Date   

Tukums birth records 1893, death records 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


Latvia SIG #Latvia Tukums birth records 1893, death records 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


INTRO - Researching GUTMANN from Niederwerrn, NEHM, Wassertruedigan and NORDSCHILD, Munchen #germany

Lisa Goodman
 

Hi. My name is Lisa Goodman and I just joined the group. I have just finished
taking a class in Jewish Geneology and have spent about 30 hours on the internet
researching my family. I have found some interesting information thus far,
but am still looking for much more. I have also completed interviewing
my few remaining relatives of that generation.

I would appreciate any help you can provide me regarding my ancestors GUTMANN,
NEHM and NORDSCHILD. I am the daughter of Heinz GUTMANN (now Harry Goodman,
born May 18, 1926, who came to the US >from Munchen in 1938.

All of my father's immediate family perished in the Holocaust - his father,
mother and sister perished in Kaunas, Lithuania on a transport that was headed
for Riga but never made it there. They died on 11/25/1941.

Heinz's father was Nathan GUTMANN, born in Niederwerrn bei Schweinfurt on
3/12/1882. He owned a shoe store in Munchen on Goethestrasse and they lived
on Pettenkoferstrasse. Nathan served in the military during WWI and won the
Iron Cross second class. I was able to find some of his military records
on Ancestry.com. Heinz's mother's maiden name was also GUTMANN - she was
Berta born in Neuburg/Donau on 11/25/1891. Heinz's sister was Ingeborg,
born in Munchen on 12/6/1923.

Nathan's siblings were Irma, Richard and Bernhard GUTMANN. They were all
likely born in Neiderwerrn. Irma was interned at Theresienstadt at the age
of 5. Irma survived and stayed in Germany. She married Herman GOLDSCHMIDT.
Richard, born 9/27/1891 emigrated to England and then to the US in 1940.
He came with his wife Mina and his 2 children=2C Kaethe and Charlotte.

Berhard, born 1/18/1879, emigrated to Buenos Aires on 12/26/1939.

Nathan's father was Max GUTMANN, an okonom and his mother was Jette NORDSCHILD.
Max was also married to Phillipina FRANKENHEIMER. She was transported from
Munchen to Theresienstadt where she died. Berta's father was Julius GUTMANN,
a clothier, and her mother was Natalie NEHM born in Wassertruedigan in 1860.

Natalie was also transported >from Munchen to Theresienstadt where she died.

I am interested in learning more about the people mentioned but also would
love to find out who my great great grandparents were and where they came from.
Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Lisa Goodman, Marina del Rey California JG ID 472243 goodverda@hotmail.com


German SIG #Germany INTRO - Researching GUTMANN from Niederwerrn, NEHM, Wassertruedigan and NORDSCHILD, Munchen #germany

Lisa Goodman
 

Hi. My name is Lisa Goodman and I just joined the group. I have just finished
taking a class in Jewish Geneology and have spent about 30 hours on the internet
researching my family. I have found some interesting information thus far,
but am still looking for much more. I have also completed interviewing
my few remaining relatives of that generation.

I would appreciate any help you can provide me regarding my ancestors GUTMANN,
NEHM and NORDSCHILD. I am the daughter of Heinz GUTMANN (now Harry Goodman,
born May 18, 1926, who came to the US >from Munchen in 1938.

All of my father's immediate family perished in the Holocaust - his father,
mother and sister perished in Kaunas, Lithuania on a transport that was headed
for Riga but never made it there. They died on 11/25/1941.

Heinz's father was Nathan GUTMANN, born in Niederwerrn bei Schweinfurt on
3/12/1882. He owned a shoe store in Munchen on Goethestrasse and they lived
on Pettenkoferstrasse. Nathan served in the military during WWI and won the
Iron Cross second class. I was able to find some of his military records
on Ancestry.com. Heinz's mother's maiden name was also GUTMANN - she was
Berta born in Neuburg/Donau on 11/25/1891. Heinz's sister was Ingeborg,
born in Munchen on 12/6/1923.

