Date   

Moses Montefiore #romania

navy7seas@...
 

A recent biography by Abigail Green titled "Moses Montefiore, Jewish
Liberator, Imperial Hero" has an interesting description of the plight
of Jews in Romania during the 1860's. Anyone with a historical bent
might find the chapter " Crisis in Romania" of interest.
Jonathan Schwartz.
researching SCHWARTZ in Focsani, Birlad, and Iasi.
MODERATOR NOTE: Please always sign with your location. This is allowed as a
one-time commercial mention.


Romania SIG #Romania Moses Montefiore #romania

navy7seas@...
 

A recent biography by Abigail Green titled "Moses Montefiore, Jewish
Liberator, Imperial Hero" has an interesting description of the plight
of Jews in Romania during the 1860's. Anyone with a historical bent
might find the chapter " Crisis in Romania" of interest.
Jonathan Schwartz.
researching SCHWARTZ in Focsani, Birlad, and Iasi.
MODERATOR NOTE: Please always sign with your location. This is allowed as a
one-time commercial mention.


Sixty-seven years since Skalat #ukraine

Israel P
 

The annual memorial meeting for Skalat will take place Thursday at five
in the afternoon, at the Skalat monument in the Holon cemetery, near Tel-
Aviv.

For those of you abroad this is the second day of Shavuot and many of you
will be saying Yizkor at the same time as our memorial meeting. If you
have Skalat connections, you might want to keep them in mind at that
time.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Sixty-seven years since Skalat #ukraine

Israel P
 

The annual memorial meeting for Skalat will take place Thursday at five
in the afternoon, at the Skalat monument in the Holon cemetery, near Tel-
Aviv.

For those of you abroad this is the second day of Shavuot and many of you
will be saying Yizkor at the same time as our memorial meeting. If you
have Skalat connections, you might want to keep them in mind at that
time.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


Asylum records and untraceable death records. #unitedkingdom

jessica@...
 

Dear all,

In recent weeks I had a number of very helpful messages >from members who
were trying to help me trace my great grandmother, Frances David, who's
incarceration in mental hospital in the 1950s had been hidden >from my
grandmother (her daughter) and my father until her death in the late 1970s.
Having taken up the suggestion to search for her death outside the area that
she was known to live in, I discovered to my amazement that there were only
three Fanny Davids to have died in England between 1967 - 1987, and so with
a bit of a hunch, I ordered the death certificate of the one I found to have
died in 1977 in Surrey.

You may remember that my mother received a phone call around 1979 - 1980
(when my sister was still a baby and I would have been about 4 or 5 years
old) >from my father's cousin, to tell him that his grandmother had died? My
mother (like my father and his mother) believed that Granny David had died
in the 50s since this is what the rest of my father's family had told her,
Grandma and Dad. So this phone call was a bit of a shock to say the least.
The reason why it was possible to cover up what had happened to Granny David
was because my father and his parents were living in Berlin and Sofia during
the war - so they weren't around and weren't involved in the decision to
have her committed to an asylum. It seems that the decision was taken to
keep it all quiet to save my grandmother and father >from the distress that
this decision would probably cause.

As it turns out, I ordered the right certificate: Granny David had died two
years before my sister's birth, and her death was registered by someone
outside the family. She died in Horton Hospital, which was part of a well
known asylum in Epsom and part of a larger group of hospitals serving the
local area at the time. It seems that the family only found out two or
three years after she died.

I am now in the process of tracing her hospital records to find out what
happened to her and where she lived in the intervening years, and I also
hope to find her grave since the burial records for Horton are kept by the
Surrey History Centre.

This is a sad chapter in my family history: but not uncommon for the times.
I suppose the most upsetting thing is that it seems her children and
grandchildren didn't know she had died until nearly three years after she
was either buried or cremated.

Like many of us, I find myself knowing yet again that a person is only truly
dead when we stop talking of them and remembering their life, culture and
experiences - however traumatic these may or may not might be. I hope to
restore the truth and memory of my great grandmother for this reason: after
all - were it not for her, I wouldn't be around!

Thank you to everyone who helped - I will keep you updated on the process I
go through to trace records since this sort of search is more difficult and
could prove helpful to anyone else going down a similar path.

