Date   

ViewMate: translation from Polish #general

Debbi Schaubman
 

I recently received a large group of old photographs that had belonged to my
great-aunt. Many of them have brief notes on the reverse. I believe this one is
in Polish. If someone can translate it, I'd be very grateful.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18744
This text is on the reverse of a photo of 3 smiling young girls.

Replies to me personally or via ViewMate, please.

Many thanks for your assistance. A Sweet Pesach to All.

Debbi Schaubman

Researching on:
EINBINDER (now COHEN) >from Drohiczyn, Poland
SZAUBMAN/SZOBMAN >from Lublin, Poland
GERSZTENBLIT/GERSTENBLUTH fom Lublin, Poland
SMOLIANOFF/SMOLONOW >from Kreminczuk, Ukraine
WESSLER/WESZLER >from Varpalota, Hungary


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate: translation from Polish #general

Debbi Schaubman
 

I recently received a large group of old photographs that had belonged to my
great-aunt. Many of them have brief notes on the reverse. I believe this one is
in Polish. If someone can translate it, I'd be very grateful.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18744
This text is on the reverse of a photo of 3 smiling young girls.

Replies to me personally or via ViewMate, please.

Many thanks for your assistance. A Sweet Pesach to All.

Debbi Schaubman

Researching on:
EINBINDER (now COHEN) >from Drohiczyn, Poland
SZAUBMAN/SZOBMAN >from Lublin, Poland
GERSZTENBLIT/GERSTENBLUTH fom Lublin, Poland
SMOLIANOFF/SMOLONOW >from Kreminczuk, Ukraine
WESSLER/WESZLER >from Varpalota, Hungary


ViewMate: translations from Yiddish, please #general

Debbi Schaubman
 

I recently received a large group of old photographs that had belonged to my great-
aunt. Many of them have brief notes on the reverse. I believe these notes are in
Yiddish. If someone can translate these notes, I'd be very grateful.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18742 The above text is on
the reverse of a large, multi-generational family photo found in my great aunt's
belongings.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18745 This text is on the
reverse of a photo of a young man and woman. (The photo was in my great aunt's
belongings but I don't know if she removed it >from someone else's album or if
someone removed it >from her album.)

I'd greatly appreciate translations. (And my apologies if the images are upside
down!)

Replies to me personally or via ViewMate, please.

Many thanks for your assistance. A Sweet Pesach to All.

Debbi Schaubman

Researching on:
EINBINDER (now COHEN) >from Drohiczyn, Poland
SZAUBMAN/SZOBMAN >from Lublin, Poland
GERSZTENBLIT/GERSTENBLUTH fom Lublin, Poland
SMOLIANOFF/SMOLONOW >from Kreminczuk, Ukraine
WESSLER/WESZLER >from Varpalota, Hungary


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate: translations from Yiddish, please #general

Debbi Schaubman
 

I recently received a large group of old photographs that had belonged to my great-
aunt. Many of them have brief notes on the reverse. I believe these notes are in
Yiddish. If someone can translate these notes, I'd be very grateful.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18742 The above text is on
the reverse of a large, multi-generational family photo found in my great aunt's
belongings.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18745 This text is on the
reverse of a photo of a young man and woman. (The photo was in my great aunt's
belongings but I don't know if she removed it >from someone else's album or if
someone removed it >from her album.)

I'd greatly appreciate translations. (And my apologies if the images are upside
down!)

Replies to me personally or via ViewMate, please.

Many thanks for your assistance. A Sweet Pesach to All.

Debbi Schaubman

Researching on:
EINBINDER (now COHEN) >from Drohiczyn, Poland
SZAUBMAN/SZOBMAN >from Lublin, Poland
GERSZTENBLIT/GERSTENBLUTH fom Lublin, Poland
SMOLIANOFF/SMOLONOW >from Kreminczuk, Ukraine
WESSLER/WESZLER >from Varpalota, Hungary


ViewMate: help with uniform in photo #general

Debbi Schaubman
 

I have uploaded a photograph to ViewMate and would greatly appreciate whatever
information people can provide.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18728

Family stories say that this photo is of my ggf, Dawid SZAUBMAN/SZOBMAN/SCHAUBMAN,
who served in the Russian Army during the Russo-Japanese War (1905).I'd like to
know if the uniform matches what would be worn by a Russian soldier during that
time. I'd also like to know what, if anything, is revealed about his rank.