Nathan's siblings were Irma, Richard and Bernhard GUTMANN. They were all
likely born in Neiderwerrn. Irma was interned at Theresienstadt at the age
of 5. Irma survived and stayed in Germany. She married Herman GOLDSCHMIDT.
Richard, born 9/27/1891 emigrated to England and then to the US in 1940.
He came with his wife Mina and his 2 children=2C Kaethe and Charlotte.

Berhard, born 1/18/1879, emigrated to Buenos Aires on 12/26/1939.

Nathan's father was Max GUTMANN, an okonom and his mother was Jette NORDSCHILD.
Max was also married to Phillipina FRANKENHEIMER. She was transported from
Munchen to Theresienstadt where she died. Berta's father was Julius GUTMANN,
a clothier, and her mother was Natalie NEHM born in Wassertruedigan in 1860.

Natalie was also transported >from Munchen to Theresienstadt where she died.

I am interested in learning more about the people mentioned but also would
love to find out who my great great grandparents were and where they came from.
Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Lisa Goodman, Marina del Rey California JG ID 472243 goodverda@hotmail.com


Re: Julian calendar or Gregorian calender #general

Susan&David
 

Confirming Howard's response. My father arrived in the USA >from Poland (at
that time Russia) at age 16. When asked for his birthday he only knew that
he had been born a week before Passover, so he guessed March 15th.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 3/5/2011 5:03 PM, HOMARGOL@aol.com wrote:
David Laskin asked about whether a relative born in Rakov, located in Russia
in 1886, and who immigrated in 1905, used a birthdate on American forms, as
it had been on the Julian calendar in Russia, or recalculated it on the
Gregorian calendar.

The question may be moot as during that period of time, most Jews in Eastern
Europe were more familiar with the Hebrew calendar rather than the Russian
calendar. My mother is an example. She arrived in the USA >from Linkuva,
Lithuania in 1899 at the age of 3. In 1917, she was getting married and
needed her date of birth for the marriage license. She only knew her date of
birth in connection with a Jewish holiday, i.e., the second night of
Passover.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Julian calendar or Gregorian calender #general

Susan&David
 

Confirming Howard's response. My father arrived in the USA >from Poland (at
that time Russia) at age 16. When asked for his birthday he only knew that
he had been born a week before Passover, so he guessed March 15th.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 3/5/2011 5:03 PM, HOMARGOL@aol.com wrote:
David Laskin asked about whether a relative born in Rakov, located in Russia
in 1886, and who immigrated in 1905, used a birthdate on American forms, as
it had been on the Julian calendar in Russia, or recalculated it on the
Gregorian calendar.

The question may be moot as during that period of time, most Jews in Eastern
Europe were more familiar with the Hebrew calendar rather than the Russian
calendar. My mother is an example. She arrived in the USA >from Linkuva,
Lithuania in 1899 at the age of 3. In 1917, she was getting married and
needed her date of birth for the marriage license. She only knew her date of
birth in connection with a Jewish holiday, i.e., the second night of
Passover.


List of Jewish Prisoner in Lithuania 1922-1940 #general

William Yoffee
 

A listing of files of Jewish prisoners detained in Lithuanian prisons
between the two World Wars for communist activities has been added to the
Panevezys District Research Group's data on its Shutterfly website. The
list of Jews is composed of 1357 names out of a total of around 4200 prisoners.
The list is composed of persons >from all of Lithuania, not just the Panevezys
District. In addition to the name of the prisoner, files contain additional
information on each prisoner, such as place of birth, age, father's name,
place and details of arrest, and in most cases photographs (right and left
profiles and front view), and the file number.

This listing of Jewish prisoners represents slightly more than 32% of the
total, whereas Jews represented only about 7% of the Lithuanian population
during the inter-war period. The Lithuanian Communist Party membership
ranged between 650 in 1930 and 1741 in 1940, so it appears that probably a
much smaller number of Jews who were detained were party members, and that
many Jews may have been associated with fellow traveler organizations such
as the Bund or the Labor Zionists. Many Jews were attracted to Communist
ideals which stressed equality of all ethnic groups, freedom from
discriminatory treatment under law, and the dignity of labor, though not
necessarily to the economic goals that subsequently became paramount.