Best wishes,

Jessie Leschnikoff - Brenchley, Kent

Researching: PELLETIER - Loire, Versaille & Carcassonne (France), DAVID -
Paris, Saint Martin de Brethencourt (France), WALSH - Ireland, PRENDERGHAST
- Ireland, LESCHNIKOFF - Sofia & Haskovo (Bulgaria), BARNETT - Plymouth,
Bristol, Birmingham & Prussia, SOLOMONS - Prussia & London, PULVERMACHER -
Breslau, MASON - Orkney & Penang, CHILL - Mayanmar & Penang, BLAUSTEIN &
LANDAU - Tanopol UKRAINE.


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Asylum records and untraceable death records. #unitedkingdom

jessica@...
 

Dear all,

In recent weeks I had a number of very helpful messages >from members who
were trying to help me trace my great grandmother, Frances David, who's
incarceration in mental hospital in the 1950s had been hidden >from my
grandmother (her daughter) and my father until her death in the late 1970s.
Having taken up the suggestion to search for her death outside the area that
she was known to live in, I discovered to my amazement that there were only
three Fanny Davids to have died in England between 1967 - 1987, and so with
a bit of a hunch, I ordered the death certificate of the one I found to have
died in 1977 in Surrey.

You may remember that my mother received a phone call around 1979 - 1980
(when my sister was still a baby and I would have been about 4 or 5 years
old) >from my father's cousin, to tell him that his grandmother had died? My
mother (like my father and his mother) believed that Granny David had died
in the 50s since this is what the rest of my father's family had told her,
Grandma and Dad. So this phone call was a bit of a shock to say the least.
The reason why it was possible to cover up what had happened to Granny David
was because my father and his parents were living in Berlin and Sofia during
the war - so they weren't around and weren't involved in the decision to
have her committed to an asylum. It seems that the decision was taken to
keep it all quiet to save my grandmother and father >from the distress that
this decision would probably cause.

As it turns out, I ordered the right certificate: Granny David had died two
years before my sister's birth, and her death was registered by someone
outside the family. She died in Horton Hospital, which was part of a well
known asylum in Epsom and part of a larger group of hospitals serving the
local area at the time. It seems that the family only found out two or
three years after she died.

I am now in the process of tracing her hospital records to find out what
happened to her and where she lived in the intervening years, and I also
hope to find her grave since the burial records for Horton are kept by the
Surrey History Centre.

This is a sad chapter in my family history: but not uncommon for the times.
I suppose the most upsetting thing is that it seems her children and
grandchildren didn't know she had died until nearly three years after she
was either buried or cremated.

Like many of us, I find myself knowing yet again that a person is only truly
dead when we stop talking of them and remembering their life, culture and
experiences - however traumatic these may or may not might be. I hope to
restore the truth and memory of my great grandmother for this reason: after
all - were it not for her, I wouldn't be around!

Thank you to everyone who helped - I will keep you updated on the process I
go through to trace records since this sort of search is more difficult and
could prove helpful to anyone else going down a similar path.

Best wishes,

Jessie Leschnikoff - Brenchley, Kent

Researching: PELLETIER - Loire, Versaille & Carcassonne (France), DAVID -
Paris, Saint Martin de Brethencourt (France), WALSH - Ireland, PRENDERGHAST
- Ireland, LESCHNIKOFF - Sofia & Haskovo (Bulgaria), BARNETT - Plymouth,
Bristol, Birmingham & Prussia, SOLOMONS - Prussia & London, PULVERMACHER -
Breslau, MASON - Orkney & Penang, CHILL - Mayanmar & Penang, BLAUSTEIN &
LANDAU - Tanopol UKRAINE.


Searching address for Malydetzna (Molodetchno) Archives #belarus

mickipot@...
 

I watch "Who Do You Think You Are" on NBC on 4 consecutive Fridays, and found
it interesting if not helpful, except for the Lisa Kudrow segment,.
My grandfather was born in Molodetchno Russia, now Belarus, and she
was shown visiting an archive in that city. I have thought I could
find information >from Vilna (until I was told that Molodetchno is not
in the Vilna "fold"....and thought to try a Belarus archive....but now...
this is perfect if...someone could advise what address (or how to
find the address of the Mlodetchno Archive. Please????? thank you
so very very much.