Replies to me personally or via ViewMate, please.

Thanks for your assistance.

Debbi Schaubman

Researching on:
EINBINDER (now COHEN) >from Drohiczyn, Poland
SZAUBMAN/SZOBMAN >from Lublin, Poland
GERSZTENBLIT/GERSTENBLUTH >from Lublin, Poland
SMOLIANOFF/SMOLONOW >from Kreminczuk, Ukraine
WESSLER/WESZLER >from Varpalota, Hungary


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate: help with uniform in photo #general

Debbi Schaubman
 

I have uploaded a photograph to ViewMate and would greatly appreciate whatever
information people can provide.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=18728

Family stories say that this photo is of my ggf, Dawid SZAUBMAN/SZOBMAN/SCHAUBMAN,
who served in the Russian Army during the Russo-Japanese War (1905).I'd like to
know if the uniform matches what would be worn by a Russian soldier during that
time. I'd also like to know what, if anything, is revealed about his rank.

Replies to me personally or via ViewMate, please.

Thanks for your assistance.

Debbi Schaubman

Researching on:
EINBINDER (now COHEN) >from Drohiczyn, Poland
SZAUBMAN/SZOBMAN >from Lublin, Poland
GERSZTENBLIT/GERSTENBLUTH >from Lublin, Poland
SMOLIANOFF/SMOLONOW >from Kreminczuk, Ukraine
WESSLER/WESZLER >from Varpalota, Hungary


Re: Pre-dated records #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

David Dubin wrote:
"How often do we find records of events that happened years before? For years I
had trouble finding records for my father-in-law's family in Dabrowa Gornicza
(snip) Lo and behold, a record >from 1902 had my wife's grandfather's birth record
from Pinczow in 1887! This is not an isolated incident, because my father-in-law
had five siblings all having their births registered in Dabrowa Gornicza in 1920
even though the kids had been born as early as 1912. So, had I not looked in an
inappropriate year I would not have found the appropriate record. It gives me hope
that some lost =A0records are just "misplaced" in another year's file, but it also
makes me despair that some records are hiding in places where they may not be
found. Does anyone have a similar experience? How should we search for records
which may not be where they are supposed to be?"


There were often late or delayed birth registrations taking place for a variety of
reasons. In the case of "illegitimate" (i.e. religious)Galician marriages, often
ten or twenty years after the fact the parents would hold a civil marriage and the
births of their children would be recorded. Often the reason would be a desire to
immigrate to another country and the need to get papers to travel that showed one's
identity and a legally recognized surname.

Sometimes there is an isolated incident in a family where most of the births were
registered in a timely manner, save one. For my great-grandmother in Czestochowa,
her 1876 birth was not registered until 1884. The reason given was that her father
was "out of town" at the time of her birth and forgot to register it. These late
registrations could have been precipitated by several events in the lives of our
ancestors, but for researchers it would make sense to get a copy of the actual
record versus relying on information just in the indexes, especially if you cannot
find a birth for a relative but others with a similar name in the right town (but
wrong year) appear in indexes.

I've found that the JRI-Poland index transcribers have caught some of these late
registrations and have noted them in the "comments" section, but not always so just
because it isn't noted -- as David found out -- doesn't mean it's not written in
the text of the document.

For Galitzianers, I've also suggested looking in the records held by the IKG (the
Jewish community registry office) in Vienna, as there are many examples of delayed
marriages and registered births to be found taking place in Vienna by Galitizianers
who traveled to Vienna (sometimes staying for only a short time) before emigrating
to the United States, England or elsewhere.

