anyone know of Rabbi Landa?

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Cleveland, Ohio
agloger@aol.com


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Mordechai Landa from Tetiev #rabbinic

Adelle Gloger
 

In 1931 Rabbi Mordechai Landa came to Cleveland, Ohio to be the
spiritual leader of the Tetiever Congregation (Orthodox). I believe
he remained until 1953. I am not sure if he left to go to another
congregation or if he died. I cannot find an obituary, a death
notice or anything about him.

Does anyone know of Rabbi Landa?

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Cleveland, Ohio
agloger@aol.com


Re: Book of Residents #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

Regarding Fay Bussgang's mention of "Ksiegi Ludnosci," here is an example
drawn >from Czestochowa (south of Lodz):

http://tinyurl.com/do34c
or
http://www.benkazez.com/dan/Englender-Book-of-Residents/Census.html

Dan Kazez

TELMAN family in Lodz and Zgierz

........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, BRODA, SZEWCZYK,
LEWKOWICZ, SZPALTYN, OFMAN, ZYLBERBERG, KRZEPICKI, LUKS, MOSZKOWICZ, STROZ,
SZWIMER, GUTMAN, PESACH, FEYNER/FEINER/FAYNER, BORZYKOWSKI, SZEWCZYK,
SZWARCBERG, HILLER, FEDERMAN, WAJSHAUS, WAJSBERG, GELBART, FINGERHUT,
PLOTEK, FAJWLEWICZ, SZKLARCZYK, WAJCENBLUT, KRZESOWICZ/KRESOWICZ

Dear Tzilla Kratter,

Lodz Archives have very good records called Ksiegi Ludnosci
(until 1931) which list all legal residents of Lodz. A whole
family is listed on one page with birth date, place, names of
parents, occupation, where they last lived, etc.

In addition, they have Personnenblatt-Karty Meldunkowe from
1918-1920 with much the same information. You could write the
Lodz State Archives and ask someone to do the research.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland re: Book of Residents #lodz #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

Regarding Fay Bussgang's mention of "Ksiegi Ludnosci," here is an example
drawn >from Czestochowa (south of Lodz):

http://tinyurl.com/do34c
or
http://www.benkazez.com/dan/Englender-Book-of-Residents/Census.html

Dan Kazez

TELMAN family in Lodz and Zgierz

........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, BRODA, SZEWCZYK,
LEWKOWICZ, SZPALTYN, OFMAN, ZYLBERBERG, KRZEPICKI, LUKS, MOSZKOWICZ, STROZ,
SZWIMER, GUTMAN, PESACH, FEYNER/FEINER/FAYNER, BORZYKOWSKI, SZEWCZYK,
SZWARCBERG, HILLER, FEDERMAN, WAJSHAUS, WAJSBERG, GELBART, FINGERHUT,
PLOTEK, FAJWLEWICZ, SZKLARCZYK, WAJCENBLUT, KRZESOWICZ/KRESOWICZ

Dear Tzilla Kratter,

Lodz Archives have very good records called Ksiegi Ludnosci
(until 1931) which list all legal residents of Lodz. A whole
family is listed on one page with birth date, place, names of
parents, occupation, where they last lived, etc.

In addition, they have Personnenblatt-Karty Meldunkowe from
1918-1920 with much the same information. You could write the
Lodz State Archives and ask someone to do the research.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


Re: Lodz Book of Residents #lodz #poland

Fbussgang@...
 

------ Original message --------
<< If I visit the archive in person - will it be more efficient rather than
writing a letter to the archive?
Will I be able to search the books myself?>>

You can ask the Lodz Archives to do the search for about $30 initial payment
and $10 a page or you can do the search yourself if you are in Poland.

Lodz Archives have a large card index organized alphabetically. You can look
through the index, pick the books you want to look at and ask the archivist to
bring them to you >from the stacks. You can then either just copy down the
information or ask to have the pages reproduced (which may take another day).

If you are planning a visit, it is best to write ahead, so they can have the
boxes with the card index for the letters you want ready. Otherwise, you may
have to wait a day until they retrieve them >from the depository.

If you are coming to Las Vegas, my husband and I are giving a talk Thursday
at 2:00 and will show examples of Books of Residents and what marvelous
information they hold.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


ksiega ludnosci #lodz #poland

Simon Srebrny <srebrny@...>
 

Dear Fellow Lodzers,

What would it take to organize a project to transcribe and publish on the web
the ksiega ludnosci entries for the Jewish population of our ancestral city?
I would volunteer some hours, even many perhaps.

Regards,

Simon Srebrny

(>from London, now in Berlin)


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Re: Lodz Book of Residents #lodz #poland

Fbussgang@...
 

------ Original message --------
<< If I visit the archive in person - will it be more efficient rather than
writing a letter to the archive?
Will I be able to search the books myself?>>

You can ask the Lodz Archives to do the search for about $30 initial payment
and $10 a page or you can do the search yourself if you are in Poland.

Lodz Archives have a large card index organized alphabetically. You can look
through the index, pick the books you want to look at and ask the archivist to
bring them to you >from the stacks. You can then either just copy down the
information or ask to have the pages reproduced (which may take another day).

If you are planning a visit, it is best to write ahead, so they can have the
boxes with the card index for the letters you want ready. Otherwise, you may
have to wait a day until they retrieve them >from the depository.

If you are coming to Las Vegas, my husband and I are giving a talk Thursday
at 2:00 and will show examples of Books of Residents and what marvelous
information they hold.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland ksiega ludnosci #lodz #poland

Simon Srebrny <srebrny@...>
 

Dear Fellow Lodzers,

What would it take to organize a project to transcribe and publish on the web
the ksiega ludnosci entries for the Jewish population of our ancestral city?
I would volunteer some hours, even many perhaps.

Regards,

Simon Srebrny

(>from London, now in Berlin)