Maxine Braslow
New York

researching:

ZARETSKY/SARETSKY, AXELROD Molodetchn Belarus
SALTSBERG/ZALTSBERG Josvainaini Lithuania
KLEIN HEISLER Maramosa Sighet Romania
MERLING MALERSTEIN Keidan or Ukraine
POCHINKA LERNER Berdechiv Ukraine


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching address for Malydetzna (Molodetchno) Archives #belarus

mickipot@...
 

I watch "Who Do You Think You Are" on NBC on 4 consecutive Fridays, and found
it interesting if not helpful, except for the Lisa Kudrow segment,.
My grandfather was born in Molodetchno Russia, now Belarus, and she
was shown visiting an archive in that city. I have thought I could
find information >from Vilna (until I was told that Molodetchno is not
in the Vilna "fold"....and thought to try a Belarus archive....but now...
this is perfect if...someone could advise what address (or how to
find the address of the Mlodetchno Archive. Please????? thank you
so very very much.

Maxine Braslow
New York

researching:

ZARETSKY/SARETSKY, AXELROD Molodetchn Belarus
SALTSBERG/ZALTSBERG Josvainaini Lithuania
KLEIN HEISLER Maramosa Sighet Romania
MERLING MALERSTEIN Keidan or Ukraine
POCHINKA LERNER Berdechiv Ukraine


New Book of Great Interest: Jewish Bialystok and Its Diaspora #poland

Bialystoker
 

"Jewish Bialystok and Its Diaspora" by Rebecca Kobrin

A book about Bialystok and its migrant communities in the US, Canada,
Israel, Australia, South America, and throughout Europe.

from the Publisher:
The mass migration of East European Jews and their resettlement in cities
throughout Europe, the United States, Argentina, the Middle East and
Australia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries not only transformed the
demographic and cultural centers of world Jewry, it also reshaped Jews'
understanding and performance of their diasporic identities. Rebecca Kobrin's
study of the dispersal of Jews >from one city in Poland - Bialystok -
demonstrates how the act of migration set in motion a wide
range of transformations that led the migrants to imagine themselves as
exiles not only >from the mythic Land of Israel but most immediately >from
their east European homeland. Kobrin explores the organizations,
institutions, newspapers, and philanthropies that the Bialystokers created
around the world and that reshaped their perceptions of exile and diaspora.

"Challenges and refines long-standing assumptions about Old World/New World
dynamics generally and Jewish immigrants to America in particular. . . .
Original and smartly conceived, grounded in careful, extensive research and
thoughtful analysis." -Jeffrey Shandler, Rutgers University

"An imaginative and original work. It offers an intriguing argument that in
the first half of the 20th century, diaspora Jewish identities were defined
through a constant, dynamic process of interaction between the place of
origin and the several sites of immigration."
-Derek Penslar, University of Toronto

Rebecca Kobrin is the Russell and Bettina Knapp Assistant Professor of
American Jewish History at Columbia University. She was a speaker at the
2009 IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Philadelphia and has spoken at
a number of Jewish Genealogical Societies about Landsmanschaften and their
connections to the old country.

The book is available >from Indiana Univeristy Press -
www.iupress.indiana.edu or 1-800-842-6796 - or any major bookseller.

http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=190706

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This message is the official commercial announcement
of the publication of this book. Any future citation of this book as a
specific resource for Bialystok area researchers does not constitute a
commercial announcement and is within the scope of this discussion group.


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland New Book of Great Interest: Jewish Bialystok and Its Diaspora #poland

Bialystoker
 

"Jewish Bialystok and Its Diaspora" by Rebecca Kobrin

A book about Bialystok and its migrant communities in the US, Canada,
Israel, Australia, South America, and throughout Europe.

from the Publisher:
The mass migration of East European Jews and their resettlement in cities
throughout Europe, the United States, Argentina, the Middle East and
Australia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries not only transformed the
demographic and cultural centers of world Jewry, it also reshaped Jews'
understanding and performance of their diasporic identities. Rebecca Kobrin's
study of the dispersal of Jews >from one city in Poland - Bialystok -
demonstrates how the act of migration set in motion a wide
range of transformations that led the migrants to imagine themselves as
exiles not only >from the mythic Land of Israel but most immediately >from
their east European homeland. Kobrin explores the organizations,
institutions, newspapers, and philanthropies that the Bialystokers created
around the world and that reshaped their perceptions of exile and diaspora.