There are many more cases like this and I think more people are becoming of aware
of this possibility but it's an excellent reminder for genealogists to leave no
stone unturned when you've hit a brick wall -- not to mix metaphors!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pre-dated records #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

David Dubin wrote:
"How often do we find records of events that happened years before? For years I
had trouble finding records for my father-in-law's family in Dabrowa Gornicza
(snip) Lo and behold, a record >from 1902 had my wife's grandfather's birth record
from Pinczow in 1887! This is not an isolated incident, because my father-in-law
had five siblings all having their births registered in Dabrowa Gornicza in 1920
even though the kids had been born as early as 1912. So, had I not looked in an
inappropriate year I would not have found the appropriate record. It gives me hope
that some lost =A0records are just "misplaced" in another year's file, but it also
makes me despair that some records are hiding in places where they may not be
found. Does anyone have a similar experience? How should we search for records
which may not be where they are supposed to be?"


There were often late or delayed birth registrations taking place for a variety of
reasons. In the case of "illegitimate" (i.e. religious)Galician marriages, often
ten or twenty years after the fact the parents would hold a civil marriage and the
births of their children would be recorded. Often the reason would be a desire to
immigrate to another country and the need to get papers to travel that showed one's
identity and a legally recognized surname.

Sometimes there is an isolated incident in a family where most of the births were
registered in a timely manner, save one. For my great-grandmother in Czestochowa,
her 1876 birth was not registered until 1884. The reason given was that her father
was "out of town" at the time of her birth and forgot to register it. These late
registrations could have been precipitated by several events in the lives of our
ancestors, but for researchers it would make sense to get a copy of the actual
record versus relying on information just in the indexes, especially if you cannot
find a birth for a relative but others with a similar name in the right town (but
wrong year) appear in indexes.

I've found that the JRI-Poland index transcribers have caught some of these late
registrations and have noted them in the "comments" section, but not always so just
because it isn't noted -- as David found out -- doesn't mean it's not written in
the text of the document.

For Galitzianers, I've also suggested looking in the records held by the IKG (the
Jewish community registry office) in Vienna, as there are many examples of delayed
marriages and registered births to be found taking place in Vienna by Galitizianers
who traveled to Vienna (sometimes staying for only a short time) before emigrating
to the United States, England or elsewhere.

There are many more cases like this and I think more people are becoming of aware
of this possibility but it's an excellent reminder for genealogists to leave no
stone unturned when you've hit a brick wall -- not to mix metaphors!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


Sarina Roffé Elected to JewishGen Board of Governors #warsaw #poland

Fishbein Associates, Inc.
 

[MODERATOR NOTE: We apologize for sending this important announcement
yet again. The earlier version may have been incorrect due to technical
problems. The version below has been approved by Dr Fishbein and by the
leadership of the JewishGen Board of Governors.]

New York, NY —The Board of Governors of JewishGen is pleased to announce
that Sarina Roffé, a respected family historian and journalist with a
background in communications and nonprofit management, has been elected
unanimously to a position on its Board.

Following her election, Rand Fishbein, Ph.D., a member of the Board’s search
committee, commented, “The Board could not be more delighted to welcome
Sarina onto the JewishGen team. We will be looking to her for fresh ideas
on how to expand our programming and online resources to include Jewish
communities that, up until now, have been under-represented in our work.
Her knowledge and experience are sure to prove invaluable as we look to
expand our outreach activities.”

Ms. Roffé is a member of Brooklyn's Syrian Jewish community and a
member of the Jewish Genealogical Society, Inc. (of New York) (JGSNY). She
has published widely on themes connected with Sephardic and Mizrahi Jewish
genealogy and is a recognized authority on the history and culture of
Aleppan Jewry.

Ms. Roffé comes to JewishGen with wide experience as a writer and speaker in
the fields of marketing, fundraising, deaf education and public relations.
She served as President of the National Cued Speech Association from
2002-2008 and as the Director of Public Affairs for the New York City
Department of Juvenile Justice >from 1996-2002. Currently, Ms. Roffé is the
Executive Director of the Shehebar Sephardic Center in New York, NY, a
nonprofit organization that fundraises for its rabbinical training program
in Israel, and support for schools and outreach centers in more than sixty
cities worldwide.

When asked how she felt about joining the JewishGen Board, Ms. Roffé said,
“It is both a great honor and opportunity to be asked to help guide this
important organization. I believe deeply in the richness and diversity of
our Jewish heritage and in the role family history can play in illuminating
our collective past. By providing our children with documentary proof of
their roots, we are grounding them for the future. I hope those who are not
working yet with JewishGen will consider doing so.”