Lithuania was not unique. Jews participated in communist activities in most
of the countries of Eastern Europe between the wars (with the possible
exception of Albania), and in many cases represented the vanguard of Soviet
domination of those countries after WWII. It should be noted that these
were not religious Jews for the most part, but Jews by birth or by "nationality"
as defined by local laws or custom. Some examples were Markus Wolf in East
Germany (DDR); Slansky and Clementis in Czeckoslovakia; Rajk, Rakosi and Gero
in Hungary (where in 1956, seven of eight members of the Central
committee were Jews); Kostov and Zhak Natan in Bulgaria; Ana Pauker in
Rumania and Moshe Pijade in Yugoslavia. Jews founded the Communist Parties in
Hungary (Bela Kun) and Greece (Avraam Benaroya). The anti-Semitic purge begun
by Stalin in 1952, just before his death, was completed in 1956 at the time
of the uprisings in some of these countries.

For anyone who finds the name of a relative on this list, in order to obtain
more details about the prisoner, it will be necessary to obtain a copy of the
complete file >from the Lithuanian State Archives in Vilna.

These data will be made available to members of the Panevezys District
Research Group for a period of at least 18 months before they are added to
the All Lithuania Database (ALD). Since these data are also being made
available to other LitvakSIG district research groups, members of any of
those groups may wish to check first to see if these data are already
available on one or more of their Shutterfly websites.

Please feel free to contact me for any further information..

Shavuah Tov,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net

MODERATOR NOTE: The Panevezys District Research Group's site may be accessed at
http://www.litvaksig.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=article&id=12&Itemid=9
or tiny URL http://goo.gl/3QGuz
Their Shutterfly site is at http://panevezys.shutterfly.com/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen List of Jewish Prisoner in Lithuania 1922-1940 #general

William Yoffee
 

A listing of files of Jewish prisoners detained in Lithuanian prisons
between the two World Wars for communist activities has been added to the
Panevezys District Research Group's data on its Shutterfly website. The
list of Jews is composed of 1357 names out of a total of around 4200 prisoners.
The list is composed of persons >from all of Lithuania, not just the Panevezys
District. In addition to the name of the prisoner, files contain additional
information on each prisoner, such as place of birth, age, father's name,
place and details of arrest, and in most cases photographs (right and left
profiles and front view), and the file number.

This listing of Jewish prisoners represents slightly more than 32% of the
total, whereas Jews represented only about 7% of the Lithuanian population
during the inter-war period. The Lithuanian Communist Party membership
ranged between 650 in 1930 and 1741 in 1940, so it appears that probably a
much smaller number of Jews who were detained were party members, and that
many Jews may have been associated with fellow traveler organizations such
as the Bund or the Labor Zionists. Many Jews were attracted to Communist
ideals which stressed equality of all ethnic groups, freedom from
discriminatory treatment under law, and the dignity of labor, though not
necessarily to the economic goals that subsequently became paramount.

Lithuania was not unique. Jews participated in communist activities in most
of the countries of Eastern Europe between the wars (with the possible
exception of Albania), and in many cases represented the vanguard of Soviet
domination of those countries after WWII. It should be noted that these
were not religious Jews for the most part, but Jews by birth or by "nationality"
as defined by local laws or custom. Some examples were Markus Wolf in East
Germany (DDR); Slansky and Clementis in Czeckoslovakia; Rajk, Rakosi and Gero
in Hungary (where in 1956, seven of eight members of the Central
committee were Jews); Kostov and Zhak Natan in Bulgaria; Ana Pauker in
Rumania and Moshe Pijade in Yugoslavia. Jews founded the Communist Parties in
Hungary (Bela Kun) and Greece (Avraam Benaroya). The anti-Semitic purge begun
by Stalin in 1952, just before his death, was completed in 1956 at the time
of the uprisings in some of these countries.

For anyone who finds the name of a relative on this list, in order to obtain
more details about the prisoner, it will be necessary to obtain a copy of the
complete file >from the Lithuanian State Archives in Vilna.

These data will be made available to members of the Panevezys District
Research Group for a period of at least 18 months before they are added to
the All Lithuania Database (ALD). Since these data are also being made
available to other LitvakSIG district research groups, members of any of
those groups may wish to check first to see if these data are already
available on one or more of their Shutterfly websites.