"Challenges and refines long-standing assumptions about Old World/New World
dynamics generally and Jewish immigrants to America in particular. . . .
Original and smartly conceived, grounded in careful, extensive research and
thoughtful analysis." -Jeffrey Shandler, Rutgers University

"An imaginative and original work. It offers an intriguing argument that in
the first half of the 20th century, diaspora Jewish identities were defined
through a constant, dynamic process of interaction between the place of
origin and the several sites of immigration."
-Derek Penslar, University of Toronto

Rebecca Kobrin is the Russell and Bettina Knapp Assistant Professor of
American Jewish History at Columbia University. She was a speaker at the
2009 IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Philadelphia and has spoken at
a number of Jewish Genealogical Societies about Landsmanschaften and their
connections to the old country.

The book is available >from Indiana Univeristy Press -
www.iupress.indiana.edu or 1-800-842-6796 - or any major bookseller.

http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=190706

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This message is the official commercial announcement
of the publication of this book. Any future citation of this book as a
specific resource for Bialystok area researchers does not constitute a
commercial announcement and is within the scope of this discussion group.


Re: Majer/Meier INGBERG, Polna 19 or Polnej 17 #poland

Bialystoker
 

Dear Elizabeth:

My mother and her family lived at Polna 27 before immigrating to the US in
1923. In the 1930s and before, Polna was a fairly long street, running >from
ul. Pilsudskiego (you will have to consult a map) northward. Now, Polna does
not exist. The streets in the center of Bialystok were changed by
reconstruction and re-routing either just before or after the War. A short
part of Polna remains, but is now called ul. Warynskiego. Remaining is the
building that housed the Cytron Synagogue (now an art gallery) at Polna
(Warynskiego) 24,which was built in 1936.

I have walked this street many times. Across >from Polna 24 is a very large
Soviet era apartment complex. I would think that Polna 17 and 19 were once
where this apartment complex now stands. This area was in the center of the
Jewish quarter and was inside the gates of the Bialystok Ghetto.

In a historical guide of Jewish Bialystok - Jewish Heritage Trail in
Bialystok - the authors state: Polna was "typical of 19th century Bialystok.
It used to be tenement houses. The higher floors we\re occupied by rental
apartments,while the ground floors and in the backyards there were usually
stores, and craft and service shops."

Mark Halpern

----- Original Message -----
Dear members,

I have asked a long time ago for assistance in researching my INGBERG
family of Bialystok, but as it has been some time and I still am at a
dead end, I am asking once again.

My great uncle was Majer INGBERG. His address on 5 August 1937 (and
from 1933 or before, I believe) was Polna 19 or 17, Bialystok. I have
been unable to locate any information on Majer INGBERG.

Here is what I know:
Majer Ingberg was probably born in Warsaw, as his brother Hirsch Wolf
INGBERG (my grandfather) was born in Warsaw. It is believed that Hirsch
and Majer also had a sister (possibly two), but I have found no
confirmation of this. Majer owned a factory/shop in Bialystok which
made leather goods. He had three sons (one named Moshe) and one daughter
(possibly named Paula). My mother said that the daughter did not look
like the sons, that she was not very smart; she was in several jobs at
the factory but never lasted in any of them; the family tried to get
her married. It is believed that one of Majer's sons lived in Warsaw.

I have a photo of an INGBERG engagement party in Bialystok which is the
celebration of the engagement of one of Majer's sons, we believe Moshe,
who was to marry a teacher. Included in the photo is their Russian maid.
I will post this soon to Viewmate, but if you are interested, contact me
privately and I can email a scan of the photo to you.