Observed Dr. Fishbein, “When we speak of ‘Am Yisrael’ we speak of one
worldwide Jewish community. It is the mission of JewishGen to strengthen
our community by providing family history researchers with easy access to a
wealth of online Jewish genealogical information. Jewish tradition teaches
that when we honor our ancestors we honor ourselves. By working together we
can achieve what none of us can do alone, the collection, preservation and
dissemination of Jewish family history. Having Sarina on our leadership
team brings us another step closer to realizing this important goal.”

Rand H. Fishbein, Ph.D.
Member
JewishGen Board of Governors
Potomac, Maryland


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Sarina Roffé Elected to JewishGen Board of Governors #warsaw #poland

Fishbein Associates, Inc.
 

[MODERATOR NOTE: We apologize for sending this important announcement
yet again. The earlier version may have been incorrect due to technical
problems. The version below has been approved by Dr Fishbein and by the
leadership of the JewishGen Board of Governors.]

New York, NY —The Board of Governors of JewishGen is pleased to announce
that Sarina Roffé, a respected family historian and journalist with a
background in communications and nonprofit management, has been elected
unanimously to a position on its Board.

Following her election, Rand Fishbein, Ph.D., a member of the Board’s search
committee, commented, “The Board could not be more delighted to welcome
Sarina onto the JewishGen team. We will be looking to her for fresh ideas
on how to expand our programming and online resources to include Jewish
communities that, up until now, have been under-represented in our work.
Her knowledge and experience are sure to prove invaluable as we look to
expand our outreach activities.”

Ms. Roffé is a member of Brooklyn's Syrian Jewish community and a
member of the Jewish Genealogical Society, Inc. (of New York) (JGSNY). She
has published widely on themes connected with Sephardic and Mizrahi Jewish
genealogy and is a recognized authority on the history and culture of
Aleppan Jewry.

Ms. Roffé comes to JewishGen with wide experience as a writer and speaker in
the fields of marketing, fundraising, deaf education and public relations.
She served as President of the National Cued Speech Association from
2002-2008 and as the Director of Public Affairs for the New York City
Department of Juvenile Justice >from 1996-2002. Currently, Ms. Roffé is the
Executive Director of the Shehebar Sephardic Center in New York, NY, a
nonprofit organization that fundraises for its rabbinical training program
in Israel, and support for schools and outreach centers in more than sixty
cities worldwide.

When asked how she felt about joining the JewishGen Board, Ms. Roffé said,
“It is both a great honor and opportunity to be asked to help guide this
important organization. I believe deeply in the richness and diversity of
our Jewish heritage and in the role family history can play in illuminating
our collective past. By providing our children with documentary proof of
their roots, we are grounding them for the future. I hope those who are not
working yet with JewishGen will consider doing so.”

Observed Dr. Fishbein, “When we speak of ‘Am Yisrael’ we speak of one
worldwide Jewish community. It is the mission of JewishGen to strengthen
our community by providing family history researchers with easy access to a
wealth of online Jewish genealogical information. Jewish tradition teaches
that when we honor our ancestors we honor ourselves. By working together we
can achieve what none of us can do alone, the collection, preservation and
dissemination of Jewish family history. Having Sarina on our leadership
team brings us another step closer to realizing this important goal.”

Rand H. Fishbein, Ph.D.
Member
JewishGen Board of Governors
Potomac, Maryland


Websites for Belarus #belarus

igenerichards@...
 

Just located some Websites that have good information (once
translated) for Belarus - some history, lots of recent photos (rivers,
towns, countryside, Jewish cemeteries and other sites, etc.), and some
links to maps, travel info, etc. Use the Google Translator feature if
you don't read Russian (or is it Belarussian?).

http://www.google.com.hk/language_tools?hl=3DEN (Google translator)

http://globus.tut.by/index.htm

http://www.radzima.net/eng/ (this one doesn't need a translator)

Another good resource is Wikipedia, of course, but you can also dig
deeper than just the particular page you are viewing. There are many
links to photos (>from the first photo) and references to related
works.