Please feel free to contact me for any further information..

Shavuah Tov,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net

MODERATOR NOTE: The Panevezys District Research Group's site may be accessed at
http://www.litvaksig.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=article&id=12&Itemid=9
or tiny URL http://goo.gl/3QGuz
Their Shutterfly site is at http://panevezys.shutterfly.com/


Re: Help obtaining NYC birth certificate - - Thank you #general

dsw <weinds@...>
 

Thank you to:
debbie, Gail, Marilyn, Cromrider, Barbara, Sally, Alan, Carol, Diane, Burt, Marcia.
for your help. I will call the NYC Dept.

Daniel Weinberg
Chicago

On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 4:26 AM, dsw <weinds@gmail.com> wrote:
Dear Genners,
I have sent a few times to obtain my father's birth cert >from the NYC
records office. He was born a few days after the SS Canada
landed(12/12/20). They have returned the $15 and form 3 times because
I do not know the exact name of my gf and gm. What do you suggest?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Help obtaining NYC birth certificate - - Thank you #general

dsw <weinds@...>
 

Thank you to:
debbie, Gail, Marilyn, Cromrider, Barbara, Sally, Alan, Carol, Diane, Burt, Marcia.
for your help. I will call the NYC Dept.

Daniel Weinberg
Chicago

On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 4:26 AM, dsw <weinds@gmail.com> wrote:
Dear Genners,
I have sent a few times to obtain my father's birth cert >from the NYC
records office. He was born a few days after the SS Canada
landed(12/12/20). They have returned the $15 and form 3 times because
I do not know the exact name of my gf and gm. What do you suggest?


Searching: Itta GRUENBERG/GREENBERG from Markarzic ? #belarus

the_ravaj@...
 

Shalom everyone

This is my first post, as part of my first attempt to trace this particular branch
of my family. I am not a newbie to genealogical research, but I am completely
green when it comes to Belarus.

I have just begun the search for the Greenbergs (Gruenberg) in my family.
My great-grandmother is supposed to have come >from Minsk, or a shtetl nearby.
The shtetl name we have is Miekarzic, but I cannot find that anywhere.
The JewishGen Shtetl-Seeker suggested Mokritsa, which is about
70 miles NNW of Minsk.

Have you by any chance come across an ITTA GRUENBERG, daughter of MAYER and LEAH?
The parents were >from Ukraine.

Many thanks
- AJ Friedlander
London, UK

you are cordially invited over to my blog
http://ravaj.blogspot.com
MODERATOR NOTE: If you haven't done so already the Belarus SIG site
list many resources to assist with your search.
See: http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching: Itta GRUENBERG/GREENBERG from Markarzic ? #belarus

the_ravaj@...
 

Shalom everyone

This is my first post, as part of my first attempt to trace this particular branch
of my family. I am not a newbie to genealogical research, but I am completely
green when it comes to Belarus.

I have just begun the search for the Greenbergs (Gruenberg) in my family.
My great-grandmother is supposed to have come >from Minsk, or a shtetl nearby.
The shtetl name we have is Miekarzic, but I cannot find that anywhere.
The JewishGen Shtetl-Seeker suggested Mokritsa, which is about
70 miles NNW of Minsk.

Have you by any chance come across an ITTA GRUENBERG, daughter of MAYER and LEAH?
The parents were >from Ukraine.

Many thanks
- AJ Friedlander
London, UK

you are cordially invited over to my blog
http://ravaj.blogspot.com
MODERATOR NOTE: If you haven't done so already the Belarus SIG site
list many resources to assist with your search.
See: http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/


Advice/contacts in Belarus #belarus

David Laskin
 

I am planning a trip to Belarus in May to research family that lived
in Rakov and Volozhin. I am hiring a guide in Vilnius who will be
taking us around. I hope to interview people in both places about
memories of my family, including seventeen relatives killed in the
Holocaust. I also will be arranging for someone to do research in the
archives in Minsk. I would appreciate getting advice >from anyone who
has done a trip like this or has contacts in Belarus. How likely are
the residents (none of them Jewish I assume) to share memories? How
cooperative/helpful are people in the Minsk archives likely to be?
Thanks.