In 1933, my grandfather, who was living in Minden Germany at the time,
requested to go visit his brother in Bialystok. Included with the
request is a copy of a medical note >from a Dr. H. Lukaczewski (line
through first "l") of Bialystok indicating that Majer was suffering
from arteriosclerosis. The address for Majer is either Polna 19 or 17.
from the Bialystok 1939 telephone directory, there are the following
listings:

Indurski Szaja, m., Polna 17
Szalmuk Ajzyk, m. Polna 19
Tabaczynski Hirz, m., Polna 17

This leads me to believe that Polna 17 and/or 19 consisted of multiple
dwellings/apartments. Can anyone confirm this?

I have searched all the normal sources, but cannot find any information
at all on the INGBERGs of Bialystok. Interestingly, the only information
I have found >from Warsaw are birth records for two of Hirsch Wolf
INGBERG's children.

Please, if anyone can provide any assistance in locating information on
the INGBERG family, I would greatly appreciate it!

Thank you everyone!
Elizabeth Jackson
Muskegon MI, USA


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Majer/Meier INGBERG, Polna 19 or Polnej 17 #poland

Bialystoker
 

Dear Elizabeth:

My mother and her family lived at Polna 27 before immigrating to the US in
1923. In the 1930s and before, Polna was a fairly long street, running >from
ul. Pilsudskiego (you will have to consult a map) northward. Now, Polna does
not exist. The streets in the center of Bialystok were changed by
reconstruction and re-routing either just before or after the War. A short
part of Polna remains, but is now called ul. Warynskiego. Remaining is the
building that housed the Cytron Synagogue (now an art gallery) at Polna
(Warynskiego) 24,which was built in 1936.

I have walked this street many times. Across >from Polna 24 is a very large
Soviet era apartment complex. I would think that Polna 17 and 19 were once
where this apartment complex now stands. This area was in the center of the
Jewish quarter and was inside the gates of the Bialystok Ghetto.

In a historical guide of Jewish Bialystok - Jewish Heritage Trail in
Bialystok - the authors state: Polna was "typical of 19th century Bialystok.
It used to be tenement houses. The higher floors we\re occupied by rental
apartments,while the ground floors and in the backyards there were usually
stores, and craft and service shops."

Mark Halpern

----- Original Message -----
Dear members,

I have asked a long time ago for assistance in researching my INGBERG
family of Bialystok, but as it has been some time and I still am at a
dead end, I am asking once again.

My great uncle was Majer INGBERG. His address on 5 August 1937 (and
from 1933 or before, I believe) was Polna 19 or 17, Bialystok. I have
been unable to locate any information on Majer INGBERG.

Here is what I know:
Majer Ingberg was probably born in Warsaw, as his brother Hirsch Wolf
INGBERG (my grandfather) was born in Warsaw. It is believed that Hirsch
and Majer also had a sister (possibly two), but I have found no
confirmation of this. Majer owned a factory/shop in Bialystok which
made leather goods. He had three sons (one named Moshe) and one daughter
(possibly named Paula). My mother said that the daughter did not look
like the sons, that she was not very smart; she was in several jobs at
the factory but never lasted in any of them; the family tried to get
her married. It is believed that one of Majer's sons lived in Warsaw.

I have a photo of an INGBERG engagement party in Bialystok which is the
celebration of the engagement of one of Majer's sons, we believe Moshe,
who was to marry a teacher. Included in the photo is their Russian maid.
I will post this soon to Viewmate, but if you are interested, contact me
privately and I can email a scan of the photo to you.

In 1933, my grandfather, who was living in Minden Germany at the time,
requested to go visit his brother in Bialystok. Included with the
request is a copy of a medical note >from a Dr. H. Lukaczewski (line
through first "l") of Bialystok indicating that Majer was suffering
from arteriosclerosis. The address for Majer is either Polna 19 or 17.
from the Bialystok 1939 telephone directory, there are the following
listings:

Indurski Szaja, m., Polna 17
Szalmuk Ajzyk, m. Polna 19
Tabaczynski Hirz, m., Polna 17

This leads me to believe that Polna 17 and/or 19 consisted of multiple
dwellings/apartments. Can anyone confirm this?

I have searched all the normal sources, but cannot find any information
at all on the INGBERGs of Bialystok. Interestingly, the only information
I have found >from Warsaw are birth records for two of Hirsch Wolf
INGBERG's children.