Gene Richards,
Fresno, California

Researching:
GREJCER Rechki, Kurenets, Vilyeyka, Barysaw in Belarus.
GORDON Rechki, Kurenets in Belarus.
KUGEL Rechki, Kurenets, Vilyeyka in Belarus.
RICHARDS Nebraska, Colorado and California.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Websites for Belarus #belarus

igenerichards@...
 

Just located some Websites that have good information (once
translated) for Belarus - some history, lots of recent photos (rivers,
towns, countryside, Jewish cemeteries and other sites, etc.), and some
links to maps, travel info, etc. Use the Google Translator feature if
you don't read Russian (or is it Belarussian?).

http://www.google.com.hk/language_tools?hl=3DEN (Google translator)

http://globus.tut.by/index.htm

http://www.radzima.net/eng/ (this one doesn't need a translator)

Another good resource is Wikipedia, of course, but you can also dig
deeper than just the particular page you are viewing. There are many
links to photos (>from the first photo) and references to related
works.

Gene Richards,
Fresno, California

Researching:
GREJCER Rechki, Kurenets, Vilyeyka, Barysaw in Belarus.
GORDON Rechki, Kurenets in Belarus.
KUGEL Rechki, Kurenets, Vilyeyka in Belarus.
RICHARDS Nebraska, Colorado and California.


Re: Contacting Pesia Aharoni in Israel #general

Lili Susser <susserl@...>
 

Hello everyone,
I asked for your help in "finding" Pesia Aharoni. We were concerned with her
wellbeing. Thanks to your efforts she wrote me and I am relieved that nothing is
wrong. Thank you all.

Lili Susser

MODERATOR NOTE: Please remember to use the same subject line when responding to
or adding to a previously posted message or providing an update to that message.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Contacting Pesia Aharoni in Israel #general

Lili Susser <susserl@...>
 

Hello everyone,
I asked for your help in "finding" Pesia Aharoni. We were concerned with her
wellbeing. Thanks to your efforts she wrote me and I am relieved that nothing is
wrong. Thank you all.

Lili Susser

MODERATOR NOTE: Please remember to use the same subject line when responding to
or adding to a previously posted message or providing an update to that message.


Re: World War I Travel #belarus

adam.katzeff@...
 

Dear all,

Adar Belinkoff wrote:

I have just discovered immigration records for a cousin who immigrated in
1916. As an 11 year old, he traveled with another 11 year old and the
latter's mother, >from Mogilev, Russia (now Belarus) to Oslo, Norway, and
then by ship to New York. My question is how they got out of a Russia at
war, and how they got >from Mogilev to Oslo? The normal immigration route
across the German border to Hamburg or Bremen was obviously closed. Does
anyone know of information about travel during WWI?
This got me interested and I checked the Ellis Island database. In 1916
there arrived 211 Jews in New York City who had sailed out of Oslo
(Christiania), Norway. Of these 211 Jews 67 listed there place of original
as Mogilev!

Three of these Mogilev Jews arrived November 27 (the family Adar Belinkoff
refers to). On December 1 another 6 Jews >from Mogilev arrived and finally
the rest arrived December 21. All this seems like a 'mass' emigration >from
Mogilev to the US via Oslo in November and December 1916. There must be some
explanation to it, I just wonder what.

Generally I know that there were a lot of Jews who emigrated out of Russia
to the Scandinavian countries just before WW1 and then were trapped in
Scandinavia for some years before they could continue their trip to other
countries (mainly the US). On their passenger records they often list their
hometown in the Russian empire as place of origin, rather than the place in
Scandinavia where they have lived for some years. I don't know if this is
the history of these Mogilev Jews sailing out of Oslo in 1916, but maybe
some people who are descended >from the these family might know something
more about it. The surnames appearing among the passengers are the following
(without corrections in relationship to what is listed in the Ellis Island
database):

ARONOVA
PESAKOFF
PEZNIR
RUDOJA
SAPIR
SCHIFRIN
SCHOFANLINE
SORKIN
SPIVAKOFF
BINER
BSKER
GOLDSTEIN
GRINER
GUREWITZ
GUSSAK
KAGAN
KONI
LAPIDUS
LEWIN
MALKEER
MAZIN
ORLOW
PESAKOFF
PEZNIR
RUDOJA
SAPIR
SCHIFRIN
SCHOFANLINE
SORKIN
SPIVAKOFF

If someone is interested, I can send a text document with full names, ages
and date of immigration.