David Laskin


Belarus SIG #Belarus Advice/contacts in Belarus #belarus

David Laskin
 

I am planning a trip to Belarus in May to research family that lived
in Rakov and Volozhin. I am hiring a guide in Vilnius who will be
taking us around. I hope to interview people in both places about
memories of my family, including seventeen relatives killed in the
Holocaust. I also will be arranging for someone to do research in the
archives in Minsk. I would appreciate getting advice >from anyone who
has done a trip like this or has contacts in Belarus. How likely are
the residents (none of them Jewish I assume) to share memories? How
cooperative/helpful are people in the Minsk archives likely to be?
Thanks.

David Laskin


question on Old Style vs. New Style Calendar #belarus

David Laskin
 

I am researching a relative born in Rakov (today's Belarus, then in
Russian Pale, between Minsk and Vilna). In American documents I have
seen her birth date given as 1886; I am aware that the old style
calendar was in use in Russia at that time. My question is: is it
likely that this date, which presumably my relative used on documents
after emigrating, is the old style -- or is it likely that she (or
some American official) re-calculated her birth year to the new style
calendar after she emigrated to the US in 1905?

David Laskin


Belarus SIG #Belarus Fwd: question on Old Style vs. New Style Calendar #belarus

David Laskin
 

I am researching a relative born in Rakov (today's Belarus, then in
Russian Pale, between Minsk and Vilna). In American documents I have
seen her birth date given as 1886; I am aware that the old style
calendar was in use in Russia at that time. My question is: is it
likely that this date, which presumably my relative used on documents
after emigrating, is the old style -- or is it likely that she (or
some American official) re-calculated her birth year to the new style
calendar after she emigrated to the US in 1905?

David Laskin


Re: Julian calendar or Gregorian calender #general

Howard Margol
 

David Laskin asked about whether a relative born in Rakov, located in Russia
in 1886, and who immigrated in 1905, used a birthdate on American forms, as
it had been on the Julian calendar in Russia, or recalculated it on the
Gregorian calendar.

The question may be moot as during that period of time, most Jews in Eastern
Europe were more familiar with the Hebrew calendar rather than the Russian
calendar. My mother is an example. She arrived in the USA >from Linkuva,
Lithuania in 1899 at the age of 3. In 1917, she was getting married and
needed her date of birth for the marriage license. She only knew her date of
birth in connection with a Jewish holiday, i.e., the second night of
Passover. She went to the Rabbi and, referring to a Hebrew calendar, he gave her
the proper date of birth.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Julian calendar or Gregorian calender #general

Howard Margol
 

David Laskin asked about whether a relative born in Rakov, located in Russia
in 1886, and who immigrated in 1905, used a birthdate on American forms, as
it had been on the Julian calendar in Russia, or recalculated it on the
Gregorian calendar.

The question may be moot as during that period of time, most Jews in Eastern
Europe were more familiar with the Hebrew calendar rather than the Russian
calendar. My mother is an example. She arrived in the USA >from Linkuva,
Lithuania in 1899 at the age of 3. In 1917, she was getting married and
needed her date of birth for the marriage license. She only knew her date of
birth in connection with a Jewish holiday, i.e., the second night of
Passover. She went to the Rabbi and, referring to a Hebrew calendar, he gave her
the proper date of birth.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia


Eva GROSS from Berlin #general

George J. Fogelson
 

My mother Hilde ANKER had a playmate on Klopstockstrasse in Berlin named
Eva GROSS. She would have been born in about 1926 and her father was an
attorney. When my mother left on a Kindertransport in June 1939 was the last
time she met her. She always wondered if she was able to get out.

Any news please send to me. Thanks.

George Fogelson
fogelson@alum.calberkeley.org
Redondo Beach. CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Eva GROSS from Berlin #general

George J. Fogelson
 

My mother Hilde ANKER had a playmate on Klopstockstrasse in Berlin named
Eva GROSS. She would have been born in about 1926 and her father was an
attorney. When my mother left on a Kindertransport in June 1939 was the last
time she met her. She always wondered if she was able to get out.

Any news please send to me. Thanks.

George Fogelson
fogelson@alum.calberkeley.org
Redondo Beach. CA

198061 - 198080 of 668716