Please, if anyone can provide any assistance in locating information on
the INGBERG family, I would greatly appreciate it!

Thank you everyone!
Elizabeth Jackson
Muskegon MI, USA


New Book of Great Interest: Jewish Bialystok and Its Diaspora #poland

Mark Halpern <willie46@...>
 

"Jewish Bialystok and Its Diaspora" by Rebecca Kobrin

A book about Bialystok and its migrant communities in the US, Canada,
Israel, Australia, South America, and throughout Europe.

from the Publisher:
The mass migration of East European Jews and their resettlement in cities
throughout Europe, the United States, Argentina, the Middle East and
Australia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries not only transformed the
demographic and cultural centers of world Jewry, it also reshaped Jews'
understanding and performance of their diasporic identities. Rebecca
Kobrin's study of the dispersal of Jews >from one city in Poland - Bialystok -
demonstrates how the act of migration set in motion a wide
range of transformations that led the migrants to imagine themselves as
exiles not only >from the mythic Land of Israel but most immediately from
their east European homeland. Kobrin explores the organizations,
institutions, newspapers, and philanthropies that the Bialystokers created
around the world and that reshaped their perceptions of exile and diaspora.

"Challenges and refines long-standing assumptions about Old World/New World
dynamics generally and Jewish immigrants to America in particular. . . .
Original and smartly conceived, grounded in careful, extensive research and
thoughtful analysis." -Jeffrey Shandler, Rutgers University

"An imaginative and original work. It offers an intriguing argument that in
the first half of the 20th century, diaspora Jewish identities were defined
through a constant, dynamic process of interaction between the place of
origin and the several sites of immigration."
-Derek Penslar, University of Toronto

Rebecca Kobrin is the Russell and Bettina Knapp Assistant Professor of
American Jewish History at Columbia University. She was a speaker at the
2009 IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Philadelphia and has spoken at
a number of Jewish Genealogical Societies about Landsmanschaften and their
connections to the old country.

The book is available >from Indiana Univeristy Press -
www.iupress.indiana.edu or 1-800-842-6796 - or any major bookseller.

http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=190706

Mark Halpern
Bialystok Archive Coordinator


JRI Poland #Poland New Book of Great Interest: Jewish Bialystok and Its Diaspora #poland

Mark Halpern <willie46@...>
 

"Jewish Bialystok and Its Diaspora" by Rebecca Kobrin

A book about Bialystok and its migrant communities in the US, Canada,
Israel, Australia, South America, and throughout Europe.

from the Publisher:
The mass migration of East European Jews and their resettlement in cities
throughout Europe, the United States, Argentina, the Middle East and
Australia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries not only transformed the
demographic and cultural centers of world Jewry, it also reshaped Jews'
understanding and performance of their diasporic identities. Rebecca
Kobrin's study of the dispersal of Jews >from one city in Poland - Bialystok -
demonstrates how the act of migration set in motion a wide
range of transformations that led the migrants to imagine themselves as
exiles not only >from the mythic Land of Israel but most immediately from
their east European homeland. Kobrin explores the organizations,
institutions, newspapers, and philanthropies that the Bialystokers created
around the world and that reshaped their perceptions of exile and diaspora.

"Challenges and refines long-standing assumptions about Old World/New World
dynamics generally and Jewish immigrants to America in particular. . . .
Original and smartly conceived, grounded in careful, extensive research and
thoughtful analysis." -Jeffrey Shandler, Rutgers University

"An imaginative and original work. It offers an intriguing argument that in
the first half of the 20th century, diaspora Jewish identities were defined
through a constant, dynamic process of interaction between the place of
origin and the several sites of immigration."
-Derek Penslar, University of Toronto

Rebecca Kobrin is the Russell and Bettina Knapp Assistant Professor of
American Jewish History at Columbia University. She was a speaker at the
2009 IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Philadelphia and has spoken at
a number of Jewish Genealogical Societies about Landsmanschaften and their
connections to the old country.