Best regards,

Adam Katzeff
Malmö, Sweden

adam.katzeff@tele2.se


New Minsk Records Available For Translation #belarus

davefox73@...
 

The Belarus SIG has recently gotten access to some records >from Minsk that
are not in the archives in Minsk and have not been filmed by the Family
History Library. These records are primarily for Minsk City, but some of
them also include a few shtetls in Minsk District.

Some of the records included are:
1. birth records 1866 Zaslsavye
2. death records 1867 (some months) Minsk
3. birth records 1879-1900 and 1906 and 1917 Minsk
4. birth records 1890 (incomplete) Rokov
5, marriage records 1907 Ostroshitskiy Gorodok
6. death records 1908 Kaminsk
7. marriage records 1914 Minsk
8. In addition to these metrical records, tax records, conscription lists,
and resident lists are also available.

If you want to make sure these records are translated and made available
for your personal research, please make a generous donation to the Minsk
Gubernia: Revision Lists and Metrical Records Project by going to:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=1

Scroll down the page till you find the project.

Thank you in advance for your generous donations.

David Fox
Belarus SIG Founder and Past Coordinator


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: World War I Travel #belarus

adam.katzeff@...
 

Dear all,

Adar Belinkoff wrote:

I have just discovered immigration records for a cousin who immigrated in
1916. As an 11 year old, he traveled with another 11 year old and the
latter's mother, >from Mogilev, Russia (now Belarus) to Oslo, Norway, and
then by ship to New York. My question is how they got out of a Russia at
war, and how they got >from Mogilev to Oslo? The normal immigration route
across the German border to Hamburg or Bremen was obviously closed. Does
anyone know of information about travel during WWI?
This got me interested and I checked the Ellis Island database. In 1916
there arrived 211 Jews in New York City who had sailed out of Oslo
(Christiania), Norway. Of these 211 Jews 67 listed there place of original
as Mogilev!

Three of these Mogilev Jews arrived November 27 (the family Adar Belinkoff
refers to). On December 1 another 6 Jews >from Mogilev arrived and finally
the rest arrived December 21. All this seems like a 'mass' emigration >from
Mogilev to the US via Oslo in November and December 1916. There must be some
explanation to it, I just wonder what.

Generally I know that there were a lot of Jews who emigrated out of Russia
to the Scandinavian countries just before WW1 and then were trapped in
Scandinavia for some years before they could continue their trip to other
countries (mainly the US). On their passenger records they often list their
hometown in the Russian empire as place of origin, rather than the place in
Scandinavia where they have lived for some years. I don't know if this is
the history of these Mogilev Jews sailing out of Oslo in 1916, but maybe
some people who are descended >from the these family might know something
more about it. The surnames appearing among the passengers are the following
(without corrections in relationship to what is listed in the Ellis Island
database):

ARONOVA
PESAKOFF
PEZNIR
RUDOJA
SAPIR
SCHIFRIN
SCHOFANLINE
SORKIN
SPIVAKOFF
BINER
BSKER
GOLDSTEIN
GRINER
GUREWITZ
GUSSAK
KAGAN
KONI
LAPIDUS
LEWIN
MALKEER
MAZIN
ORLOW
PESAKOFF
PEZNIR
RUDOJA
SAPIR
SCHIFRIN
SCHOFANLINE
SORKIN
SPIVAKOFF

If someone is interested, I can send a text document with full names, ages
and date of immigration.

Best regards,

Adam Katzeff
Malmö, Sweden

adam.katzeff@tele2.se


Belarus SIG #Belarus New Minsk Records Available For Translation #belarus

davefox73@...
 

The Belarus SIG has recently gotten access to some records >from Minsk that
are not in the archives in Minsk and have not been filmed by the Family
History Library. These records are primarily for Minsk City, but some of
them also include a few shtetls in Minsk District.