The book is available >from Indiana Univeristy Press -
www.iupress.indiana.edu or 1-800-842-6796 - or any major bookseller.

http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=190706

Mark Halpern
Bialystok Archive Coordinator


Sixty-seven years since Skalat #poland

Israel P
 

The annual memorial meeting for Skalat will take place Thursday at five
in the afternoon, at the Skalat monument in the Holon cemetery, near
Tel Aviv.

For those of you abroad this is the second day of Shavuot and many of you
will be saying Yizkor at the same time as our memorial meeting. If you
have Skalat connections, you might want to keep them in mind at that
time.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


JRI Poland #Poland Sixty-seven years since Skalat #poland

Israel P
 

The annual memorial meeting for Skalat will take place Thursday at five
in the afternoon, at the Skalat monument in the Holon cemetery, near
Tel Aviv.

For those of you abroad this is the second day of Shavuot and many of you
will be saying Yizkor at the same time as our memorial meeting. If you
have Skalat connections, you might want to keep them in mind at that
time.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


Re: Lviv Jewish Community records -- on LDS microfilms? #poland

Mark Halpern <willie46@...>
 

As usual, JRI-Poland has the resource to answer Jim's question. At
http://www.jri-poland.org/agad/lviv.htm, you will find a webpage dedicated
to the LDS collection of microfilms of Jewish records >from the Ukraine State
Historical Archive in Lviv. Click on "more detailed inventory" link for
individual film inventories.

Also, check out the JewishGen SIG Lists Archive for Galicia SIG postings
"1941-1942 Lwow Jewish Registration Cards" by Mark Jacobson.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator

----- Original Message -----
The Family History Library Catalogue shows a whole series of 19th century
metrical records of the Jews of Lviv/Lvov/Lemberg, Yet no film numbers.

Do the films exist? Can they be ordered to local FHC's?

Jim Bennett
Haifa


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Lviv Jewish Community records -- on LDS microfilms? #poland

Mark Halpern <willie46@...>
 

As usual, JRI-Poland has the resource to answer Jim's question. At
http://www.jri-poland.org/agad/lviv.htm, you will find a webpage dedicated
to the LDS collection of microfilms of Jewish records >from the Ukraine State
Historical Archive in Lviv. Click on "more detailed inventory" link for
individual film inventories.

Also, check out the JewishGen SIG Lists Archive for Galicia SIG postings
"1941-1942 Lwow Jewish Registration Cards" by Mark Jacobson.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator

----- Original Message -----
The Family History Library Catalogue shows a whole series of 19th century
metrical records of the Jews of Lviv/Lvov/Lemberg, Yet no film numbers.

Do the films exist? Can they be ordered to local FHC's?

Jim Bennett
Haifa


Iasi National Archives #romania

saragal@...
 

To All,
Obtaining documents previous to 1910 >from the Iasi National Archives.
On August 2009
I have sent an E-mail in Romanian to the National Archives at Iasi :
<iasi.an@mira.gov.ro>
asking for a copy of my grandparents 1890 civil marriage document. I
know the date ,namely, day, month and year.
On January 2010 I have received an invitation in Romanian to transfer
the payement on the bank account of the National Archives but only the
IBAN code was mentioned. The BIC/SWIFT code was absent. Now I know it.
Last month I have sent an E-mail applying in Romanian for 5 additional
documents. No reaction yet.
A person >from France has received a document by E-mail >from the National
Archives at Iasi four months after applying.
The Director of the Iasi National Archives is fluent in French.
Lisbeth Saraga
Paris, France


Romania SIG #Romania Iasi National Archives #romania

saragal@...
 

To All,
Obtaining documents previous to 1910 >from the Iasi National Archives.
On August 2009
I have sent an E-mail in Romanian to the National Archives at Iasi :
<iasi.an@mira.gov.ro>
asking for a copy of my grandparents 1890 civil marriage document. I
know the date ,namely, day, month and year.
On January 2010 I have received an invitation in Romanian to transfer
the payement on the bank account of the National Archives but only the
IBAN code was mentioned. The BIC/SWIFT code was absent. Now I know it.
Last month I have sent an E-mail applying in Romanian for 5 additional
documents. No reaction yet.
A person >from France has received a document by E-mail >from the National
Archives at Iasi four months after applying.
The Director of the Iasi National Archives is fluent in French.
Lisbeth Saraga
Paris, France