Some of the records included are:
1. birth records 1866 Zaslsavye
2. death records 1867 (some months) Minsk
3. birth records 1879-1900 and 1906 and 1917 Minsk
4. birth records 1890 (incomplete) Rokov
5, marriage records 1907 Ostroshitskiy Gorodok
6. death records 1908 Kaminsk
7. marriage records 1914 Minsk
8. In addition to these metrical records, tax records, conscription lists,
and resident lists are also available.

If you want to make sure these records are translated and made available
for your personal research, please make a generous donation to the Minsk
Gubernia: Revision Lists and Metrical Records Project by going to:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=1

Scroll down the page till you find the project.

Thank you in advance for your generous donations.

David Fox
Belarus SIG Founder and Past Coordinator


Sarina Roffé Elected to JewishGen Board of Governors #belarus

bounce-2211893-772948@...
 

[MODERATOR NOTE: We apologize for sending this important announcement
yet again. The earlier version may have been incorrect due to technical
problems. The version below has been approved by Dr Fishbein and by the
leadership of the JewishGen Board of Governors.]

New York, NY —The Board of Governors of JewishGen is pleased to announce
that Sarina Roffé, a respected family historian and journalist with a
background in communications and nonprofit management, has been elected
unanimously to a position on its Board.

Following her election, Rand Fishbein, Ph.D., a member of the Board’s search
committee, commented, “The Board could not be more delighted to welcome
Sarina onto the JewishGen team. We will be looking to her for fresh ideas
on how to expand our programming and online resources to include Jewish
communities that, up until now, have been under-represented in our work.
Her knowledge and experience are sure to prove invaluable as we look to
expand our outreach activities.”

Ms. Roffé is a member of Brooklyn's Syrian Jewish community and an active
member of the Jewish Genealogical Society, Inc. (of New York) (JGSNY). She
has published widely on themes connected with Sephardic and Mizrahi Jewish
genealogy and is a recognized authority on the history and culture of
Aleppan Jewry.

Ms. Roffé comes to JewishGen with wide experience as a writer and speaker in
the fields of marketing, fundraising, deaf education and public relations.
She served as President of the National Cued Speech Association from
2002-2008 and as the Director of Public Affairs for the New York City
Department of Juvenile Justice >from 1996-2002. Currently, Ms. Roffé is the
Executive Director of the Shehebar Sephardic Center in New York, NY, a
nonprofit organization that fundraises for its rabbinical training program
in Israel, and support for schools and outreach centers in more than sixty
cities worldwide.

When asked how she felt about joining the JewishGen Board, Ms. Roffé said,
“It is both a great honor and opportunity to be asked to help guide this
important organization. I believe deeply in the richness and diversity of
our Jewish heritage and in the role family history can play in illuminating
our collective past. By providing our children with documentary proof of
their roots, we are grounding them for the future. I hope those who are not
working yet with JewishGen will consider doing so.”

Observed Dr. Fishbein, “When we speak of ‘Am Yisrael’ we speak of one
worldwide Jewish community. It is the mission of JewishGen to strengthen
our community by providing family history researchers with easy access to a
wealth of online Jewish genealogical information. Jewish tradition teaches
that when we honor our ancestors we honor ourselves. By working together we
can achieve what none of us can do alone, the collection, preservation and
dissemination of Jewish family history. Having Sarina on our leadership
team brings us another step closer to realizing this important goal.”

Rand H. Fishbein, Ph.D.
Member
JewishGen Board of Governors
Potomac, Maryland


Typical Routes from Belarus to America #belarus

igenerichards@...
 

Speaking of immigration >from Belarus to the US during WWI, as ADAR
BELINKOFF did, my GF came in 1899/1900 >from Vileika to US. Was there a
pretty much standard route that most would have taken? I know this
must be old hat to long-time researchers but would like to know for
myself. Or directed to online help.

Thanks much,

Gene Richards
Fresno, CA USA

GREJCER =96 Rechki, Kurenets, Vilyeyka, Barysaw in Belarus.
GORDON =96 Rechki, Kurenets in Belarus.
KUGEL =96 Rechki, Kurenets, Vilyeyka in Belarus.
RICHARDS =96 Nebraska, Colorado and California.

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